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Table of Contents
Executive Summary 1
Introduction 4
Learning through Transmedia Play 10

  Why transmedia and learning? 11
  Origins of Transmedia: Key terms and logics 13
  Transmedia logics 14
  Transmedia for children 15

Ready to Learn Transmedia Initiative 17
Thinking Seriously about Transmedia Play 19

  Transmedia play can promote new approaches to reading 19
  Transmedia play can encourage learning through joint media engagement 21
  Transmedia play can support constructivist learning goals 22

Learning to Play with Information 23
Building Transmedia Play Experiences 28
Examples of Transmedia Play 34

  Case 1: Caine’s Arcade 34
  Case 2: Story Pirates 39
  Case 3: Flotsam Transmedia Experience 43

Future Directions for Research and Development 49
References 51
Executive Summary


Within the context of a media saturated, hyper-connected,       no storyline, such as open-ended videogames. Our explora-
and rapidly changing world, the concept of “transmedia”         tion of transmedia play and its relationships to learning in
has come into the spotlight among those creating and using      middle childhood is important and timely as more media
media and technology for and with children. Transmedia,         producers consider ways to incorporate transmedia into
by itself, means “across media” and describes any combina-      their creations and as educators increasingly look to new
tion of relationships that might exist between the various      media as a site for expanded and enhanced learning oppor-
texts (analog or digital) that constitute a contemporary        tunities.
entertainment media experience. In recent years, the texts
and practices associated with transmedia have developed         Some transmedia experiences for children are designed
through active conversations among fan communities, cre-        with learning objectives in mind; for others, learning is not
ative artists, entertainment industry executives, academic      an explicit goal. However, even without overt “educational
scholars, policy makers, and others interested in the future    content,” transmedia offers numerous opportunities for
of entertainment and storytelling.                              learning. The complex, interconnected, and dynamic narra-
                                                                tives and vibrant story worlds characteristic of transmedia
In this report, we focus on transmedia in the lives of chil-    provide fertile sites for children to explore, experiment, and
dren aged aged 5 to 11 and its applications to storytelling,    oftentimes contribute as story worlds unfold across media.
play, and learning. As educators, researchers, and designers,   The multi-modal, multi-sited nature of many transmedia
we are interested in the ways in which transmedia can be        productions challenge children to use varied textual, visual,
a resource for learning through participation, experimenta-     and media literacy skills to decode and remix media ele-
tion, expression—and, in particular, through play. We will      ments. In these ways, the active, ongoing, creative engage-
discuss both transmedia storytelling and transmedia play, a     ment with complex stories required of participants in a
related but distinct concept from transmedia storytelling in    transmedia play experience stands in contrast to the rou-
that it involves experimentation with and participation in a    tine, decontextualized learning that, unfortunately, all too
transmedia experience, but also applies to media that has       often characterizes children’s experiences in school.


                                                                                                                                 1
Transmedia, done well, can contribute to an immersive, re-       In order to take part in a transmedia play
sponsive, learner-centered learning environment rich with        experience, children must learn to read both
information and linked to children’s existing knowledge and      written and multimedia texts broadly (across
experiences. It can build upon what children already know        multiple media) and deeply (digging into details
about playing games, telling stories, and sharing media.         of the narrative). This kind of reading has been
While transmedia does not have to privilege new media            described as “transmedia navigation” or “the
technologies, leveraging new media in creative and acces-        ability to follow the flow of stories and information
sible ways in order to facilitate sharing and communication      across multiple modalities” within the context
among participants or to provide frequent and personalized       of the new media literacies (Jenkins, Clinton,
formative feedback can be valuable for enhancing the learn-      Purushotma, Robinson, & Weigel, 2006, p. 4).
ing environment.
                                                                •	Transmedia play can encourage learning through
                                                                  joint media engagement.
Learning with Transmedia

We believe that transmedia has the potential to be a valu-       The complex narratives, rich worlds, and multiple
able tool for expanded learning that addresses some of the       points of entry characteristic of transmedia
most pressing challenges facing education today. Through         experiences can provide opportunities for
immersive, interconnected, and dynamic narratives, trans-        families to experience transmedia together.
media engages multiple literacies, including textual, visual,
and media literacies, as well as multiple intelligences. It     •	Transmedia play can support constructivist
is highly engaging and allows for important social sharing        learning goals.
among collaborators.
                                                                 Transmedia play involves exploration,
In reviewing numerous children’s media properties and the        experimentation, and remix, all activities firmly
existing popular and scholarly literature about transmedia       aligned with a constructivist approach to learning
and children, we have identified the following key links be-     (e.g. Bruner, 1990; Piaget, 1985; Vygotsky, 1978)
tween transmedia and learning:                                   that emphasizes the active role of the learner
                                                                 in creating knowledge by working to make
   •	Transmedia play can promote new approaches                  connections among information in a specific
     to reading.                                                 context.



                                                                                                                         2
Characteristics of Transmedia Play                          Building Transmedia Play Experiences

We highlight five characteristics of transmedia play that   We present three core principles for building transmedia
make it useful for learning:                                play experiences:

   •	Resourceful: The ability to act with/react to            1.	Play Partners: Relationships between producers
     diverse, challenging situations by thinking                 and audiences; conditions for people engaging in
     creatively about solutions that leverage any and            transmedia play together
     all available tools and materials
                                                              2.	Places to Play: Metaphorically, meaning places
   •	Social: Conversing with others who may be co-               within a transmedia “universe”; and physically,
     located or linked through media/technology, as in           the environments within which children
     the case of social media or virtual worlds                  participate in transmedia play

   •	Mobile: Use of mobile technologies, movement             3.	Paradigm-shifting Play: Modifying pre-existing
     between platforms/media, and causing                        concepts and routines to maximize the lasting
     movement within media themselves                            positive impact of children’s transmedia play

   •	Accessible: The ability to jump in from a variety of
     starting points and define a trajectory that takes
     into account people’s own unique contexts and          We offer three extended examples of transmedia play expe-
     types of access                                        riences that support these core principles: the emergence
                                                            of Caine’s Arcade, the work of the Story Pirates, and the
   •	Replayable: Enticing people to revisit, explore,       Flotsam Transmedia Experience.
     and investigate rich worlds so intensive that they
     require multiple “visits”




                                                                                                                        3
Introduction
by Henry Jenkins



There is a monster at the end of this report (well, maybe        such a powerful learning system. In a 2007 online poll, the
there is, but you won’t know for sure until you turn all of      American Education Association voted The Monster at the
the pages and read what we have to say).                         End of this Book onto a list of “Teachers’ Top 100 Books for
                                                                 Children.” A few years later, the School Library Journal gave
But, it is telling that most of you probably recognize this      it a prominent spot on its list of the Top 100 picture books.
phrase as a reference to a classic children’s book, written by
Jon Stone, illustrated by Michael Smollen, released in 1971
just a few years after Sesame Street debuted on PBS, and
“starring lovable, furry old Grover.” Much has been made of
the ways that Sesame Street reinvented children’s televi-
sion, embracing rather than running away from the proper-
ties of its medium, incorporating tricks from advertising,
parodies of popular culture, songs and skits, into something
which encouraged the active engagement of its young
viewers. Yet, far less has been made of the fact that Sesame
Street from the very start encouraged its young fans to
follow it across media platforms—from television to re-
cords, books, stuffed toys, public performances, feature
films, and much more. Certainly, the then-Children’s Televi-
sion Workshop’s steps in that direction were cautious, given
the anxieties many parents have about the commercializa-
tion of children’s culture. But, over time, much of the
American public came to embrace those experiments in
transmedia storytelling as part of what made Sesame Street                      image credit: Sesame Workshop



                                                                                                                                 4
Part of what makes The Monster at the End of this Book so       not want to exclude adults from the fun—reading books to-
compelling is that it is as reflexive about the nature of the   gether across generations is perhaps the most powerful way
printed book as a medium as Sesame Street was about our         to foster a deeper appreciation of the pleasures of reading.
experiences of watching and learning from television. Read-     But, Sesame Street has always understood that children do
ing this book becomes a kind of play as children scream         not enjoy equal opportunities to learn. Some children are
with a mixture of fear and delight as we turn each page,        left on their own while their parents work long hours. Some
wondering when the scary monster is going to appear, only       parents do not have good models for active reading with
to discover that it is “lovable furry old Grover” who is the    their children and look for prompts that might allow them
monster we warmly welcome at the end of the book. Gro-          to learn how to play and perform and speculate around the
ver tries to do everything he can to block us from turning      printed page. The experience of an e-book version of The
the pages, from tying knots to constructing brick walls, from   Monster at the End of this Book will ideally supplement and
begging to haranguing us, yet the desire to read overcomes      scaffold the experience of reading the traditional picture
all of the walls he might try to erect. The children’s book     book, not replace it, but it also adds a new layer to the ever
has long been a site for domestic performance, as parents       expanding “supersystem” which constitutes the world of
and children alike try out different voices, make sound ef-     Sesame Street. So does The Putamayo Kids Presents Sesame
fects, and respond with mock emotions, to the pictures on       Street Playground, a CD/DVD set which shares with children
the page.                                                       songs from the many versions of the program which have
                                                                been localized to languages and cultures around the world,
This book had effects that go beyond the printed page:          and video clips featuring the original casts in India, Mexico,
Grover emerged as an early fan favorite on Sesame Street        Russia, or South Africa. And Sesame Street, the longest
as his personality took shape across platforms. When young      street in the world, just keeps growing.
people pick up The Monster at the End of this Book, they
already know who Grover is, they know his back story, they      Today, we might describe Sesame Street as a transmedia
understand his motivations, they identify with what he is       experience—that concept did not exist in 1971 when The
feeling, and as a result, there is an immediacy about our       Monster at the End of this Book was first published. Trans-
experience of this book.                                        media is an idea that has come into sharper focus over the
                                                                past decade, having emerged from active conversations be-
Predictably enough, The Monster at the End of this Book         tween academic researchers, creative artists, policy makers,
has in recent years evolved into a digital book, an interac-    fan communities, anyone and everyone interested in the
tive experience children have on their iPad. We certainly do


                                                                                                                                 5
future of entertainment and storytelling. Transmedia, by          suggest how much he means to the larger Sesame Street
itself, means “across media” and it describes any number of       community. Neither example builds on extensive narra-
possible relationships that might exist between the various       tive information that must be remembered across differ-
texts that constitute a contemporary entertainment fran-          ent texts—that would not necessarily be appropriate for
chise. Marsha Kinder (1991), a media scholar who has writ-        younger viewers—but it does reward fans who apply what
ten extensively about children’s media, coined the term,          they learned in one context to each new appearance of the
“transmedia,” to refer to the “entertainment supersystem”         characters.
which had emerged around charac-
ters such as the Teenage Mutant Ninja In a hunting society, children learn by Each of these texts contributes
Turtles, the Muppet Babies, or the        playing with bows and arrows. In an something to our knowledge of
Super Mario Brothers, as personali-                                                         this fictional realm, and each takes
ties and characters that move across
                                          information society, they learn to play advantage of those things their
media platforms, encouraging their        with information.                                 respective medium does best. We
fans to follow them wherever they                                                           want the depiction of Oscar or
appeared. In my own work (Jenkins, 2006), I extended her          Cookie Monster or the Count in a Sesame Street game to
concept to talk about transmedia storytelling, which refers       be consistent with what we see on television, but we also
to the systematic unfolding of elements of a story world          want the game to provide us with an interactive experience
across multiple media platforms, with each platform mak-          that is only possible in digital media. By combining media
ing a unique and original contribution to the experience as       with different affordances, we create a more layered enter-
a whole.                                                          tainment experience. Or at least, that’s the theory. A good
                                                                  transmedia narrative uses these various cross-platform
The Monster at the End of the Book builds off what we know        extensions to flesh out the world, to extend the timeline, to
of Grover on television but it creates a new kind of experi-      deepen our familiarity with the characters, and to increase
ence that takes advantage of the distinctive affordances of       our engagement.
the printed book, which is designed to be read aloud in the
child’s bedroom or playroom. The feature film Follow that         With an educational property like Sesame Street, transme-
Bird (1985) expands upon the time we get to spend with Big        dia does something else—it reinforces the learning both by
Bird while watching the television series in order to flesh       encouraging us to reread and re-experience a particularly
out his backstory, situate him within a quest narrative, and      pleasurable narrative (something, as we all know, kids are
                                                                  often inclined to do with little or no adult encouragement)


                                                                                                                                   6
and readers are invited to connect together pieces of infor-     the sea, the universe beyond the Earth, the ancient world,
mation across multiple installments. In his book, The Tip-       the people who live on the other side of the planet—which
ping Point, Malcolm Gladwell (2000) describes the original       are central to our desired curriculum. Perhaps, the best way
Sesame Street as “sticky,” suggesting that young people be-      to learn about them is to explore their stories, their envi-
come so drawn to its vivid characters that they keep coming      ronments, across media platforms, much as we acquire a
back for more and in the process, these repeated encoun-         deeper affection for Grover through repeated encounters.
ters reinforce what they learn from its curricular design.
                                                                 Like any other kind of storytelling, transmedia is something
Transmedia encourages additive comprehension. We learn           that can be done well or badly. You can be attentive to the
something new as we follow the story across media. This          possibilities of expanding a story in new directions or you
distinguishes it from cross-media, which refers to the use of    can simply slap a logo on something and pretend like it’s
these other media platforms as simple delivery mechanisms        part of the same franchise. Transmedia can be enriching or
for the same old content. If we watch Sesame Street online       exploitative, can be motivated by the crudest of economic
or on a DVD and change nothing else about the content,           motives or shaped by the most cutting edge learning sci-
that’s cross-media. We might also distinguish transmedia         ence. But, when transmedia is done well, it creates a deeply
from multimedia. Multimedia might use multiple kinds             engaging, immersive experience, which multiplies the num-
of media—words, pictures, sounds, videos—which are               ber of learning opportunities.
brought together in a single package: in the old days, there
might be a CD-ROM developed around Sesame Street,                Young people do not simply consume transmedia narra-
where clicking a button opens us up to a range of different      tives; rather, transmedia encourages playful participation.
kinds of media. In transmedia, there’s something power-          In my book, Convergence Culture (2006), I talk about attrac-
ful about how the reader is incited to search out dispersed      tors (things that draw together an audience) and activa-
content and reassemble it into a meaningful mental model.        tors (elements which give the audience something to do,
                                                                 especially in a network society, ways to interact with each
In a hunting society, children learn by playing with bows and    other around the shared content). Narrative-inflected play
arrows. In an information society, they learn to play with in-   is hardly new. Go back and reread the great children’s books
formation. That’s part of why we think transmedia learning       of the 19th century. There’s Meg in Little Women develop-
is such a compelling concept. A science fiction writer has to    ing a backyard game based on Pilgrim’s Progress. There’s
construct a world which can extend across media platforms,       Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s novel pretending to be a pirate
but there already exist many rich worlds—the world under         or Robin Hood. There’s Anne, she of the Green Gables, who


                                                                                                                                7
re-enacts the story of the Lady in the Lake. Each of these       about or manipulating Grover, they become the monster––
books remind us that children before the era of mass media       and again, that’s a valuable experience. The child psycholo-
actively engaged with stories told to them by adults and         gist Bruno Bettelheim (1976) tells us that young people
transformed them into resources for their own creative           need to read stories which acknowledge the monstrous,
play. In the 20th century, mass media displaced many tradi-      because children know that they are not always good and
tional forms of storytelling, but children’s play with narra-    they need resources for thinking through how they should
tive remained meaningful as a way of trying on adult roles       respond to the things that frighten them in the real world.
and expanding core stories that matter to them. And this is
what this report means by transmedia play. Certainly, adults
have some legitimate worries about commercial media
“colonizing” their children’s imaginations, but keep in mind
that the human imagination feeds upon the culture around
it and children show enormous capacity to re-imagine the
stories that enter their lives.

