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The Hunting of the Snark <ul><li>'Just the place for a Snark!' the Bellman cried, </li></ul><ul><li>As he landed his crew ...
Digital Natives and the Snark Syndrome Simon Lorimer
 
<ul><li>Kids are wired differently these days….They’re digitally nimble. They multitask, transpose and extrapolate. And th...
Some issues <ul><li>Generational hypothesis not supported </li></ul><ul><li>Processing preferences </li></ul><ul><li>Gende...
OECD. (2008). New millennium learners. Initial findings on the effects of digital technologies on school-age learners.  Le...
OECD. (2008). New millennium learners. Initial findings on the effects of digital technologies on school-age learners.  Le...
 
Do these HE conclusions fit? <ul><li>1. The rhetoric that university students are Digital Natives and university staff are...
<ul><li>Digital inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Democratic </li></ul><ul><li>Effortful </li></ul><ul><li>Messy </li></ul><ul><...
Discussion Questions <ul><li>What questions should we expect educational research to give us the answer to? </li></ul><ul>...
Some sources <ul><li>http://simonlorimer.wordpress.com/category/btg-sources/  my own list of sources </li></ul><ul><li>htt...
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Digital Natives and the Snark Syndrome

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Presentation given at BTG09.
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Digital Natives and the Snark Syndrome

  1. 2. The Hunting of the Snark <ul><li>'Just the place for a Snark!' the Bellman cried, </li></ul><ul><li>As he landed his crew with care; </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting each man on the top of the tide </li></ul><ul><li>By a finger entwined in his hair. </li></ul><ul><li>'Just the place for a Snark! I have said it twice: </li></ul><ul><li>That alone should encourage the crew. </li></ul><ul><li>Just the place for a Snark! I have said thrice: </li></ul><ul><li>What I tell you three times is true.' </li></ul>
  2. 3. Digital Natives and the Snark Syndrome Simon Lorimer
  3. 5. <ul><li>Kids are wired differently these days….They’re digitally nimble. They multitask, transpose and extrapolate. And they think of knowledge as infinite. </li></ul><ul><li>We’re still in a brick-and-mortar, 30-students-to-1-teacher paradigm, but we need to get out of that framework to having 200 or 300 kids taking courses online, at night, 24/7, whenever they want. </li></ul>Lewin, T. (2009, 8 9). New York Times. Retrieved 10 16, 2009, from: In the future text books are history: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/09/education/09textbook.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=Digital%20Textbooks&st=cse
  4. 6. Some issues <ul><li>Generational hypothesis not supported </li></ul><ul><li>Processing preferences </li></ul><ul><li>Gender issues </li></ul><ul><li>Disempowerment </li></ul>
  5. 7. OECD. (2008). New millennium learners. Initial findings on the effects of digital technologies on school-age learners. Learning in the 21st Century: Research, Innovation and Policy. Paris: OECD/CERI.
  6. 8. OECD. (2008). New millennium learners. Initial findings on the effects of digital technologies on school-age learners. Learning in the 21st Century: Research, Innovation and Policy. Paris: OECD/CERI.
  7. 10. Do these HE conclusions fit? <ul><li>1. The rhetoric that university students are Digital Natives and university staff are Digital Immigrants is not supported. </li></ul><ul><li>2. There is great diversity in students’ and staff experiences with technology, and their preferences for the use of technology in higher education. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Emerging technologies afford a range of learning activities that can improve student learning processes, outcomes, and assessment practices. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Managing and aligning pedagogical, technical and administrative issues is a necessary condition of success when using emerging technologies for learning. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Innovation with learning technologies typically requires the development of new learning and teaching and technology-based skills, which is effortful for both students and staff. </li></ul><ul><li>6. The use of emerging technologies for learning and teaching can challenge current university policies in learning and teaching and IT. </li></ul>Kennedy, G. (2009). Educating the net generation: A handbook of findings for practice and policy. Melbourne, Australia: Australian learning and teaching council.
  8. 11. <ul><li>Digital inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Democratic </li></ul><ul><li>Effortful </li></ul><ul><li>Messy </li></ul><ul><li>Home use matters </li></ul>
  9. 12. Discussion Questions <ul><li>What questions should we expect educational research to give us the answer to? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the uses and limitations of the native/immigrant image? </li></ul><ul><li>What findings discussed are supported or not supported by your observations </li></ul><ul><li>What borders exist between school and social settings – should they continue to exist? What would be different without them? </li></ul><ul><li>What is age appropriate? </li></ul><ul><li>Home use matters – how do we support this? </li></ul>
  10. 13. Some sources <ul><li>http://simonlorimer.wordpress.com/category/btg-sources/ my own list of sources </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.netgenskeptic.com/ the source of most of my sources </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.nml-conference.be/?cat=4 from the OECD </li></ul>

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