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THESTYLEMATE.COM
Photo:YayoiKusama
Stylemate
THE
wabi - sabi
NEWS ABOUT LIFE, STYLE & HOTELS
ISSUE No 01 | 2020
thestylemate.com
2THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photo:Heldentheater
Essentials
Page 3
From sumo stables
to yuzu baths
Pages 4 – 7
Interview with Megumi Ito:
magical moments
Page 6
LIFE:
Itadakimasu:
three recommendations
for Japanese cuisine
in Europe
Pages 8 – 10
Pearls from the
misty lagoon
Page 11
Franzobel
Page 12
STYLE:
Kamikatz
Page 13
Cities of Design
Kobe and Nagoya
Pages 14 – 15
New in Town:
Kyoto’s latest hotels
Page 16
Cosmic Nature
Page 17
Lost in fashion
Pages 18 – 20
Column
by Helder Suffenplan:
Japan my Love!
Page 21
Record-breaker
Pages 22 – 23
HOTELS:
LIFESTYLEHOTELS
selection:
Hotel Collect
Page LH 01
The Kaltenbach
Pages LH 02 – 03
Sportresidenz Zillertal
Page LH 04
Alpinlodge & Spa
Page LH 05
New Member:
Designhotel Laurichhof
Das Max
Gästehaus Krenn
Hotel Collect
Pages LH 06 – 07
Bergland Design and
Wellness Hotel, Sölden
Page LH 08
Hotel des Balances
Page LH 09
Art & Business Hotel
Page LH 10
La Petite Ivy
Page LH 11
Hotel Stein and
Hotel Goldgasse
Pages LH 12 – 13
Geinberg5
Private Spa Villas
Page LH 14
Hotel
Lemongarden
Page LH 15
Directory
lifestylehotels
Page LH 16
IMPRINT
Page 2
Wabi-sabi, finding beauty in imperfection, is a Japanese
concept of aesthetic values that we really like and wish to
embrace. This issue of THE Stylemate is dedicated to all things
Japan and we have put together a selection of many beautiful
things for you to enjoy, some of which are virtually perfect,
while others are so interesting that that could be deemed as
their version of beauty. The reason for orienting our focus on
Japan and the Japanese culture is that this summer will see
Tokyo playing host to the Olympic Games. Our cover is more
unusual than sporty, but we think it is the perfect example
of the concept of wabi-sabi. Successful Japanese artist Yayoi
Kusama is known for her polka dots that have the capacity to
put us into an almost trance-like state and convey the feeling
of obsession, and this spring will be presenting a huge show in
The New York Botanical Garden. Information and photos that
have already been released to the press indicate that it will be
something quite extraordinary. So we’re not just looking at
Japan in Japan, but also at Japan around the world.
In this respect, we have chatted to Vienna resident and lighting
designer Megumi Ito, and asked an Austrian jeweller to show
us some exciting Japanese pearls. We write about how we in
Europe can be inspired by unusual culinary delicacies from
Japan, and which designers and fashion stores in Tokyo you
absolutely have and visit. Helder Suffenplan, a publicist
living in Berlin, talks in his column about fragrance and his
love of Japan – he will also report in future issues on the world
of olfactory delights.
And of course, we have the usual selection of hotels that are
sure to inspire you to get out and travel.
Thomas Holzleithner & Hardy Egger
E D I T O R S
IN THIS ISSUE
Be sure to subscribe to
THE Stylemate so you'll
never miss an issue!
thestylemate.com
IMPRINT Media owner and publisher: Prime Time Touristik & Marketing GmbH, Schmiedgasse 38/1, 8010 Graz, Austria
Editors: Thomas Holzleithner & Hardy Egger Editor-in-chief: Nina Prehofer Managing editor: Christin Maier-Erlach
Cover photo: Yayoi Kusama Layout: VON K Brand Design
Writers: Franzobel, Hedi Grager, Nora Palzenberger, Helder Suffenplan Copy editor: Katherine Nussey, Lisbeth Wild
Advertising: office@thestylemate.com Printed by: Medienfabrik Graz, 8020 Graz Published in: Graz Publication: 3 x yearly
3THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:Karimoku / AxelArigato / f-p-design / Gressl / LouisVuitton / Vitra
essentials
T O KYO S T O O L
Multi-award-winning design studio Drill Design
was founded in Tokyo in 2001 by Yusuke Hayashi and
Yoko Yasunishi, and they have since produced designs
for big names such as Muji, Canon, Mercedes-Benz and
Camper. The small Tokyo Stool is a direct reference to
the national stadium in Tokyo, which was built for the
1964 Olympic Games. By using the old seats that would
otherwise have ended up as waste, the stool embodies
the heritage of the former stadium and the history
behind it. The elegant wooden legs elevate the stool to
become a fitting memorial. The 350 limited-edition
pieces were made by Karimoku.
drill-design.com, approx. €250
G E N E S I S T R I P L E
Axel Arigato’s success story tells of a rapid rise to
fame, with the Swedish online label transforming
into an internationally recognised brand within
a very short period of time. Minimalist Japanese
aesthetics have had a strong influence on the brand
run by Creative Director Max Svardh and CEO Albin
Johansson. It’s all about the attempt to achieve more
from less, and it’s something they succeeded in
doing with their range of sneakers. The new Genesis
Triple sneaker, with white leather base, cremino
sole and contrasting tab, has an upper that draws
inspiration from retro silhouettes but is set on a
modern streamlined sole to create the perfect
fusion of retro and contemporary.
axelarigato.com, €205
M A R U T OM I S A K E S E T
Urushi craftsmanship has been practised in Japan for
almost 6,500 years and enables high-quality utensils to
be made out of wood. Even today, urushi, a 100% natural
lacquer derived from the sap of the Japanese urushi
tree and processed by means of a unique and arduous
traditional technique, continues to be extracted in Japan.
The aim of the project by f/p design entitled Real Japan
was to present this traditional Japanese craft to a wide
audience and diversify it by means of modern designs.
f-p-design.com
L O U I S V U I T T ON B AG
What would Japan be without eccentric accessories?
The perfect accessory for a trip to Japan is the Louis
Vuitton Video Cassette clutch in calfskin with its strap in
monogram canvas. You can always rely on designer
Nicolas Ghesquière to bring out an “it” accessory every
season. Following in the footsteps of the futuristic
Archlight trainers in 2018, the monogrammed handbag
that looks like a small UFO and the Wallabee shoes comes
the clutch that looks like a video tape from the 1980s.
We love it!
louisvuitton.com, €4,200
A KA R I BY V I T RA
Japanese-American artist and designer Isamu Noguchi
started creating the Akari Light Sculptures in the 1950s.
He chose the name “akari”, a word that means “light”
in Japanese, connoting both illumination and physical
lightness. “The harshness of electricity is transformed
through the magic of paper back to the light of our
origin – the sun – so that its warmth may continue to
fill our rooms at night,” explained Noguchi. Each Akari
Light Sculpture is meticulously crafted by hand in the
Ozeki workshop, a traditional family-run company
based in Gifu, Japan. In a first step, bamboo rods are
stretched across the original wooden forms designed
by Noguchi to make the framework that determines the
object’s shape. Washi paper, derived from the bark of the
mulberry tree, is cut in strips and glued to the bamboo
ribbing. After the glue has dried, the wooden form
is removed and the shade can be folded.
vitra.com, €789
S O U T H S E A D R E A M I NG
These earrings by jewellery brand Gressl have got
us in the mood for summer. The carved South Sea
mother of pearl evokes images of white sandy beaches,
while the fine chalcedony drops are reminiscent of
the glittering blue-green of the sea. The jewellery is
proof of goldsmith Barbara Gressl’s love of exceptional
gemstones. The white gold earrings with brilliant-cut
white stones will go just as well with a shirt, jeans and
trainers as with a delicate, softly flowing dress.
gressl.com, €3,950
F O R T H I S E D I T I O N
4THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photo:shutterstock.com,Dr.GiladFiskus
BY
NINA
PREHOFER
S T A B L E S
F R O M S U M O
Y U Z U
B A T H S
T O
5THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photo:shutterstock.com,Dziobek
THE OLYMPIC TORCH IN GREECE
WILL BE LIT ON 12 MARCH.