Transmedia encourages this kind of creative reworking. The
scattered fragments of a transmedia story are like pieces
of a puzzle; they encourage curiosity, exploration, experi-
mentation, and problem solving. Transmedia’s process of
dispersal creates gaps that require our active speculation:
some call this negative capability. Transmedia processes
show us that there are more than one way to tell story, that
there is always more we can learn about the characters and       So, there you have the core concepts of this report—trans-
their world, and that such insights encourage us to imagine      media stories, transmedia play, transmedia learning. Put
aspects of these characters that have not yet made it to the     them all together and something magical happens.
screen. Young people make these stories their own through
their active imaginations. The stuffed toy becomes their         Transmedia is not the monster at the end of the book; it’s
avatar: they use it as a stand-in for some other powerful        not something you need to be afraid of encountering. So
figure in their lives. For a short moment, as they are reading   far, we know more about transmedia in entertainment and
                                                                 branding contexts than in relation to learning. That’s not a


                                                                                                                                8
reason to take off running down the street. That’s a reason
for people who care deeply about insuring the most diverse
learning opportunities for our children to take transmedia
seriously, to try to understand how to link multiple media
together to create new pedagogical experiences, to be
ready to play together around the materials of a transme-
dia franchise, to invite children to explore what it means to
read a story across the borders and boundaries between
different texts and different media. This report offers some
rich exemplars of groups who are doing well by children
through their creation of powerful and transformative
transmedia experiences, and it offers some design princi-
ples so that educators and producers might generate more
meaningful, even mind blowing, transmedia experiences for
the coming generation.




                                                                9
Learning Through Transmedia Play
by Becky Herr-Stephenson and Meryl Alper with
Erin Reilly


In this report, we survey transmedia products and experi-         complex connections between information, leading to
ences designed for children, focusing on products designed        learning that is deeply meaningful.
for children ages 5 to 11. We are interested in how trans-
media can be a resource for learning through participation,       Some transmedia experiences for children are designed
experimentation, expression and, in particular, through           with learning objectives in mind; for others, learning is not
play. In the introduction, Henry Jenkins discusses the “play-     an explicit goal. However, even without overt “educational
ful participation” encouraged by transmedia narratives.           content,” transmedia offers numerous opportunities for
Through transmedia play, children explore, enjoy, and remix       learning. The complex, interconnected, and dynamic narra-
elements from diverse media—for example, characters,              tives and vibrant story worlds characteristic of transmedia
settings, and plot elements taken from books, television,         provide fertile sites for children to explore, experiment, and
videos, toys, and new media. This “creative reworking” (in        oftentimes contribute as story worlds unfold across media.
Jenkins’ terms) allows children to tell new stories, work         The multi-modal, multi-sited nature of many transmedia
through problems, and share with others.                          productions challenge children to use varied textual, visual,
                                                                  and media literacy skills to decode and remix media ele-
 As we will discuss in more detail in later sections of the       ments. In these ways, the active, ongoing, creative engage-
report, we believe that transmedia play has several charac-       ment with complex stories required of participants in a
teristics that are highly supportive of learning. First, trans-   transmedia play experience stands in contrast to the rou-
media play can support new approaches to reading across           tine, decontextualized learning that, unfortunately, all too
media, helping children develop broad literacy skills neces-      often characterizes children’s experiences in school.
sary to navigate a media-saturated society; second, trans-
media play can foster co-learning among children, peers,          Transmedia, done well, can contribute to an immersive, re-
parents, and other adults through joint media engagement          sponsive, learner-centered learning environment rich with
(Takeuchi & Stevens, 2011); and third, transmedia play can        information and linked to children’s existing knowledge and
encourage learners to construct understanding and draw            experiences. It can build upon what children already know



                                                                                                                                   10
about playing games, telling stories, and sharing media.            transmedia within the children’s media industry to the pres-
While transmedia does not have to privilege new media               ence of producers who grew up in an age of “ubiquitous
technologies, leveraging new media in creative and acces-           but discontinuous content… bouncing medium to medium,
sible ways in order to facilitate sharing and communication         while longing for a connective thread” (2012, pp. 1-2). Now
among participants or to provide                                                             in positions of power in the indus-
frequent and personalized formative
                                           The multi-modal, multi-sited nature of try with access to multiple new
feedback can be valuable for en-                                                             media tools and platforms, this new
hancing the learning environment.          many transmedia productions challenge generation of producers can craft
We have carefully selected the ex-         children to use varied textual, visual, the transmedia experiences they
amples and case studies presented          and media literacy skills to decode and have long desired and imagined. As
later in this report to demonstrate        remix media elements.                             Kleeman notes: “Suddenly, it seems,
both old- and new-media approach-                                                            the world of ‘transmedia’ isn’t just
es to transmedia play. Despite these                                                         a buzzword, or even necessary to
differences, we believe that all the examples demonstrate           say [within the children’s media industry]. It has seeped into
how transmedia play acknowledges children’s cultural                mainstream culture, not only surrounding the audience, but
participation, respects children’s thoughts and feelings, and       coming from the audience” (2012, p. 2).
builds up and upon 21st century literacies.
                                                                    Our second reason for considering relationships between
                                                                    transmedia and learning is related to trends in education. It
Why transmedia and learning?                                        is well documented that public schools in the U.S. are strug-
We have chosen to investigate transmedia and learning               gling to keep up with their students’ needs—whether they
at this time for two reasons: First, although transmedia is         are supplemental literacy supports for struggling readers or
not a new concept, it has in recent years become a regular          enrichment activities for advanced students. Throughout
practice within the children’s media industry. As we will           the United States, school districts are challenged to stretch
describe in later sections of this report, numerous children’s      shrinking budgets; and, while changes to the No Child Left
media producers have been experimenting with transme-               Behind (NCLB) Act have been authorized and implemented
dia narratives built around books, television programs, and         in some states, the accountability movement that links
interactive media. David Kleeman, President of the Ameri-           student performance on standardized tests to school fund-
can Center for Children and Media, attributes the rise of           ing continues to trouble the climate in schools. Within this



                                                                                                                                     11
context, many school districts are looking to media and         opportunities, and empowerment for some marginalized
technology for solutions to provide additional support to       groups (p. 12).
students, from instructional technologies such as interac-
tive white boards to school services such as online credit      In the sections that follow, we explore a variety of transme-
recovery classes. In addition to the efforts from schools       dia properties for children, looking at how children learn
themselves, numerous organizations have leveraged media         and play with these media. We highlight five characteristics
and technology in creative ways to provide expanded learn-      of transmedia play that make it useful for learning. We then
ing opportunities to students. Expanded learning includes       present three core principles for designing transmedia play
informal learning experiences that take place in non-school
spaces such as afterschool programs, libraries, museums, or
online communities.

We believe that transmedia has the potential to be a valu-
able tool for expanded learning that addresses some of the
most pressing challenges facing education today. Through
immersive, interconnected, and dynamic narratives, trans-
media engages multiple literacies, including textual, visual,
and media literacies, as well as multiple intelligences. It
is highly engaging and allows for important social sharing
among collaborators. We see a strong connection between
transmedia play and the practices and settings conducive to
“connected learning,” a concept put forth by a MacArthur
Foundation-funded research network and defined as learn-        experiences before presenting extended examples that
ing that is “socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented   support the principles. In the final section of the report, we
toward educational, economic, or political opportunity”         sketch out a research and development agenda in this area.
(Ito et al., 2013, p. 4). Media use, production, and sharing    First, however, we present a brief discussion covering the
are essential parts of connected learning. New media in         basics of transmedia. We recognize that the interdisciplin-
particular are thought to support engagement, self-expres-      ary nature of transmedia, as well as the enthusiasm with
sion, social support for interests, access to unique learning   which it has been adopted by different sectors, has poten-
                                                                tial to create confusion through differences in language and


                                                                                                                                 12
grounding theories. For this reason, we wish to present the     of delivery than about the process by which audiences and
origins, key terms, and logics of transmedia that shape this    producers shape content and negotiate meanings. Multi-
report.                                                         media emphasizes the number of different types of expres-
                                                                sion used within a given project, while transmedia focuses
                                                                on the way a project is dispersed across multiple media
Origins of Transmedia: Key Terms and Logics
                                                                platforms without privileging one combination of media
Multiple theoretical principles and historical precedents       platforms over another. Multimedia is separate too from
have formed the foundation for contemporary conversa-           the idea of “multimodality,” or a range of possible modes of
tions about transmedia. The word “transmedia” on its            expression across various systems of representation (Kress,
own simply means “across media.” Different scholars have        2003).
focused on “intertextuality,” or ways that media cross be-
tween boundaries. Cinema scholar Marsha Kinder (1991)           For a work to be a transmedia story, the storytelling process
first wrote about “transmedia intertextuality” in the late      needs to combine multimodality with radical intertextual-
1980s, defining it as “the intertextual relations between       ity. For example, one way of combining radical intertextual-
television and cinema as compatible members of the same         ity with multimodality would be the characters, plots, and
ever-expanding supersystem of mass entertainment”               events dispersed across multiple comic book titles, mov-
(p. 40). Literary critic Julia Kristeva (1986) also discusses   ies, and TV series within the DC or Marvel universes. Each
media and intertextuality, using “intertextuality writ large”   medium has a different range of possible affordances and
to describe the uncoordinated but complex relationships         different constraints around what kind of transmedia story
between texts that influence and reference one another.         can be told across it (Dena, 2009; Gomez, 2010). This way of
Jenkins (2011) explores what he terms “radical intertextuali-   distinguishing transmedia from other modes of storytelling
ty,” or “a movement across texts or across textual structures   emphasizes that networks of people (e.g., audiences and
within the same medium.”	                                       producers, individually and collaboratively), technology, and
                                                                institutions all have the potential power to influence the
Those who use the term transmedia to describe their work        stories we consume, create, and share using media.
sometimes use it interchangeably with “multimedia” or
“cross-platform.” While these terms describe related con-       Historically, transmedia entertainment is not a new industry
cepts, using them as synonyms elides important differences.     development, despite its recent official recognition by the
As a concept, cross-platform tells us more about the means      Producers Guild of America (“PGA Board”, 2010). The idea
                                                                of a fictional franchise existing across multiple platforms is


                                                                                                                                 13
fairly old. For example, modern serialized “webisodes” on           logics might include transmedia branding, transmedia activ-
the Internet have generic roots in newspapers and maga-             ism, transmedia ritual, or transmedia play.
zines through the unfolding fictional narratives of Charles
Dickens in the 19th century (Hayward, 1997). The ways               Transmedia storytelling (Jenkins, 2006) is, at the time of
these narratives unfold, however, has evolved over time.            this writing, the most robustly theorized logic of transme-
“Old” media and established ways of audiences engaging              dia. Transmedia stories are, at their most basic level, nar-
with media are not being displaced by the introduction of           ratives experienced across multiple media. Jenkins (2007)
new media platforms, as expressed in the digital revolution         defines transmedia storytelling as “a process where integral
paradigm of the 1990s (Negroponte,                                                            elements of a fiction get dispersed
1995). Instead, the function and          Through immersive, interconnected, systematically across multiple de-
status of older platforms continually                                                         livery channels for the purpose of
shift (Gitelman, 2006), as articulated
                                          and dynamic narratives, transmedia creating a unified and coordinated
by the concept of “convergence            engages multiple literacies, including entertainment experience.” The
culture” (Jenkins, 2006). These           textual, visual, and media literacies, as specific properties of each me-
shifts are partly possible because of     well as multiple intelligences.                     dium—from television to websites
the interconnectivity, layering, and                                                          to social media—are leveraged to
diversification of networked com-                                                             shape the way in which the story
munication. New media has not brought about transmedia              unfolds. For example, books and television episodes are
practices, but it has certainly enhanced the circulation or         useful for conveying large amounts of information about a
“spreadability” of content at all levels of culture (Jenkins,       story’s plot and characters, while websites make it possible
Ford, & Green, 2013).                                               for producers and users to add on to the story in an ongoing
                                                                    and time-sensitive manner. Websites and social media fur-
                                                                    ther provide places for users to connect, discuss, and share
Transmedia Logics                                                   fan-made media. In a well-designed and executed transme-
There are different “transmedia logics” shaping conver-             dia property, there is a careful balance of new and repeated
gence culture, or ways to think about the flow of content,          information across mediums.
information, and knowledge across media (Jenkins, 2011).
These flexible strategies are leveraged by producers and              Transmedia play is a related but distinct concept from trans-
consumers alike to shape mediated experiences. Some such              media storytelling in that it involves experimentation with
                                                                      and participation in a transmedia experience; but it also


                                                                                                                                      14
applies to media that has no storyline, such as open-ended       ity for interacting with the narrative. As we will discuss in a
videogames. Within the logic of transmedia play, play is         future section of this report, children as young as preschool
approached not as a frivolous activity, but as a meaningful      are included in initiatives to create transmedia for learning.
and important mode of interacting in the world. This way         Transmedia for children similarly reflects beliefs about who
of understanding play is aligned with its definition as a new    children are and what they can do. In particular, when we
media literacy: “the capacity to experiment with the sur-        think about transmedia experiences that support learning
roundings as a form of problem solving” (Jenkins Clinton,        (either by design or incidentally), we see a construction of
Purushotma, Robinson, & Weigel, 2006, p. 35). Writing            the child audience as being made up of interactive, con-
about young children’s play, Vivian Paley (1990), noted that
“there is a tendency to look upon the noisy, repetitious fan-
tasies of children as non-educational, but helicopters and
kittens and superhero capes and Barbie dolls are storytell-
ing aids and conversational tools (p. 39). For children grow-
ing up amidst convergence culture, transmedia experiences
can provide rich sites for exploring, enacting, and learning
through imaginative and productive play.


