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WOMANWOMAN
Today’s LANCASTER, SC • SPRING 2015
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WOMANWOMANWWWWWOMANWWWOMANWWOMANOMANOMANWOMANWOMANWOMANWOMANWOMANOMANOMANWOMANWOMANWWWOMANWOMANWOMANWWWOMANWOMANWOMANOMANOMANWOMANOMAN
Formal Affair
PROM 2015
Rucker sisters take on reality TVRucker sisters take on reality TVRucker sisters take on reality TV
Seeing
DoubleTwins
SUCCESSPALEO DIET
TORIES
‘TilDeathDoUsPartSecrets to a Lasting Marriage
2 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
On the cover:
The Rucker sisters,
from left, Ruby, Ione
and Ellen, star in the
reality TV show, ”Love
Thy Sister,” on WE TV.
Read all about it on
page 11.
PHOTO BY
SANTANNA HAYES
COURTESY OF
DARON PRESSLEY
is a free quarterly publication of The Lancaster News
701 N. White St., Lancaster, SC 29720 • P.O. Box 640, Lancaster, SC 29721
Telephone: (803) 283-1133 or toll-free (800) 844-9344 Fax: (803) 283-8969
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Contributors: Sherry Archie, Amanda Harris, Ashley Lowrimore, Chris McGinn, Aaron Morrison, Gregory Summers
Advertising Staff: Rachel Bradley, Michelle Craig, Wanda Linderman, Linda O’Neil, Lori Sistare, Donna Stokes
Graphics Staff: Vicki Jenkins, Athena Redmond
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WOMANWOMAN
Today’s
Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 3
M
arriage is a true
commitment.
One that should
not be taken lightly, or
at least, that’s the mes-
sage from two couples
who recently celebrated
their golden wedding
anniversaries. They all
shared their heartfelt
secrets to how they
have made their mar-
riages last.
As when building
anything – from a
home to a relationship
– the foundation should
be strong. Once that’s
in place, remember to
nurture your relationship and the rest
will follow. This leads many couples to
their “happily-ever-after” life together.
MAGGIE AND CHARLIE BOWERS
Little did Charlie Bowers know when
he was serving in the U.S. Army in
Germany that he would meet the love of
his life. But he did just that.
When he returned to the United
States, Mechthild “Maggie” Diener came
with him, back to his hometown of
Lancaster.
“I believe it was love at first sight. We
met and knew we were
meant to be together.
“After coming to
Lancaster, we were
married in a simple
ceremony by a local
official,” Maggie said.
“We were very poor,
but we had each other
and were very happy.”
Now, 50 years later,
she says their secret to
wedded bliss is to
remain committed to
each other, remember-
ing to hon-
or and
accept one
a n o t h e r
just as they are.
“We did not try to change
each other,” Maggie said. “I
believe it’s important for
couples to remember what
attracted them in the first
place. Then keep their core
values to honor and accept
one another.”
Maggie and Charlie have
two daughters, Caroline and
Joan, and three grandchil-
dren. Maggie says they are
the core of their existence.
4 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
PHOTO BELOW BY SHERRY ARCHIE; WEDDING PHOTO COURTESY OF SHIRLEY AND REECE KIRK
Shirley and Reece Kirk were married Nov. 25, 1961. Now, 53 years later, the longtime couple says they
get along well and rarely ever fight. They credit their long marriage to having the Lord in their home
and trust and faith in each other.
BY SHERRY ARCHIE FOR TODAY’S WOMAN
‘TilDeathDoUsPartLongtimers Share Secrets To A Lasting Marriage
PHOTOS COURTESY OF
MAGGIE BOWERS
Maggie and Charlie
Bowers met in Ger-
many, where the photo
above was taken in
1963-64 in Mannheim.
They went back again
in 2014, where the
photo at left was taken
in Goslar. Inset photo:
the couple celebrated
their golden anniversa-
ry on Dec. 29, 2104.
Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 5
Shirley and Reece Kirk
Shirley and Reece Kirk grew up just two miles from each
other, but never met until they were introduced on a blind
date. Reece attended what was then Heath Springs High
School, while Shirley attended school in Lancaster.
One of their cousins initiated the date, asking Shirley if
she would go out with Reece on a double date (mostly
because Reece had a car).
“Yes, that car brought us together that first time,” Shirley
said, with a laugh. Their first date was on Halloween 1959.
Driving the drag (from Howard’s Motor Inn on Charlotte
Highway to the Pit Stop on Meeting Street), they joined the
other teens on Saturday nights. Fridays were for football
games (mostly at Lancaster). They also attended church
together on Sundays, alternating between her church, St.
Luke Methodist, and his family church, Rich Hill Baptist.
They got engaged on July 30, 1961, and were married
Nov. 25 of that same year.
Now some 53 years later, they say having the Lord in
their home and trust and faith in each other has kept their
marriage thriving.
“We both had a church background growing up, so we
continued to keep that first and foremost in our marriage,”
Shirley said.
Both remain very active and Reece still makes sure the
family farm keeps running. In addition to church, they
attend school reunions annually and go to many organized
functions their classmates plan. They also help out with the
grandchildren, driving them to school and picking them up
from after-school activities.
“We get along good and never fight. Now, we may have
disagreements from time to time, but no fights. We have
always worked it out and kept it among ourselves,” Reece
said. “She usually wins.”
A
re you engaged – a bride-
to-be? Then planning the
perfect wedding is high
on your agenda. Wearing the per-
fect wedding dress is a must for
this once-in-a-lifetime event.
Chances are you have been look-
ing at bridal wear magazines for
years, but have you considered
wearing your mother or grand-
mother’s wedding dress? This
could be the answer, one that
would put you right in the middle
of the growing vintage clothing
trend.
It’s also a way to incorporate the
traditional “something old, some-
thing new, something borrowed
and something blue.”
SOMETHING OLD
Elizabeth Roach Hammond did
exactly that on May 31, 2014,
when she married the love of her
life, Garrett Hammond.
“I always thought my mother’s
wedding dress was one of the most
beautiful dresses I have ever seen,”
Hammond said. “When I got
engaged, I knew from the very
beginning that I wanted to wear it.
It was exactly what I wanted – a
beautiful lace A-line dress.
“I remember asking my mom
and I thought she might cry,”
Hammond said. “Of course, she
asked me if I was sure, and once
she knew I was absolutely positive,
that was the dress for me. She was
tickled pink.
“The bridal consultant could not
get over how fashion forward my
mom was back in 1983,” she said.
The gown, designed by Bianchi,
needed only simple modifications.
Hammond says they removed the
Juliet cap from the original veil
and she wore it as well.
“My mom actually paid for that
dress with money that her grand-
father had left her, so it was really
neat to think my great-grandfa-
ther bought my wedding dress.
6 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
COURTESY OF ELIZABETH ROACH HAMMOND
Elizabeth Roach Hammond, right, wore her mother’s wedding dress when she married Garrett Hammond on May
31, 2014. At left is a photo of her mother, Shelley Roach, on her wedding day in 1983 in the same Bianchi dress.
Something Old
PHOTOS COURTESY OF
PAIGE SISTARE KUBIAK
Paige Sistare, above
and below, had her
mother’s wedding
gown remade for her
Dec. 13, 2014,
wedding to Justin
Kubiak. At right are
Sistare’s parents,
Cathy and Reggie
Sistare of Lancaster
in their June 20,
1987, wedding
photo.
BY BEVERLY LANE LORENZ FOR TODAY’S WOMAN
VintageGownsUniteFamilies
SPRING 2015 • TODAY’S WOMAN • 7
VINTAGE PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHERIE ELLIS
PHOTOS AT LEFTBY GREGORY SUMMERS
Holly Ellis, above left, will carry pieces of
several vintage gowns in her bouquet
when she marries Brandon Craig in May.
It will include lace from her mother
Cherie Horne Ellis’ dress, left, satin from
her grandmother Carolyn Funderburk
Horne’s dress, above, and blue velvet
from her grandmother Mayo Bailey
Ellis’ dress, right. Inset at left shows all
the pieces, along with her grand-
mother’s dress and a handerkerchief
that will be worked into the bouquet as
well. Bottom left, Cherie Ellis buttons
her mother’s satin gown, which was
handmade by her grandmother.