AFTER THIS, IT WILL
EMBARK ON A JOURNEY
THROUGH JAPAN BEFORE
THE OLYMPIC GAMES OPEN
IN TOKYO ON 24 JULY.
HERE WE PROVIDE A BRIEF
INSIGHT INTO THE ISLAND
COUNTRY’S SPORTING
TRADITIONS, ANCIENT
RITUALS AND NEW CUSTOMS.
The Olympic Games captivate people.
Competing, getting faster, higher, further;
the emotions, the sweat, the tears …
they’re all part of this major sporting
event. The Summer Games in Tokyo this
year have been described by the organisers
as the Reconstruction Olympics, and will
serve as a reminder of the nuclear disaster
in Fukushima, where an earthquake caused
several nuclear meltdowns. There are some
incidents that we just can’t forget. And
nor should we. Another such event is the
devastating aftermath of the Americans
dropping two atomic bombs on Hiroshima
and Nagasaki. The bombs were given the
seemingly harmless names of “Little Boy”
and “Fat Man”, yet they brought horror
to an entire nation. No, to the entire
world. How strange, then, that we seem to
think nothing of overlooking thoroughly
unsettling images of “Little Rocket Man”
Kim Jong-un with his finger on the button.
DOHYŌ
THE RING
WHERE THE FIGHTS
ARE HELD.
Back to sport – traditional Japanese sport.
Have you ever been to a sumo stable? No?
Me neither, because it’s not that easy to get
into one if you don’t speak Japanese. The
sumo wrestlers’ accommodation is actually
called a stable, or beya. It’s the name of the
team the wrestlers fight for and is training
centre and accommodation all in one.
If you looked at it kindly, you could call it
a residential community for men, but in
reality it’s more like a bootcamp. Training
starts early in the morning – warm up,
stretch, wrestle. A strict hierarchy is in
force, with the youngsters having to make
breakfast, do the shopping and clean.
The practices are archaic in accordance
with the 2,000-year-old tradition. Ancient
rituals are still followed to this day, and
before a match starts, a lot of time is
devoted to religious ceremony. The same
can be said for kyudo, the Japanese art
of archery. The impressive thing about
this is the unbelievably slow sequences of
movements that make it seem like a zen
ritual. The bow and arrows are made out
of the most intricately crafted bamboo.
Kyudo, judo, kendo, sado, shodo – all of
them names of sports that end with “do”,
meaning “path” or “way”. All traditional
Japanese “master” training is linked to
meditation – you walk a path that you must
first find, then master.
SUMŌ
A FORM
OF WRESTLING
ORIGINATING
IN JAPAN.
A FIGHT
TYPICALLY
LASTS AROUND
TEN SECONDS.
6THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
ito-megumi.com
Photos:HervèGoluza
You like to work with Japanese materials like
kimono fabrics and paper. What’s so magical
about these materials?
With kimonos, I’m fascinated by the
patterns and colour combinations, and
the fact that the quality is so good you can
easily reuse the material. But it’s also the
way in which we wear the kimono that
I like so much. When it’s raining outside,
we wear a fish pattern, for example; at
a summer party we might have a hare
and the moon. Japanese paper, on the
other hand, just infuses a room with an
unbelievably soft light and also seems to
“purify” the air. When I work with bamboo,
it makes me think of building a nest, like
a bird would for its chicks. So a lamp made
out of bamboo gives off a very emotional
light. All of these materials are part of my
memories of my childhood that I want to
carry around with me always. I experience
magical moments when I work with them.
What qualities does a material need to have
in order for you to enjoy working with it?
It needs to be pure – synthetic materials
make us and nature sick and broken. I like
trying new things and usually work with
something for as long as I need to in order
to really know and understand it. That
makes it sound as though I’m talking about
a partnership …
magical
In the Hotel Sacher in Vienna, a five-metre-
tall chandelier glitters with crystals that
you applied individually by hand. How long
did that take you?
We applied the 4,000 crystals in a couple
of days. I started early in the morning
and spent the day and most of the night
standing on a ladder. But it was a wonder-
ful experience, and I had the best team in
BWM Architekten and the Sacher.
How do you work when you’re at home or in
your studio?
I mostly work in silence. I don’t have the
radio or the TV on. It’s only when I’m
totally alone that I can hear the stories of
the great philosophers. My hands are busy,
therefore so is my mind. It’s incredible
when I see what can be created in a day.
Which parts of growing up in the town of
Kamakura will you never forget?
The horizon, the sea, where I always went
with my dog, and the fresh fish. I studied
kendo for seven years and we all had to
clean the dojo, the training room, before
we started the class. I often had to spend
a long time kneeling on the floor until it
was my turn.
Which elements of Japanese culture are also
present in your new home in Vienna?
Art nouveau has many Japanese influences
and was strongly inspired by Japanese
art, and I’ve studied and been shaped by
both. Vienna is extremely beautiful and
fairly small. The music is great and the
appreciation of art and culture is just as
important in Japan as it is in Vienna. I find
that very comforting.
moments
Designer Megumi Ito makes unique light sculptures that illuminate hotels, bars
and shops. She grew up in the historic town of Kamakura in Japan, but since
completing her studies at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, it’s here that
she now lives and works.
To what extent does your heritage shape
your way of working?
I am never hectic when I work; I’m always
very deliberate. What I do is meditative,
and I have to create the right meaning
behind everything. I love imperfect
perfection. I try not to push my clients
in a particular direction, nor to be too
restrained. I always wait for the right
moment to come.
The lights you create are all one-off pieces.
Would you not like to produce your designs
on a larger scale?
I’ve never had the opportunity to go into
production, and no company has ever
approached me to do so. Until recently,
that is! I’m currently working on a
range called MITO, from the Greek word
“mythos”. It’s been like stepping into a
new phase of my life, before which I asked
myself what my current situation was –
am I still really Japanese or have I become
a bit more European? I realised that I am
both and that my sense of self has evolved.
Both cultures are also expressed in my
work, and that’s what I’ve incorporated
into the new range.
But the reason I love the individual pieces
so much is that I want to create the best
light for each specific environment. That’s
what I’m good at.
7THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:shutterstock.com:2630ben / lusia83
But the “path” doesn’t only need to be
followed in sport – you even have to go
down it for tea. Introducing sado, the
prestigious tea ceremony and ritualised
preparation of powdered green tea, or
matcha, in the presence of guests. A tea
house is always surrounded by a garden
that you have to walk through and forms
part of the ritual. The ceremony involves
many steps and strict processes that need
to be observed, including cleaning the
mouth and hands to wash away all evils
before entering the minimalist tea house,
and stooping through a low entrance
doorway to show humility. The tea master
prepares all of the utensils in a way that
aids the harmonious execution of the
processes. It’s not only tea that will finally
be handed out, but small dishes of food
as well.
Kyuto-Ryu is a newly established, modern
type of tea ceremony that can be held in
an office kitchen or a shop during a lunch
break. You still kneel on the floor, but the
crockery you use is much less valuable –
normally an everyday office coffee cup.
Despite this, the pared-back variation still
offers the opportunity to relax during the
hectic working day and provides a caffeine
hit for the afternoon ahead.
HINKAKU
WHAT SUMO WRESTLERS
HAVE TO DISPLAY.
IT MEANS DIGNITY.
IT MEANS
NOT CELEBRATING
WHEN YOU WIN,
AND NOT COMPLAINING
WHEN YOU LOSE.