Transmedia for Children
Transmedia storytelling and play assume an active audience
capable of demonstrating new media literacies—the techni-
cal and social skills Jenkins et al. (2006) have identified as
essential to taking part in participatory cultures. New media    nected, interest-driven learners (Dickson, 2012a; Michael
literacies differ from “traditional” literacies—reading and      Cohen Group, 2012; Pasnik et al., 2011). This notion of the
writing—placing increased value on visual, oral, and aural       (inter)active child user is consistent with new models of
communication as well as on performance, experimenta-            childhood that posit the child as an agent who has rights
tion, and play. The relationship users have to transmedia        and needs, rather than a “work in progress” becoming
experiences is at least partly bounded by the beliefs of         an adult (at which time s/he will have rights and needs)
media producers about the audience’s ability and capac-          (James, Jenks, & Prout, 1998; James & Prout, 1997). Impor-



                                                                                                                                   15
tantly, new models of childhood position children as “active    inexorably linked to consumer culture.
participant[s] in, and impacting upon, a wider social world”
(Marsh, 2010, p. 13) from an early age. Such constructions      Such concerns have not receded in the era of transme-
have supported an understanding of media as an important        dia. Transmedia requires access to multiple media–often
resource in addressing concerns about children’s academic       accenting the problem of the participation gap (that is,
achievement and preparation for future work and civic par-      inequalities in terms of access to resources and opportuni-
ticipation (U.S. Department of Education, 2010).                ties for participation in the new media landscape). Further,
                                                                transmedia asks users to immerse themselves in the story,
The children’s media industry has long focused on ways to       removing critical distance in favor of “immersive aesthet-
reach audiences through multiple channels and has main-         ics” and “pervasive fiction” (Dena, 2004; McGonigal, 2003),
tained a commitment to creating learning opportunities          both of which may be seen as positioning viewers in a
within the different media that children access. One might      particularly vulnerable position. Early attempts at trans-
trace the historical antecedents of transmedia for children     media, which mainly involved reusing the same media on
to the period following World War II, during which factors      different platforms, contribute to ideas about transmedia as
such as free market capitalism, the influx of modern domes-     overly commercialized and without much other benefit. As
tic conveniences, and the availability of affordable mass-      Brenda Laurel (2001), a key figure in the digital arena in the
produced goods in the U.S. altered the amount and type of       1990s and founder of girls’ software company Purple Moon,
cultural materials available to children, particularly paper-   writes:
back books, board games, and other toys (Jenkins, 1998).
                                                                      [T]he transmedia process has thus far consisted
The array of media and products associated with transme-              of repurposing content from one medium for an-
                                                                      other—film to TV, comics to film, dolls and toys
dia properties may bring to mind the “program length com-
                                                                      to videogames, movies to dolls and toys, or mov-
mercials” (animated programs produced to sell toys) that              ies to the Web. In a transmedia world, where
dominated Saturday morning television in the United States            you know from the start that you want to pro-
throughout the 1980s. In Playing with Power, Kinder ac-               duce content that will appear across several
knowledges that these shows helped children “to recognize,            media types and delivery devices, repurposing
                                                                      is an inelegant and inefficient solution (p. 82).
distinguish, and combine different popular genres and their
respective iconography that cut across movies, television,
                                                                An alternative to repurposing content that is better aligned
comic books, commercials, video games, and toys” (p. 47),
                                                                with transmedia is what Mizuko Ito has called “media mix”
but expresses concern that this cognitive development was


                                                                                                                                 16
(Ito, 2008). Ito uses this term to describe “a synergistic      program experience has been enhanced by a transmedia
relationship between multiple media formats, particularly       story The Adventures of the Electric Company on Prankster
animation, comics, video games, and trading card games”         Planet, a serial animated adventure that unfolds across tele-
(p. 403) that she has observed to be particularly strong in     vision, and online comics, games, and videos. Each piece
Japanese children’s media. Japanese media mixes open            of the transmedia story supports a math curriculum while
up story worlds and invite different types of participation.    making unique contributions to the experience of the story.
Using Pokémon as an example, Ito describes how children         Prankster Planet is credited with increasing traffic to the
can “look to the television anime for character and back-       Electric Company website by 432% in 2011 with nearly 3.2
story, create their own trajectories through the content        million visits and 900,000 unique visitors (Dickson, 2012b).
through video games and trading card play, and go to the
Internet to exchange information...” (p. 403).                  Transmedia remains a hotly debated topic in the children’s
                                                                media industry; some producers have invested heavily in its
Laurel (2001) points to a need for children’s media produc-     abilities to engage and communicate with audiences while
ers, designers, and researchers to develop “a methodology       others think it is no more than a buzzword (Getzler, 2011).
for creating core content that can be shaped with equal         Despite this debate, examples of significant investment in
ease and effectiveness for myriad devices and context, in-      transmedia as a strategy for supporting learning through
cluding ones that haven’t been invented yet” (p. 84). Some      media exist. In the next section, we describe a multi-million
producers, both in the U.S. and internationally, have taken     dollar transmedia initiative sponsored by the U.S. Depart-
this challenge to heart, such as the German program Ene         ment of Education. This initiative provides significant sup-
Mene Bu (And It’s Up to You) from Der Kinderkanal ARD/ZDF       port (financial and symbolic) to the project of educational
(KIKA). Ene Mene Bu is a television show for preschoolers       transmedia.
where young children show viewers how they draw, craft,
build, and play. The program also collects images of viewers’
artwork through its online site and incorporates selected
                                                                Ready to Learn Transmedia Initiative
artwork into the show’s graphics.                               In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education awarded three
                                                                grants through its Ready to Learn program to support the
Evidence of the value of experimenting with new methods         development and evaluation of transmedia properties for
for storytelling can be seen in Sesame Workshop’s dynamic       children ages 2-8. The three grants were awarded to sup-
re-launch of the literacy-focused series The Electric Com-      port organizations creating transmedia properties that
pany. Beginning with the show’s third season, the television


                                                                                                                                17
integrate math and literacy curricula for young children. The          as well as formative and summative research reports from
projects, funded through 2015, include: Expanded Learning              the project’s evaluators. In addition to the online site, CPB/
through Transmedia Content, conducted through a partner-               PBS has partnered with 11 public television stations across
ship between the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB)             the country. As demonstration sites for the project, these
and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS); Project LAMP                stations will work to introduce local communities to the
(The Learning Apps Media Partnership), run by the Hispanic             transmedia content through outreach and public awareness
Information and Telecommunications Network, Inc. (HITN);               campaigns, as well as train caregivers and teachers on its
and UMIGO (yoU Make It GO), created by Window to the                   use.
World Communications, Inc. (WTTW).
                                                                      Similarly, Project LAMP focuses transmedia storytelling in
Each of these projects takes a different approach to provid-          new and existing properties. This project aims to produce
ing cross-platform media content to child audiences. For              open educational resources available through a variety of
example, Expanded Learning through Transmedia Content                 platforms from books to television, with an emphasis on
has supported development of                                                                  mobile applications. Again, the math
PBS Kids Lab, a website featuring                                                             and literacy curricula are an impor-
“suites” of cross-platform games
                                        Harry Potter and The 39 Clues are tant part of the transmedia stories
designed for play on computers,         intensive social reading experiences. in this project, providing a particular
various mobile devices, and smart       For many, reading also involves type of story to guide users as they
boards. The suites of games are         participating by creating and circulating navigate across media platforms.
built around popular characters         media         or     information,        making
from PBS Kids programs such as                                                                Whereas Expanded Learning through
Curious George and Dinosaur Train
                                        connections between elements of the Transmedia Content and Project
and allow children to play with the     story found in different media, and LAMP focus on transmedia storytell-
same characters and story worlds        collaborating with other readers.                     ing—following characters across
across devices. The suites are also                                                           platforms and expanding story
linked by math and literacy curriculum, and accompanied                                       worlds, UMIGO emphasizes trans-
by suggested activities for home, school, and out-of-school           media play, a concept we will explore in greater depth in
settings. These suites are bundled with tools for tracking            the next section of this report. Key to UMIGO’s transmedia
learning and modeling content for use in the classroom,               play approach is the way in which stories unfold hand-in-
                                                                      hand with opportunities for children to explore, build, and


                                                                                                                                        18
tinker with digital and physical objects. Tinkering tasks from     •	Transmedia play can promote new approaches to
designing clothing to creating musical mashups are linked            reading
to an early math curriculum. All three projects emphasize
outreach through community organizations. This is accom-            In order to take part in a transmedia play experience,
plished through partnerships with children’s museums and            children must learn to read both written and multimedia
public television stations across the country.                      texts broadly (across multiple media) and deeply (digging
                                                                    into details of the narrative). This kind of reading has been
The Ready to Learn grants provide important support to              described as “transmedia navigation” or “the ability to
theories about the value of transmedia for learning. Fur-           follow the flow of stories and information across multiple
ther, the grants call attention to the needs of low-income          modalities” within the context of the new media literacies
children and English language learners—children who are             (Jenkins et al., 2006, p. 4). Dresang (1999) has noted
not the target audiences for other high-tech transmedia ex-         changes to print books themselves in reaction to the
periences. The projects appear to straddle the line between         new demands and pleasures of reading new media. She
cross-platform and transmedia content. As the content rolls         describes such books as “Radical Change” books—print
out across media formats and demonstration sites, the suc-          books influenced by digital age aesthetics and logics.
cess of the projects as transmedia storytelling and transme-        For example, these books may tell stories in a non-linear
dia play experiences should become more apparent.                   manner or may feature narratives with multiple layers
                                                                    of meaning. More recently, Jenkins (2009) has discussed
                                                                    the concepts of “spreadability” and “drillability” as
Thinking Seriously about Transmedia Play
                                                                    important features of transmedia texts. In order to
The evaluations and research poised to come out of the              navigate transmedia stories, children must learn to cope
Ready to Learn transmedia projects will meet a need for             with spreadability by learning to scan different media to
empirical data about the roles that transmedia might play in        collect bits of a distributed narrative. Drillability requires
learning. Currently, very little of this type of evidence exists    that a child learn research techniques and skills for
(Fisch, Lesh, Motoki, Crespo, & Melfi, 2011). However, in           comprehending complex narratives. Both spreadability
reviewing numerous children’s media properties and the              and drillability leave room for readers to contribute to the
existing popular and scholarly literature about transmedia          unfolding narrative (Jenkins, 2009).
and children, we have identified the following ideas about
transmedia play and learning:



                                                                                                                                     19
In 2011, Scholastic and Ruckus Media announced a              fandom,” or in-depth research and theory-building around
partnership to create a children’s transmedia imprint         the story. Potter fans also have contributed to building
that will publish children’s books across print, e-book,      the transmedia story by creating music, videos, art, and
and enhanced e-book platforms (“Scholastic and Ruckus         podcasts; by writing and publishing fan fiction as well
Media”, 2011). This is certainly not Scholastic’s first       as scholarly papers and books; by hosting conferences
foray into the world of transmedia. Indeed, several of        and performances; and by creating organizations like
the publisher’s top titles for children in the 5-to-11 age    the Harry Potter Alliance (HPA). The HPA works online,
range are examples of transmedia storytelling. This is        in local communities, and in conjunction with schools
certainly not Scholastic’s first foray into the world of
transmedia. Indeed, several of the publisher’s top titles
for children in the five to eleven age range are examples
of transmedia storytelling. The Harry Potter series and The
39 Clues series are two particularly interesting transmedia
examples, in part because of their very different
approaches to transmedia storytelling.

Although not initially conceived as a transmedia
experience, the Harry Potter franchise provides a strong
example of transmedia storytelling. The seven books in
the Potter series act as a “mothership” for a transmedia
property that extends to films, music, toys, clothing, food
items, video games, mobile apps, a theme park, museum
exhibits, and ancillary books. Reading the Potter books       and community organizations to incite action around
is, for many, just one part of the experience. In addition    social justice issues. Through all of these extensions,
to these many official extensions, a vibrant and prolific     the transmedia world of Harry Potter is expanded and
fandom has developed over the 15 or so years since            enriched. Although not every Harry Potter reader engages
the first installment of Harry’s story hit bookshelves.       with all of the transmedia elements of the story, it has
During the wait between books, Potter fans showed             become nearly impossible to experience Potter as “just”
their acumen at what Jason Mittell (2009) calls “forensic     a book series. Navigating the many extensions to the



                                                                                                                         20
narrative and storyworld—including places where the              characteristics of the series that contribute to its strength
Wizarding World and “real” world meet—is an integral             as a transmedia property are the series’ multiple authors,
part of reading Harry Potter.                                    which include many well-known young adult authors
                                                                 with distinct styles. This situates the books within a
Scholastic’s The 39 Clues series was from its inception          larger context of children’s/young adult literature and
designed as a children’s transmedia experience. The 39           contributes to the ways in which the stories can be
Clues currently includes two series of books: 12 books           interpreted. The series also incorporates important
in the original 39 Clues series and six books (so far) in a      historical figures from around the world—from Benjamin
spinoff series called Cahills vs. Vespers. The books tell the    Franklin to Anastasia Romanov, adding to the story’s
story of Amy and Dan Cahill, tween-aged orphans who              sense of alternate reality.
join in their family’s long-standing hunt for the 39 Clues.
Although the books are the basis of the property, reading        Both Harry Potter and The 39 Clues are intensive social
the series involves also engaging with a number of game-         reading experiences. For many, reading also involves
like elements of the story, including finding collectable        participating by creating and circulating media or
cards and participating in an ongoing interactive game           information, making connections between elements of
on the39clues.com. The collectable cards contain clues           the story found in different media, and collaborating
related to the narrative in the books; readers must              with other readers. These four Cs (creating, circulating,
log their cards on the website to track clues and earn           connecting, and collaborating) have been identified
additional cards. The online game is a role-playing game/        as important functions of participatory culture (Reilly,
alternate reality game in which users participate as a           Vartabedian, Felt, & Jenkins, 2012).
member of one branch of the warring Cahill family and
compete with other user-populated families to collect
clues. Taking part in the clue hunt by collecting cards         •	Transmedia play can encourage learning through joint
and participating in the online game are not just nice            media engagement
enhancements to the story; they are essential to the
active reading experience designed into The 39 Clues.            The complex narratives, rich worlds, and multiple
                                                                 points of entry characteristic of transmedia experiences
Further expanding the transmedia experience of The               can provide opportunities for families to experience
39 Clues is a forthcoming movie, which will likely be            transmedia together. Previous research from the Joan
accompanied by new licensed products. Other unique


                                                                                                                                 21
Ganz Cooney Center has investigated “joint media              or reading ancillary books. In these ways, both mother
engagement,” an expansion of the concept of co-viewing        and child are able to share in the transmedia experience
television to include multiple new media platforms            of Star Wars in ways that are appropriate to their
(Stevens & Penuel, 2010). Authors Takeuchi and Stevens        comprehension level and that maximize their enjoyment
(2011) have identified characteristics, challenges, and       of the story.
design strategies related to productive joint media
engagement. As they describe, experiences designed for        Other characteristics of joint media engagement such
productive joint media engagement “can result in deeper       as dialogic inquiry— “collaborating with others to make
understanding, inspiration, greater fluency, and physical,    meaning of situations” (p. 43)—and co-creation—making
emotional, or mental wellbeing than others” (p. 43).          media, physical artifacts, or shared understandings—also
The idea of productive engagement with media, as well         apply to transmedia experiences. The three case studies
as a number of the characteristics and design principles      appearing later in this report are excellent examples of
presented in Takeuchi and Stevens’ report, are salient to     these characteristics as well as of what Takeuchi and
transmedia.                                                   Stevens call “intention to develop” —an orientation toward
                                                              media use in which “at least one partner intends for herself
For example, joint media engagement involves mutual           or a partner to grow through the activity” (p. 44).
engagement—meaning something in the experience
appeals to the diverse partners involved. As Takeuchi and
Stevens note: “Neither partner is bored nor participates     •	Transmedia play can support constructivist learning
out of sheer obligation to the other” (p. 43). Transmedia      goals
with multigenerational appeal, for example, Star Wars,
exemplifies this principle. The broad transmedia narrative    Transmedia play involves exploration, experimentation,
and linked extensions offer multiple opportunities for        and remix, all activities that are firmly aligned with a
users to enter the story and to experience it in ways that    constructivist approach to learning (e.g. Bruner, 1990;
are interesting and engaging to them. For example, a child    Piaget, 1985; Vygotsky, 1978) that emphasizes the
may engage with Star Wars through LEGOs or other toys,        active role of the learner in creating knowledge by
while her mother is drawn to online fandom practices          working to make connections among information in a
such as writing fan fiction. Conjunctive points of their      specific context. Constructivist learning theory has been
participation might exist around watching the movies          influential in much research on digital media and learning,