“It was beautiful, and to me, it
was truly one of a kind,” Hammond
said. “I remember trying [the gown]
on for my last fitting and my mom
looked so proud. I was proud, too.
“It was just a wonderful experi-
ence and such a special moment for
me to be able to get married in the
same dress my mom wore when she
exchanged her vows,” she said.
“If I have a little girl, I hope one
day she will want to wear the same
dress. Maybe this dress will be
passed down for generations to
come.”
SOMETHING NEW AGAIN
When Paige Sistare married Justin
Kubiak on Dec. 13, 2014, she wore
a wedding dress that debuted on
June 20, 1987, when her
own mother played
the starring role.
“I chose to
wear it because,
as a child, I
always thought it
looked like a princess’
dress,” Kubiak said. “I was never allowed to
try it on until I found the man of my
dreams.”
After Justin asked Paige for her hand in mar-
riage, “My mom and I spent two hours opening a
preserved box with her wedding dress from ’87.
The dress looked incredible.
“I had the dress altered and changed quite a bit
by Judy Funderburk of Lancaster,” Kubiak said,
removing the sleeves to make her vintage dress new again.
SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLUE
No longer true is the old adage a wedding gown is
something that will only be worn once. Young women
today are reflecting the richness and sentimentality of
their heritage in their wedding day choices. If wearing
your mom’s gown is not your particular choice, you may
want to include some part of it in your wedding regalia.
Some brides choose to start with their very own bridal
gown and incorporate vestige pieces from the wedding
gowns of their mothers or grandmothers.
A good example of this type of ingenuity will be seen in
the wedding of Holly Ellis, who is marrying her high
school sweetheart, Brandon Craig, in May.
“We are wrapping her bouquet with lace from my dress,
worn on Sept. 11, 1976,” said her mother, Cherie Ellis,
along with “satin from her maternal grandmother’s dress,
which was worn on Jan. 23, 1955, and blue velvet from
her paternal grandmother’s dress, worn Dec. 27, 1941.”
Debbie Dunn with Winona’s Flowers will use the pieces
to create a soft and Victorian-style hand-tied clutch bou-
quet of off-white roses, ranunculus and lysanthia, with
accents of blue hydrangea. The arrangement will include a
handkerchief her mother carried in her wedding, which
Holly wore as a bonnet at her baptism as an infant.
Holly Ellis was close to both her grandmothers, but
especially to her paternal grandmother, Mayo Bailey Ellis,
who died in 2011, as did her grandfather, John Fred Ellis,
after nearly 70 years of marriage.
Her maternal grandmother, Carolyn Funderburk Horne,
who married Joyce Horne, died when Holly was about 10.
“She’s just sentimental,” Cherie Ellis. “She wanted them
to be part of the wedding, and since they’re deceased, this
is a way to include them.”
“It was beautiful, and to me, it
was truly one of a kind,” Hammond
said. “I remember trying [the gown]
on for my last fitting and my mom
looked so proud. I was proud, too.
“It was just a wonderful experi-
ence and such a special moment for
me to be able to get married in the
same dress my mom wore when she
exchanged her vows,” she said.
“If I have a little girl, I hope one
day she will want to wear the same
dress. Maybe this dress will be
passed down for generations to
SOMETHING NEW AGAIN
When Paige Sistare married Justin
Kubiak on Dec. 13, 2014, she wore
a wedding dress that debuted on
June 20, 1987, when her
own mother played
the starring role.
“I chose to
wear it because,
as a child, I
always thought it
looked like a princess’
8 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
BY ASHLEY LOWRIMORE FOR TODAY’S WOMAN
L
ocal girls are going very formal in their prom
dress choices this year, with sequins and beading
topping their gotta-have-it lists.
BEADS AND BRAIDS
This year’s prom style includes formal lengths, elegant
silhouettes and lots of sparkle.
Craig Mathis, owner of CB’s Limited, says popular
trends in his store are dresses with lace, pastel colors and
full-length formals.
“They want very formal dresses with a lot of beading,”
he said. “Sequins were so hot in the 80s and now they’re
back big time.”
According to Mathis, another big trend was seen earlier
this year at the Miss Universe pageant – the two-piece
dress.
“Two-piece dresses are hot this year,” he said. “Schools
are allowing it in the dress code now and that’s opened up
new opportunities.”
Mathis says A-line dresses and dresses with a simple
silhouette are preferred, as opposed to more revealing
dresses.
“One thing we’ve noticed is that we’ve got little mix of
almost everything this year,” he
said.
For prom 2015 tresses, hair
accessories are out and braiding
is in, says Amy Jordan, owner of
Scizzor FX in Indian Land.
“We’re seeing that loose, messy
up-do with a lot of braiding,” she
said.
Jordan say it’s best to take the
style and ornamentation of the
dress into consideration when
deciding on a hairstyle.
“If you have a halter or a lot of
beadwork going on on top of the
dress, wearing your hair up is
probably best, because you don’t want anything to take
away from that,” she said. “If it’s a strapless or something
similar, then wearing your hair down or half-up would
really work.”
ORGANIZING THE PROM
Lancaster High School prom coordinator and chaperone
Kristie Davis is in her third year of organizing the event,
planned for April 25 in Richburg.
The social studies teacher is working with Do-It Printing
to design, print and sell prom tickets; hiring a photogra-
pher; coordinating prom memorabilia and more.
Davis also is working with Balloon Express and Special
Occasions for the “Frozen in Time” prom that anticipates
about 400 prom-goers.
“As the prom coordinator, my biggest concern is decorat-
ing the ballroom,” said Davis, who has about eight hours
to decorate. “I always have a handful of teachers that are
willing to help me with the big day and I am so apprecia-
tive for them.”
Davis says high-low dresses were popular the year she
began chaperoning and that she sees students drive their
parents’ sporty cars or rent limos or party vans.
“Our students put a lot of thought and money into their
fashion,” she said. “I am always very pleased with how
they look and behave.”
PROM 2014
When deciding on a dress for her senior prom at Andrew
Jackson High School, Sarah Ellis had a good idea of what
she wanted to wear.
“I wanted something that had a lot of sparkle, and I
wanted it to be strapless,” Ellis said.
Ellis, now a student at USCL, said she tried on several
dresses before choosing a pale blue dress to coordinate with
her date, Alex Jackson.
“I had a pink dress the year before, so I knew I didn’t
want another pink one,” she said. “And I liked blue on Alex,
so he helped me decide on that one.”
Ellis and Jackson took photos at the Kershaw Country
Club and Lancaster County Courthouse and ate dinner
before heading to the 2014 prom at the Fairway Room.
PROM 1998
As a member of the 1998 Indian Land High School prom
committee, then-junior Kristen Schwerthoffer Wilson dec-
COURTESY OF SARAH ELLIS
Sarah Ellis sparkled in this pale blue, off-the-shoulder gown with a long chiffon train that
coordinated with her date Alex Jackson’s vest and tie at last year’s Andrew Jackson High
School prom at the Fairway Room.
COURTESY OF AMUY JORDAN
Loose, messy up-dos with braids
are popular for prom this year,
says stylist Amy Jordan.
Prom 2015
a very
Formal Affair
TheBigDayChangesOverTime
Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 9
orated columns of blue
and white balloons and
arranged the photo
area for the “Starry
Night” prom theme.
Wilson went to prom
at the Sheraton Hotel
on Billy Graham Park-
way with a friend,
Michael LeRoy, after a
fellow classmate,
Tommy, declined her
invitation.
She says ballgown
dresses were a big fash-
ion trend, as well as
spaghetti straps, elbow-
length gloves and leg
garters.
“I wore a blue Jessica
McClintock dress that
was long and poofy,
like Cinderella,” said
Wilson, who also had a
matching blue corsage
ribbon.
And the original
classmate that Wilson
asked to the prom,
Tommy? The two went
on to date and married
seven years later.
“I told him, ‘You’re
never going to live this
down.’”
courtesy of Kristin Wilson
Kristin Schwerthoffer and Michael LeRoy pose
for photos at the 1998 Indian Land High
School prom.
To include your business in the next edition,
call The Lancaster News at (803) 283-1140.
