Succession & Retirement 
Planning for Small 
Businesses 

Jon Fry
Darren Finn
Disclosures

This presentation and these materials are for educational purposes only and are not intended, and should not ...
Agenda
1. Succession and Retirement Planning 
Background
2. Key Considerations in Planning
3. The Transaction/Transition
4...
Succession & Retirement Planning Background
1. Why do I need to consider a succession plan?
A. Proactive Planning‐ask your...
Key Considerations in Planning
Choosing a Successor
Generally three choices:
1. Third Party
A. Receive large cash payment ...
Key Considerations in Planning
Sale to Third Party – Maximize Value
1. Need to have in place a business environment that c...
Key Considerations in Planning
Buy‐Sell Agreements
1. Essential in any closely held  business‐with more than one owner
A. ...
Key Considerations in Planning
Legacy‐Transfer to Children
1. Continue ownership through children who are managing the bus...
The Transaction‐Considerations
Checklist of key items
1. Representation you will need
A. Accounting
B. Banking
C. Legal
2....
The Transaction‐Basic Tax Issues
Asset Sale to Third Party
1. No problem‐gain (except for depreciation recapture treated a...
The Transaction‐Basic Tax Issues
Some Alternative Solutions
1. Make whole payments (stock sale)
A. Seller agrees to sell a...
Post‐Transaction/Transition‐What is Next? 
1. Continuing relationship
A. Employment
B. Business Adviser/Board of Directors...
Final Take Aways
Determine your 
objectives, lifestyle needs
To whom will the business 
be transferred 
Decide on an exit ...
Succession and Retirement Planning

Questions and Answers

14
About the Speakers
Jonathan Fry is a partner in our Management & Advisory Services practice at Simon Lever. He
brings over...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Succession & Retirement Planning for Small Businesses

415 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
415
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Succession & Retirement Planning for Small Businesses