                                                                                                                             22
which has highlighted the importance of experience and       Learning to Play with Information
active participation in learning activities. An important
part of the construction of knowledge is communicating       Years of research in developmental psychology have high-
one’s ideas and understandings; this is what takes it from   lighted different aspects of play that contribute to children’s
being an individual to social process, thus facilitating     healthy development. In Play, Dreams, and Imitation in
additional connections and deeper understanding.             Childhood (1962), Jean Piaget distinguished between play
                                                             and imitation, describing play as “primarily mere functional
Good transmedia experiences scaffold children’s              or reproductive assimilation,” meaning that a child plays
participation—supporting them through tasks such as          without thought to how her/his play fits with reality. For
asking and answering questions, making connections           example, a block can be used as an airplane without having
between information, creating media, and sharing             to adhere to laws of gravity or aerodynamics. Piaget distin-
creations with others. Such activities, in and of            guishes play from “objective thought,” a hallmark of adult
themselves, are examples of constructivist learning.         cognition, “which seeks to adapt itself to the requirements
When designed with specific constructivist practices         of external reality” (p. 87).
in mind—for example, providing learners with highly
relevant, real-world experiences, emphasizing multiple       Whereas play (and especially imaginative play) aligns with
realities and perspectives, or fostering collaboration and   the process of assimilation, imitation aligns with accom-
co-construction of meaning—transmedia play can be a          modation. When a child recreates activities from real life,
transformative learning experience. As Laura Fleming,        making an effort to portray them accurately, s/he is working
library media specialist and advisor to the transmedia       to change the way s/he thinks about the world. Imitating
project Inanimate Alice, notes, such actions “shift the      a parent kicking a ball while playing soccer or mimicking a
locus of control in learning firmly away from the teacher    media character’s speech or actions are examples of accom-
towards the learner…” thus “morph[ing] the concept           modation. Learning, according to Piaget, happens as chil-
of StoryWorld familiar to transmedia producers, into         dren work toward achieving equilibrium between assimila-
something that is powerful for learning in the digital       tion and accommodation.
age, the Transmedia Learning World (TLW)” (2012, p. 1).
                                                             Lev Vygotsky (1978) emphasized play as a tool for practicing
The case studies presented later in this report exemplify
                                                             behaviors. Importantly, Vygotsky highlighted the value of
Transmedia Learning Worlds.
                                                             play in helping children develop abstract thinking by sepa-
                                                             rating thought and action. Pretend play is especially good
                                                             for the development of abstract thinking, as children must

                                                                                                                               23
learn to reconcile competing realities. As Tsao (2002) sum-          •	 Constructive play involves manipulating objects,
marizes:                                                                building, and designing

       Thinking and acting are no longer simultaneous;               •	 Games with rules show a child’s progression from
       behaviors are no longer driven by objects, but                   an egocentric understanding of the world to
       rather by children’s thinking. By exercising their
                                                                        social play.
       minds through different play behaviors, children
       become capable of using high-level mental func-
       tions (i.e. abstract thinking) to manipulate and             Children’s play rarely is restricted to any one of the above
       monitor thoughts and ideas without direct and               categories; indeed, children engage in different genres of
       immediate reference to the real world. Therefore,           play depending on the circumstances (e.g., locations, play
       play can be an important educational strategy for           partners) and resources (e.g., toys, stories) available.
       facilitating children’s development in cognitive, so-
       cial/emotional, motor and language areas (p. 231).
                                                                   When playing in transmedia universes, people manipulate
                                                                   the different forms of media available across platforms,
The child development literature highlights social and
                                                                   “collecting” the pieces of a narrative—plots, characters, set-
cognitive elements that categorize play. In terms of social
                                                                   tings, and so on—distributed through transmedia storytell-
interaction, play can be solitary, parallel, or social. Solitary
                                                                   ing and world building. People employ these pieces in new
play happens throughout childhood. Parallel play, in which
                                                                   ways and/or explore and experiment in non-narrative but
children play near but not with one another, is typical of
                                                                   alternatively linked cross-platform spaces. For many chil-
toddlers. Social play tends to emerge during the preschool
                                                                   dren, this kind of “mixing and matching” of media is not a
years for typically-developing children.
                                                                   new mode of play; indeed, researchers have long noted the
There are also distinct cognitive characteristics of play:         appropriation of media elements in children’s play (Dyson,
                                                                   1997; Kinder, 1999; Paley, 2005; Seiter, 1993). As children
   •	 Sensorimotor play includes play and exploration              remix media properties through imaginative play, tinkering,
      with objects (movement, banging, shaking, etc.)              experimentation, and creative expression, creating their
                                                                   own rules for how media may be used, they push on the
   •	 Pretend play includes socio-dramatic play                    boundaries defined by institutions and media companies.
      wherein children act out roles and try on
      identities




                                                                                                                                    24
Writing about young readers (age 8-12) of popular (or            Taking a more critical view, Stephen Kline (1993) notes char-
“branded”) fiction, Sekeres (2009) describes an “interplay”      acter play with television characters as a phenomenon that
between the real and the story world:                            is frequently co-opted by marketers in order to sell more
                                                                 toys:
      The tween reader of branded fiction may see, hear,
      write, and, through tangible toy products like action            In character play the mental processes of “expres-
      figures or dolls, manipulate the market child—the                sion” (entailed in the creative encoding which takes
      virtual character imagined through the consump-                  place in a child’s play enactments) and “interpre-
      tion of multiple products associated with a brand—               tation” (the application of social knowledge and
      in ways that expand the imaginative potential of                 media grammar which allows a child to understand
      the character. When tweens interact with other                   television fiction) must be brought into alignment.
      products in the brand and with other real children               The activities of watching television and playing
      in an imaginary or virtual world, their imaginary                with toys have thus become mutually reinforc-
      interplay expands, changes, and codifies storylines              ing: television feeds the child’s social imagination
      and interpretations of the market child. (p. 403)                with knowledge about fictive social universes that
                                                                       only a particular toy can make available for simu-
The three processes noted in this quotation—expanding,                 lated play enactment. The synergy created between
changing, and codifying—are significant to transmedia play,            television and toys through their merger within a
as they represent different modes of participation across              single narrative universe links these separate do-
                                                                       mains of expressive and interpretive experience
media. Just as non-media-based play involves different                 through a common structure of fantasy (p. 323).
modes of participation (e.g. pretend play versus sensorimo-
tor/active play), transmedia play offers multiple opportuni-     Kline’s concern is that children’s play with television charac-
ties to experiment with and participate in a transmedia ex-      ters may be circumscribed by their understandings of televi-
perience. In this way, transmedia play reflects the definition   sion narrative—that is, that television will draw boundaries
of play put forth as one of the new media literacies: “the       for children’s creative play. This is a reasonable concern, as
capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of      television (like all media) is a mix of open texts (allowing
problem solving” (Jenkins et al., 2006, p. 24).                  multiple interpretations) and closed ones (leading readers
                                                                 to a single interpretation) (Eco, 1979). Good transmedia
                                                                 experiences, we argue, primarily consist of open texts, thus
                                                                 creating myriad opportunities to play.




                                                                                                                                   25
A nice example of open-ended transmedia play can be seen           Understanding the characteristics of transmedia play and
in the example of Minecraft, a transmedia experience that          the ways in which it fits within the context of children’s play
is quickly growing in popularity among children and adults         experiences more broadly is one way to give play the atten-
alike. Markus Persson, a developer with the Swedish inde-          tion it needs and deserves. In the next section of this report,
pendent game development studio Mojang, created the                we describe a working set of principles for educators and
game in 2009. As of November 2012, the game boasted 8              producers to consider when building meaningful transmedia
million downloads for PC. Minecraft is, first and foremost,        play experiences.
an open-ended video game that challenges players to build
with virtual blocks. Currently, users can build with 153 differ-
ent kinds of blocks; some are “naturally occurring” within the
Minecraft world, while others are created during gameplay
(“Blocks”, n.d.). Each block has different characteristics and
features. For example, stone blocks can be used to construct
buildings or pathways, while note blocks allow the user to
compose music in-game. Discovering, researching, gathering,
and experimenting with different kinds of blocks, involves
developing and leveraging knowledge of the “natural” prop-
erties of these resources within the world of Minecraft. It
also involves reaching out to various other media resources,
including online videos, wikis, and other websites, to learn
from other players’ experiences. All of these activities can
be described as “tinkering,” casual experimentation with the
intention of learning how something works and/or repairing
it; tinkering has been found to be a useful mode for learning
in formal and informal learning spaces (Kafai & Peppler, 2011;
Guzzetti, Elliot, & Welsch, 2010).




                                                                                                                                     26
Transmedia play is:
                       Mobile
                        Mobility in transmedia play means a num-       Rich worlds that invite exploration, characters that require analy-
                        ber of things: use of mobile technologies;     sis, and clues that need investigation all contribute to replayabil-
                        movement between platforms, media,             ity.
and setting; and causing movement within media themselves. By
linking stories together across platforms, transmedia storytelling
encourages children’s media producers to consider formats other                               Resourceful
than the 11-minute television episode. The remix, appropriation,                              As we have described in earlier sections of
and tinkering characteristic of transmedia play similarly pushes                              this report, transmedia requires participa-
industry creators to consider how children are moving stories,                                tion that is different from that required by
characters, merchandise, and other aspects of a media product          more traditional media. Transmedia consumers are expected to
between platforms in order to create new meanings.                     be active and motivated, skilled in new media literacies, and able
                                                                       to access and navigate ubiquitous connections to networked,
                                                                       convergent media. Another related characteristic is resourceful-
                       Accessible                                      ness, which we define in the context of transmedia play as a
                        The cross-platform nature of many trans-       quality that combines the ability to act with/react to diverse,
                        media experiences gives them a high            challenging situations by thinking creatively about solutions that
                        potential for accessibility. People can jump   leverage any and all available tools and materials, even if that
in to play with transmedia from a variety of starting points and       means pulling from somewhere else or repurposing items.
can define a trajectory that takes into account their own unique
context and access. Accessibility in transmedia play also means
that some experiences become memorable moments that can be                                    Social
accessed in future play. Salient and memorable transmedia experi-                             Transmedia play generally happens in con-
ences can be a valuable resource for learning.                                                versation with others. Other players may
                                                                                              be co-located, or linked through media/
                                                                       technology, as in the case of social media, online communities, or
                      Replayable                                       massively multiplayer online (MMO) games.
                      Many transmedia experiences are large-
                      scale and unfold over time, leading to high
                      potential for replayability as the story is
revealed and revisited. Indeed some transmedia experiences are
so intensive that they require multiple “visits” or interactions.


                                                                                                                                              27
Building Transmedia Play Experiences




Play Partners     Places To Play   Paradigm-shifting Play




                                                            28
Aligned with the Joan Ganz Cooney Center’s mission to           Creative Director, Erin Reilly and advised by USC Annenberg
study the relationship between digital media and the devel-     Professor Henry Jenkins. This design guide also incorporates
opmental needs of children ages 5 to 11, our suggestions        our experiences discussing transmedia storytelling, play,
for building transmedia play experiences target this age        and performance with scholars, researchers, educators, and
range, itself quite diverse. The guiding principles below may   children’s media industry professionals at various children’s
also be a useful starting point for those designing trans-      media and transmedia conferences and meetings.
media play experiences for older or younger groups. Our
principles are summarized by three core themes:                 We believe that children have much to add to the process
                                                                of developing exciting and personally meaningful trans-
  1.	 Play Partners Relationships between producers             media play experiences. Young people can contribute to
      and audiences; conditions for people engaging in          the socio-technological design process in many valuable
      transmedia play together                                  ways through a variety of age-appropriate methods (Druin,
                                                                1999). More work must be done to develop and refine best
  2.	 Places to Play Metaphorically, meaning places             practices for supporting children’s roles as users, testers,
      within a transmedia “universe”; and physically,           informants, and design partners (Druin, 2002) at the inter-
      the environments within which children                    section of participatory culture, participatory learning, and
      participate in transmedia play                            participatory design.

  3.	 Paradigm-shifting Play Or “pattern-shifting               What follows is not intended to be complete or compre-
      play”—modifying pre-existing concepts and                 hensive, but a work-in-progress to which we invite further
      routines to maximize the lasting positive impact          reflection and refinement. Not all of these design principles
      of children’s transmedia play                             must be present in a children’s transmedia play experience
                                                                for learning to occur. However, each component focuses
These principles emerged from the authors’ various experi-      on an important part of the process of making a media text
ences researching and developing experimental, small-scale      “transmediated” and the challenges in producing a trans-
transmedia play experiences. For nearly two years, we had       media play experience whose “final product” will continu-
a regular series of discussions about the relationship be-      ally evolve in the minds, hands, and hearts of audiences.
tween transmedia and learning as part of the USC Annen-
berg Innovation Lab’s Children, Youth, and Media Research-
Design Track, led by the Annenberg Innovation Lab’s



                                                                                                                                29
Play Partners                                                •	Together isn’t always better. While collaboration
                                                               is important and transmedia play is generally a social
   •	Flexible contracts. Adults and children entering          activity, some children may feel more comfortable
     into collaborative transmedia projects together           setting boundaries and engaging in peripheral,
     start off inherently in different positions of power.     parallel, or solitary transmedia play. Spending time
     It can be tricky to navigate from consulting children     with a rich transmedia world doesn’t necessarily need
     to involving children more deeply in design without       to involve partners or parents. Children frequently
     tipping the scales and overburdening them.                imagine partners for their play (with tea parties as
     Beginning a project with a contract—but one with          a classic example); participation in fandom can be a
     wiggle room—opens up possibilities for youth-led          next step in imaginary play, with children imagining
     actions, shared decision making, and partnerships         possible publics with whom they might engage.
     with adults while balancing children’s needs for
     scaffolding and safety.

   •	Sharing transmedia. Kids, often very organically
     come up with conditions for playing together and
     sharing, particularly when using popular culture
     material (e.g., favorite characters, toys, songs) as
     the basis for play. While children may sometimes
     act in the interest of the group and with a notion
     of shared ownership (both online and offline), joint
     media engagement also necessitates children being
     able to identify “that’s mine” and “that’s yours.”
     Issues around individual and collective ownership,
     consumption, creation, and circulation of media
     might also raise issues around what traces children
     leave behind in this process (again, both online and
     offline).




                                                                                                                        30
Places to Play
   •	Environment as third teacher. While teachers and           •	Accessible play places. In both online and offline
     families are children’s primary mentors early in their       play, it is important not only to make the content of
     lives, the thoughtful arrangement of physical space          transmedia play experiences accessible for children
     around a child and around her/his use of media (both         of all abilities, but also to provide a variety of low and
     at home and school) can provoke new ways of looking          high tech tools that enable participation, creation, and
     at the world (Caldwell, 1997). Consider how the              contribution (Alper, Hourcade, & Gilutz, 2012). Make
     physical environment might impact the effectiveness          space for difference in participation online and offline
     of learning through transmedia play in formal and            spaces, including grade-level differences, a range of
     informal educational settings. Also consider how             linguistic backgrounds, and budgetary constraints on
     transmedia play might pop up in unexpected places            schools, families, and communities.
     (e.g., see Caine’s Arcade, below).
                                                                •	Mobility matters. Designers of transmedia play
   •	Strategic mix of positive and negative space.                experiences should be aware of how people spend
     More participatory transmedia properties build               time with media—and if that time is on the go or
     rich worlds for audiences to explore, but minimally          spent in a fixed location. In the Joan Ganz Cooney
     participatory ones leave little opportunity for children     Center’s report on joint media engagement (2011),
     to cause any personally meaningful change or test            authors Takeuchi and Stevens describe the need
     their ever-evolving theories about how the world             for designers to understand the “fit” of any new
     works. Look for “hooks” or ways for less engaged             platform within families’ existing practices. They
     users to focus on dense pre-established narratives           emphasize that technologies must “easily slot
     that hint at later engagement (or “positive space”),         into existing routines, parent work schedules, and
     and for more engaged users to fill in the “negative          classroom practices” (p. 48). Mobile technologies
     space” with their own missing pieces or build out on         are increasingly a part of these practices, as well as
     provided materials (Laurel, 2001; Long, 2007).               many others that are part of families’ everyday lives-
                                                                  -including play. Transmedia play experiences that are
                                                                  flexible and mobile are best able to fit within diverse
                                                                  family practices, routines, and play spaces.