Tomorrow’s Woman
Baylee Evans
G Full name and age: Baylee Evans, 15
G Hometown: Lancaster
G Family: Parents, Lee Evans and
Paula Evans; siblings, Austin and
Lindsay
G Education: Freshman at Lancaster
High School
G Life goals: Go to college with a
scholarship
G What are you most proud of? My
improvements in golf from where
I was a year ago to now
G What do you enjoy most about golfing?
Playing with friends; the competi-
tiveness; being able to improve;
and meeting new and unique people
G Favorite golf course: Edgewater Golf
Course, because they’re so
friendly
G Best golf game/score: In tournament,
72
G Favorite movie: “The Greatest
Game Ever Played”
G Favorite song: “Living on a Prayer”
by Bon Jovi
G Favorite way to spend free time: With
friends and family, and Penny Board
G Most influential person in your life: My late
grandfather, Carl Evans – he gave
me my first golf club at age 3 and
got me started
G Your personality in just one word: Outgoing
G Words that inspire you: Always do your
best and get the job done right.
10 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
PHOTO COURTESY OF PAULA EVANS
Baylee Evans plays golf in her party dress during
her eighth-grade formal at the Lancaster Golf Club.
SPRING 2015 • TODAY’S WOMAN • 11
A
trio of sassy and stylish sisters has hit reality TV and
those in the Lancaster area will see the familiar faces
of three Rucker sisters – Ruby, Ellen and Ione.
“Love Thy Sister,” which airs Thursday evenings on WE
TV, follows the Lancaster natives through family life, high
society living and sisterhood. The season began Jan. 8.
“We wanted to be on TV because we think we have a
unique story connection as sisters,” said Ione Rucker
Jamison, the youngest of the three sisters. “We believe we
have a story to tell, being modern Southern women with
strong morals but also a strong sense of acceptance of all
people.”
Jamison, who has three young children and a master’s
degree in education, is divorced from pro basketball player
Antawn Jamison of the LA Lakers
and trying to find the next love of
her life. The cast includes Jamison’s
transgender best friend, Londyn.
Ruby Rucker Cooper, the
eldest sister and a lawyer by
profession, and her hus-
band, Ford, an orthodon-
tist, have three children
and are experiencing
financial strain.
Ellen Rucker Carter,
the middle sister, is
divorced from Vince
Carter of the Dallas
Mavericks, and is the
mother of their daughter,
Kai. She has been dating attor-
ney and former state represen-
tative Bakari Sellers for five
years, struggling with the idea of
commitment. Carter is on hiatus
from Rucker Chiropractic in
Lancaster.
The sisters, the daughters of Dr.
Douglas Rucker and Ruby King
Rucker of Lancaster, are partnering
to launch a natural hair care line,
Rucker Roots.
Their mother, Ruby Rucker, says
as a 75-year-old, church-going
woman, she is not the target
demographic for the show and
its, at times, controversial, racy
content. She leaves the room during certain scenes.
The Rucker matriarch and mother of eight believes there
is always falsity to television, even if it is called “reality
TV,” but she stands behind her daughters and supports
their decision to be in the spotlight.
“They are enjoying it. It’s what they want to do,” said
Rucker, who admitted her husband is not keen on the show.
“I know how good of mothers they are and have good rela-
tionships with their husbands and ex-husbands. They are
good girls.”
A friend for 30 years, S.C. Rep. Mandy Powers Norrell
has known Ruby Rucker Cooper since the fifth grade. They
went through school and law school together, and were in
each other’s weddings.
To Powers Norrell, the Ruckers are like family.
When first watching “Love Thy
Sister,” she felt protective, worry-
ing about how viewers would per-
ceive her surrogate family.
“But objectively, they are funny
and interesting,” she said. “I
think the show will be suc-
cessful. It’s not like any-
thing else I know of. It’s
real and shows a dif-
ferent kind of
dynamic.”
Others who know
the Rucker sisters
have told them the
show is entertaining
and a breath of fresh
air.
“They love seeing us repre-
sent women who are strong,
loyal, family-oriented mothers
and career women,” Jamison
said.
The Rucker name is well-
known in Lancaster. The sisters’
grandfather, A.R. Rucker, was the
superintendent of the black public
schools in Lancaster and their
grandmother, Ruth Wright Rucker,
was a teacher for more than 30
years. Their father, the first black
dentist in town, is still practicing
dentistry here.
Reality TV show
focuses on
Rucker sisters’
relationships
Antawn Jamison of the LA Lakers
and trying to find the next love of
her life. The cast includes Jamison’s
transgender best friend, Londyn.
Ruby Rucker Cooper, the
eldest sister and a lawyer by
profession, and her hus-
band, Ford, an orthodon-
tist, have three children
and are experiencing
Ellen Rucker Carter,
the middle sister, is
divorced from Vince
Carter of the Dallas
Mavericks, and is the
mother of their daughter,
Kai. She has been dating attor-
ney and former state represen-
tative Bakari Sellers for five
years, struggling with the idea of
commitment. Carter is on hiatus
from Rucker Chiropractic in
The sisters, the daughters of Dr.
Douglas Rucker and Ruby King
Rucker of Lancaster, are partnering
to launch a natural hair care line,
Their mother, Ruby Rucker, says
as a 75-year-old, church-going
woman, she is not the target
demographic for the show and
its, at times, controversial, racy
To Powers Norrell, the Ruckers are like family.
When first watching “Love Thy
Sister,” she felt protective, worry-
ing about how viewers would per-
ceive her surrogate family.
“But objectively, they are funny
and interesting,” she said. “I
think the show will be suc-
cessful. It’s not like any-
thing else I know of. It’s
and a breath of fresh
air.
“They love seeing us repre-
sent women who are strong,
loyal, family-oriented mothers
and career women,” Jamison
said.
The Rucker name is well-
known in Lancaster. The sisters’
grandfather, A.R. Rucker, was the
superintendent of the black public
schools in Lancaster and their
grandmother, Ruth Wright Rucker,
was a teacher for more than 30
years. Their father, the first black
dentist in town, is still practicing
dentistry here.
COURTESY OF IONE RUCKER JAMISONABOVE: Ione Rucker Jamison, second from left, and Ellen Rucker Carter, second from right, pose with someof the women who attended the Rucker Family Foundation fashion show at Ione’s Waxhaw home in 2014.The show raises funds for foundation scholarships. BELOW: The Rucker sisters, from left, Ruby RuckerCooper, Ellen and Ione put on the glitz for their reality TV show, “Love Thy Sister,” on WE TV.
BY JULIE GRAHAM FOR TODAY’S WOMAN
PHOTO BY SANTANNA HAYES; COURTESY OF DARON PRESSLEY
12 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
S
eeing double is a normal part of life for Lancaster
resident Angela Rorie. Rorie had her first set of twins
on April 30, 1986. Now 27, Krystal Duncan and her
twin sister, Kimberly Williams, have their own families,
Duncan with twin 3-year-old boys of her own.
On Feb. 19, 1992, Rorie had Kayce and her twin brother
Kyle, now both 22.
Another five years passed and Rorie once again learned
she was pregnant with twins. However, one of the twins
did not make it and her daughter Kayla, now 17, was born
Aug. 27, 1997.
The multiples meant buying two of everything and
meant they shared much of what they got.
“It was a houseful; it still is a houseful,” Rorie said.
The siblings all share the same initials – KDR – a trend
Rorie decided to adopt after her oldest girls were born. She
enjoyed dressing them alike when they were young.
Rorie said she deliberately waited five years each time to
have more children. She said all her twins were natural,
without any fertility treatments.
“I’ve always been interested in twins; I think they are
fascinating,” she said. “It’s double the arms to hug you.”
Rorie said her children never had to walk to school alone
and always had a friend.
“They may fight with each other, but they won’t let
anyone else bother them,” Rorie said. “One good thing
about having a sibling is always having someone you can
depend on if you need to.”
Krystal and Kimberly were particularly close during a
trying time in Kimberly’s life. She was diagnosed with
heart and lung problems at a year old and had to be put on
oxygen at age 5, Rorie said.
At 15, Kimberly had to travel to Boston for open heart
surgery.
“That was a challenge,” Rorie said.
She said Krystal always knew something was wrong and
stayed by her sister’s side in the hospital.
Rorie said all her children are still close and spend time
together when they can.
“It’s unique to have a family full of twins,” she said. “It’s
been a blessing for me.”
TWINS, BUT NOT THE SAME
Having multiples is a trend among many Lancaster area
families.