YOKOZUNA
THE HIGHEST-
RANKING
SUMO WRESTLER.
HAS TO SHOW
IMMENSE STRENGTH
IN COMBAT.
WEARS A HEAVY
ROPE, OR TSUNA,
AS A SYMBOL
OF HIS RANK.
Japan has such an abundance of traditions,
rituals and customs that you could probably
spend an awfully long time looking into all
the details. They also offer a great number
of opportunities for you to put your foot in
it when you’re there visiting. Space in Japan
is divided up according to what is clean
and what is not. The house is classed as
clean, the outside is not, meaning you must
always take your shoes off before going into
someone’s home. The only room in a house
that isn’t clean is the bathroom – toilet
slippers are provided for this purpose.
Just never make the mistake of forgetting
to take them off when you come out.
Or bowing incorrectly in greeting. There
is a hierarchy to observe – older above
younger, guests above hosts, men above
women. Remember not to bow too low to
hotel employees, as they will then have to
bow even lower the next time they see you.
And if you’re wondering why there’s no
room number four, it’s because it brings
bad luck. If you’re eating with others, don’t
help yourself to another drink, but rather
wait for a companion to serve you one,
otherwise you could be seen as a drunk. If
you’ve had enough, leave your glass half full.
CHANKONABE
A STEW FOR SUMO
WRESTLERS THAT IS
HIGH IN PROTEIN AND
FAT, THEREBY PRO-
MOTING WEIGHT GAIN.
IT CONTAINS ONLY
TWO-LEGGED ANIMALS,
THE IDEA BEING THAT
SUMO WRESTLERS
SHOULD ALWAYS BE ON
TWO FEET AS WELL.
SENIOR WRESTLERS CAN
POLISH OFF UP TO TEN
LARGE PLATEFULS IN
ONE LUNCH SITTING.
CHONMAGE
THE TRADITIONAL
JAPANESE MEN’S
HAIRCUT. PREVIOUSLY
FAVOURED BY SAMURAIS,
NOW ALMOST
EXCLUSIVELY WORN
BY SUMO WRESTLERS.
IT INVOLVES COVERING
LONG HAIR WITH
CHAMOMILE OIL AND
TYING IT UP WITH A WAX
BAND IN A FORWARD-
FACING PONYTAIL.
Even while living in Vienna, lamp designer
Megumi Ito still follows rituals from her
native Japan. “I only start working once
my space, the kitchen and the bathroom
are clean. I scatter salt in the corridor
and in the corners of the rooms to keep
bad energy at bay.” In addition to this,
Ito cleanses the rooms in the morning
with incense sticks and spends every
evening in the bath. The most important
bath, though, is the one before the winter
solstice, or touji. On this night, it is
tradition to take a bath with slices of
yuzu, a fruit that is similar to the lemon
but which tastes slightly sweeter. It has
been recognised for its health-promoting
properties for centuries and is packed
with vitamins. “During this bath, we
soak up the powers of the citrus fruit and
remain healthy throughout the winter
months. Yuzu has a cleansing effect and
the fragrance is very strong and lasts a
long time, so the body stays fresh and
free of bacteria,” explains the designer.
Internalised values are just as important
to Megumi Ito as the rituals – how to be
thankful and show gratitude, how to be
gentle and be able to listen and respond,
and knowing which words to use, as every
word has its own power.
Just one more thing – if you’re not happy
with the outcome of a sumo fight, you can
throw your zabuton cushion into the ring.
Just for fun.
YORIKIRI,
OSHIDASHI
AND HATAKIKOMI
DIFFERENT WAYS OF
WINNING A FIGHT.
THERE ARE
82 DIFFERENT WAYS
IN TOTAL.
8THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
I Y O
A A L T O
iyo.it
ITADAKIMASU*
Photos:MaurizioLai
Precious materials, clean lines and custom design features characterise this restaurant, where Japan is given an original and unconventional new twist.
The IYO AALTO is a Japanese restaurant in Milan that was designed by Italian architect Maurizio Lai. It’s the second restaurant
to be opened by the group following the IYO Taste Experience, the only Japanese restaurant in Italy to have been awarded a Michelin star.
The furniture was developed exclusively in collaboration with Poliform Contract, and the resulting subtle traditional references,
contemporary and clean design language, and the interplay of materials and light create a sense of excitement.
At the sushi counter, sushi master Masashi Suzuki demonstrates his vast knowledge of edomae sushi – an ancient technique that is rarely found
outside Tokyo. The name is derived from “edo”, the former name of the Japanese capital, and “mae”, which roughly translates as “style”.
In this method of preparation, the fish is marinated for a couple of days in soy sauce, salt or vinegar and preserved, rather than being served fresh.
Delicious!
MILAN
LifeexpectancyinJapanisremarkablyhigh,and
thatcouldhavesomethingtodowithJapanesecuisine.
ITADAKIMASU*
9THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
kikko.at
Photos:SandraJedliczka
K I K K O
B Ā
How could you possibly imagine Vienna without Japanese restaurant Mochi? For many years, it has delighted the taste buds
of its guests, and tables are still highly sought after – the Falter newspaper recommends visiting out of peak times.
But there’s good news – the Mochi has now introduced a new member of the family! With the opening of Kikko Bā, the restaurant’s own
Kikko sake, which has long been a regular on the menu of the original restaurant, has found a new home in the Fourth District of the city.
The sake and wine bar, which also offers a varying selection of snacks and natural wines from around the world, was originally planned as a pop-up,
but it’s now been decided that it’s here to stay. Creative Japanese fusion dishes are whipped up in a tiny kitchen, including the ever-popular sandos
(top-notch Japanese sandwiches), crispy fried octopus with mojo rojo made out of grilled peppers, garlic and olive oil, and particularly
spicy patatas bravas: potatoes that are crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside, and accompanied by Japanese curry sauce and mayo.
Finally, you can wash it all down with carefully selected natural wines, perfectly mixed drinks, beer or sake.
VIENNA
Luckilyit’salsopossibletoenjoydeliciousJapanesefood
outsideofJapan.Herearethreerecommendations.
10THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:JuleMüller / RobertRieger
Y O S H I D A
GRAZ yoshida.at
“Beauty, perfection and passion – that’s all you need to understand about the Japanese way of living,” says Margarethe Yoshida,
who lived in Japan for 16 years and learnt the art of reducing everything down to the essential. For some time now, she has been passing on her
knowledge of all things related to Japanese cuisine through various cooking courses at her home on Ruckerlberg in Graz, Austria. Here you can learn about
the authentic preparation of butajiru, onigiri, tamagoyaki and many other dishes. Yoshida grows specific plants like shiso or myoga (the ginger flower bud)
in her garden, and stocks up on organic wine in the fridge. If you don’t feel like doing the work yourself, you can devote yourself to listening and watching.
Individually tailored cooking courses can be enjoyed by up to eight people at a time.
The Gault-Millau website describes Margarethe Yoshida’s kitchen as “perhaps the best Japanese restaurant in Austria,
although strictly speaking it’s not actually a restaurant”. If that’s not a compliment, we don’t know what is!
*Theword“itadakimasu”isroughlyequivalenttotheFrench“bonappétit”,orsomethinglike“let’seat”inEnglish,andissaidbeforeevery
mealwithyourhandstogetherasifinprayer.Itcanbetranslatedas“Ihumblyreceive”–alovelyexampleofthespiritualsideofJapanese
culture.Incidentally,attheendofthemeal,yousay“gochisousamadesu”inthanksforthedeliciousfood.
