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The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
Benchmarks
SS.7.C.2.1 Define the term
“citizen”, and identify legal
means of becoming a U.S.
Citizen.
What It
Means to Be
a Citizen
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
WARM UP ACTIVITY:
COULD YOU PASS
THIS TEST?
Complete the handout
provided to the best of
your ability!
What is the supreme law of the
land?
What does the Constitution do?
Under our Constitution, some powers
belong to the federal government. What
is one power of the federal government?
The idea of self-government is in the
first three words of the Constitution.
What are these words?
How many amendments does
the Constitution have?
What is the “rule of law”?
What stops one branch of
government from becoming
too powerful?
What does the judicial branch
do?
When was the Constitution
written?
The Federalist Papers supported the
passage of the U.S. Constitution.
Name one of the writers.
Did you pass the test?
• In order to become a citizen,
immigrants/aliens/residents in the
United States are required to take a
Naturalization Test.
• To pass the civics portion of the United
States Naturalization Test you are required
to get 6 out of 10 questions correct.
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
WHAT DOES IT MEAN
TO BE A U.S.
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
WHAT DOES IT MEAN
TO BE A CITIZEN?
Your turn!
What does being a citizen
mean to you?
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
WHAT DOES THE
CONSTITUTION OF THE
UNITED STATES SAY
The Constitution is like a
rule book for government:
it outlines the structure and
function of our government
and names some of the
rights of the people.
The Fourteenth Amendment
or naturalized
in the United States and subject to the
jurisdiction thereof
are citizens of the United States
and of the State wherein they
reside…
All persons born
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
NATURAL BORN
CITIZENS
Who is a natural born
citizen of the United
States?
Natural Born Citizenship is
based on two “laws”:
1. “Law of the Soil”
– Children born in the United States or
Territories/Possessions
2. “Law of the Blood”
– Children born to a parent or parents who are
United States citizens.
S B
FLREA Copyright 2011
• Any child born in the United States is a
citizen of the United States, even if the
child’s parents are not citizens.
• Soil of the U.S. includes Puerto Rico, Guam,
the Virgin Islands, and the Northern
Mariana Islands.
“Law of the Soil”
FLREA Copyright 2011
• Principle in which citizenship is determined
by parentage rather than by place of birth.
• The U.S. recognizes children born abroad to
American citizens as citizens .
“Law of the Blood”
FLREA Copyright 2011
To Sum It Up…
• Law of the Soil – WHERE you are born
(must be within the United States or
territory/possession)
• Law of the Blood – WHO you are born to
S B
FLREA Copyright 2011
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
NATURALIZED
CITIZEN
How to become a citizen
of the United States
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
Defining Immigrants, Residents,
and Aliens
Immigrant
• A person who comes to
live permanently in a
foreign country.
• A resident is someone
who has been legally
allowed to live in the
United States, but is not a
citizen; lawful permanent
resident
Alien
• Any person not a citizen or
national of the United
States.
Resident
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
Becoming a Citizen of the
United States
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
To Become a Naturalized
Citizen…
There are special considerations for those who serve in the military or
served during times of war/conflict.
Rights and Responsibilities of
Citizens
and Obligations (or Duties)
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
WHAT DO YOU
THINK?
What impact does the
naturalization process have
on:
• Society?
• Government?
• Political process?
Poster Walkabout
You are going to be visiting three
posters in a small group. Each
poster will be labeled with:
society, government, and political
process. In your group, write
about the impact that the
naturalization has on society,
government, and the political
process.
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
SOCIETY
Think about the impact
naturalization has on our
culture.
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
GOVERNMENT
Think about the debates
you hear about
immigration among
government officials.
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
POLITICAL PROCESS
Think about the roles that
naturalized citizens play in
the processes of our
government (elections, jury
service, running for office)
The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015
Checking for Understanding

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What It Means to Be a Citizen Presentation_2.1.pptx