Lancaster resident Carrie Steele was five months preg-
nant when she learned that she was going to welcome two
children to the world.
“It was a quite a shock,” she said.
On March 26, 2006, Steele had Layla and Seneca Steele,
SEEING DOUBLE
COURTESY OF ANGIE RORIE
The Rorie family is still multiplying. Angela Rorie, center, had three sets of twins (although one did not make it), and one of her daughters, Krystal, has also had twins. The extended
family now includes, from left, seated: Kayce Rorie holding Logan Pate, William Duncan, Gabriel Duncan, Wyatt Duncan and Krystal Duncan (William and Wyatt are twins); second row:
Mike Pate, Kayla Rorie, Angela Rorie, Kimberly Williams and Steven Duncan; back row: Kyle Rorie and Canaan Williams.
BY AMANDA HARRIS FOR TODAY’S WOMAN
SSEEINGEEING DDOUBLEOUBLESEEING DOUBLE
Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 13
now 8 years old.
Layla and Seneca are fraternal twins and
different in every way. Layla is laid-back, hates
pink and enjoys football and sports, while
Seneca enjoys dressing up and princesses.
“We’ve really tried hard to let them grow into
the people they are individually,” she said. “I
wouldn’t change anything; they are great
girls.”
The girls had their own way of communi-
cating with each other when they were little,
Steele said.
Seneca said she and her sister are close.
“We get to argue and play a lot,” she said.
“We’re best friends.”
Layla said she enjoys having a twin sister.
“They are always there for you,” she said.
“My twin is pretty nice.”
While they are each their own person, Steele
said Layla and Seneca sometimes seem to
switch personalities and like to do what the
other does. “We go with the flow,” she said.
One Of Each
Lancaster resident Sharlee Lucas has the
challenge of raising a boy and a girl at the
same time. Lucas’ daughter, Georgie, and her
brother, Gunnar, now 16, were born May 13,
1998.
“It’s challenging at times, but I was blessed,”
Lucas said. “I know nothing else.”
Having a boy and a girl means always mov-
ing in two directions, she said. Her son does
sports, while Georgie does competitive dance.
Both attend Andrew Jackson High School.
“It’s always been them two,” Lucas said.
“They balance each other.”
Lucas said she enjoyed throwing joint birth-
day parties with two themes for her son and
daughter.
“It’s a lot of fun having two the same age
running around,” she said. “It’s a great experi-
ence.”
Georgie said she and her brother are oppo-
sites, but enjoy each other’s company.
Growing Up As Twins
Tracie Sims Veal and Sharon Sims Minors,
born Jan. 12, 1971, are close, even for identical
twins.
The duo, who live in Lancaster a few min-
utes from each other, grew up as best friends,
dressing alike until sophomore year of high
school. They attended college together and
studied education.
Veal now teaches second grade at McDonald
Green Elementary, while Minors teaches first
grade at Erwin Elementary.
“We’ve been together forever,” Minors said.
“There is a natural bond there, I just can’t
explain it.”
Inspired by her eighth-grade teachers, Veal
said she always wanted to become a teacher.
Minors said she decided on pursuing educa-
tion like her sister.
Veal and Minors said the challenging part of
being identical is getting people to recognize
them as their own person.
“We’re constantly trying to identify who we
are,” Minors said.
But both said they enjoy being a twin.
“We always had a friend with us,” Veal said.
photos courtesy of Tracie Veal
ABOVE: Sharon Minors, left, and her twin sister, Tracie Veal, both teach at Lancaster
County elementary schools. BELOW: Twins Sharon, left, and Tracie Sims in a portrait
made while they were children.
courtesy of the Steele Family
The Princess and the Packer: Fraternal twin sisters Seneca, left, and Layla Steele, 8, display
some of their different interests.
AdviceFrom
TheTrenches
Experienced moms and
dads share their tips for
parents with multiples or
who are expecting multi-
ples:
l Keep your children
on the same feeding and
sleeping schedules.
l Help them grow as
individuals.
l Have your children
share with each other
instead of buying two of
everything.
l Use coupons – dia-
pers are expensive.
l Don’t be afraid to
ask for advice
l Get as much sleep
as you can.
l Be patient, caring
and loving.
l Enjoy the experi-
ence.
T
he Paleo diet and its sisters, Whole 30 and
Primal Blueprint, have gained popularity in
the last few years. So what is a Paleo diet?
The idea is that, genetically, our bodies have not
changed significantly since the Paleolithic “hunt-
er gatherers,” so if we eat a diet similar to that of
our ancient ancestors, we will be healthier.
Food do’s and don’ts are relatively simple. On
the “do” list are meats, fish, poultry, vegetables
and fruit, eggs, nuts and seeds, and oils like olive,
walnut, coconut and flaxseed. The “don’t” list
include cereal grains, legumes, dairy, refined
sugar, potatoes, salt, coffee and tea, refined vege-
table oils and processed foods.
WHOLE 30
A number of Lancaster women have discov-
ered and benefitted from the Paleo diet or one of
its sister plans.
Jodi Honeycutt and Candye Faile used
the Whole 30 plan. It is just what the
name implies – a Paleo-based 30-day
plan. Using guidelines available online
and in print suits the needs of many
people, and both used one or more.
“The reason I chose this program was
because I said I could do anything for 30
days,” Faile said.
A nurse with Novant Healthcare in
Matthews, N.C., Faile enrolled in the Island
Sun Fitness “boot camp” exercise program as
well. She started her program on Jan. 5 this
year, and is very happy with her results after
the 30-day period. So far, she’s lost just
under 10 pounds, and plans to continue both
diet and boot camp.
Honeycutt, a Lancaster woman who’s now
a high school teacher in New York, had dra-
matic results from the Whole 30 program,
which she started on New Year’s Day 2013 to
help a friend.
“I wasn’t looking for a diet, but as a
woman in my 50s with Type 2 diabetes, I
was looking for a way to get healthy,”
Honeycutt said.
She’s lost 40 pounds so far, and the weight
has stayed off. But what made her the happiest
was getting her blood sugar under control.
14 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015
A number of Lancaster women have discov-
ered and benefitted from the Paleo diet or one of
Jodi Honeycutt and Candye Faile used
the Whole 30 plan. It is just what the
A nurse with Novant Healthcare in
Matthews, N.C., Faile enrolled in the Island
Sun Fitness “boot camp” exercise program as
well. She started her program on Jan. 5 this
year, and is very happy with her results after
the 30-day period. So far, she’s lost just
under 10 pounds, and plans to continue both
Honeycutt, a Lancaster woman who’s now
a high school teacher in New York, had dra-
matic results from the Whole 30 program,
which she started on New Year’s Day 2013 to
“I wasn’t looking for a diet, but as a
woman in my 50s with Type 2 diabetes, I
was looking for a way to get healthy,”
She’s lost 40 pounds so far, and the weight
PALEO DIET
TORIESBY NITA BROWN FOR TODAY’S WOMAN
Trayce Griffin AFTER 18
months on Primal Blueprint
Trayce Griffin BEFORE Primal Blueprint
Candye Faile
AFTER one
month on
Whole 30
PHOTOS COURTESY OF CANDYE FAILE
Candye Faile
BEFORE
Whole 30
Candye Faile
AFTER one
month on
Whole 30
SUCCESS
PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRAYCE GRIFFIN
SPRING 2015 • TODAY’S WOMAN • 15
Honeycutt, who had Type 2 diabetes
for nine years, and had been on five pills
per day. Now she no longer takes any
diabetes medication, and rarely any med-
icine at all.
PRIMAL BLUEPRINT
Trayce Griffin, a stylist at At Salon
Dimensions, reports similar dramatic
results using the Primal Blueprint, which
she explains is a simplified Paleo plan.
She never bought anything, just used
information and recipes found online or
exchanged with friends and clients, and is
taking it “one day at a time.”
In addition to changing food choices,
the Primal offered another benefit for
Griffin.
“It teaches your body to burn stored
fat, using intermittent fasting and eating
only when you’re hungry,” she said.
Griffin began the Primal program on
Sept. 11, 2012, and about the same time
discovered she is grain-intolerant. She’s
now free from inflammation and a host
of other grain allergy symptoms, feels
much better, has lost 70 pounds, and
gone from a size 16/18 to size 6/8.