                                                                                                                               31
Paradigm-shifting Play
  •	Mind-blowing experiences. Transmedia play and               and share with children outside of one’s immediate
    storytelling can be paradigm-shifting experiences           geographic area, and the possibility of sharing one’s
    in that they provide gestalt moments that children          ideas or creations publicly and widely are among
    can reflect upon, revisit, and activate later for new       the most compelling features of a transmedia play
    purposes or new stories. These experiences may come         experience. However, with these new opportunities
    all at once (e.g., class field trips, seeing a theatrical   for participation come concerns about safety and
    performance), or coalesce over time. For example,           privacy as children venture into public (or semi-public)
    Sherry Turkle’s book Falling For Science (2008), a          conversations, often for the first time. Transmedia
    collection of essays written by her students at MIT,        producers should carefully consider the benefits and
    includes various accounts of how countless hours            drawbacks of children’s real time versus delayed (and
    spent with LEGO bricks led many of them to see the          moderated) participation, particularly if producers
    scientific world in new ways. Transmedia is partly          wish to incorporate children’s feedback into a
    something that a child consumes, but also something         transmedia play experience in a timely manner and if
    that a child does. Be aware of the everyday, ordinary,      those children are geographically dispersed.
    and mundane of kids’ lives so that the transmedia you
    are making matters.

  •	Playing in real time. New media and, in particular,
    mobile and social media, make it possible for children
    to participate in ongoing, real-time conversations and
    games as part of a transmedia play experience. This
    stands in contrast to the delayed response children,
    even in recent years, may have had with media, such
    as sending letters that might be read on a future
    episode of a television program or waiting for a
    requested toy to arrive in the mail. In many cases,
    providing feedback that changes the progression
    of the experience, having opportunities to connect


                                                                                                                           32
In the section that follows, we look at these principles in      example, Story Pirates work closely with science teachers
action through three extended examples—Caine’s Arcade,           on the classroom level to link arts and literacy content to
Story Pirates, and the prototype for the Flotsam Transmedia      Common Core, national, and state standards.
Experience. Over the past year, we have been observing and
interviewing producers and participants of these transme-       •	None start with TV. A great number of children’s
dia play experiences (Case 1: Caine’s Arcade and Case 2:          media experiences start with television, and many
Story Pirates), as well as applying our theory and research       franchises expand outward from the medium. However,
to the practice of making a transmedia play experience            these examples show how transmedia play can develop
ourselves (Case 3: Flotsam). Each of the three case studies       sometimes unexpectedly out of online video, theater, and
described below represents a different approach to trans-         books.
media play. While Cases 1 and 2 are particularly relevant for
educators, Case 3 is geared towards producers interested in     •	Different stages of development. Some of these
the research and development (R&D) process. The educa-            projects are further along or are more scalable than
tor-focused and producer-focused case studies showcase            others. Much insight is to be gained though from looking
different perspectives on how best to incorporate transme-        at the available resources at any given point during the
dia play principles and the challenges faced in doing so.         course of these projects and the choices that these
                                                                  producers of transmedia play make along the way.
We have chosen to include these examples because of the
following shared characteristics:

•	Literacy and STEM content. Momentum is growing
  among educational experts in support of better
  integrating the humanities, arts, and design thinking
  with the national imperative around science, technology,
  engineering, and math (STEM) education. Each of the
  experiences profiled promotes transmedia play as a way
  to amplify children’s learning, creativity, and curiosity
  about real world environmental and social issues. For



                                                                                                                               33
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play
T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play

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T is for Transmedia: Learning through Transmedia Play