ADVERTORIALTHE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
ADVERTORIAL
gressl.com
BY
HEDI GRAGER
Photos:Gressl
Barbara Gressl has established herself
as a diamond and gemstone consultant
with a 24-carat reputation stretching far
beyond the borders of Austria. She has
been a specialist member of the Austrian
Gemmological Association since 1995, and
in 2019 was nominated for a Schmuckstars
award. Gressl discovered her love for rare
stones and pearls at a young age, as her
parents ran a specialist jewellers in Köflach
in eastern Austria. For the last ten years,
she has run her own studio on Stempfer-
gasse in Graz, where she displays selected
pieces of her goldsmithing work.
In specialist circles, Gressl is considered an
expert on Kasumigaura pearls, a Japanese
cultivated freshwater pearl. “‘Kasumigaura’
means ‘misty lagoon’ and it’s a lake around
55 miles north-east of Tokyo,” she explains
to me during my visit to her studio in
Graz. “I discovered this rare type of pearl
Pearls from
			the misty
	lagoon
Gold- and silversmith Barbara Gressl is
globally renowned as an expert on Kasumigaura pearls,
a Japanese cultivated freshwater pearl. She displays precious
pearl items in her studio on Stempfergasse in Graz, Austria,
as well as other special pieces of jewellery.
by accident a few years ago at a Japanese
dealer in Munich. They are only available
in small quantities, and even then not on
the open pearl market.” Gressl gets hers
from Japanese pearl cultivator Kazuhisa
Yanase, who will only hand them over
to selected dealers with many years of
experience of working with pearls. “That
I can get them at all is a reward in itself,”
comments the pearl expert with a proud
smile. “The main characteristic of these
pearls is their intense metallic lustre,
which delicately overlays their natural pink
and peach tones.” She reveals a few more
interesting details: “Very rarely do you
find a perfectly round pearl. Cultivators
implant a nucleus bead into the oyster,
which is lowered back into the lake in a
basket and regularly pulled up and cleaned
of any plankton. Because of this constant
up and down, the bead isn’t able to grow
steadily and uniformly, so after two or
three years you get these baroque-style
pearls.”
Akoya cultivated pearls are also beautiful.
They are one of the oldest known types
of pearl and stand out because of their
perfectly round shape and brilliant
lustre. Their colours range from cream
to pinkish-white to champagne. While
only 32 kilos of Kasumigaura pearls can
be harvested each year, with a diameter
of up to 16 millimetres, the white Akoya
cultured pearls have a yield of around
14 tonnes and a diameter of between 2 and
12 millimetres.
Barbara Gressl is also proud that she
once had the chance to meet cultivator
Kazuhisa Yanase. “He came over to me
because he had seen one of my rather
different jewellery pieces. I had a perfect
and stunning pearl with a pink, almost
purple shimmer to incorporate in a piece
of jewellery that would then be presented
at a big international jewellery trade fair.
I created a large platinum pendant in
which the pearl appeared to float freely.
It really was a huge honour,” smiles
the likeable jewellery designer. Gressl
particularly likes combining the stunning
Kasumigaura pearls with the warm tones
of rose gold. “Any woman can wear this
flattering warm shade. But it doesn’t
always have to be gold – I think the pearls
go just as well with natural materials such
as buffalo horn or Macassar ebony, and of
course with sumptuous gemstones like
champagne diamonds or pink tourmaline.”
Barbara Gressl is bursting with creative
ideas. “I have far more ideas than I could
ever possibly make,” she grins, continuing:
“I also get great joy from responding to
the demands of individual customers.”
Her concluding piece of advice: “I believe
there will be fewer and fewer high-quality
pearls in future due to environmental
factors, so it is important to make sure you
are buying absolutely perfect pearls.”
12THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
F RA N Z O B E L
Photo:DirkSkiba
LIFE
That was something I wanted to experience.
Of course, I should have been suspicious when
I asked my Japanese friend about it and they
said it would be better to do that in spring, but
by that point my flight was already booked.
Tokyo is overwhelming. Modern glass
architecture and enormous skyscrapers tower
above narrow twisting alleyways. At street level
it smells of rice cakes. People in uniform are
smiling at you everywhere you turn, bending
at a precisely defined angle, arigato gozaimasu,
even at the bottom of escalators – as if they want
to thank you for trusting the contraption. The
food is unlike anywhere else: cooked fish eggs,
crab foetuses, lotus roots, fermented soy beans,
leaves, algae, fish heads stuffed with ginger, and
much more, but no sign of the sumo wrestlers.
When can I meet them? You’d be better off
trying Kyoto.
Japan is clean. No trace of graffiti. Not a hint of
vandalism, no words of wisdom scrawled on the
toilet walls. The public toilets have heated seats.
And the trains – oh, the trains! The front of the
locomotive looks like a bobsled, they arrive bang
on time and a delay of even 15 seconds requires
a written report – a one-minute delay leads to a
newspaper article, and three minutes will have
the driver wanting to commit harakiri. Young-
sters roam about Kyoto in bizarre outfits. Manga
festival! And what about the sumo wrestlers?
You’d be better off trying Kobe.
The people are short, slim and decidedly elegant.
Their tiny noses make them look a bit like fish.
They all adore their work. Even if a member of
their family dies, work takes priority. A birth
should also preferably take place outside of
working hours. It goes without saying that you
should arrive before your boss, leave after them
and not use up your holiday allowance. Kobe
is famous for its beer-massaged cattle, who
spend their days listening to Mozart. I meet
Mr Takanake, who will help me. While we’re
eating, he accidentally touches the hot food
warmer on the table. Beads of sweat start
to form on his forehead, he bites his tongue
but tries not to let his pain show. Discipline
is everything. Never lose face. He spends the
rest of the evening cooling his hand on a damp
napkin. I discover that the Meriken harbour
area is named after an epic love story between
Mary and Ken – or is it based on a poor
understanding of the word “American”?
And what about the sumo wrestlers? You’d
be better off trying Hiroshima.
Like all other cities, Hiroshima, which was once
totally destroyed by the atomic bomb, also has
a huge red Ferris wheel. I meet Mrs Kagamura,
whose look resembles a tadpole. She invites
me to try a regional speciality, okonomiyaki,
which is a type of cabbage pancake. As for the
sumo wrestlers, they should be in Nagoya.
There I meet Mr Mitsura, who invites me to
a baseball game. There’s nothing you’d really
class as action in the four-hour game, but the
crowds are still beside themselves, holding the
mascots of the various hitters high in the air.
And what about the sumo wrestlers? I’m sent
to Kagoshima. From there I travel on to Osaka,
Atami and Sapporo, where I finally realise that
while the Japanese are incredibly welcoming
people, there’s just one thing they can’t manage:
saying no. And what about the sumo wrestlers?
They’re currently on a promotional tour in
Europe. I learn this from an Austrian judoka
I meet on the return flight, and what he tells me
is far more fascinating than any sumo wrestler.
But that’s another story.
Apparently,
in Japan you
can go and
watch sumo
wrestlers training
then have
breakfast with
them afterwards.
sumos in japan
chasing
Franzobel is an Austrian
writer. He has published
numerous plays, works of
prose and poems. His plays
have been produced in
countries including Mexico,
Argentina, Chile, Denmark,
France, Poland, Romania,
Ukraine, Italy, Russia and
the USA.
His great historical adven-
ture novel “Das Floß der
Medusa” (published by
Zsolnay) was awarded the
Bayerischer Buchpreis
(Bavarian Book Award) 2017
and was on the shortlist for
the German Book Prize 2017.
Photo:HotelCollect
Developed for couples looking for a glamorous city break or as a second home for business travellers
and urban adventurers, the Hotel Collect in Budapest boasts a contemporary design and a timeless
feel. The people behind the hotel are also the owners of a home décor store and love to share their
passion for design. The hotel is their dream project, and it’s thanks to their passion that
unique furniture pieces and artworks from their private collection can be found in the hotel –
iconic pieces that elegantly complement the modernist styling and French influences.