All three women said this is a lifestyle
change for them, not a fad diet. It has
worked well for them to use the Paleo
diet principles to improve their overall
health, something they consider even
more important than losing some
unwanted pounds.
MoreInfo
Look here for more
information:
G Dr. Loren
Cordain’s website: thep-
aleodiet.com, informa-
tion, research, recipes
and books
G Whole 30:
whole30.com/new
G Primal
Blueprint: www.marks-
dailyapple.com
G Island Sun Boot
Camp Facebook page:
recipes, information
and encouragement
from others in the area
on the program
G Book: It Starts
with Food, by Dallas &
Melissa Hartwig
G Cooking: nom-
nompaleo.com –
Michelle Tam’s “Food
for Humans”
G Well-Fed: Paleo
Recipes for People Who
Love to Eat – Melissa
Joulwan’s cookbook
G Also visit
Joulwan’s blogsite: the-
clothesmakethegirl.com
G Juli Bauer’s
blogsite: paleomg.com

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Today's Woman

  • 1. WOMANWOMAN Today’s LANCASTER, SC • SPRING 2015 FREE WOMANWOMANWWWWWOMANWWWOMANWWOMANOMANOMANWOMANWOMANWOMANWOMANWOMANOMANOMANWOMANWOMANWWWOMANWOMANWOMANWWWOMANWOMANWOMANOMANOMANWOMANOMAN Formal Affair PROM 2015 Rucker sisters take on reality TVRucker sisters take on reality TVRucker sisters take on reality TV Seeing DoubleTwins SUCCESSPALEO DIET TORIES ‘TilDeathDoUsPartSecrets to a Lasting Marriage
  • 2. 2 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 On the cover: The Rucker sisters, from left, Ruby, Ione and Ellen, star in the reality TV show, ”Love Thy Sister,” on WE TV. Read all about it on page 11. PHOTO BY SANTANNA HAYES COURTESY OF DARON PRESSLEY is a free quarterly publication of The Lancaster News 701 N. White St., Lancaster, SC 29720 • P.O. Box 640, Lancaster, SC 29721 Telephone: (803) 283-1133 or toll-free (800) 844-9344 Fax: (803) 283-8969 Publisher: Susan Rowell • Editor: Jane Alford • Advertising Manager: Leigh Sullivan Contributors: Sherry Archie, Amanda Harris, Ashley Lowrimore, Chris McGinn, Aaron Morrison, Gregory Summers Advertising Staff: Rachel Bradley, Michelle Craig, Wanda Linderman, Linda O’Neil, Lori Sistare, Donna Stokes Graphics Staff: Vicki Jenkins, Athena Redmond Landmark Community Newspapers of South Carolina Inc. WOMANWOMAN Today’s
  • 3. Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 3
  • 4. M arriage is a true commitment. One that should not be taken lightly, or at least, that’s the mes- sage from two couples who recently celebrated their golden wedding anniversaries. They all shared their heartfelt secrets to how they have made their mar- riages last. As when building anything – from a home to a relationship – the foundation should be strong. Once that’s in place, remember to nurture your relationship and the rest will follow. This leads many couples to their “happily-ever-after” life together. MAGGIE AND CHARLIE BOWERS Little did Charlie Bowers know when he was serving in the U.S. Army in Germany that he would meet the love of his life. But he did just that. When he returned to the United States, Mechthild “Maggie” Diener came with him, back to his hometown of Lancaster. “I believe it was love at first sight. We met and knew we were meant to be together. “After coming to Lancaster, we were married in a simple ceremony by a local official,” Maggie said. “We were very poor, but we had each other and were very happy.” Now, 50 years later, she says their secret to wedded bliss is to remain committed to each other, remember- ing to hon- or and accept one a n o t h e r just as they are. “We did not try to change each other,” Maggie said. “I believe it’s important for couples to remember what attracted them in the first place. Then keep their core values to honor and accept one another.” Maggie and Charlie have two daughters, Caroline and Joan, and three grandchil- dren. Maggie says they are the core of their existence. 4 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 PHOTO BELOW BY SHERRY ARCHIE; WEDDING PHOTO COURTESY OF SHIRLEY AND REECE KIRK Shirley and Reece Kirk were married Nov. 25, 1961. Now, 53 years later, the longtime couple says they get along well and rarely ever fight. They credit their long marriage to having the Lord in their home and trust and faith in each other. BY SHERRY ARCHIE FOR TODAY’S WOMAN ‘TilDeathDoUsPartLongtimers Share Secrets To A Lasting Marriage PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAGGIE BOWERS Maggie and Charlie Bowers met in Ger- many, where the photo above was taken in 1963-64 in Mannheim. They went back again in 2014, where the photo at left was taken in Goslar. Inset photo: the couple celebrated their golden anniversa- ry on Dec. 29, 2104.
  • 5. Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 5 Shirley and Reece Kirk Shirley and Reece Kirk grew up just two miles from each other, but never met until they were introduced on a blind date. Reece attended what was then Heath Springs High School, while Shirley attended school in Lancaster. One of their cousins initiated the date, asking Shirley if she would go out with Reece on a double date (mostly because Reece had a car). “Yes, that car brought us together that first time,” Shirley said, with a laugh. Their first date was on Halloween 1959. Driving the drag (from Howard’s Motor Inn on Charlotte Highway to the Pit Stop on Meeting Street), they joined the other teens on Saturday nights. Fridays were for football games (mostly at Lancaster). They also attended church together on Sundays, alternating between her church, St. Luke Methodist, and his family church, Rich Hill Baptist. They got engaged on July 30, 1961, and were married Nov. 25 of that same year. Now some 53 years later, they say having the Lord in their home and trust and faith in each other has kept their marriage thriving. “We both had a church background growing up, so we continued to keep that first and foremost in our marriage,” Shirley said. Both remain very active and Reece still makes sure the family farm keeps running. In addition to church, they attend school reunions annually and go to many organized functions their classmates plan. They also help out with the grandchildren, driving them to school and picking them up from after-school activities. “We get along good and never fight. Now, we may have disagreements from time to time, but no fights. We have always worked it out and kept it among ourselves,” Reece said. “She usually wins.”