  • 1.
  • 2. Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 Introduction 4 Learning through Transmedia Play 10 Why transmedia and learning? 11 Origins of Transmedia: Key terms and logics 13 Transmedia logics 14 Transmedia for children 15 Ready to Learn Transmedia Initiative 17 Thinking Seriously about Transmedia Play 19 Transmedia play can promote new approaches to reading 19 Transmedia play can encourage learning through joint media engagement 21 Transmedia play can support constructivist learning goals 22 Learning to Play with Information 23 Building Transmedia Play Experiences 28 Examples of Transmedia Play 34 Case 1: Caine’s Arcade 34 Case 2: Story Pirates 39 Case 3: Flotsam Transmedia Experience 43 Future Directions for Research and Development 49 References 51
  • 3. Executive Summary Within the context of a media saturated, hyper-connected, no storyline, such as open-ended videogames. Our explora- and rapidly changing world, the concept of “transmedia” tion of transmedia play and its relationships to learning in has come into the spotlight among those creating and using middle childhood is important and timely as more media media and technology for and with children. Transmedia, producers consider ways to incorporate transmedia into by itself, means “across media” and describes any combina- their creations and as educators increasingly look to new tion of relationships that might exist between the various media as a site for expanded and enhanced learning oppor- texts (analog or digital) that constitute a contemporary tunities. entertainment media experience. In recent years, the texts and practices associated with transmedia have developed Some transmedia experiences for children are designed through active conversations among fan communities, cre- with learning objectives in mind; for others, learning is not ative artists, entertainment industry executives, academic an explicit goal. However, even without overt “educational scholars, policy makers, and others interested in the future content,” transmedia offers numerous opportunities for of entertainment and storytelling. learning. The complex, interconnected, and dynamic narra- tives and vibrant story worlds characteristic of transmedia In this report, we focus on transmedia in the lives of chil- provide fertile sites for children to explore, experiment, and dren aged aged 5 to 11 and its applications to storytelling, oftentimes contribute as story worlds unfold across media. play, and learning. As educators, researchers, and designers, The multi-modal, multi-sited nature of many transmedia we are interested in the ways in which transmedia can be productions challenge children to use varied textual, visual, a resource for learning through participation, experimenta- and media literacy skills to decode and remix media ele- tion, expression—and, in particular, through play. We will ments. In these ways, the active, ongoing, creative engage- discuss both transmedia storytelling and transmedia play, a ment with complex stories required of participants in a related but distinct concept from transmedia storytelling in transmedia play experience stands in contrast to the rou- that it involves experimentation with and participation in a tine, decontextualized learning that, unfortunately, all too transmedia experience, but also applies to media that has often characterizes children’s experiences in school. 1
  • 4. Transmedia, done well, can contribute to an immersive, re- In order to take part in a transmedia play sponsive, learner-centered learning environment rich with experience, children must learn to read both information and linked to children’s existing knowledge and written and multimedia texts broadly (across experiences. It can build upon what children already know multiple media) and deeply (digging into details about playing games, telling stories, and sharing media. of the narrative). This kind of reading has been While transmedia does not have to privilege new media described as “transmedia navigation” or “the technologies, leveraging new media in creative and acces- ability to follow the flow of stories and information sible ways in order to facilitate sharing and communication across multiple modalities” within the context among participants or to provide frequent and personalized of the new media literacies (Jenkins, Clinton, formative feedback can be valuable for enhancing the learn- Purushotma, Robinson, & Weigel, 2006, p. 4). ing environment. • Transmedia play can encourage learning through joint media engagement. Learning with Transmedia We believe that transmedia has the potential to be a valu- The complex narratives, rich worlds, and multiple able tool for expanded learning that addresses some of the points of entry characteristic of transmedia most pressing challenges facing education today. Through experiences can provide opportunities for immersive, interconnected, and dynamic narratives, trans- families to experience transmedia together. media engages multiple literacies, including textual, visual, and media literacies, as well as multiple intelligences. It • Transmedia play can support constructivist is highly engaging and allows for important social sharing learning goals. among collaborators. Transmedia play involves exploration, In reviewing numerous children’s media properties and the experimentation, and remix, all activities firmly existing popular and scholarly literature about transmedia aligned with a constructivist approach to learning and children, we have identified the following key links be- (e.g. Bruner, 1990; Piaget, 1985; Vygotsky, 1978) tween transmedia and learning: that emphasizes the active role of the learner in creating knowledge by working to make • Transmedia play can promote new approaches connections among information in a specific to reading. context. 2
  • 5. Characteristics of Transmedia Play Building Transmedia Play Experiences We highlight five characteristics of transmedia play that We present three core principles for building transmedia make it useful for learning: play experiences: • Resourceful: The ability to act with/react to 1. Play Partners: Relationships between producers diverse, challenging situations by thinking and audiences; conditions for people engaging in creatively about solutions that leverage any and transmedia play together all available tools and materials 2. Places to Play: Metaphorically, meaning places • Social: Conversing with others who may be co- within a transmedia “universe”; and physically, located or linked through media/technology, as in the environments within which children the case of social media or virtual worlds participate in transmedia play • Mobile: Use of mobile technologies, movement 3. Paradigm-shifting Play: Modifying pre-existing between platforms/media, and causing concepts and routines to maximize the lasting movement within media themselves positive impact of children’s transmedia play • Accessible: The ability to jump in from a variety of starting points and define a trajectory that takes into account people’s own unique contexts and We offer three extended examples of transmedia play expe- types of access riences that support these core principles: the emergence of Caine’s Arcade, the work of the Story Pirates, and the • Replayable: Enticing people to revisit, explore, Flotsam Transmedia Experience. and investigate rich worlds so intensive that they require multiple “visits” 3
  • 6. Introduction by Henry Jenkins There is a monster at the end of this report (well, maybe such a powerful learning system. In a 2007 online poll, the there is, but you won’t know for sure until you turn all of American Education Association voted The Monster at the the pages and read what we have to say). End of this Book onto a list of “Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children.” A few years later, the School Library Journal gave But, it is telling that most of you probably recognize this it a prominent spot on its list of the Top 100 picture books. phrase as a reference to a classic children’s book, written by Jon Stone, illustrated by Michael Smollen, released in 1971 just a few years after Sesame Street debuted on PBS, and “starring lovable, furry old Grover.” Much has been made of the ways that Sesame Street reinvented children’s televi- sion, embracing rather than running away from the proper- ties of its medium, incorporating tricks from advertising, parodies of popular culture, songs and skits, into something which encouraged the active engagement of its young viewers. Yet, far less has been made of the fact that Sesame Street from the very start encouraged its young fans to follow it across media platforms—from television to re- cords, books, stuffed toys, public performances, feature films, and much more. Certainly, the then-Children’s Televi- sion Workshop’s steps in that direction were cautious, given the anxieties many parents have about the commercializa- tion of children’s culture. But, over time, much of the American public came to embrace those experiments in transmedia storytelling as part of what made Sesame Street image credit: Sesame Workshop 4
  • 7. Part of what makes The Monster at the End of this Book so not want to exclude adults from the fun—reading books to- compelling is that it is as reflexive about the nature of the gether across generations is perhaps the most powerful way printed book as a medium as Sesame Street was about our to foster a deeper appreciation of the pleasures of reading. experiences of watching and learning from television. Read- But, Sesame Street has always understood that children do ing this book becomes a kind of play as children scream not enjoy equal opportunities to learn. Some children are with a mixture of fear and delight as we turn each page, left on their own while their parents work long hours. Some wondering when the scary monster is going to appear, only parents do not have good models for active reading with to discover that it is “lovable furry old Grover” who is the their children and look for prompts that might allow them monster we warmly welcome at the end of the book. Gro- to learn how to play and perform and speculate around the ver tries to do everything he can to block us from turning printed page. The experience of an e-book version of The the pages, from tying knots to constructing brick walls, from Monster at the End of this Book will ideally supplement and begging to haranguing us, yet the desire to read overcomes scaffold the experience of reading the traditional picture all of the walls he might try to erect. The children’s book book, not replace it, but it also adds a new layer to the ever has long been a site for domestic performance, as parents expanding “supersystem” which constitutes the world of and children alike try out different voices, make sound ef- Sesame Street. So does The Putamayo Kids Presents Sesame fects, and respond with mock emotions, to the pictures on Street Playground, a CD/DVD set which shares with children the page. songs from the many versions of the program which have been localized to languages and cultures around the world, This book had effects that go beyond the printed page: and video clips featuring the original casts in India, Mexico, Grover emerged as an early fan favorite on Sesame Street Russia, or South Africa. And Sesame Street, the longest as his personality took shape across platforms. When young street in the world, just keeps growing. people pick up The Monster at the End of this Book, they already know who Grover is, they know his back story, they Today, we might describe Sesame Street as a transmedia understand his motivations, they identify with what he is experience—that concept did not exist in 1971 when The feeling, and as a result, there is an immediacy about our Monster at the End of this Book was first published. Trans- experience of this book. media is an idea that has come into sharper focus over the past decade, having emerged from active conversations be- Predictably enough, The Monster at the End of this Book tween academic researchers, creative artists, policy makers, has in recent years evolved into a digital book, an interac- fan communities, anyone and everyone interested in the tive experience children have on their iPad. We certainly do 5
  • 8. future of entertainment and storytelling. Transmedia, by suggest how much he means to the larger Sesame Street itself, means “across media” and it describes any number of community. Neither example builds on extensive narra- possible relationships that might exist between the various tive information that must be remembered across differ- texts that constitute a contemporary entertainment fran- ent texts—that would not necessarily be appropriate for chise. Marsha Kinder (1991), a media scholar who has writ- younger viewers—but it does reward fans who apply what ten extensively about children’s media, coined the term, they learned in one context to each new appearance of the “transmedia,” to refer to the “entertainment supersystem” characters. which had emerged around charac- ters such as the Teenage Mutant Ninja In a hunting society, children learn by Each of these texts contributes Turtles, the Muppet Babies, or the playing with bows and arrows. In an something to our knowledge of Super Mario Brothers, as personali- this fictional realm, and each takes ties and characters that move across information society, they learn to play advantage of those things their media platforms, encouraging their with information. respective medium does best. We fans to follow them wherever they want the depiction of Oscar or appeared. In my own work (Jenkins, 2006), I extended her Cookie Monster or the Count in a Sesame Street game to concept to talk about transmedia storytelling, which refers be consistent with what we see on television, but we also to the systematic unfolding of elements of a story world want the game to provide us with an interactive experience across multiple media platforms, with each platform mak- that is only possible in digital media. By combining media ing a unique and original contribution to the experience as with different affordances, we create a more layered enter- a whole. tainment experience. Or at least, that’s the theory. A good transmedia narrative uses these various cross-platform The Monster at the End of the Book builds off what we know extensions to flesh out the world, to extend the timeline, to of Grover on television but it creates a new kind of experi- deepen our familiarity with the characters, and to increase ence that takes advantage of the distinctive affordances of our engagement. the printed book, which is designed to be read aloud in the child’s bedroom or playroom. The feature film Follow that With an educational property like Sesame Street, transme- Bird (1985) expands upon the time we get to spend with Big dia does something else—it reinforces the learning both by Bird while watching the television series in order to flesh encouraging us to reread and re-experience a particularly out his backstory, situate him within a quest narrative, and pleasurable narrative (something, as we all know, kids are often inclined to do with little or no adult encouragement) 6
  • 9. and readers are invited to connect together pieces of infor- the sea, the universe beyond the Earth, the ancient world, mation across multiple installments. In his book, The Tip- the people who live on the other side of the planet—which ping Point, Malcolm Gladwell (2000) describes the original are central to our desired curriculum. Perhaps, the best way Sesame Street as “sticky,” suggesting that young people be- to learn about them is to explore their stories, their envi- come so drawn to its vivid characters that they keep coming ronments, across media platforms, much as we acquire a back for more and in the process, these repeated encoun- deeper affection for Grover through repeated encounters. ters reinforce what they learn from its curricular design. Like any other kind of storytelling, transmedia is something Transmedia encourages additive comprehension. We learn that can be done well or badly. You can be attentive to the something new as we follow the story across media. This possibilities of expanding a story in new directions or you distinguishes it from cross-media, which refers to the use of can simply slap a logo on something and pretend like it’s these other media platforms as simple delivery mechanisms part of the same franchise. Transmedia can be enriching or for the same old content. If we watch Sesame Street online exploitative, can be motivated by the crudest of economic or on a DVD and change nothing else about the content, motives or shaped by the most cutting edge learning sci- that’s cross-media. We might also distinguish transmedia ence. But, when transmedia is done well, it creates a deeply from multimedia. Multimedia might use multiple kinds engaging, immersive experience, which multiplies the num- of media—words, pictures, sounds, videos—which are ber of learning opportunities. brought together in a single package: in the old days, there might be a CD-ROM developed around Sesame Street, Young people do not simply consume transmedia narra- where clicking a button opens us up to a range of different tives; rather, transmedia encourages playful participation. kinds of media. In transmedia, there’s something power- In my book, Convergence Culture (2006), I talk about attrac- ful about how the reader is incited to search out dispersed tors (things that draw together an audience) and activa- content and reassemble it into a meaningful mental model. tors (elements which give the audience something to do, especially in a network society, ways to interact with each In a hunting society, children learn by playing with bows and other around the shared content). Narrative-inflected play arrows. In an information society, they learn to play with in- is hardly new. Go back and reread the great children’s books formation. That’s part of why we think transmedia learning of the 19th century. There’s Meg in Little Women develop- is such a compelling concept. A science fiction writer has to ing a backyard game based on Pilgrim’s Progress. There’s construct a world which can extend across media platforms, Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s novel pretending to be a pirate but there already exist many rich worlds—the world under or Robin Hood. There’s Anne, she of the Green Gables, who 7
  • 10. re-enacts the story of the Lady in the Lake. Each of these about or manipulating Grover, they become the monster–– books remind us that children before the era of mass media and again, that’s a valuable experience. The child psycholo- actively engaged with stories told to them by adults and gist Bruno Bettelheim (1976) tells us that young people transformed them into resources for their own creative need to read stories which acknowledge the monstrous, play. In the 20th century, mass media displaced many tradi- because children know that they are not always good and tional forms of storytelling, but children’s play with narra- they need resources for thinking through how they should tive remained meaningful as a way of trying on adult roles respond to the things that frighten them in the real world. and expanding core stories that matter to them. And this is what this report means by transmedia play. Certainly, adults have some legitimate worries about commercial media “colonizing” their children’s imaginations, but keep in mind that the human imagination feeds upon the culture around it and children show enormous capacity to re-imagine the stories that enter their lives. Transmedia encourages this kind of creative reworking. The scattered fragments of a transmedia story are like pieces of a puzzle; they encourage curiosity, exploration, experi- mentation, and problem solving. Transmedia’s process of dispersal creates gaps that require our active speculation: some call this negative capability. Transmedia processes show us that there are more than one way to tell story, that there is always more we can learn about the characters and So, there you have the core concepts of this report—trans- their world, and that such insights encourage us to imagine media stories, transmedia play, transmedia learning. Put aspects of these characters that have not yet made it to the them all together and something magical happens. screen. Young people make these stories their own through their active imaginations. The stuffed toy becomes their Transmedia is not the monster at the end of the book; it’s avatar: they use it as a stand-in for some other powerful not something you need to be afraid of encountering. So figure in their lives. For a short moment, as they are reading far, we know more about transmedia in entertainment and branding contexts than in relation to learning. That’s not a 8
  • 11. reason to take off running down the street. That’s a reason for people who care deeply about insuring the most diverse learning opportunities for our children to take transmedia seriously, to try to understand how to link multiple media together to create new pedagogical experiences, to be ready to play together around the materials of a transme- dia franchise, to invite children to explore what it means to read a story across the borders and boundaries between different texts and different media. This report offers some rich exemplars of groups who are doing well by children through their creation of powerful and transformative transmedia experiences, and it offers some design princi- ples so that educators and producers might generate more meaningful, even mind blowing, transmedia experiences for the coming generation. 9
  • 12. Learning Through Transmedia Play by Becky Herr-Stephenson and Meryl Alper with Erin Reilly In this report, we survey transmedia products and experi- complex connections between information, leading to ences designed for children, focusing on products designed learning that is deeply meaningful. for children ages 5 to 11. We are interested in how trans- media can be a resource for learning through participation, Some transmedia experiences for children are designed experimentation, expression and, in particular, through with learning objectives in mind; for others, learning is not play. In the introduction, Henry Jenkins discusses the “play- an explicit goal. However, even without overt “educational ful participation” encouraged by transmedia narratives. content,” transmedia offers numerous opportunities for Through transmedia play, children explore, enjoy, and remix learning. The complex, interconnected, and dynamic narra- elements from diverse media—for example, characters, tives and vibrant story worlds characteristic of transmedia settings, and plot elements taken from books, television, provide fertile sites for children to explore, experiment, and videos, toys, and new media. This “creative reworking” (in oftentimes contribute as story worlds unfold across media. Jenkins’ terms) allows children to tell new stories, work The multi-modal, multi-sited nature of many transmedia through problems, and share with others. productions challenge children to use varied textual, visual, and media literacy skills to decode and remix media ele- As we will discuss in more detail in later sections of the ments. In these ways, the active, ongoing, creative engage- report, we believe that transmedia play has several charac- ment with complex stories required of participants in a teristics that are highly supportive of learning. First, trans- transmedia play experience stands in contrast to the rou- media play can support new approaches to reading across tine, decontextualized learning that, unfortunately, all too media, helping children develop broad literacy skills neces- often characterizes children’s experiences in school. sary to navigate a media-saturated society; second, trans- media play can foster co-learning among children, peers, Transmedia, done well, can contribute to an immersive, re- parents, and other adults through joint media engagement sponsive, learner-centered learning environment rich with (Takeuchi & Stevens, 2011); and third, transmedia play can information and linked to children’s existing knowledge and encourage learners to construct understanding and draw experiences. It can build upon what children already know 10
  • 13. about playing games, telling stories, and sharing media. transmedia within the children’s media industry to the pres- While transmedia does not have to privilege new media ence of producers who grew up in an age of “ubiquitous technologies, leveraging new media in creative and acces- but discontinuous content… bouncing medium to medium, sible ways in order to facilitate sharing and communication while longing for a connective thread” (2012, pp. 1-2). Now among participants or to provide in positions of power in the indus- frequent and personalized formative The multi-modal, multi-sited nature of try with access to multiple new feedback can be valuable for en- media tools and platforms, this new hancing the learning environment. many transmedia productions challenge generation of producers can craft We have carefully selected the ex- children to use varied textual, visual, the transmedia experiences they amples and case studies presented and media literacy skills to decode and have long desired and imagined. As later in this report to demonstrate remix media elements. Kleeman notes: “Suddenly, it seems, both old- and new-media approach- the world of ‘transmedia’ isn’t just es to transmedia play. Despite these a buzzword, or even necessary to differences, we believe that all the examples demonstrate say [within the children’s media industry]. It has seeped into how transmedia play acknowledges children’s cultural mainstream culture, not only surrounding the audience, but participation, respects children’s thoughts and feelings, and coming from the audience” (2012, p. 2). builds up and upon 21st century literacies. Our second reason for considering relationships between transmedia and learning is related to trends in education. It Why transmedia and learning? is well documented that public schools in the U.S. are strug- We have chosen to investigate transmedia and learning gling to keep up with their students’ needs—whether they at this time for two reasons: First, although transmedia is are supplemental literacy supports for struggling readers or not a new concept, it has in recent years become a regular enrichment activities for advanced students. Throughout practice within the children’s media industry. As we will the United States, school districts are challenged to stretch describe in later sections of this report, numerous children’s shrinking budgets; and, while changes to the No Child Left media producers have been experimenting with transme- Behind (NCLB) Act have been authorized and implemented dia narratives built around books, television programs, and in some states, the accountability movement that links interactive media. David Kleeman, President of the Ameri- student performance on standardized tests to school fund- can Center for Children and Media, attributes the rise of ing continues to trouble the climate in schools. Within this 11
