How to Beat  Test Anxiety
What is test anxiety? It’s worry or fear caused by having to take tests.  Test anxiety may cause: Physical symptoms   You ...
Who is affected? Every student who takes a test feels some anxiety.  But for some students, the feeling is so intense that...
What causes test anxiety? It’s caused by pressure, past experience, and fear of failure. If I don’t do well, I’ll flunk th...
My parents have invested so much in me, I can’t let them down.  They’ll still love you no matter how you do on the exam. I...
Effective studying gives you confidence <ul><li>Set the right atmosphere.  </li></ul><ul><li>Study where you can concentra...
<ul><li>Create learning aids. </li></ul><ul><li>Match the study material to the aid. For example: </li></ul><ul><li>Use fl...
Learn good test-taking skills. For any exam you take, read the directions carefully!  Then, follow these tips: <ul><li>For...
<ul><li>For essay exams   </li></ul><ul><li>Read all the questions first.. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Underline key words, such...
<ul><li>For objective exams (multiple choice, matching, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Solve in the order given. </li></ul><ul><u...
You  can  learn to control your anxiety! <ul><li>Don’t let emotions interfere with logic. Here are some  ways to keep your...
<ul><li>Learn to relax! </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s one technique: </li></ul><ul><li>Loosen your clothing and get comfortable...
<ul><li>Right before the exam: </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try to cram more information into your head. This can cause you to ...
Final Notes: You have prepared for this test. Trust your knowledge and believe in yourself. Remember to think positive tho...
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Test anxiety 2