  • 6. A re you engaged – a bride- to-be? Then planning the perfect wedding is high on your agenda. Wearing the per- fect wedding dress is a must for this once-in-a-lifetime event. Chances are you have been look- ing at bridal wear magazines for years, but have you considered wearing your mother or grand- mother’s wedding dress? This could be the answer, one that would put you right in the middle of the growing vintage clothing trend. It’s also a way to incorporate the traditional “something old, some- thing new, something borrowed and something blue.” SOMETHING OLD Elizabeth Roach Hammond did exactly that on May 31, 2014, when she married the love of her life, Garrett Hammond. “I always thought my mother’s wedding dress was one of the most beautiful dresses I have ever seen,” Hammond said. “When I got engaged, I knew from the very beginning that I wanted to wear it. It was exactly what I wanted – a beautiful lace A-line dress. “I remember asking my mom and I thought she might cry,” Hammond said. “Of course, she asked me if I was sure, and once she knew I was absolutely positive, that was the dress for me. She was tickled pink. “The bridal consultant could not get over how fashion forward my mom was back in 1983,” she said. The gown, designed by Bianchi, needed only simple modifications. Hammond says they removed the Juliet cap from the original veil and she wore it as well. “My mom actually paid for that dress with money that her grand- father had left her, so it was really neat to think my great-grandfa- ther bought my wedding dress. 6 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 COURTESY OF ELIZABETH ROACH HAMMOND Elizabeth Roach Hammond, right, wore her mother’s wedding dress when she married Garrett Hammond on May 31, 2014. At left is a photo of her mother, Shelley Roach, on her wedding day in 1983 in the same Bianchi dress. Something Old PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAIGE SISTARE KUBIAK Paige Sistare, above and below, had her mother’s wedding gown remade for her Dec. 13, 2014, wedding to Justin Kubiak. At right are Sistare’s parents, Cathy and Reggie Sistare of Lancaster in their June 20, 1987, wedding photo. BY BEVERLY LANE LORENZ FOR TODAY’S WOMAN VintageGownsUniteFamilies
  • 7. SPRING 2015 • TODAY’S WOMAN • 7 VINTAGE PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHERIE ELLIS PHOTOS AT LEFTBY GREGORY SUMMERS Holly Ellis, above left, will carry pieces of several vintage gowns in her bouquet when she marries Brandon Craig in May. It will include lace from her mother Cherie Horne Ellis’ dress, left, satin from her grandmother Carolyn Funderburk Horne’s dress, above, and blue velvet from her grandmother Mayo Bailey Ellis’ dress, right. Inset at left shows all the pieces, along with her grand- mother’s dress and a handerkerchief that will be worked into the bouquet as well. Bottom left, Cherie Ellis buttons her mother’s satin gown, which was handmade by her grandmother. “It was beautiful, and to me, it was truly one of a kind,” Hammond said. “I remember trying [the gown] on for my last fitting and my mom looked so proud. I was proud, too. “It was just a wonderful experi- ence and such a special moment for me to be able to get married in the same dress my mom wore when she exchanged her vows,” she said. “If I have a little girl, I hope one day she will want to wear the same dress. Maybe this dress will be passed down for generations to come.” SOMETHING NEW AGAIN When Paige Sistare married Justin Kubiak on Dec. 13, 2014, she wore a wedding dress that debuted on June 20, 1987, when her own mother played the starring role. “I chose to wear it because, as a child, I always thought it looked like a princess’ dress,” Kubiak said. “I was never allowed to try it on until I found the man of my dreams.” After Justin asked Paige for her hand in mar- riage, “My mom and I spent two hours opening a preserved box with her wedding dress from ’87. The dress looked incredible. “I had the dress altered and changed quite a bit by Judy Funderburk of Lancaster,” Kubiak said, removing the sleeves to make her vintage dress new again. SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLUE No longer true is the old adage a wedding gown is something that will only be worn once. Young women today are reflecting the richness and sentimentality of their heritage in their wedding day choices. If wearing your mom’s gown is not your particular choice, you may want to include some part of it in your wedding regalia. Some brides choose to start with their very own bridal gown and incorporate vestige pieces from the wedding gowns of their mothers or grandmothers. A good example of this type of ingenuity will be seen in the wedding of Holly Ellis, who is marrying her high school sweetheart, Brandon Craig, in May. “We are wrapping her bouquet with lace from my dress, worn on Sept. 11, 1976,” said her mother, Cherie Ellis, along with “satin from her maternal grandmother’s dress, which was worn on Jan. 23, 1955, and blue velvet from her paternal grandmother’s dress, worn Dec. 27, 1941.” Debbie Dunn with Winona’s Flowers will use the pieces to create a soft and Victorian-style hand-tied clutch bou- quet of off-white roses, ranunculus and lysanthia, with accents of blue hydrangea. The arrangement will include a handkerchief her mother carried in her wedding, which Holly wore as a bonnet at her baptism as an infant. Holly Ellis was close to both her grandmothers, but especially to her paternal grandmother, Mayo Bailey Ellis, who died in 2011, as did her grandfather, John Fred Ellis, after nearly 70 years of marriage. Her maternal grandmother, Carolyn Funderburk Horne, who married Joyce Horne, died when Holly was about 10. “She’s just sentimental,” Cherie Ellis. “She wanted them to be part of the wedding, and since they’re deceased, this is a way to include them.” “It was beautiful, and to me, it was truly one of a kind,” Hammond said. “I remember trying [the gown] on for my last fitting and my mom looked so proud. I was proud, too. “It was just a wonderful experi- ence and such a special moment for me to be able to get married in the same dress my mom wore when she exchanged her vows,” she said. “If I have a little girl, I hope one day she will want to wear the same dress. Maybe this dress will be passed down for generations to SOMETHING NEW AGAIN When Paige Sistare married Justin Kubiak on Dec. 13, 2014, she wore a wedding dress that debuted on June 20, 1987, when her own mother played the starring role. “I chose to wear it because, as a child, I always thought it looked like a princess’
  • 8. 8 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 BY ASHLEY LOWRIMORE FOR TODAY’S WOMAN L ocal girls are going very formal in their prom dress choices this year, with sequins and beading topping their gotta-have-it lists. BEADS AND BRAIDS This year’s prom style includes formal lengths, elegant silhouettes and lots of sparkle. Craig Mathis, owner of CB’s Limited, says popular trends in his store are dresses with lace, pastel colors and full-length formals. “They want very formal dresses with a lot of beading,” he said. “Sequins were so hot in the 80s and now they’re back big time.” According to Mathis, another big trend was seen earlier this year at the Miss Universe pageant – the two-piece dress. “Two-piece dresses are hot this year,” he said. “Schools are allowing it in the dress code now and that’s opened up new opportunities.” Mathis says A-line dresses and dresses with a simple silhouette are preferred, as opposed to more revealing dresses. “One thing we’ve noticed is that we’ve got little mix of almost everything this year,” he said. For prom 2015 tresses, hair accessories are out and braiding is in, says Amy Jordan, owner of Scizzor FX in Indian Land. “We’re seeing that loose, messy up-do with a lot of braiding,” she said. Jordan say it’s best to take the style and ornamentation of the dress into consideration when deciding on a hairstyle. “If you have a halter or a lot of beadwork going on on top of the dress, wearing your hair up is probably best, because you don’t want anything to take away from that,” she said. “If it’s a strapless or something similar, then wearing your hair down or half-up would really work.” ORGANIZING THE PROM Lancaster High School prom coordinator and chaperone Kristie Davis is in her third year of organizing the event, planned for April 25 in Richburg. The social studies teacher is working with Do-It Printing to design, print and sell prom tickets; hiring a photogra- pher; coordinating prom memorabilia and more. Davis also is working with Balloon Express and Special Occasions for the “Frozen in Time” prom that anticipates about 400 prom-goers. “As the prom coordinator, my biggest concern is decorat- ing the ballroom,” said Davis, who has about eight hours to decorate. “I always have a handful of teachers that are willing to help me with the big day and I am so apprecia- tive for them.” Davis says high-low dresses were popular the year she began chaperoning and that she sees students drive their parents’ sporty cars or rent limos or party vans. “Our students put a lot of thought and money into their fashion,” she said. “I am always very pleased with how they look and behave.” PROM 2014 When deciding on a dress for her senior prom at Andrew Jackson High School, Sarah Ellis had a good idea of what she wanted to wear. “I wanted something that had a lot of sparkle, and I wanted it to be strapless,” Ellis said. Ellis, now a student at USCL, said she tried on several dresses before choosing a pale blue dress to coordinate with her date, Alex Jackson. “I had a pink dress the year before, so I knew I didn’t want another pink one,” she said. “And I liked blue on Alex, so he helped me decide on that one.” Ellis and Jackson took photos at the Kershaw Country Club and Lancaster County Courthouse and ate dinner before heading to the 2014 prom at the Fairway Room. PROM 1998 As a member of the 1998 Indian Land High School prom committee, then-junior Kristen Schwerthoffer Wilson dec- COURTESY OF SARAH ELLIS Sarah Ellis sparkled in this pale blue, off-the-shoulder gown with a long chiffon train that coordinated with her date Alex Jackson’s vest and tie at last year’s Andrew Jackson High School prom at the Fairway Room. COURTESY OF AMUY JORDAN Loose, messy up-dos with braids are popular for prom this year, says stylist Amy Jordan. Prom 2015 a very Formal Affair TheBigDayChangesOverTime
  • 9. Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 9 orated columns of blue and white balloons and arranged the photo area for the “Starry Night” prom theme. Wilson went to prom at the Sheraton Hotel on Billy Graham Park- way with a friend, Michael LeRoy, after a fellow classmate, Tommy, declined her invitation. She says ballgown dresses were a big fash- ion trend, as well as spaghetti straps, elbow- length gloves and leg garters. “I wore a blue Jessica McClintock dress that was long and poofy, like Cinderella,” said Wilson, who also had a matching blue corsage ribbon. And the original classmate that Wilson asked to the prom, Tommy? The two went on to date and married seven years later. “I told him, ‘You’re never going to live this down.’” courtesy of Kristin Wilson Kristin Schwerthoffer and Michael LeRoy pose for photos at the 1998 Indian Land High School prom. To include your business in the next edition, call The Lancaster News at (803) 283-1140.