  • 14. context, many school districts are looking to media and opportunities, and empowerment for some marginalized technology for solutions to provide additional support to groups (p. 12). students, from instructional technologies such as interac- tive white boards to school services such as online credit In the sections that follow, we explore a variety of transme- recovery classes. In addition to the efforts from schools dia properties for children, looking at how children learn themselves, numerous organizations have leveraged media and play with these media. We highlight five characteristics and technology in creative ways to provide expanded learn- of transmedia play that make it useful for learning. We then ing opportunities to students. Expanded learning includes present three core principles for designing transmedia play informal learning experiences that take place in non-school spaces such as afterschool programs, libraries, museums, or online communities. We believe that transmedia has the potential to be a valu- able tool for expanded learning that addresses some of the most pressing challenges facing education today. Through immersive, interconnected, and dynamic narratives, trans- media engages multiple literacies, including textual, visual, and media literacies, as well as multiple intelligences. It is highly engaging and allows for important social sharing among collaborators. We see a strong connection between transmedia play and the practices and settings conducive to “connected learning,” a concept put forth by a MacArthur Foundation-funded research network and defined as learn- experiences before presenting extended examples that ing that is “socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented support the principles. In the final section of the report, we toward educational, economic, or political opportunity” sketch out a research and development agenda in this area. (Ito et al., 2013, p. 4). Media use, production, and sharing First, however, we present a brief discussion covering the are essential parts of connected learning. New media in basics of transmedia. We recognize that the interdisciplin- particular are thought to support engagement, self-expres- ary nature of transmedia, as well as the enthusiasm with sion, social support for interests, access to unique learning which it has been adopted by different sectors, has poten- tial to create confusion through differences in language and 12
  • 15. grounding theories. For this reason, we wish to present the of delivery than about the process by which audiences and origins, key terms, and logics of transmedia that shape this producers shape content and negotiate meanings. Multi- report. media emphasizes the number of different types of expres- sion used within a given project, while transmedia focuses on the way a project is dispersed across multiple media Origins of Transmedia: Key Terms and Logics platforms without privileging one combination of media Multiple theoretical principles and historical precedents platforms over another. Multimedia is separate too from have formed the foundation for contemporary conversa- the idea of “multimodality,” or a range of possible modes of tions about transmedia. The word “transmedia” on its expression across various systems of representation (Kress, own simply means “across media.” Different scholars have 2003). focused on “intertextuality,” or ways that media cross be- tween boundaries. Cinema scholar Marsha Kinder (1991) For a work to be a transmedia story, the storytelling process first wrote about “transmedia intertextuality” in the late needs to combine multimodality with radical intertextual- 1980s, defining it as “the intertextual relations between ity. For example, one way of combining radical intertextual- television and cinema as compatible members of the same ity with multimodality would be the characters, plots, and ever-expanding supersystem of mass entertainment” events dispersed across multiple comic book titles, mov- (p. 40). Literary critic Julia Kristeva (1986) also discusses ies, and TV series within the DC or Marvel universes. Each media and intertextuality, using “intertextuality writ large” medium has a different range of possible affordances and to describe the uncoordinated but complex relationships different constraints around what kind of transmedia story between texts that influence and reference one another. can be told across it (Dena, 2009; Gomez, 2010). This way of Jenkins (2011) explores what he terms “radical intertextuali- distinguishing transmedia from other modes of storytelling ty,” or “a movement across texts or across textual structures emphasizes that networks of people (e.g., audiences and within the same medium.” producers, individually and collaboratively), technology, and institutions all have the potential power to influence the Those who use the term transmedia to describe their work stories we consume, create, and share using media. sometimes use it interchangeably with “multimedia” or “cross-platform.” While these terms describe related con- Historically, transmedia entertainment is not a new industry cepts, using them as synonyms elides important differences. development, despite its recent official recognition by the As a concept, cross-platform tells us more about the means Producers Guild of America (“PGA Board”, 2010). The idea of a fictional franchise existing across multiple platforms is 13
  • 16. fairly old. For example, modern serialized “webisodes” on logics might include transmedia branding, transmedia activ- the Internet have generic roots in newspapers and maga- ism, transmedia ritual, or transmedia play. zines through the unfolding fictional narratives of Charles Dickens in the 19th century (Hayward, 1997). The ways Transmedia storytelling (Jenkins, 2006) is, at the time of these narratives unfold, however, has evolved over time. this writing, the most robustly theorized logic of transme- “Old” media and established ways of audiences engaging dia. Transmedia stories are, at their most basic level, nar- with media are not being displaced by the introduction of ratives experienced across multiple media. Jenkins (2007) new media platforms, as expressed in the digital revolution defines transmedia storytelling as “a process where integral paradigm of the 1990s (Negroponte, elements of a fiction get dispersed 1995). Instead, the function and Through immersive, interconnected, systematically across multiple de- status of older platforms continually livery channels for the purpose of shift (Gitelman, 2006), as articulated and dynamic narratives, transmedia creating a unified and coordinated by the concept of “convergence engages multiple literacies, including entertainment experience.” The culture” (Jenkins, 2006). These textual, visual, and media literacies, as specific properties of each me- shifts are partly possible because of well as multiple intelligences. dium—from television to websites the interconnectivity, layering, and to social media—are leveraged to diversification of networked com- shape the way in which the story munication. New media has not brought about transmedia unfolds. For example, books and television episodes are practices, but it has certainly enhanced the circulation or useful for conveying large amounts of information about a “spreadability” of content at all levels of culture (Jenkins, story’s plot and characters, while websites make it possible Ford, & Green, 2013). for producers and users to add on to the story in an ongoing and time-sensitive manner. Websites and social media fur- ther provide places for users to connect, discuss, and share Transmedia Logics fan-made media. In a well-designed and executed transme- There are different “transmedia logics” shaping conver- dia property, there is a careful balance of new and repeated gence culture, or ways to think about the flow of content, information across mediums. information, and knowledge across media (Jenkins, 2011). These flexible strategies are leveraged by producers and Transmedia play is a related but distinct concept from trans- consumers alike to shape mediated experiences. Some such media storytelling in that it involves experimentation with and participation in a transmedia experience; but it also 14
  • 17. applies to media that has no storyline, such as open-ended ity for interacting with the narrative. As we will discuss in a videogames. Within the logic of transmedia play, play is future section of this report, children as young as preschool approached not as a frivolous activity, but as a meaningful are included in initiatives to create transmedia for learning. and important mode of interacting in the world. This way Transmedia for children similarly reflects beliefs about who of understanding play is aligned with its definition as a new children are and what they can do. In particular, when we media literacy: “the capacity to experiment with the sur- think about transmedia experiences that support learning roundings as a form of problem solving” (Jenkins Clinton, (either by design or incidentally), we see a construction of Purushotma, Robinson, & Weigel, 2006, p. 35). Writing the child audience as being made up of interactive, con- about young children’s play, Vivian Paley (1990), noted that “there is a tendency to look upon the noisy, repetitious fan- tasies of children as non-educational, but helicopters and kittens and superhero capes and Barbie dolls are storytell- ing aids and conversational tools (p. 39). For children grow- ing up amidst convergence culture, transmedia experiences can provide rich sites for exploring, enacting, and learning through imaginative and productive play. Transmedia for Children Transmedia storytelling and play assume an active audience capable of demonstrating new media literacies—the techni- cal and social skills Jenkins et al. (2006) have identified as essential to taking part in participatory cultures. New media nected, interest-driven learners (Dickson, 2012a; Michael literacies differ from “traditional” literacies—reading and Cohen Group, 2012; Pasnik et al., 2011). This notion of the writing—placing increased value on visual, oral, and aural (inter)active child user is consistent with new models of communication as well as on performance, experimenta- childhood that posit the child as an agent who has rights tion, and play. The relationship users have to transmedia and needs, rather than a “work in progress” becoming experiences is at least partly bounded by the beliefs of an adult (at which time s/he will have rights and needs) media producers about the audience’s ability and capac- (James, Jenks, & Prout, 1998; James & Prout, 1997). Impor- 15
  • 18. tantly, new models of childhood position children as “active inexorably linked to consumer culture. participant[s] in, and impacting upon, a wider social world” (Marsh, 2010, p. 13) from an early age. Such constructions Such concerns have not receded in the era of transme- have supported an understanding of media as an important dia. Transmedia requires access to multiple media–often resource in addressing concerns about children’s academic accenting the problem of the participation gap (that is, achievement and preparation for future work and civic par- inequalities in terms of access to resources and opportuni- ticipation (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). ties for participation in the new media landscape). Further, transmedia asks users to immerse themselves in the story, The children’s media industry has long focused on ways to removing critical distance in favor of “immersive aesthet- reach audiences through multiple channels and has main- ics” and “pervasive fiction” (Dena, 2004; McGonigal, 2003), tained a commitment to creating learning opportunities both of which may be seen as positioning viewers in a within the different media that children access. One might particularly vulnerable position. Early attempts at trans- trace the historical antecedents of transmedia for children media, which mainly involved reusing the same media on to the period following World War II, during which factors different platforms, contribute to ideas about transmedia as such as free market capitalism, the influx of modern domes- overly commercialized and without much other benefit. As tic conveniences, and the availability of affordable mass- Brenda Laurel (2001), a key figure in the digital arena in the produced goods in the U.S. altered the amount and type of 1990s and founder of girls’ software company Purple Moon, cultural materials available to children, particularly paper- writes: back books, board games, and other toys (Jenkins, 1998). [T]he transmedia process has thus far consisted The array of media and products associated with transme- of repurposing content from one medium for an- other—film to TV, comics to film, dolls and toys dia properties may bring to mind the “program length com- to videogames, movies to dolls and toys, or mov- mercials” (animated programs produced to sell toys) that ies to the Web. In a transmedia world, where dominated Saturday morning television in the United States you know from the start that you want to pro- throughout the 1980s. In Playing with Power, Kinder ac- duce content that will appear across several knowledges that these shows helped children “to recognize, media types and delivery devices, repurposing is an inelegant and inefficient solution (p. 82). distinguish, and combine different popular genres and their respective iconography that cut across movies, television, An alternative to repurposing content that is better aligned comic books, commercials, video games, and toys” (p. 47), with transmedia is what Mizuko Ito has called “media mix” but expresses concern that this cognitive development was 16
  • 19. (Ito, 2008). Ito uses this term to describe “a synergistic program experience has been enhanced by a transmedia relationship between multiple media formats, particularly story The Adventures of the Electric Company on Prankster animation, comics, video games, and trading card games” Planet, a serial animated adventure that unfolds across tele- (p. 403) that she has observed to be particularly strong in vision, and online comics, games, and videos. Each piece Japanese children’s media. Japanese media mixes open of the transmedia story supports a math curriculum while up story worlds and invite different types of participation. making unique contributions to the experience of the story. Using Pokémon as an example, Ito describes how children Prankster Planet is credited with increasing traffic to the can “look to the television anime for character and back- Electric Company website by 432% in 2011 with nearly 3.2 story, create their own trajectories through the content million visits and 900,000 unique visitors (Dickson, 2012b). through video games and trading card play, and go to the Internet to exchange information...” (p. 403). Transmedia remains a hotly debated topic in the children’s media industry; some producers have invested heavily in its Laurel (2001) points to a need for children’s media produc- abilities to engage and communicate with audiences while ers, designers, and researchers to develop “a methodology others think it is no more than a buzzword (Getzler, 2011). for creating core content that can be shaped with equal Despite this debate, examples of significant investment in ease and effectiveness for myriad devices and context, in- transmedia as a strategy for supporting learning through cluding ones that haven’t been invented yet” (p. 84). Some media exist. In the next section, we describe a multi-million producers, both in the U.S. and internationally, have taken dollar transmedia initiative sponsored by the U.S. Depart- this challenge to heart, such as the German program Ene ment of Education. This initiative provides significant sup- Mene Bu (And It’s Up to You) from Der Kinderkanal ARD/ZDF port (financial and symbolic) to the project of educational (KIKA). Ene Mene Bu is a television show for preschoolers transmedia. where young children show viewers how they draw, craft, build, and play. The program also collects images of viewers’ artwork through its online site and incorporates selected Ready to Learn Transmedia Initiative artwork into the show’s graphics. In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education awarded three grants through its Ready to Learn program to support the Evidence of the value of experimenting with new methods development and evaluation of transmedia properties for for storytelling can be seen in Sesame Workshop’s dynamic children ages 2-8. The three grants were awarded to sup- re-launch of the literacy-focused series The Electric Com- port organizations creating transmedia properties that pany. Beginning with the show’s third season, the television 17
  • 20. integrate math and literacy curricula for young children. The as well as formative and summative research reports from projects, funded through 2015, include: Expanded Learning the project’s evaluators. In addition to the online site, CPB/ through Transmedia Content, conducted through a partner- PBS has partnered with 11 public television stations across ship between the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) the country. As demonstration sites for the project, these and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS); Project LAMP stations will work to introduce local communities to the (The Learning Apps Media Partnership), run by the Hispanic transmedia content through outreach and public awareness Information and Telecommunications Network, Inc. (HITN); campaigns, as well as train caregivers and teachers on its and UMIGO (yoU Make It GO), created by Window to the use. World Communications, Inc. (WTTW). Similarly, Project LAMP focuses transmedia storytelling in Each of these projects takes a different approach to provid- new and existing properties. This project aims to produce ing cross-platform media content to child audiences. For open educational resources available through a variety of example, Expanded Learning through Transmedia Content platforms from books to television, with an emphasis on has supported development of mobile applications. Again, the math PBS Kids Lab, a website featuring and literacy curricula are an impor- “suites” of cross-platform games Harry Potter and The 39 Clues are tant part of the transmedia stories designed for play on computers, intensive social reading experiences. in this project, providing a particular various mobile devices, and smart For many, reading also involves type of story to guide users as they boards. The suites of games are participating by creating and circulating navigate across media platforms. built around popular characters media or information, making from PBS Kids programs such as Whereas Expanded Learning through Curious George and Dinosaur Train connections between elements of the Transmedia Content and Project and allow children to play with the story found in different media, and LAMP focus on transmedia storytell- same characters and story worlds collaborating with other readers. ing—following characters across across devices. The suites are also platforms and expanding story linked by math and literacy curriculum, and accompanied worlds, UMIGO emphasizes trans- by suggested activities for home, school, and out-of-school media play, a concept we will explore in greater depth in settings. These suites are bundled with tools for tracking the next section of this report. Key to UMIGO’s transmedia learning and modeling content for use in the classroom, play approach is the way in which stories unfold hand-in- hand with opportunities for children to explore, build, and 18
  • 21. tinker with digital and physical objects. Tinkering tasks from • Transmedia play can promote new approaches to designing clothing to creating musical mashups are linked reading to an early math curriculum. All three projects emphasize outreach through community organizations. This is accom- In order to take part in a transmedia play experience, plished through partnerships with children’s museums and children must learn to read both written and multimedia public television stations across the country. texts broadly (across multiple media) and deeply (digging into details of the narrative). This kind of reading has been The Ready to Learn grants provide important support to described as “transmedia navigation” or “the ability to theories about the value of transmedia for learning. Fur- follow the flow of stories and information across multiple ther, the grants call attention to the needs of low-income modalities” within the context of the new media literacies children and English language learners—children who are (Jenkins et al., 2006, p. 4). Dresang (1999) has noted not the target audiences for other high-tech transmedia ex- changes to print books themselves in reaction to the periences. The projects appear to straddle the line between new demands and pleasures of reading new media. She cross-platform and transmedia content. As the content rolls describes such books as “Radical Change” books—print out across media formats and demonstration sites, the suc- books influenced by digital age aesthetics and logics. cess of the projects as transmedia storytelling and transme- For example, these books may tell stories in a non-linear dia play experiences should become more apparent. manner or may feature narratives with multiple layers of meaning. More recently, Jenkins (2009) has discussed the concepts of “spreadability” and “drillability” as Thinking Seriously about Transmedia Play important features of transmedia texts. In order to The evaluations and research poised to come out of the navigate transmedia stories, children must learn to cope Ready to Learn transmedia projects will meet a need for with spreadability by learning to scan different media to empirical data about the roles that transmedia might play in collect bits of a distributed narrative. Drillability requires learning. Currently, very little of this type of evidence exists that a child learn research techniques and skills for (Fisch, Lesh, Motoki, Crespo, & Melfi, 2011). However, in comprehending complex narratives. Both spreadability reviewing numerous children’s media properties and the and drillability leave room for readers to contribute to the existing popular and scholarly literature about transmedia unfolding narrative (Jenkins, 2009). and children, we have identified the following ideas about transmedia play and learning: 19
  • 22. In 2011, Scholastic and Ruckus Media announced a fandom,” or in-depth research and theory-building around partnership to create a children’s transmedia imprint the story. Potter fans also have contributed to building that will publish children’s books across print, e-book, the transmedia story by creating music, videos, art, and and enhanced e-book platforms (“Scholastic and Ruckus podcasts; by writing and publishing fan fiction as well Media”, 2011). This is certainly not Scholastic’s first as scholarly papers and books; by hosting conferences foray into the world of transmedia. Indeed, several of and performances; and by creating organizations like the publisher’s top titles for children in the 5-to-11 age the Harry Potter Alliance (HPA). The HPA works online, range are examples of transmedia storytelling. This is in local communities, and in conjunction with schools certainly not Scholastic’s first foray into the world of transmedia. Indeed, several of the publisher’s top titles for children in the five to eleven age range are examples of transmedia storytelling. The Harry Potter series and The 39 Clues series are two particularly interesting transmedia examples, in part because of their very different approaches to transmedia storytelling. Although not initially conceived as a transmedia experience, the Harry Potter franchise provides a strong example of transmedia storytelling. The seven books in the Potter series act as a “mothership” for a transmedia property that extends to films, music, toys, clothing, food items, video games, mobile apps, a theme park, museum exhibits, and ancillary books. Reading the Potter books and community organizations to incite action around is, for many, just one part of the experience. In addition social justice issues. Through all of these extensions, to these many official extensions, a vibrant and prolific the transmedia world of Harry Potter is expanded and fandom has developed over the 15 or so years since enriched. Although not every Harry Potter reader engages the first installment of Harry’s story hit bookshelves. with all of the transmedia elements of the story, it has During the wait between books, Potter fans showed become nearly impossible to experience Potter as “just” their acumen at what Jason Mittell (2009) calls “forensic a book series. Navigating the many extensions to the 20
  • 23. narrative and storyworld—including places where the characteristics of the series that contribute to its strength Wizarding World and “real” world meet—is an integral as a transmedia property are the series’ multiple authors, part of reading Harry Potter. which include many well-known young adult authors with distinct styles. This situates the books within a Scholastic’s The 39 Clues series was from its inception larger context of children’s/young adult literature and designed as a children’s transmedia experience. The 39 contributes to the ways in which the stories can be Clues currently includes two series of books: 12 books interpreted. The series also incorporates important in the original 39 Clues series and six books (so far) in a historical figures from around the world—from Benjamin spinoff series called Cahills vs. Vespers. The books tell the Franklin to Anastasia Romanov, adding to the story’s story of Amy and Dan Cahill, tween-aged orphans who sense of alternate reality. join in their family’s long-standing hunt for the 39 Clues. Although the books are the basis of the property, reading Both Harry Potter and The 39 Clues are intensive social the series involves also engaging with a number of game- reading experiences. For many, reading also involves like elements of the story, including finding collectable participating by creating and circulating media or cards and participating in an ongoing interactive game information, making connections between elements of on the39clues.com. The collectable cards contain clues the story found in different media, and collaborating related to the narrative in the books; readers must with other readers. These four Cs (creating, circulating, log their cards on the website to track clues and earn connecting, and collaborating) have been identified additional cards. The online game is a role-playing game/ as important functions of participatory culture (Reilly, alternate reality game in which users participate as a Vartabedian, Felt, & Jenkins, 2012). member of one branch of the warring Cahill family and compete with other user-populated families to collect clues. Taking part in the clue hunt by collecting cards • Transmedia play can encourage learning through joint and participating in the online game are not just nice media engagement enhancements to the story; they are essential to the active reading experience designed into The 39 Clues. The complex narratives, rich worlds, and multiple points of entry characteristic of transmedia experiences Further expanding the transmedia experience of The can provide opportunities for families to experience 39 Clues is a forthcoming movie, which will likely be transmedia together. Previous research from the Joan accompanied by new licensed products. Other unique 21