L I F E S T Y L E HO T E L S
LIFESTYLEHOTELS.NET
H O T E L C O L L E C T, B U DA P E S T
R E A D M O R E ON PAG E L H 0 7
Selection01 | 2020
LH 02THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
How do you know when you've done
everything right as a hotel owner?
When guests no longer know which day of
the week it is – they’re in true holiday mode
and can really switch off.
What is the best thing about nature
for you, and how do you maintain your
connection with the natural world?
A passion for the mountains runs in the
family – my great-grandfather used to
make a living as a renowned mountain
guide in the Tyrolean Alps. My soul lights
up when I wake up in the morning, look out
the window and can see the unparalleled
mountain landscape and the Zillertal
countryside right in front of me. What's
particularly interesting about our location
to those who don't enjoy the hot weather is
that we border the forest. In the summer,
this helps to maintain a comfortable
temperature, to the point where we don’t
need air conditioning in the rooms. That in
turn makes a substantial contribution to
our efforts to operate more sustainably.
As a hotel owner and host, when do you
get to go on holiday yourself?
I get asked this question a lot by our guests.
The answer is quite simple. Whenever I
go on a hike in the Tyrolean mountains –
either with other mountain enthusiasts or
on my own – it feels like a proper holiday
experience. The recreational value is huge
and it allows me to really recharge my
batteries for everyday life. People are often
rather taken aback when I tell them during
a mountain tour that it feels like I’m on
holiday in that moment.
You built The Kaltenbach from nothing in
the middle of the countryside. What were
you looking to achieve?
A unique new hotel concept with the
perfect combination of much-needed
privacy and the luxury of an upmarket
four-star hotel. The result is like a typical
Tyrolean mountain village, characterised
by fascinating architecture and placed
right at the heart of nature – we call it
our power place. We’ve received several
awards for it.
A power place allows you to achieve
calmness, gain strength or expand your
consciousness. You live in a power place.
What is so special about this location?
It’s not just that it’s a power place it’s
the symbiosis of architecture, design
and being the perfect starting point for
activities in and around the mountain
village, as well as cultural city excursions
and sightseeing. Our motto “Feel right
at home” is something our guests also
experience – we’re not just saying that,
it’s proven by the fact that they come back
time after time.
Stephan Haas spent more than two decades
working in senior management at a bank before
leaving it all behind and becoming a hotel owner.
The result is The Kaltenbach, which offers the perfect
combination of much-needed privacy and luxury.
the
ultimate
day-
dream
THE
KALTENBACH
LH 03THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
What are your five favourite places in
and around the hotel?
It’s natural to have favourite places that
you’re drawn to because they radiate some
kind of special energy. But now that I’ve
started thinking about it, I’m finding it
hard to choose. As a mountain guide with
many years of experience, I would say that
there is a really special moment when you
reach the top of a mountain – you see the
cross at the summit, in varying shapes
and conditions, marked by the weather
and the climate. That never fails to be
a defining experience. You take a moment
to pause and be thankful.
What do you daydream about?
Even though it’s also the most popular
image of the Zillertal on Instagram, the
view from the suspension bridge at the
Olperer Hut is really something spectacu-
lar, above the turquoise lake and with the
enormous mountains in the background.
Guests always feel the special atmosphere
when they go there, as well. Joy, inner
peace and glittering eyes are always proof
for us as hosts and friends that they’re in
the right spot in the world.
Which experiences should absolutely
not be missed during a stay in the Ziller
Valley?
That’s one of the most difficult questions
because I find it almost impossible to
choose. There are many reasons why Zill-
ertal is one of the most active valleys in the
world, bursting as it is with destinations
that will provide unforgettable experiences
for the whole family – for example the
Spruce Tree Castle in the Zillertal Arena, or
the birds of prey display at the Adlerbühne
in Mayrhofen, which is ideal for nature
enthusiasts. Nature’s Ice Palace at the
Hintertux glacier is a guaranteed adren-
aline rush and an incredible adventure.
Mountain lovers yearn for many different
things, but one thing is certain: those
who stay with us at The Kaltenbach enjoy
maximum holiday time.
lifestylehotels.net
AU S T R I A
T Y RO L   /   H O C H Z I L L E R TA L
45
rooms,
apartments and
suites
5,000 m2
nature garden
LH 04THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
SPORTRESIDENZ
ZILLERTAL ****S
Photos:“BECKNAPHOTO” / ThomasEberharter.
This cosiness begins as soon as you get
into your room with its own infrared
sauna, or private traditional sauna if you’re
in a suite. Anyone wanting to venture a
little further will find plenty of space in
the Cloud7 wellness area, which caters to
all requirements. Whether you’re in the
sauna, the steam room, the relaxation
room, the hot tub or on one of the terraces,
you are guaranteed to find a quiet moment
to yourself and become aware of just how
extensive the Sportresidenz is with so few
rooms. In the heated infinity pool on the
roof, you can allow the day to fade away and
think about the following day, which will
once again offer plenty of opportunities to
work the body and calm the mind.
Sport, sport and more sport! The Zillertal in Austria’s
Tyrol region is a real sporting paradise, so it’s fitting that
the Sportresidenz should offer the best in working the body
and calming the mind. The cuisine will also keep you on
your toes, with a new six-course menu every day.
GOING FOR GOLD
Also keeping active is head chef Willy,
who offers a new six-course menu every
day in the Genusswerkstatt restaurant.
He cooks predominantly using ingredients
from the region and turns them into local
dishes with international influences, and
it’s these dishes that have already earnt the
ambitious chef an award. Everything from
the abundant and inviting breakfast buffet
and afternoon snacks to the gourmet
evening meals can be made to take into
account any allergies or intolerances,
and vegan or vegetarian options are also
available. Those who like a sense of routine
even on holiday will appreciate being able
to keep “their” table in the restaurant
throughout their stay so that no one else
is able to sit there.
MORE SPACE, FEWER PEOPLE
What makes a stay at the Sportresidenz
even more enjoyable is that despite its size,
there are only 33 rooms and suites, mean-
ing you can really feel at home here and
benefit from a warm and personal service.
The high-quality construction makes for
a cosy, intimate and relaxing atmosphere.
The right setup, the right grip, a graceful
swing and the little white ball is sent flying
high over the lush green fairway. It’s not
just the Zillertal that keeps you active –
the Sportresidenz Zillertal boutique hotel
certainly also lives up to its name. The
hotel sits right on the edge of an 18-hole
championship golf course, which is sure to
delight amateurs and professionals alike.
And for anyone who still wants more after
an arduous game, there’s the opportunity
to watch other golfers reach the island
green from the hotel. But sport doesn’t
only have to mean golf. Those who like to
keep it simple can explore the countless
hiking and mountain biking trails, get a
lungful of fresh mountain air and marvel
at the panoramic views. On the other hand,
if you want to show off your adventurous
side, there are more extreme activities
like rafting, canyoning and paragliding.
Winter, of course, sees both aspiring and
experienced skiers and cross-country
skiers quenching their sporting thirst.
Providing enrichment for the body, mind
and soul are the yoga, Qigong, Pilates and
meditation sessions that form part of the
comprehensive activities programme at
the Sportresidenz. Or you could go for aqua
aerobics or a fitness class. If you haven’t
yet tried singing bowls for relaxation,
it’s a real must. When the tone of the bell
vibrates through the body, you feel every
single wave. It’s surprising how cleansing
a treatment using sound can feel.
hole
in
one
lifestylehotels.net
AU S T R I A
T Y RO L   /   Z I L L E R TA L
33
rooms
On the
golf course
LH 05THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:Alpinlodge&Spa
Set amidst the spectacular Engadin mountain landscape on the sunny side
of the Samnaun valley, you will find the design hotel Alpinlodge & Spa*****.