  • 10. Tomorrow’s Woman Baylee Evans G Full name and age: Baylee Evans, 15 G Hometown: Lancaster G Family: Parents, Lee Evans and Paula Evans; siblings, Austin and Lindsay G Education: Freshman at Lancaster High School G Life goals: Go to college with a scholarship G What are you most proud of? My improvements in golf from where I was a year ago to now G What do you enjoy most about golfing? Playing with friends; the competi- tiveness; being able to improve; and meeting new and unique people G Favorite golf course: Edgewater Golf Course, because they’re so friendly G Best golf game/score: In tournament, 72 G Favorite movie: “The Greatest Game Ever Played” G Favorite song: “Living on a Prayer” by Bon Jovi G Favorite way to spend free time: With friends and family, and Penny Board G Most influential person in your life: My late grandfather, Carl Evans – he gave me my first golf club at age 3 and got me started G Your personality in just one word: Outgoing G Words that inspire you: Always do your best and get the job done right. 10 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 PHOTO COURTESY OF PAULA EVANS Baylee Evans plays golf in her party dress during her eighth-grade formal at the Lancaster Golf Club.
  • 11. SPRING 2015 • TODAY’S WOMAN • 11 A trio of sassy and stylish sisters has hit reality TV and those in the Lancaster area will see the familiar faces of three Rucker sisters – Ruby, Ellen and Ione. “Love Thy Sister,” which airs Thursday evenings on WE TV, follows the Lancaster natives through family life, high society living and sisterhood. The season began Jan. 8. “We wanted to be on TV because we think we have a unique story connection as sisters,” said Ione Rucker Jamison, the youngest of the three sisters. “We believe we have a story to tell, being modern Southern women with strong morals but also a strong sense of acceptance of all people.” Jamison, who has three young children and a master’s degree in education, is divorced from pro basketball player Antawn Jamison of the LA Lakers and trying to find the next love of her life. The cast includes Jamison’s transgender best friend, Londyn. Ruby Rucker Cooper, the eldest sister and a lawyer by profession, and her hus- band, Ford, an orthodon- tist, have three children and are experiencing financial strain. Ellen Rucker Carter, the middle sister, is divorced from Vince Carter of the Dallas Mavericks, and is the mother of their daughter, Kai. She has been dating attor- ney and former state represen- tative Bakari Sellers for five years, struggling with the idea of commitment. Carter is on hiatus from Rucker Chiropractic in Lancaster. The sisters, the daughters of Dr. Douglas Rucker and Ruby King Rucker of Lancaster, are partnering to launch a natural hair care line, Rucker Roots. Their mother, Ruby Rucker, says as a 75-year-old, church-going woman, she is not the target demographic for the show and its, at times, controversial, racy content. She leaves the room during certain scenes. The Rucker matriarch and mother of eight believes there is always falsity to television, even if it is called “reality TV,” but she stands behind her daughters and supports their decision to be in the spotlight. “They are enjoying it. It’s what they want to do,” said Rucker, who admitted her husband is not keen on the show. “I know how good of mothers they are and have good rela- tionships with their husbands and ex-husbands. They are good girls.” A friend for 30 years, S.C. Rep. Mandy Powers Norrell has known Ruby Rucker Cooper since the fifth grade. They went through school and law school together, and were in each other’s weddings. To Powers Norrell, the Ruckers are like family. When first watching “Love Thy Sister,” she felt protective, worry- ing about how viewers would per- ceive her surrogate family. “But objectively, they are funny and interesting,” she said. “I think the show will be suc- cessful. It’s not like any- thing else I know of. It’s real and shows a dif- ferent kind of dynamic.” Others who know the Rucker sisters have told them the show is entertaining and a breath of fresh air. “They love seeing us repre- sent women who are strong, loyal, family-oriented mothers and career women,” Jamison said. The Rucker name is well- known in Lancaster. The sisters’ grandfather, A.R. Rucker, was the superintendent of the black public schools in Lancaster and their grandmother, Ruth Wright Rucker, was a teacher for more than 30 years. Their father, the first black dentist in town, is still practicing dentistry here. Reality TV show focuses on Rucker sisters’ relationships Antawn Jamison of the LA Lakers and trying to find the next love of her life. The cast includes Jamison’s transgender best friend, Londyn. Ruby Rucker Cooper, the eldest sister and a lawyer by profession, and her hus- band, Ford, an orthodon- tist, have three children and are experiencing Ellen Rucker Carter, the middle sister, is divorced from Vince Carter of the Dallas Mavericks, and is the mother of their daughter, Kai. She has been dating attor- ney and former state represen- tative Bakari Sellers for five years, struggling with the idea of commitment. Carter is on hiatus from Rucker Chiropractic in The sisters, the daughters of Dr. Douglas Rucker and Ruby King Rucker of Lancaster, are partnering to launch a natural hair care line, Their mother, Ruby Rucker, says as a 75-year-old, church-going woman, she is not the target demographic for the show and its, at times, controversial, racy To Powers Norrell, the Ruckers are like family. When first watching “Love Thy Sister,” she felt protective, worry- ing about how viewers would per- ceive her surrogate family. “But objectively, they are funny and interesting,” she said. “I think the show will be suc- cessful. It’s not like any- thing else I know of. It’s and a breath of fresh air. “They love seeing us repre- sent women who are strong, loyal, family-oriented mothers and career women,” Jamison said. The Rucker name is well- known in Lancaster. The sisters’ grandfather, A.R. Rucker, was the superintendent of the black public schools in Lancaster and their grandmother, Ruth Wright Rucker, was a teacher for more than 30 years. Their father, the first black dentist in town, is still practicing dentistry here. COURTESY OF IONE RUCKER JAMISONABOVE: Ione Rucker Jamison, second from left, and Ellen Rucker Carter, second from right, pose with someof the women who attended the Rucker Family Foundation fashion show at Ione’s Waxhaw home in 2014.The show raises funds for foundation scholarships. BELOW: The Rucker sisters, from left, Ruby RuckerCooper, Ellen and Ione put on the glitz for their reality TV show, “Love Thy Sister,” on WE TV. BY JULIE GRAHAM FOR TODAY’S WOMAN PHOTO BY SANTANNA HAYES; COURTESY OF DARON PRESSLEY
  • 12. 12 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 S eeing double is a normal part of life for Lancaster resident Angela Rorie. Rorie had her first set of twins on April 30, 1986. Now 27, Krystal Duncan and her twin sister, Kimberly Williams, have their own families, Duncan with twin 3-year-old boys of her own. On Feb. 19, 1992, Rorie had Kayce and her twin brother Kyle, now both 22. Another five years passed and Rorie once again learned she was pregnant with twins. However, one of the twins did not make it and her daughter Kayla, now 17, was born Aug. 27, 1997. The multiples meant buying two of everything and meant they shared much of what they got. “It was a houseful; it still is a houseful,” Rorie said. The siblings all share the same initials – KDR – a trend Rorie decided to adopt after her oldest girls were born. She enjoyed dressing them alike when they were young. Rorie said she deliberately waited five years each time to have more children. She said all her twins were natural, without any fertility treatments. “I’ve always been interested in twins; I think they are fascinating,” she said. “It’s double the arms to hug you.” Rorie said her children never had to walk to school alone and always had a friend. “They may fight with each other, but they won’t let anyone else bother them,” Rorie said. “One good thing about having a sibling is always having someone you can depend on if you need to.” Krystal and Kimberly were particularly close during a trying time in Kimberly’s life. She was diagnosed with heart and lung problems at a year old and had to be put on oxygen at age 5, Rorie said. At 15, Kimberly had to travel to Boston for open heart surgery. “That was a challenge,” Rorie said. She said Krystal always knew something was wrong and stayed by her sister’s side in the hospital. Rorie said all her children are still close and spend time together when they can. “It’s unique to have a family full of twins,” she said. “It’s been a blessing for me.” TWINS, BUT NOT THE SAME Having multiples is a trend among many Lancaster area families. Lancaster resident Carrie Steele was five months preg- nant when she learned that she was going to welcome two children to the world. “It was a quite a shock,” she said. On March 26, 2006, Steele had Layla and Seneca Steele, SEEING DOUBLE COURTESY OF ANGIE RORIE The Rorie family is still multiplying. Angela Rorie, center, had three sets of twins (although one did not make it), and one of her daughters, Krystal, has also had twins. The extended family now includes, from left, seated: Kayce Rorie holding Logan Pate, William Duncan, Gabriel Duncan, Wyatt Duncan and Krystal Duncan (William and Wyatt are twins); second row: Mike Pate, Kayla Rorie, Angela Rorie, Kimberly Williams and Steven Duncan; back row: Kyle Rorie and Canaan Williams. BY AMANDA HARRIS FOR TODAY’S WOMAN SSEEINGEEING DDOUBLEOUBLESEEING DOUBLE