  • 24. Ganz Cooney Center has investigated “joint media or reading ancillary books. In these ways, both mother engagement,” an expansion of the concept of co-viewing and child are able to share in the transmedia experience television to include multiple new media platforms of Star Wars in ways that are appropriate to their (Stevens & Penuel, 2010). Authors Takeuchi and Stevens comprehension level and that maximize their enjoyment (2011) have identified characteristics, challenges, and of the story. design strategies related to productive joint media engagement. As they describe, experiences designed for Other characteristics of joint media engagement such productive joint media engagement “can result in deeper as dialogic inquiry— “collaborating with others to make understanding, inspiration, greater fluency, and physical, meaning of situations” (p. 43)—and co-creation—making emotional, or mental wellbeing than others” (p. 43). media, physical artifacts, or shared understandings—also The idea of productive engagement with media, as well apply to transmedia experiences. The three case studies as a number of the characteristics and design principles appearing later in this report are excellent examples of presented in Takeuchi and Stevens’ report, are salient to these characteristics as well as of what Takeuchi and transmedia. Stevens call “intention to develop” —an orientation toward media use in which “at least one partner intends for herself For example, joint media engagement involves mutual or a partner to grow through the activity” (p. 44). engagement—meaning something in the experience appeals to the diverse partners involved. As Takeuchi and Stevens note: “Neither partner is bored nor participates • Transmedia play can support constructivist learning out of sheer obligation to the other” (p. 43). Transmedia goals with multigenerational appeal, for example, Star Wars, exemplifies this principle. The broad transmedia narrative Transmedia play involves exploration, experimentation, and linked extensions offer multiple opportunities for and remix, all activities that are firmly aligned with a users to enter the story and to experience it in ways that constructivist approach to learning (e.g. Bruner, 1990; are interesting and engaging to them. For example, a child Piaget, 1985; Vygotsky, 1978) that emphasizes the may engage with Star Wars through LEGOs or other toys, active role of the learner in creating knowledge by while her mother is drawn to online fandom practices working to make connections among information in a such as writing fan fiction. Conjunctive points of their specific context. Constructivist learning theory has been participation might exist around watching the movies influential in much research on digital media and learning, 22
  • 25. which has highlighted the importance of experience and Learning to Play with Information active participation in learning activities. An important part of the construction of knowledge is communicating Years of research in developmental psychology have high- one’s ideas and understandings; this is what takes it from lighted different aspects of play that contribute to children’s being an individual to social process, thus facilitating healthy development. In Play, Dreams, and Imitation in additional connections and deeper understanding. Childhood (1962), Jean Piaget distinguished between play and imitation, describing play as “primarily mere functional Good transmedia experiences scaffold children’s or reproductive assimilation,” meaning that a child plays participation—supporting them through tasks such as without thought to how her/his play fits with reality. For asking and answering questions, making connections example, a block can be used as an airplane without having between information, creating media, and sharing to adhere to laws of gravity or aerodynamics. Piaget distin- creations with others. Such activities, in and of guishes play from “objective thought,” a hallmark of adult themselves, are examples of constructivist learning. cognition, “which seeks to adapt itself to the requirements When designed with specific constructivist practices of external reality” (p. 87). in mind—for example, providing learners with highly relevant, real-world experiences, emphasizing multiple Whereas play (and especially imaginative play) aligns with realities and perspectives, or fostering collaboration and the process of assimilation, imitation aligns with accom- co-construction of meaning—transmedia play can be a modation. When a child recreates activities from real life, transformative learning experience. As Laura Fleming, making an effort to portray them accurately, s/he is working library media specialist and advisor to the transmedia to change the way s/he thinks about the world. Imitating project Inanimate Alice, notes, such actions “shift the a parent kicking a ball while playing soccer or mimicking a locus of control in learning firmly away from the teacher media character’s speech or actions are examples of accom- towards the learner…” thus “morph[ing] the concept modation. Learning, according to Piaget, happens as chil- of StoryWorld familiar to transmedia producers, into dren work toward achieving equilibrium between assimila- something that is powerful for learning in the digital tion and accommodation. age, the Transmedia Learning World (TLW)” (2012, p. 1). Lev Vygotsky (1978) emphasized play as a tool for practicing The case studies presented later in this report exemplify behaviors. Importantly, Vygotsky highlighted the value of Transmedia Learning Worlds. play in helping children develop abstract thinking by sepa- rating thought and action. Pretend play is especially good for the development of abstract thinking, as children must 23
  • 26. learn to reconcile competing realities. As Tsao (2002) sum- • Constructive play involves manipulating objects, marizes: building, and designing Thinking and acting are no longer simultaneous; • Games with rules show a child’s progression from behaviors are no longer driven by objects, but an egocentric understanding of the world to rather by children’s thinking. By exercising their social play. minds through different play behaviors, children become capable of using high-level mental func- tions (i.e. abstract thinking) to manipulate and Children’s play rarely is restricted to any one of the above monitor thoughts and ideas without direct and categories; indeed, children engage in different genres of immediate reference to the real world. Therefore, play depending on the circumstances (e.g., locations, play play can be an important educational strategy for partners) and resources (e.g., toys, stories) available. facilitating children’s development in cognitive, so- cial/emotional, motor and language areas (p. 231). When playing in transmedia universes, people manipulate the different forms of media available across platforms, The child development literature highlights social and “collecting” the pieces of a narrative—plots, characters, set- cognitive elements that categorize play. In terms of social tings, and so on—distributed through transmedia storytell- interaction, play can be solitary, parallel, or social. Solitary ing and world building. People employ these pieces in new play happens throughout childhood. Parallel play, in which ways and/or explore and experiment in non-narrative but children play near but not with one another, is typical of alternatively linked cross-platform spaces. For many chil- toddlers. Social play tends to emerge during the preschool dren, this kind of “mixing and matching” of media is not a years for typically-developing children. new mode of play; indeed, researchers have long noted the There are also distinct cognitive characteristics of play: appropriation of media elements in children’s play (Dyson, 1997; Kinder, 1999; Paley, 2005; Seiter, 1993). As children • Sensorimotor play includes play and exploration remix media properties through imaginative play, tinkering, with objects (movement, banging, shaking, etc.) experimentation, and creative expression, creating their own rules for how media may be used, they push on the • Pretend play includes socio-dramatic play boundaries defined by institutions and media companies. wherein children act out roles and try on identities 24
  • 27. Writing about young readers (age 8-12) of popular (or Taking a more critical view, Stephen Kline (1993) notes char- “branded”) fiction, Sekeres (2009) describes an “interplay” acter play with television characters as a phenomenon that between the real and the story world: is frequently co-opted by marketers in order to sell more toys: The tween reader of branded fiction may see, hear, write, and, through tangible toy products like action In character play the mental processes of “expres- figures or dolls, manipulate the market child—the sion” (entailed in the creative encoding which takes virtual character imagined through the consump- place in a child’s play enactments) and “interpre- tion of multiple products associated with a brand— tation” (the application of social knowledge and in ways that expand the imaginative potential of media grammar which allows a child to understand the character. When tweens interact with other television fiction) must be brought into alignment. products in the brand and with other real children The activities of watching television and playing in an imaginary or virtual world, their imaginary with toys have thus become mutually reinforc- interplay expands, changes, and codifies storylines ing: television feeds the child’s social imagination and interpretations of the market child. (p. 403) with knowledge about fictive social universes that only a particular toy can make available for simu- The three processes noted in this quotation—expanding, lated play enactment. The synergy created between changing, and codifying—are significant to transmedia play, television and toys through their merger within a as they represent different modes of participation across single narrative universe links these separate do- mains of expressive and interpretive experience media. Just as non-media-based play involves different through a common structure of fantasy (p. 323). modes of participation (e.g. pretend play versus sensorimo- tor/active play), transmedia play offers multiple opportuni- Kline’s concern is that children’s play with television charac- ties to experiment with and participate in a transmedia ex- ters may be circumscribed by their understandings of televi- perience. In this way, transmedia play reflects the definition sion narrative—that is, that television will draw boundaries of play put forth as one of the new media literacies: “the for children’s creative play. This is a reasonable concern, as capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of television (like all media) is a mix of open texts (allowing problem solving” (Jenkins et al., 2006, p. 24). multiple interpretations) and closed ones (leading readers to a single interpretation) (Eco, 1979). Good transmedia experiences, we argue, primarily consist of open texts, thus creating myriad opportunities to play. 25
  • 28. A nice example of open-ended transmedia play can be seen Understanding the characteristics of transmedia play and in the example of Minecraft, a transmedia experience that the ways in which it fits within the context of children’s play is quickly growing in popularity among children and adults experiences more broadly is one way to give play the atten- alike. Markus Persson, a developer with the Swedish inde- tion it needs and deserves. In the next section of this report, pendent game development studio Mojang, created the we describe a working set of principles for educators and game in 2009. As of November 2012, the game boasted 8 producers to consider when building meaningful transmedia million downloads for PC. Minecraft is, first and foremost, play experiences. an open-ended video game that challenges players to build with virtual blocks. Currently, users can build with 153 differ- ent kinds of blocks; some are “naturally occurring” within the Minecraft world, while others are created during gameplay (“Blocks”, n.d.). Each block has different characteristics and features. For example, stone blocks can be used to construct buildings or pathways, while note blocks allow the user to compose music in-game. Discovering, researching, gathering, and experimenting with different kinds of blocks, involves developing and leveraging knowledge of the “natural” prop- erties of these resources within the world of Minecraft. It also involves reaching out to various other media resources, including online videos, wikis, and other websites, to learn from other players’ experiences. All of these activities can be described as “tinkering,” casual experimentation with the intention of learning how something works and/or repairing it; tinkering has been found to be a useful mode for learning in formal and informal learning spaces (Kafai & Peppler, 2011; Guzzetti, Elliot, & Welsch, 2010). 26
  • 29. Transmedia play is: Mobile Mobility in transmedia play means a num- Rich worlds that invite exploration, characters that require analy- ber of things: use of mobile technologies; sis, and clues that need investigation all contribute to replayabil- movement between platforms, media, ity. and setting; and causing movement within media themselves. By linking stories together across platforms, transmedia storytelling encourages children’s media producers to consider formats other Resourceful than the 11-minute television episode. The remix, appropriation, As we have described in earlier sections of and tinkering characteristic of transmedia play similarly pushes this report, transmedia requires participa- industry creators to consider how children are moving stories, tion that is different from that required by characters, merchandise, and other aspects of a media product more traditional media. Transmedia consumers are expected to between platforms in order to create new meanings. be active and motivated, skilled in new media literacies, and able to access and navigate ubiquitous connections to networked, convergent media. Another related characteristic is resourceful- Accessible ness, which we define in the context of transmedia play as a The cross-platform nature of many trans- quality that combines the ability to act with/react to diverse, media experiences gives them a high challenging situations by thinking creatively about solutions that potential for accessibility. People can jump leverage any and all available tools and materials, even if that in to play with transmedia from a variety of starting points and means pulling from somewhere else or repurposing items. can define a trajectory that takes into account their own unique context and access. Accessibility in transmedia play also means that some experiences become memorable moments that can be Social accessed in future play. Salient and memorable transmedia experi- Transmedia play generally happens in con- ences can be a valuable resource for learning. versation with others. Other players may be co-located, or linked through media/ technology, as in the case of social media, online communities, or Replayable massively multiplayer online (MMO) games. Many transmedia experiences are large- scale and unfold over time, leading to high potential for replayability as the story is revealed and revisited. Indeed some transmedia experiences are so intensive that they require multiple “visits” or interactions. 27
  • 30. Building Transmedia Play Experiences Play Partners Places To Play Paradigm-shifting Play 28
  • 31. Aligned with the Joan Ganz Cooney Center’s mission to Creative Director, Erin Reilly and advised by USC Annenberg study the relationship between digital media and the devel- Professor Henry Jenkins. This design guide also incorporates opmental needs of children ages 5 to 11, our suggestions our experiences discussing transmedia storytelling, play, for building transmedia play experiences target this age and performance with scholars, researchers, educators, and range, itself quite diverse. The guiding principles below may children’s media industry professionals at various children’s also be a useful starting point for those designing trans- media and transmedia conferences and meetings. media play experiences for older or younger groups. Our principles are summarized by three core themes: We believe that children have much to add to the process of developing exciting and personally meaningful trans- 1. Play Partners Relationships between producers media play experiences. Young people can contribute to and audiences; conditions for people engaging in the socio-technological design process in many valuable transmedia play together ways through a variety of age-appropriate methods (Druin, 1999). More work must be done to develop and refine best 2. Places to Play Metaphorically, meaning places practices for supporting children’s roles as users, testers, within a transmedia “universe”; and physically, informants, and design partners (Druin, 2002) at the inter- the environments within which children section of participatory culture, participatory learning, and participate in transmedia play participatory design. 3. Paradigm-shifting Play Or “pattern-shifting What follows is not intended to be complete or compre- play”—modifying pre-existing concepts and hensive, but a work-in-progress to which we invite further routines to maximize the lasting positive impact reflection and refinement. Not all of these design principles of children’s transmedia play must be present in a children’s transmedia play experience for learning to occur. However, each component focuses These principles emerged from the authors’ various experi- on an important part of the process of making a media text ences researching and developing experimental, small-scale “transmediated” and the challenges in producing a trans- transmedia play experiences. For nearly two years, we had media play experience whose “final product” will continu- a regular series of discussions about the relationship be- ally evolve in the minds, hands, and hearts of audiences. tween transmedia and learning as part of the USC Annen- berg Innovation Lab’s Children, Youth, and Media Research- Design Track, led by the Annenberg Innovation Lab’s 29
  • 32. Play Partners • Together isn’t always better. While collaboration is important and transmedia play is generally a social • Flexible contracts. Adults and children entering activity, some children may feel more comfortable into collaborative transmedia projects together setting boundaries and engaging in peripheral, start off inherently in different positions of power. parallel, or solitary transmedia play. Spending time It can be tricky to navigate from consulting children with a rich transmedia world doesn’t necessarily need to involving children more deeply in design without to involve partners or parents. Children frequently tipping the scales and overburdening them. imagine partners for their play (with tea parties as Beginning a project with a contract—but one with a classic example); participation in fandom can be a wiggle room—opens up possibilities for youth-led next step in imaginary play, with children imagining actions, shared decision making, and partnerships possible publics with whom they might engage. with adults while balancing children’s needs for scaffolding and safety. • Sharing transmedia. Kids, often very organically come up with conditions for playing together and sharing, particularly when using popular culture material (e.g., favorite characters, toys, songs) as the basis for play. While children may sometimes act in the interest of the group and with a notion of shared ownership (both online and offline), joint media engagement also necessitates children being able to identify “that’s mine” and “that’s yours.” Issues around individual and collective ownership, consumption, creation, and circulation of media might also raise issues around what traces children leave behind in this process (again, both online and offline). 30
  • 33. Places to Play • Environment as third teacher. While teachers and • Accessible play places. In both online and offline families are children’s primary mentors early in their play, it is important not only to make the content of lives, the thoughtful arrangement of physical space transmedia play experiences accessible for children around a child and around her/his use of media (both of all abilities, but also to provide a variety of low and at home and school) can provoke new ways of looking high tech tools that enable participation, creation, and at the world (Caldwell, 1997). Consider how the contribution (Alper, Hourcade, & Gilutz, 2012). Make physical environment might impact the effectiveness space for difference in participation online and offline of learning through transmedia play in formal and spaces, including grade-level differences, a range of informal educational settings. Also consider how linguistic backgrounds, and budgetary constraints on transmedia play might pop up in unexpected places schools, families, and communities. (e.g., see Caine’s Arcade, below). • Mobility matters. Designers of transmedia play • Strategic mix of positive and negative space. experiences should be aware of how people spend More participatory transmedia properties build time with media—and if that time is on the go or rich worlds for audiences to explore, but minimally spent in a fixed location. In the Joan Ganz Cooney participatory ones leave little opportunity for children Center’s report on joint media engagement (2011), to cause any personally meaningful change or test authors Takeuchi and Stevens describe the need their ever-evolving theories about how the world for designers to understand the “fit” of any new works. Look for “hooks” or ways for less engaged platform within families’ existing practices. They users to focus on dense pre-established narratives emphasize that technologies must “easily slot that hint at later engagement (or “positive space”), into existing routines, parent work schedules, and and for more engaged users to fill in the “negative classroom practices” (p. 48). Mobile technologies space” with their own missing pieces or build out on are increasingly a part of these practices, as well as provided materials (Laurel, 2001; Long, 2007). many others that are part of families’ everyday lives- -including play. Transmedia play experiences that are flexible and mobile are best able to fit within diverse family practices, routines, and play spaces. 31
  • 34. Paradigm-shifting Play • Mind-blowing experiences. Transmedia play and and share with children outside of one’s immediate storytelling can be paradigm-shifting experiences geographic area, and the possibility of sharing one’s in that they provide gestalt moments that children ideas or creations publicly and widely are among can reflect upon, revisit, and activate later for new the most compelling features of a transmedia play purposes or new stories. These experiences may come experience. However, with these new opportunities all at once (e.g., class field trips, seeing a theatrical for participation come concerns about safety and performance), or coalesce over time. For example, privacy as children venture into public (or semi-public) Sherry Turkle’s book Falling For Science (2008), a conversations, often for the first time. Transmedia collection of essays written by her students at MIT, producers should carefully consider the benefits and includes various accounts of how countless hours drawbacks of children’s real time versus delayed (and spent with LEGO bricks led many of them to see the moderated) participation, particularly if producers scientific world in new ways. Transmedia is partly wish to incorporate children’s feedback into a something that a child consumes, but also something transmedia play experience in a timely manner and if that a child does. Be aware of the everyday, ordinary, those children are geographically dispersed. and mundane of kids’ lives so that the transmedia you are making matters. • Playing in real time. New media and, in particular, mobile and social media, make it possible for children to participate in ongoing, real-time conversations and games as part of a transmedia play experience. This stands in contrast to the delayed response children, even in recent years, may have had with media, such as sending letters that might be read on a future episode of a television program or waiting for a requested toy to arrive in the mail. In many cases, providing feedback that changes the progression of the experience, having opportunities to connect 32
  • 35. In the section that follows, we look at these principles in example, Story Pirates work closely with science teachers action through three extended examples—Caine’s Arcade, on the classroom level to link arts and literacy content to Story Pirates, and the prototype for the Flotsam Transmedia Common Core, national, and state standards. Experience. Over the past year, we have been observing and interviewing producers and participants of these transme- • None start with TV. A great number of children’s dia play experiences (Case 1: Caine’s Arcade and Case 2: media experiences start with television, and many Story Pirates), as well as applying our theory and research franchises expand outward from the medium. However, to the practice of making a transmedia play experience these examples show how transmedia play can develop ourselves (Case 3: Flotsam). Each of the three case studies sometimes unexpectedly out of online video, theater, and described below represents a different approach to trans- books. media play. While Cases 1 and 2 are particularly relevant for educators, Case 3 is geared towards producers interested in • Different stages of development. Some of these the research and development (R&D) process. The educa- projects are further along or are more scalable than tor-focused and producer-focused case studies showcase others. Much insight is to be gained though from looking different perspectives on how best to incorporate transme- at the available resources at any given point during the dia play principles and the challenges faced in doing so. course of these projects and the choices that these producers of transmedia play make along the way. We have chosen to include these examples because of the following shared characteristics: • Literacy and STEM content. Momentum is growing among educational experts in support of better integrating the humanities, arts, and design thinking with the national imperative around science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Each of the experiences profiled promotes transmedia play as a way to amplify children’s learning, creativity, and curiosity about real world environmental and social issues. For 33