Claudia and Hansjörg Kolednik have been its owners and hosts
for over ten years, but their biggest success has been the 27 years as owners
of architectural firm artis plan ag, which has made a name for itself
on many national and international projects.
architecture
that evokes
emotions
artisplan.com
alpinlodge.ch
S W I T Z E R L A N D
S A M N AU N   /   RAVA I S C H
3
exclusive
apartments
Alpine spa
with infinity pool
They say that people should always
be the focus. How is that expressed in
architecture and design?
HK: We accommodate the needs and
desires of people. What do we need in
order to experience wellbeing? That’s what
we measure ourselves against. What’s
more, we connect with each project on an
individual level so that everything is tailo-
red to that specific set of requirements.
Every building has a unique selling point
that sets it apart from the rest and that’s
what makes it a one-of-a-kind solution for
customers and guests.
First an architectural firm, then luxury
holiday apartments – why did you want
to become hosts?
CK: My parents had a guesthouse, so even
when I was a child I was dealing with
guests and I am a passionate host.
What did you place particular emphasis
on when designing and planning the
Alpinlodge?
HK: The surroundings and the landscape
had to take centre stage to bring the
associated emotions into the interior
totally unfiltered. The rooms are flooded
with light and the materials possess an
Alpine charm.
You are the hosts of luxury five-star
apartments and owners of architectural
firm artis plan ag. What are the best
things about the two worlds?
Claudia Kolednik: Thanks to the direct
contact we have with our guests at the
Alpinlodge, we can take on board their
needs and suggestions and feed them
straight into the plans we’re working on,
allowing for cross-fertilisation between
the two worlds. A major advantage for
us is that we stay up to date with design
trends because we move through life with
our eyes wide open and draw constant
inspiration from our travels and attending
international trade shows.
Which type of design do you prefer?
Hansjörg Kolednik: Contemporary,
uncomplicated architecture combined
with a corresponding interior design
concept that takes into account our Alpine
location. We endeavour to open up spaces
with lots of glass and to highlight features
in the best possible way with customised
lighting solutions. Through the use of
natural materials like wood, steel, stone
and glass, we create cosy yet open rooms
that promote a sense of wellbeing. This has
been confirmed to us in extremely positive
feedback from our guests. As a guest
recently said: “You were way ahead of your
time!” That gives us real motivation for
the future.
What knowledge and experiences of hotel
projects for other clients were you able to
bring to the Alpinlodge?
HK: Actually, it was the other way around!
We tried out a lot of new things at the
Alpinlodge so we could see how it might
work with customers. In our building we
used materials like reclaimed timber in the
bathroom areas to find out whether it would
be suitable for use in a hotel environment.
The Alpinlodge is celebrating its tenth anni-
versary this year. Which of its assets would
you identify as being the most important?
CK and HK: Definitely our alpinSpa with
the panoramic infinity pool on the third
floor and the magical view of the moun-
tains. Going for a swim there is like being
in a warm mountain lake. Other things
that have proved popular are the high
ceilings like those in turn-of-the-century
stately homes.
Which artistic details in the Alpinlodge
still make you smile after ten years?
CK: I couldn’t possibly choose – everything!
The wealth of details is always appreciated
by our guests, and this feedback gives us
incentive and motivation.
What’s the main philosophy of the
Alpinlodge?
CK: The enjoyment of relaxation. As a
small but luxury design hotel, we want to
make sure our guests enjoy an unforgetta-
ble break.
An anniversary is always an occasion to
look towards the future. What do you see
in store for the architectural firm and the
Alpinlodge?
CK and HK: It’s important to us to evoke
positive emotions and to surprise our
guests and customers. To put it in the
words of Charles Eames: “The role of a
designer is that of a very good, thoughtful
host who anticipates the needs of their
guests.” This is our ultimate goal.
ALPINLODGE &
SPA *****
LH 06THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:HotelMax:ArchivMarcati / HotelLaurichhof:www.seidelstudios.de
DAS MAX
DESIGNHOTEL LAURICHHOF
Have you ever been to Pirna? Where is it, you ask?
It’s in the Saxon Switzerland region of Germany, of course!
You don’t know where that is either? Then it really is time for a trip
to the Laurichhof design hotel to meet the Seidel family.
“Creativity never sleeps. If you let it in,
if you live by it, you will see what joy
people can experience when they give in to
abstract thinking. You will want to take it
by the hand and be led into a dream world.
We are capable of so much more than
simply experiencing the day to day and
clinging on to the obvious and what has
always been,” believes owner and interior
designer Annette Katrin Seidel. And that’s
exactly what pushed her and her son Franz
Philip Seidel, an architecture student, to
conceive the Laurichhof in Pirna.
A HOTEL THAT DOUBLES
AS A SHOWROOM
Stemming from the family love of design
and architecture – her husband Uwe is an
architect – Annette has created a place that
aims to be as inspiring as a showroom and
as comfortable as a beautiful home. Each
of the suites tells a different story, brings a
different style to life, and every last detail,
right down to the plug sockets, has been
carefully considered. Take the Big in Japan
suite – the bamboo-effect wooden flooring
and the bathroom tiles that look like
origami join forces to pay homage to the
Japanese way of life. Guests that like their
suites so much that they want to take them
home are in the right place: everything you
find in the suites, from individual pieces
of furniture to entire Laurichhof concepts,
can be replicated within your own four
walls. Those who manage to leave their
suite, or the Laurichhof in general, which
offers delicious meals in its Lazy Laurich
restaurant, will discover the stunning and
idyllic beauty of its location right on the
banks of the Elbe between the cultural
hubs of Dresden and Prague. The Saxon
Switzerland National Park is sure to calm
the soul thanks to its rugged sandstone
cliffs, bubbling streams and sandy trails.
At that point you won’t just know about
Pirna, you’ll love it.
home
suite
home lifestylehotels.net
G E R M A N Y
S AXON S W I T Z E R L A N D   /   P I R N A
27
individual suites
Rooms
that tell a story
NEW
MEMBER
urban. rural.
max
and colours have been styled together
to create a “happy” ambience. The spa
area and roof terrace invite you to sit back
and chill, while at the 24-hour honesty
bar guests can mix up their drinks around
the clock, as the name suggests. Arrival
is simple, check-in is uncomplicated and
flexible. Seefeld itself has a lot to offer
for nature enthusiasts and city lovers
in equal measure, with cool bars and
restaurants demonstrating the benefit of
being in a popular destination. And for
those who still love the traditional side of
things, you can find that too.
Speak to any Austrian about Seefeld
in Tyrol and they’ll probably all have
a similar image in their heads. Nestled
on a plateau between the Wetterstein and
Karwendel mountain ranges, it was used
several times as a venue for the Winter
Olympics, evoking images of classic winter
tourism, idyllic Tyrolean mountain land-
scapes and quaint chalets. Architect Alex-
ander Meissl has a couple of other words in
mind when he talks about his home town:
“For a long time, I felt it was just a tourist
destination with an overload of chalets in
a too-obvious traditional regional style,
with a smattering of Bavarian-baroque
elements, and they seemed like caricatures
of architecture in my eyes. Considering
the hotel industry is the future, I didn’t
want anything to do with that image.”
Luckily times have changed and provided
an opening for a hotel like the dasMAX
boutique hotel developed by Meissl.
FREEDOM, INDIVIDUALITY AND
A HEALTHY DOSE OF MODERN DESIGN
dasMAX now offers a combination of both
a typical Alpine destination and modern
urban design. The stylish BoConcept
rooms provide everything you could
possibly need and only lack the things
you don’t. Different materials, shapes
“Do more of what makes you happy” – that’s the
motto of the dasMAX hotel in Seefeld. You can feel the
vibe, and that’s why dasMAX makes us happy too.
AU S T R I A
T Y RO L   /   S E E F E L D
19
rooms in prime location
Stylish roof terrace
with sauna
lifestylehotels.net
LH 07THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:GästehausKrenn:ArminWalcher / HotelCollect:HotelCollect
GÄSTEHAUS KRENN
HOTEL COLLECT
I have to say, rarely have I arrived somewhere as beautiful as Pürgg
im Ennstal in the Styria region of Austria. Who would have thought?