  1. 1. Succession & Retirement  Planning for Small  Businesses  Jon Fry Darren Finn
  2. 2. Disclosures This presentation and these materials are for educational purposes only and are not intended, and should not be  relied upon, as accounting or tax advice.  Please speak with your advisor about your particular facts and  circumstances. IRS Circular 230 Disclosure: Any tax advice included in this written or electronic communication, including  attachments and enclosures, was not intended or written to be used, and it may not be used by the taxpayer, for the  purpose of avoiding any tax‐related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer by any governmental taxing  authority or agency, or for promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax‐related matters. 2
  3. 3. Agenda 1. Succession and Retirement Planning  Background 2. Key Considerations in Planning 3. The Transaction/Transition 4. Post‐Transition/Transaction‐What Is Next? 5. Questions & Answers 3
  4. 4. Succession & Retirement Planning Background 1. Why do I need to consider a succession plan? A. Proactive Planning‐ask yourself the following i. When do I want to leave or wind down my active role in the business? ii. How much money will I need to maintain my desired lifestyle? iii. What is my business worth? iv. Who will be my successor? v. Even if retirement is not a desired goal, a plan to protect family and the  business is prudent B. Reactive Planning i. What if unforeseen circumstances occur  ii. Receive less than fair value iii. Employees may be without jobs 2. Why do I need to consider retirement planning? A. The best planning starts early and builds on goals i. Assess your needs and lifestyle B. Take advantage of time and compounding i. Determine strategy using a mix of tax‐deferred and taxable alternatives 4
  5. 5. Key Considerations in Planning Choosing a Successor Generally three choices: 1. Third Party A. Receive large cash payment up front B. Facilitates retirement and estate planning ‐ liquidity 2. Employees and/or Co‐owners A. They know the business and you are familiar with them B. More control over the deal structure and timetable C. Business can use its free cash flow to fund buy‐out D. Continuity‐maintain the business culture 3. Legacy‐Family Members A. Personal satisfaction B. More freedom of choice with involvement in the business C. Most difficult to achieve • Family issues (not estate taxes) are the biggest hurdle 5
  6. 6. Key Considerations in Planning Sale to Third Party – Maximize Value 1. Need to have in place a business environment that can run well without you  (the owner) with these elements: A. Strong management structure B. Plan that develops and retain key employees C. Focus on value drivers i. Cash flows ii. Income 2. Different types of third party A. Strategic Buyer‐a buyer who is in and knows your industry and can take  advantage of synergies in an acquisition B. Financial Buyer‐ a buyer who acts more in an investor capacity 6
  7. 7. Key Considerations in Planning Buy‐Sell Agreements 1. Essential in any closely held  business‐with more than one owner A. Contractual arrangement between current owners and potentially  future owners B. Included within a shareholder agreement (corporation) or partnership  agreement C. Can be a separate document D. Agreements should be reviewed especially if you haven’t looked at in  the past 5 years 2. Determines disposition of business interests in certain circumstances‐death,  disability, resignation A. Provides provisions for company and other owners to purchase your  business interest B. Use to determine a process for valuing the business (formula or  appraisal) C. Establish transfer restrictions 7
  8. 8. Key Considerations in Planning Legacy‐Transfer to Children 1. Continue ownership through children who are managing the business 2. Key issue‐children generally do not have the cash for a buy‐out i. “Fair price” to the Buyer‐not necessarily “top dollar” ii. Meet objectives of the Seller 3. Solutions to the cash crunch problem i. Basic transfer techniques‐gift of stock or sale using minority and  marketability discounts ii. Installment  sales Special Notes: Business Transfer Techniques There are multiple means of transferring business interests through sales, trusts, family limited  partnerships.  The key issue is determining the value of the business and applying appropriate discounts.   The question valuation experts wrestle with is value to whom?  In determining value, experts must be  sure to avoid the pitfalls of Internal Revenue Code section 2703 which is concerned with fair market value  standards.  In other words, attempting to transfer a business without regard to any fair market value  considerations can be troublesome when dealing with the IRS. 8
  9. 9. The Transaction‐Considerations Checklist of key items 1. Representation you will need A. Accounting B. Banking C. Legal 2. Transaction A. Selling the business B. Passing down the business to the next generation C. Seller owned real estate‐consider long‐term lease arrangement i. Income stream to retired owner ii. Ensures business has continuing use of property D. Charitable bequests/gifts 3. Valuation A. Value to whom? 4. Basic tax issues 5. Selected key provisions A. Retaining some control to protect against the business struggling B. Participating in the upside when value increases‐trailing provision C. Restrictive covenants 9
  10. 10. The Transaction‐Basic Tax Issues Asset Sale to Third Party 1. No problem‐gain (except for depreciation recapture treated as ordinary  income) taxed at long‐term capital gains rates (15%,20%, 23.8%  depending on your tax bracket) IF you are not a C corporation 2. C corporation asset sale is subject to double‐taxation at effective rates  that could be greater than 50%! 3. Buyers generally want to buy assets and Sellers want to sell stock Legacy Sale (to children/employees) 1. Key issue‐liquidity and cash must come from the business A. Generally buy‐out payments will come from after‐tax dollars B. Also need cash to reinvest back into business 10
  11. 11. The Transaction‐Basic Tax Issues Some Alternative Solutions 1. Make whole payments (stock sale) A. Seller agrees to sell assets and Buyer agrees to a higher sale price  to get a net cash amount into Seller’s hands 2. Structure buy‐out to include deductible consulting or compensation  payments 3. Use non‐qualified deferred compensation (NQDC) payable to owner A. NQDC reduces business value that must be purchased with after‐ tax dollars B. More risk to Seller as the payment of NQDC depends on the  continuing profitability of the business during the pay out period 4. Employee Stock Ownership Plan (for corporations) A. ESOPs are used to provide a market for the shares of a departing  owner of a profitable, closely held company B. Company sets up plan for the benefit of employees i. Plan can borrow money to purchase company stock ii. Company  contributions to Plan to pay‐off loan are  deductible iii. Employee contributions are not taxed until they receive the  stock when they leave or retire 11
  12. 12. Post‐Transaction/Transition‐What is Next?  1. Continuing relationship A. Employment B. Business Adviser/Board of Directors C. Non‐compete D. Landlord (retaining real estate) 2. Retirement Planning A. Save early and save often!  Measure your progress B. Tax advantage savings A. 401(k)‐deferred B. IRA‐deferred C. Roth IRA‐tax‐free distribution C. Other savings A. Social Security B. Your business C. Your home Installment sale defined‐section 453 3. Estate Planning 12
  13. 13. Final Take Aways Determine your  objectives, lifestyle needs To whom will the business  be transferred  Decide on an exit date and  strategy for winding  down‐even if tentative Understand value of  business (high level) for  sale and tax purposes Continue to focus on value  drivers Retain and motivate key  employees Building income Discuss preliminary plans  with advisors Tax‐review tax issues and  fixes Legal‐are documents in  order (including buy‐sell  agreement)? Ensure your plan and  goals are in synch with  your lifestyle and estate  plans Develop a plan with  measurable goals Planning early and proactively is best 13
  14. 14. Succession and Retirement Planning Questions and Answers 14
  15. 15. About the Speakers Jonathan Fry is a partner in our Management & Advisory Services practice at Simon Lever. He brings over 10 years of experience to our clients and our community including 6 years at an  international accounting firm.  Jonathan serves clients in the following areas: • Succession Planning • Valuation – Business, Estate, and Gift • Mergers and Acquisitions • Personal Financial Planning Contact Jon at jfry@simonlever.com or phone 717‐569‐7081 Jonathan Fry  Darren Finn is a principal in our Tax Services practice at Simon Lever.  He brings over  20 years of tax experience to our clients and community including eight years at an  international taxation firm.  Darren serves clients in the following areas: • Tax Compliance and Planning • State and Local Tax • Audit Controversy and Defense • Succession Planning Contact Darren at dfinn@simonlever.com or phone 717‐569‐7081 15

×