  • 13. Spring 2015 • Today’s Woman • 13 now 8 years old. Layla and Seneca are fraternal twins and different in every way. Layla is laid-back, hates pink and enjoys football and sports, while Seneca enjoys dressing up and princesses. “We’ve really tried hard to let them grow into the people they are individually,” she said. “I wouldn’t change anything; they are great girls.” The girls had their own way of communi- cating with each other when they were little, Steele said. Seneca said she and her sister are close. “We get to argue and play a lot,” she said. “We’re best friends.” Layla said she enjoys having a twin sister. “They are always there for you,” she said. “My twin is pretty nice.” While they are each their own person, Steele said Layla and Seneca sometimes seem to switch personalities and like to do what the other does. “We go with the flow,” she said. One Of Each Lancaster resident Sharlee Lucas has the challenge of raising a boy and a girl at the same time. Lucas’ daughter, Georgie, and her brother, Gunnar, now 16, were born May 13, 1998. “It’s challenging at times, but I was blessed,” Lucas said. “I know nothing else.” Having a boy and a girl means always mov- ing in two directions, she said. Her son does sports, while Georgie does competitive dance. Both attend Andrew Jackson High School. “It’s always been them two,” Lucas said. “They balance each other.” Lucas said she enjoyed throwing joint birth- day parties with two themes for her son and daughter. “It’s a lot of fun having two the same age running around,” she said. “It’s a great experi- ence.” Georgie said she and her brother are oppo- sites, but enjoy each other’s company. Growing Up As Twins Tracie Sims Veal and Sharon Sims Minors, born Jan. 12, 1971, are close, even for identical twins. The duo, who live in Lancaster a few min- utes from each other, grew up as best friends, dressing alike until sophomore year of high school. They attended college together and studied education. Veal now teaches second grade at McDonald Green Elementary, while Minors teaches first grade at Erwin Elementary. “We’ve been together forever,” Minors said. “There is a natural bond there, I just can’t explain it.” Inspired by her eighth-grade teachers, Veal said she always wanted to become a teacher. Minors said she decided on pursuing educa- tion like her sister. Veal and Minors said the challenging part of being identical is getting people to recognize them as their own person. “We’re constantly trying to identify who we are,” Minors said. But both said they enjoy being a twin. “We always had a friend with us,” Veal said. photos courtesy of Tracie Veal ABOVE: Sharon Minors, left, and her twin sister, Tracie Veal, both teach at Lancaster County elementary schools. BELOW: Twins Sharon, left, and Tracie Sims in a portrait made while they were children. courtesy of the Steele Family The Princess and the Packer: Fraternal twin sisters Seneca, left, and Layla Steele, 8, display some of their different interests. AdviceFrom TheTrenches Experienced moms and dads share their tips for parents with multiples or who are expecting multi- ples: l Keep your children on the same feeding and sleeping schedules. l Help them grow as individuals. l Have your children share with each other instead of buying two of everything. l Use coupons – dia- pers are expensive. l Don’t be afraid to ask for advice l Get as much sleep as you can. l Be patient, caring and loving. l Enjoy the experi- ence.
  • 14. T he Paleo diet and its sisters, Whole 30 and Primal Blueprint, have gained popularity in the last few years. So what is a Paleo diet? The idea is that, genetically, our bodies have not changed significantly since the Paleolithic “hunt- er gatherers,” so if we eat a diet similar to that of our ancient ancestors, we will be healthier. Food do’s and don’ts are relatively simple. On the “do” list are meats, fish, poultry, vegetables and fruit, eggs, nuts and seeds, and oils like olive, walnut, coconut and flaxseed. The “don’t” list include cereal grains, legumes, dairy, refined sugar, potatoes, salt, coffee and tea, refined vege- table oils and processed foods. WHOLE 30 A number of Lancaster women have discov- ered and benefitted from the Paleo diet or one of its sister plans. Jodi Honeycutt and Candye Faile used the Whole 30 plan. It is just what the name implies – a Paleo-based 30-day plan. Using guidelines available online and in print suits the needs of many people, and both used one or more. “The reason I chose this program was because I said I could do anything for 30 days,” Faile said. A nurse with Novant Healthcare in Matthews, N.C., Faile enrolled in the Island Sun Fitness “boot camp” exercise program as well. She started her program on Jan. 5 this year, and is very happy with her results after the 30-day period. So far, she’s lost just under 10 pounds, and plans to continue both diet and boot camp. Honeycutt, a Lancaster woman who’s now a high school teacher in New York, had dra- matic results from the Whole 30 program, which she started on New Year’s Day 2013 to help a friend. “I wasn’t looking for a diet, but as a woman in my 50s with Type 2 diabetes, I was looking for a way to get healthy,” Honeycutt said. She’s lost 40 pounds so far, and the weight has stayed off. But what made her the happiest was getting her blood sugar under control. 14 • TODAY’S WOMAN • SPRING 2015 A number of Lancaster women have discov- ered and benefitted from the Paleo diet or one of Jodi Honeycutt and Candye Faile used the Whole 30 plan. It is just what the A nurse with Novant Healthcare in Matthews, N.C., Faile enrolled in the Island Sun Fitness “boot camp” exercise program as well. She started her program on Jan. 5 this year, and is very happy with her results after the 30-day period. So far, she’s lost just under 10 pounds, and plans to continue both Honeycutt, a Lancaster woman who’s now a high school teacher in New York, had dra- matic results from the Whole 30 program, which she started on New Year’s Day 2013 to “I wasn’t looking for a diet, but as a woman in my 50s with Type 2 diabetes, I was looking for a way to get healthy,” She’s lost 40 pounds so far, and the weight PALEO DIET TORIESBY NITA BROWN FOR TODAY’S WOMAN Trayce Griffin AFTER 18 months on Primal Blueprint Trayce Griffin BEFORE Primal Blueprint Candye Faile AFTER one month on Whole 30 PHOTOS COURTESY OF CANDYE FAILE Candye Faile BEFORE Whole 30 Candye Faile AFTER one month on Whole 30 SUCCESS PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRAYCE GRIFFIN
  • 15. SPRING 2015 • TODAY’S WOMAN • 15 Honeycutt, who had Type 2 diabetes for nine years, and had been on five pills per day. Now she no longer takes any diabetes medication, and rarely any med- icine at all. PRIMAL BLUEPRINT Trayce Griffin, a stylist at At Salon Dimensions, reports similar dramatic results using the Primal Blueprint, which she explains is a simplified Paleo plan. She never bought anything, just used information and recipes found online or exchanged with friends and clients, and is taking it “one day at a time.” In addition to changing food choices, the Primal offered another benefit for Griffin. “It teaches your body to burn stored fat, using intermittent fasting and eating only when you’re hungry,” she said. Griffin began the Primal program on Sept. 11, 2012, and about the same time discovered she is grain-intolerant. She’s now free from inflammation and a host of other grain allergy symptoms, feels much better, has lost 70 pounds, and gone from a size 16/18 to size 6/8. All three women said this is a lifestyle change for them, not a fad diet. It has worked well for them to use the Paleo diet principles to improve their overall health, something they consider even more important than losing some unwanted pounds. MoreInfo Look here for more information: G Dr. Loren Cordain’s website: thep- aleodiet.com, informa- tion, research, recipes and books G Whole 30: whole30.com/new G Primal Blueprint: www.marks- dailyapple.com G Island Sun Boot Camp Facebook page: recipes, information and encouragement from others in the area on the program G Book: It Starts with Food, by Dallas & Melissa Hartwig G Cooking: nom- nompaleo.com – Michelle Tam’s “Food for Humans” G Well-Fed: Paleo Recipes for People Who Love to Eat – Melissa Joulwan’s cookbook G Also visit Joulwan’s blogsite: the- clothesmakethegirl.com G Juli Bauer’s blogsite: paleomg.com