The delightful, small, charming district
of Pürgg totally stole my heart, and the
view of the Grimming mountain range
took my breath away. But the fact that
I lost my heart to Pürgg wasn’t just down
to the wildly romantic surroundings;
it was mostly thanks to the Gästehaus
Krenn and Valerie and Theresia Graf, who
along with their team nurture constant
interaction with their guests. The way they
have styled the interior of the guesthouse
makes for a charming mix of detailed
pieces just waiting to be discovered.
Modern and linear items are paired with
more traditional pieces and hand-picked
antiques for an effect that is not forced
but rather homely. Designer vases stand
fall in
love
with
pürgg lifestylehotels.net
AU S T R I A
E N N S TA L   /   P Ü RG G
4
double rooms
3
suites
From a grocery store
to e-bikes
alongside hand-woven baskets, butchers’
blocks next to sumptuous velvet wingback
chairs. The bedding and towels are made
out of linen and create both a traditional
and contemporary feel. The garden level
of the guesthouse provides an impressive
and grand open-plan living space that
resembles an extended living room, and
from here you can move into the fabulous
garden and the covered loggia.
In the library, guests can expect to find a
good selection of literature, crime novels
and magazines that you can grab and take
with you into the garden. The love of the
written word is accompanied by the same
sentiment towards art, with the walls
bedecked with works by young artists.
I could spend between now and forever
daydreaming about the mouth-watering
meals at the guesthouse, which encour-
agingly included vegetarian dishes and
were complemented by homemade bread
and fresh regional ingredients, handmade
mustard creations from Senferei Anna-
Max, delicious organic muesli from Zagler
Müslibär and pesto products from Taschler
im Glas in the grocery store. I simply don’t
have the room on this page to tell you
more. The premise of any guesthouse is
that “You arrive as a guest and leave as a
friend” – nowhere is this more true than
in the unremarkable-sounding district of
Pürgg and the Gästehaus Krenn.
an
eclectic
mix
modern colours such as petrol blue, ochre
and rust combined with expansive mirrors
and bold stone elements to stunning
effect. The bathrooms are limited to black,
white and grey. The small courtyard
features an interplay of Moroccan and
French influences, while the lobby bar
provides the perfect setting for sipping on
a glass of Prosecco before you head out.
Anyone who feels the need for a TV when
they visit this city should be ashamed of
themselves … But there are TVs in the
rooms, and they even have Netflix.
If you find yourself on the chain bridge
as the sun’s setting, you’ll be rewarded
with a truly spectacular ambience.
A pastel-coloured sky extends across the
Danube, which runs through the middle
of the city, and if you wait until it’s dark,
the lights from the houses and the bridges
start to dance on the surface of the water.
Beyond the western bank lie the hills
of Buda, which look down on medieval
cobblestones and the brightly coloured
Matthias Church. On the other side of
the river in Pest, elegant 19th-century
houses line up next to one another and
today play host to a vast array of shops,
bars and cafés.
For a city break, you’re best off at the
Collect boutique hotel, which gets guests
in the mood for such a cool city with its
blend of eclectic modernist styling and
French influences. Ideally situated next
to the Károlyi Garden and only a short
distance from the highly recommended
Hungarian National Museum, the Collect
is the perfect hangout for culturally refined
design enthusiasts. You feel as though you
have lost all sense of time, as everything
seems to take on a timeless quality in this
atmospheric space. The rooms showcase
a variety of designs, with furniture in
Budapest is known as the Paris of the east, and not without good
reason. The hugely diverse city on the Danube is unexpected. The best
starting point for your voyage of discovery? The new Hotel Collect.
lifestylehotels.net
H U NG A RY
B U DA P E S T
16
rooms/suites
Modernist luxury
with a French influence
LH 08THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:eye5.li // ChristophSchöch
BERGLAND
DESIGN AND
WELLNESS HOTEL
SÖLDEN
and strengthen the body’s own self-healing
capabilities,” comments Julia Keimling.
In the Sky Spa, you experience a commit-
ment to the regional and the sustainable
through the application of carefully
selected natural beauty products and
extraordinary treatments, meaning
the skin and the soul have everything
they need.
If you require a bit of “fast” after all the
“slow”, pay a visit to the Electric Mountain
Festival in spring and show off your
new-found spa glow. But don’t go to bed
too late! There are scientists who claim
to have discovered that skin cell renewal
occurs at around 11pm, and it will only
happen if you’re already asleep by that
time. But no matter what time you snuggle
down in your hotel bed, even sleep feels
more restful here at the Bergland.
Too many thoughts whizzing around in your head?
Had enough of the noise of the city? Leave your stresses
behind and join us at the Bergland Design and Wellness
Hotel Sölden, where you can take it slow on your way
to achieving total relaxation and a fresh glow.
Those who manage to make their days as
balanced and as stress-free as possible
will not only achieve a greater sense of
relaxation, but also a more radiant skin.
It’s especially easy to enjoy a day without
stress at the Bergland – set amongst
nature, surrounded by tasteful décor,
there’s no option but to float your way
blissfully from morning to night.
ANCIENT KNOWLEDGE,
NEW GLOW
The origins of the hot stone massage can
be traced back more than 2,000 years.
Now, in the Ötztal Alpine valley, the
ancient practice has been studied in depth
and reinterpreted afresh at the Sky Spa.
“We complement the traditional lava
stones with the power of local granite and
arnica oil in order to both fully activate
“I think that people should be considered
as a whole being, and that we are all unique
in the sense of our body, mind and soul.
For this reason, our approach is to offer
treatments that strive to meet the indi-
vidual needs of each guest,” explains Julia
Keimling, Spa Manager at the Bergland
Design and Wellness Hotel in Sölden in the
Austrian Tyrol region. This is the perfect
complement for the new “slow ageing”
lifestyle trend, which isn’t a case of not
growing any older – what a nightmare! –
but rather living as your best self at every
age. At the heart of it is positive thinking,
avoiding stress and an overall good feeling.
Products that can give you a glowing
complexion while limiting their impact
on the environment play a supporting role
in this.
NATURAL BEAUTY
FOR EVERY SKIN TYPE
In the Sky Spa at the Bergland, they know
just how to help their guests achieve this
feeling of slow ageing, offering relaxing
and nourishing wellbeing packages using
the hotel’s own Natural Alpine range of
products. Why not try a deeply moistur-
ising and refreshing arnica salt peel to
soften and clear the skin of dead skin cells?
Or how about a hayflower bath so you can
soak up the power of nutrient-rich grasses
and meadow flowers, or a zeolite head
massage using a dense ball of sheep’s wool
for an incredible feeling of deep relaxation?
However, it’s not just the approach to
self-care that is slowing down these days.
slow
ageing
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and Sky Spa
LH 09THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:HoteldesBalances,Lucerne
PETER E.
BÜSSER
HOTEL
DES BALANCES
take
a walk
on the
cultural
side
You’re located on the banks of the Reuss
with views of the Jesuit Church, the
Chapel Bridge and the mountains in the
background. Why would you even need to
leave the hotel?
The location in the centre of Lucerne’s
old town, right on the Reuss, is certainly
unique. From the rooms and suites or
from the restaurant terrace, you can
enjoy a simply breathtaking view of the
mountain landscape, the Chapel Bridge –
the landmark of the city – and the Jesuit
Church. But ultimately it is the whole
package that sets our hotel apart from
the rest: the stylish décor, the charm of
the building, the cosy atmosphere, the
creative culinary offering and particularly
our personal service. All of Lucerne’s most
famous sights are within a short walk of
the hotel. A stroll through the quaint old
town is always worth it, as is a visit to the
weekly market on the edge of the Reuss. Or
why not head to the theatre, out on a boat
or take a trip up Pilatus or Rigi? It’s all on
our doorstep.
