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Differentiation vs scaffolding

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Differentiation vs scaffolding

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Differentiation vs scaffolding

  1. 1. What’s the difference?
  2. 2. Objective: Lead a healthier life by losing weight and eating healthier Activity - Losing Weight: run 1 hour on the treadmill 5 times per week Activity - Eat Healthier: Eat a diet focusing on protein and limiting carbs Everything is great! Everything is great! Is a vegetarian! Is a vegetarian! Senior Citizen - bad heart! Senior Citizen - bad heart! Has an ankle injury! Has an ankle injury!
  3. 3. Differentiation = Change Scaffolding = Add to Support VegetarianVegetarian BadHeartBadHeart AnkleInjuryAnkleInjury Instead of meat/fish/ chicken – eat nuts, beans, and protein shakes Instead of treadmill, will use stationary bicycle for 1 hour, 5 times a week Will be given a calorie counter to make sure she meets daily protein requirements Will wear a heart rate monitor to make sure she is not over- exerting
  4. 4.  “To differentiate instruction is to recognize students’ varying background knowledge, readiness, language, preferences in learning and interests, and to react responsively.” (Hall, 2003)  Three Ways to Differentiate: Change Content Change Process Change Student Product  Still meeting the same objective!
  5. 5.  “Scaffolding is actually a bridge used to build upon what students already know to arrive at something they do not know. If scaffolding is properly administered, it will act as an enabler, not as a disabler” (Benson, 1997).  Adding something to your instruction to assist learners who are having difficulty  Support is withdrawn as students gain proficiency  Scaffolding can occur alongside of differentiated instruction  Still meeting the same objective!
  6. 6.  Differentiation Material- Instead of book use: Sentence: This is my red bed. Set of words: bed, cake, red Activity- Instead of having students find the two rhyming words in the book by themselves: While reading the book, the teacher can ask the student “which word rhymes with vines?” Student Product – Instead of drawing their own, students can find a pair of rhyming words from a set of picture cards In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines Lived 12 little girls in 2 straight lines They left the house, at half past nine The smallest one was Madeline
  7. 7.  Differentiation Material- Instead of book use: Sentence: This is my red bed. Set of words: bed, cake, red Activity- Instead of having students find the two rhyming words in the book by themselves: While reading the book, the teacher can ask the student “which word rhymes with vines?” Student Product – Instead of drawing their own, students can find a pair of rhyming words from a set of picture cards In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines Lived 12 little girls in 2 straight lines They left the house, at half past nine The smallest one was Madeline
  8. 8.  Scaffolding Teacher can do a think-aloud explaining what rhyming is: “Rhyming words have sound the same at the end. When I listen to the story, I’m going to listen to see which words have the same ending” While reading the story, the teacher can stress the rhyming words In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines Lived 12 little girls in 2 straight lines They left the house, at half past nine The smallest one was Madeline
  9. 9. Taxonomy of scaffolding strategies MODELLING (the teacher offers examples that students can imitate or clearly demonstrates what they have to do) BRIDGING (connecting new input with students’ previous knowledge, for example activating knowledge they already have from personal experience) CONTEXTUALIZING (the teacher enhances learning with pictures, graphs, etc. or verbally with metaphors or analogies to make the input more comprehensible) SCHEMA-BUILDING (the teacher helps students organize their thinking or knowledge by creating schemas that are mutually connected) RE-PRESENTING (students change a text into another written or visual form, for instance a story can be changed into a dialogue) DEVELOPING METACOGNITION ( students learn how to evaluate themselves and are taught strategies of thinking)
  10. 10.  Break up into groups. Each group should focus on a different topic. Example Vocabulary Phonological Awareness Oral Language Comprehension  Choose an objective  Discuss how you can differentiate instruction Think of the materials, activity, product  Discuss ways to scaffold Include scaffolding for differentiated instruction and the original activity

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