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Test anxiety 2

  1. 1. How to Beat Test Anxiety
  2. 2. What is test anxiety? It’s worry or fear caused by having to take tests. Test anxiety may cause: Physical symptoms You may fidget, have “butterflies” in your stomach, a quickened heart rate or breathing, nausea, sweaty palms, a headache, etc. Mental distraction You may be unable to concentrate, and may be easily distracted by noise, uncomfortable temperature, passersby, etc. Mental blocks You may be unable to think effectively about the task at hand.
  3. 3. Who is affected? Every student who takes a test feels some anxiety. But for some students, the feeling is so intense that it affects their performance – with serious results! Some students can rise to the challenge. They see an exam as an opportunity to show what they know. Others view tests as threats. For example, students who’ve failed in the past often fear that they’ll fail again. A test-anxious student may do poorly on an exam even if he or she knows material better than a classmate who is able to control anxiety. But you can learn to control test anxiety.
  4. 4. What causes test anxiety? It’s caused by pressure, past experience, and fear of failure. If I don’t do well, I’ll flunk the class. Then, I’ll never get into college… or graduate, or get a job… Don’t put your whole future on the line with a single test. It’s unlikely that one test will “make or break” your chances. I study hard, but in the exam room I just get confused. Better study habits and some relaxation techniques can help keep your mind clear. I always get so worked up the night before an exam that I can’t sleep. The next day I’m exhausted and I flunk. You can help yourself by learning how to relax and control your anxiety. I just can’t keep my mind on the test. It wanders – to weekends, plans, my friends, whatever. You can improve your concentration by learning some basic self-discipline techniques.
  5. 5. My parents have invested so much in me, I can’t let them down. They’ll still love you no matter how you do on the exam. I never do well, no matter how much I study, so why study at all? Don’t fall into the trap of having low expectations. Studying brings results! My sister’s the smart one in the family. She always does better than I do. Don’t try to compete with others. In the end, all that matters if what you know. Learn in the way that’s best for you . I always think of the answers AFTER I leave the room. That’s because your tension has been released! Learning relaxation techniques could help you.
  6. 6. Effective studying gives you confidence <ul><li>Set the right atmosphere. </li></ul><ul><li>Study where you can concentrate without interruption – no TV, phone or friends. Study in the same place each day. </li></ul><ul><li>Sit at a well-lit desk or table. (Stay away from easy chairs!) </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t study when you’re overtired. Take a nap and come back refreshed. </li></ul><ul><li>Make the most of your notes. </li></ul><ul><li>Take notes efficiently – in a notebook. </li></ul><ul><li>Spend a couple of minutes reading your notes right after class. </li></ul><ul><li>Set aside some time each week to review your notes. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Mark deadlines and exam dates for the semester on a calendar. </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule several short review sessions rather than a few longer ones. </li></ul><ul><li>Be realistic about how much material you can cover in one session. </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule some free time, too! </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Create learning aids. </li></ul><ul><li>Match the study material to the aid. For example: </li></ul><ul><li>Use flash cards to learn technical terms and vocabulary. </li></ul><ul><li>Make charts and time lines for historical events. </li></ul><ul><li>Use outlines to help break information into smaller units that are easy to remember. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare yourself. </li></ul><ul><li>Use flash cards to learn technical terms and vocabulary. </li></ul><ul><li>Attend all classes. Skipping classes now may add to your anxiety at test time. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions, and try to pick out important information. Listen for key phrases such as, “The 3 main reasons are…” </li></ul><ul><li>Get help if you have a particular problem with the material. </li></ul>Be kind to yourself. Eat and sleep well before the exam, so you’re in top form. Don’t try to “Cram” or stay up all night by taking caffeine. You’re likely to be tired, irritable, and distracted by test time.
  8. 8. Learn good test-taking skills. For any exam you take, read the directions carefully! Then, follow these tips: <ul><li>For short-answer exams </li></ul><ul><li>Budget your time. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Estimate how much time you have to answer each question. If some questions are worth more points than others, plan to spend more time answering them. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Do easiest questions first. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>• Don’t stay on any particular question for too long. You may </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>come up with the answer as you work on a different question. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Answer each question. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>• Write what you do know even if you don’t know the complete </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>answer. (Writing may spark your memory.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use the full time allowed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you finish before class is over, review your answers, make corrections, add information, etc. Don’t turn it in until you’re completely satisfied with your performance. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>For essay exams </li></ul><ul><li>Read all the questions first.. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Underline key words, such as “discuss,” “explain,” and “compare.” Then write down your initial thoughts. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Start with the easiest questions. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Organize your thoughts into a simple outline. Draft your answer, leaving space between lines and in the margin for corrections and rewrites. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Be realistic. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Answers should be logical and clear, but they don’t have to be literary masterpieces! Use short, simple sentences to make your points. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Answer more difficult questions last. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the same technique when you’re finished. Go back and add more details, illustrations, etc… and correct any errors. Make changes as neatly as possible. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>For objective exams (multiple choice, matching, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Solve in the order given. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Answers to previous questions may help you to answer questions later in the exam. But don’t get hung up on the tough questions. Leave them and move on. Circle the ones you “skip.” Return if you have enough time. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Read each choice carefully. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beware of words like “often,” “sometimes,” and “always.” Select the answer that’s most correct. (Even wrong answers may be partially true.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Think as you read. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple choice questions can be tricky. Be sure you understand what’s being asked. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finish the exam. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Then go back to any questions you skipped, and use all the time allowed. Narrow down the choices as best you can, then make an educated guess. </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. You can learn to control your anxiety! <ul><li>Don’t let emotions interfere with logic. Here are some ways to keep your perspective: </li></ul><ul><li>Think about why you become anxious and afraid. </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize that some thoughts are negative and self-defeating. </li></ul><ul><li>For each emotional, frightening thought, come up with a rational counter-thought. For instance, replace: “I could never study enough for this test.” with : “I do have a lot I need to study, but if I stick to my schedule and concentrate, I can definitely do it.” </li></ul>Use your imagination in a positive way. When you let your imagination create disastrous scenarios, anxiety is sure to follow. Learn to imagine yourself remaining calm and in control. Cast yourself in the role of a winner – not a loser!
  12. 12. <ul><li>Learn to relax! </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s one technique: </li></ul><ul><li>Loosen your clothing and get comfortable. </li></ul><ul><li>Tighten the muscles in your toes. Hold for a count of 10. Relax and enjoy the sensation of release from tension. </li></ul><ul><li>Flex the muscles in your feet. Hold for a count of 10. Relax. </li></ul><ul><li>Move slowly up through your body – legs, abdomen, back, neck, face – contracting and relaxing muscles as you go. </li></ul><ul><li>Breathe deeply and slowly. </li></ul><ul><li>Use relaxation techniques </li></ul><ul><li>When you feel yourself becoming anxious. </li></ul><ul><li>To help you sleep the night before an exam. </li></ul><ul><li>As a refresher between study sessions. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Right before the exam: </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try to cram more information into your head. This can cause you to feel more anxious. Be confident in what you know! </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t listen when other students are asking each other questions about something that’s going to be on the test. Listening to them worry will only make you worry. </li></ul><ul><li>Take out your pencil, put your books away, and relax. Take long, deep breaths so you’ll be ready when your teacher hands you your test. </li></ul><ul><li>If your mind is blocked by tension during an exam: </li></ul><ul><li>Close your eyes. </li></ul><ul><li>Take a long, deep breath. </li></ul><ul><li>Let it out slowly. </li></ul><ul><li>Concentrate on your breathing – actually feel or hear yourself breathe. Don’t allow yourself to worry about the time, test, or tension. </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat once, then return to the test. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Final Notes: You have prepared for this test. Trust your knowledge and believe in yourself. Remember to think positive thoughts. Imagine the face of someone who loves you, cheering you on! We’re so proud of all your hard work.

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