  • 1. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 Benchmarks SS.7.C.2.1 Define the term “citizen”, and identify legal means of becoming a U.S. Citizen. What It Means to Be a Citizen
  • 2. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 WARM UP ACTIVITY: COULD YOU PASS THIS TEST? Complete the handout provided to the best of your ability!
  • 3. What is the supreme law of the land?
  • 4. What does the Constitution do?
  • 5. Under our Constitution, some powers belong to the federal government. What is one power of the federal government?
  • 6. The idea of self-government is in the first three words of the Constitution. What are these words?
  • 7. How many amendments does the Constitution have?
  • 8. What is the “rule of law”?
  • 9. What stops one branch of government from becoming too powerful?
  • 10. What does the judicial branch do?
  • 11. When was the Constitution written?
  • 12. The Federalist Papers supported the passage of the U.S. Constitution. Name one of the writers.
  • 13. Did you pass the test? • In order to become a citizen, immigrants/aliens/residents in the United States are required to take a Naturalization Test. • To pass the civics portion of the United States Naturalization Test you are required to get 6 out of 10 questions correct.
  • 14. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A U.S.
  • 15. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A CITIZEN? Your turn! What does being a citizen mean to you?
  • 16. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 WHAT DOES THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES SAY The Constitution is like a rule book for government: it outlines the structure and function of our government and names some of the rights of the people.
  • 17. The Fourteenth Amendment or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside… All persons born
  • 18. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 NATURAL BORN CITIZENS Who is a natural born citizen of the United States?
  • 19. Natural Born Citizenship is based on two “laws”: 1. “Law of the Soil” – Children born in the United States or Territories/Possessions 2. “Law of the Blood” – Children born to a parent or parents who are United States citizens. S B FLREA Copyright 2011
  • 20. • Any child born in the United States is a citizen of the United States, even if the child’s parents are not citizens. • Soil of the U.S. includes Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands. “Law of the Soil” FLREA Copyright 2011
  • 21. • Principle in which citizenship is determined by parentage rather than by place of birth. • The U.S. recognizes children born abroad to American citizens as citizens . “Law of the Blood” FLREA Copyright 2011
  • 22. To Sum It Up… • Law of the Soil – WHERE you are born (must be within the United States or territory/possession) • Law of the Blood – WHO you are born to S B FLREA Copyright 2011
  • 23. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 NATURALIZED CITIZEN How to become a citizen of the United States
  • 24. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 Defining Immigrants, Residents, and Aliens Immigrant • A person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country. • A resident is someone who has been legally allowed to live in the United States, but is not a citizen; lawful permanent resident Alien • Any person not a citizen or national of the United States. Resident
  • 25. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 Becoming a Citizen of the United States
  • 26. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 To Become a Naturalized Citizen… There are special considerations for those who serve in the military or served during times of war/conflict.
  • 27. Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens and Obligations (or Duties)
  • 28. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 WHAT DO YOU THINK? What impact does the naturalization process have on: • Society? • Government? • Political process? Poster Walkabout You are going to be visiting three posters in a small group. Each poster will be labeled with: society, government, and political process. In your group, write about the impact that the naturalization has on society, government, and the political process.
  • 29. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 SOCIETY Think about the impact naturalization has on our culture.
  • 30. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 GOVERNMENT Think about the debates you hear about immigration among government officials.
  • 31. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 POLITICAL PROCESS Think about the roles that naturalized citizens play in the processes of our government (elections, jury service, running for office)
  • 32. The Florida Law Related Education Association, Inc. © 2015 Checking for Understanding

Editor's Notes

  1. As participants enter, provide Handout A – Could you pass the test? Have participants complete the 10 question quiz. After completed, ask participants where these questions are from. Explain they were selected from the 100 question pool for the United States Naturalization Exam. The 100 questions address U.S. government, U.S. history, and basic U.S. geography. Debrief by providing the answers to the questions (see following slides). http://www.uscis.gov/citizenship/learners/study-test/study-materials-civics-test
  2. http://uscode.house.gov/view.xhtml?path=/prelim@title8/chapter12/subchapter3&edition=prelim
  3. Those who have legal status in the United States are known as “lawful permanent residents”, "Permanent Resident Alien," "Resident Alien Permit Holder," and "Green Card Holder”. http://www.uscis.gov/tools/glossary/permanent-resident-alien
  4. Go over the chart provided to explain the naturalization process. Permanent residents also must establish “continuous residence” in the U.S., meaning they cannot leave the country for trips longer than 6 months.
  5. Discuss (briefly) the rights, responsibilities, and obligations that citizens of the United States have. The chart provided is from the United States Center for Immigration Services.
  6. The following slides will provide a brief overview of what is meant by “society”, “government”, and “political process”. Then, divide the class into six groups. Place 6 posters around the room: 2 labeled society, 2 labeled government, and 2 labeled political process. Assign each group to a poster. Students should rotate 3 times, visiting “society”, “government”, and “political process” once. Once they have completed the walkabout, return to slides 26-28 to discuss what is written on the posters and the talking points included in the notes.
  7. Before the walkabout: explain what is meant by society. After the walkabout: In addition to what the students have explained on their posters, discuss the diversity that comes from having naturalized citizens in our society. The United States is one of the most diverse countries in the world with a wide range of cultures (including religions, languages, food, music, and more). The U.S. has been called a melting pot (where cultures come together to make up the U.S.) and a salad bowl (where everyone keeps their individual identity but comes together to make a complete society).
  8. Before the walkabout: explain what is meant by “government”. After the walkabout: In addition to what the students have explained on their posters, discuss how immigration policy is a controversial topic in government and different groups have different approaches on immigration – from how to address illegal immigrants within the United States to the role of legal immigrants to Position of the Democratic Party on immigration (www.democrats.org): That’s why Democrats support comprehensive reform grounded in the principles of responsibility and accountability: Responsibility from the federal government to secure our borders: The Obama administration has dedicated unprecedented resources to securing our borders and reducing the flow of illegal traffic in both directions. Responsibility from unscrupulous businesses that break the law: Employers who exploit undocumented workers undermine American workers, and they have to be held accountable. Responsibility from people who are living in the United States illegally: Undocumented workers who are in good standing must admit that they broke the law, pay taxes and a penalty, learn English, and get right with the law before they can get in line to earn their citizenship. Position of the Republican Party on Immigration (www.gop.com) “In this country, the rule of law guarantees equal treatment to every individual, including more than one million immigrants to whom we grant permanent residence every year. That is why we oppose any form of amnesty for those who, by intentionally violating the law, disadvantage those who have obeyed it. Granting amnesty only rewards and encourages more law breaking.” “America is proud to be a nation of immigrants. Today’s legal immigrants make vital contributions to every aspect of our nation by enriching our culture and strengthening our economy. But our current immigration system is broken, and President Obama has failed to provide the leadership necessary to repair it. The Republican Party seeks policies that secure our border and boosts our economy.”
  9. Before walkabout: explain what is meant by political process. After walkabout: In addition to what the students have explained on their posters, discuss that citizens, both natural born and naturalized, have rights and responsibilities in the United States, including voting, jury service, running for political office, and being active in the civic life of our nation.