1.3 how is matter classified

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1.3 how is matter classified

  1. 1. How is matter classified? 1.3
  2. 2. Matter <ul><li>Element: A substance that cannot be separated or broken down into simpler substances. </li></ul><ul><li>Atom: the smallest unit of an element that maintains the properties of that element. </li></ul><ul><li>Molecule: the smallest unit of a substance that keeps all the physical and chemical properties of that substance. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Matter is divided into two categories: <ul><li>Pure substances only have one kind of atom or molecule. </li></ul><ul><li>Mixtures are made of more than one kind of molecule. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Pure Substances <ul><li>Atoms and elements are pure substances. </li></ul><ul><li>Compounds are also pure substances but are composed of more than one kind of atom. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>example: water, (H 2 O,) has 2 hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compounds can be broken down into their elements. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Pure Substance examples <ul><li>Elements: Any element on the periodic table. Gold (Au), Oxygen (O) and 113 more. See back inside cover of your book. </li></ul><ul><li>Compounds: NaCl, H 2 O, HCl, H 2 SO 4 … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>see the “compounds you should know” sheet. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Mixtures <ul><li>Not “pure” substances. </li></ul><ul><li>Two or more substances NOT chemically combined. </li></ul><ul><li>The ratio/proportion in the mixture can change. </li></ul><ul><li>The properties of a mixture may vary. </li></ul><ul><li>An Alloy is a mixture. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Pure vs. Alloy of Gold
  8. 8. Two Types of Mixtures <ul><li>Heterogeneous: not uniform throughout </li></ul><ul><ul><li>examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>tacos </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>muddy water </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>vegetable soup </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>chocolate chip cookie </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Homogeneous: uniform throughout </li></ul><ul><ul><li>examples: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Kool-Aid </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>salt water </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>rubbing alcohol </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>air </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Mixtures vs. Compounds <ul><li>Mixtures: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Properties of a mixture Reflect the properties of the materials it contains. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No uniform composition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be separated by physical means. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Compounds: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Different properties from that of the elements that make up the compound. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Definite composition. Definite ratio/formula. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cannot be separated by physical means. </li></ul></ul>

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