It’s not just the Hotel des Balances that’s
steeped in history – the city of Lucerne
simply oozes tradition. What are your
own cultural and historical highlights?
The Hotel des Balances has a truly rich
heritage stretching all the way back to
1199. At that time, an inn stood on this
spot, then later the nobility would meet
here for tea, and in the 1960s renowned
Swiss cabaret artist Emil Steinberger
began his stage career here. The building
itself is also famous for its façade murals
painted in the style of German renaissance
artist Hans Holbein, and it is one of the
most-photographed spots in Lucerne.
Today, the Hotel des Balances displays the
ultimate harmony of historical structure
and contemporary design.
In more recent history, the development of
KKL Luzern, the city’s culture and congress
centre, is a milestone that really puts
Lucerne in the international spotlight.
It’s not just the architecture by Jean Nouvel
that draws people in – the acoustics of the
Concert Hall also attract prominent artists
from around the world year after year. It is
both an architectural and a cultural asset
for the city and for our guests.
Guests at your hotel can expect a comple-
mentary programme of events, from jazz
piano to talks by female speakers. What
can they look forward to this spring?
We will mainly be spoiling our guests with
a culinary assortment of spring delicacies.
Our pianist will also be playing in the
bar and lounge every week. Then we have
an interesting selection of female speakers
here once a month to discuss some hot
topics, and the events are always well
attended – even by men.
Peter E. Büsser has been successfully
running the Hotel des Balances in picturesque
Lucerne for over thirty years. And who can blame him for
not wanting to leave when the city is so rich in culture,
including his own historic building?
You yourself have been at the Hotel des
Balances for many years. What have
you always placed the most emphasis on?
The details and the quality of service.
I want to offer our guests an enjoyable
and decadent experience that they won’t
forget in a hurry. That includes creating
a pleasant atmosphere in which both
guests and employees feel comfortable,
an atmosphere where you can meet and
chat with people informally. I attach
great importance to employees who love
their job and who love people. I have run
the hotel with a high degree of trust and
respect for over thirty years now, and it’s
thanks to my incredible team that I can
hand over authority and responsibility
without reservation – it’s a method that’s
proved itself successful for many years.
Which moment will always stay with you?
There are two: first of all, the fire on the
Chapel Bridge in 1993. We could see the
flames from up close in the hotel – that
was a tragic moment. Then in 2005 we
spent over a million francs on renovating
our restaurant. Just two months later,
there was a flood and we were knee-deep
in water. We had to start the renovations
all over again.
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56
rooms
Situated on the Reuss
in the heart of Lucerne’s old town
What will be important in the future?
An undamaged environment – we do our
bit to take care of it, and we also try to
encourage our guests to be more aware of
how they use resources. In addition to that,
I want to increase the use of the Hotel des
Balances as a venue for meetings and other
events. Our stunning rooms are perfect for
this purpose.
LH 10THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:UweMühlhäuser
ART &
BUSINESS
HOTEL
INDIVIDUALITY AND
RELAXATION
The art & business hotel is an easy two-
minute walk from the main train station
and located on the edge of the historic old
town of Nuremberg, making it practical
and a real time-saver. But despite all the
practicalities, it’s important not to forget
individuality and a need for relaxation.
“We only display original artworks by
regional Franconian artists.” There’s even
a whole wall that’s a work of art – the gold
leaf concrete wall, which was created back
in 1972. Sculptures line the hotel corridors
and its cosy garden. A kinetic wind chime
by Hans Karl Busch exerts a soothing
pull. Anyone wanting to brush up on their
knowledge of wine should attend one of
the wine tastings that take part throughout
the year and cover a range of themes.
Because the opportunity for a little time
out from work should never be missed.
Do you travel for business three or more
times a month? If so, all the more reason to find a
place that makes your stay as comfortable as
possible, and perhaps even a bit more.
A CHEERY “GOOD MORNING”
SETS YOU UP FOR THE DAY
Get your day off to a great start in a light-
flooded room with a view of the art garden,
with an open and cheery “Good morning”
and dishes made on the premises from
the finest ingredients. Jams, pastries,
confectionery, salads, desserts, antipasti,
fruit yoghurts, porridge, muesli, different
types of bread, homemade gluten-free
bread and much more pile up on a table
that threatens to sag under the weight.
The best bit? Almost all of it has been
made at the hotel. The meat products
come from a gourmet butcher, some of the
cheeses come from a master cheesemaker
in Erlangen. The eggs are delivered from
a farm, the vegetables come straight from
the surrounding Knoblauchsland region.
Gluten-free or vegan dishes are readily
available. With everything appetisingly laid
out in small individual portions, guests are
able to enjoy a stress-free start to the day.
“When guests stay with us, they will find
a cleanly designed space with a feel-good
vibe and pleasant atmosphere. Ultimately,
when you’re travelling on business and
are away from your family, it’s important
to feel welcome,” believes Stephanie
Hirschfelder from the family-run art &
business hotel in Nuremburg. What else
can guests expect? “Aesthetics, aspiration,
comfort, functionality and of course a high
level of professionalism.” Surveys show
that business travellers have very clear
requirements. At the top of the wish list
are flexible check-in and check-out times,
and a room with a desk where they can
get their work done. No less important is
their appetite for healthy, balanced meals,
and particular attention is paid to this last
point at the art & business hotel.
business
not as
usual
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LH 11THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
MODERN ART
WITHIN ANCIENT WALLS
The entire hotel is devoted to modern art,
and there are countless pieces from Martin
Ho’s private collection on display not just
on the walls, but also as little surprises
in between. “Even at the entrance to
the hotel, I’m greeted by one of Erwin
Wurm’s sausage sculptures, which always
brings a smile to my face,” reveals the art
collector. The effect on the guests is much
the same when they are surrounded by
works by Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons, Daniel
Richter and Jonathan Meese, to name
but a few, during their stay beneath the
vaulted gothic ceilings. Each of the five
individually designed guest rooms is also
dedicated to a theme, art movement or
artist – for example, the Pop room follows
the principles of pop art, the Copenhagen
room is inspired by designer and architect
Arne Jacobsen and the deluxe Bukkake
What does a relentless businessman
buy himself for his 32nd birthday? With
galleries, restaurants and clubs already in
his portfolio, Martin Ho was still missing
something: a hotel. He had always wanted
to join the ranks of hoteliers, although
when he was younger it was more an
idyllic treehouse in Sapa, Vietnam, on the
border with China that he had in mind.
But the newcomer to the hotel scene has
now found a similar sense of tranquillity
in Wachau in Lower Austria. In autumn
2018, just in time for his birthday, he
opened LA PETITE IVY in the historic
Trenninghof building. The boutique hotel
promotes itself as a place of relaxation and
deceleration away from the big-city hustle
and bustle of Vienna, and brings together
all of Ho’s passions under its 717-year-old
roof: cuisine, individuality, design and art.
With the opening of boutique hotel
LA PETITE IVY, Martin Ho has fulfilled a lifelong dream.
Art-loving guests visit the haven in the Wachau region
of Austria to indulge in peace and contemplation.
ho-tel
room, with its freestanding bath and
private balcony with panoramic view, pays
tribute to artist Nobuyoshi Araki.
GEARED UP TO WIND DOWN
That being said, it’s not just boasts of
art and design that entice guests to visit
this countryside gem. In addition to
the impressive sculpture park, nestled
amongst the idyllic hills of the Wachau
region those seeking relaxation will also
find a pool, an in-house bar and a library.
In the colder months, it’s best to withdraw
to the small, exclusive spa area with its
steam and infrared saunas. Alternatively,
you could flick through a good book by the
cosy fireplace, lost in thought, allowing
your gaze to wander to the spectacular
Wachau landscape, which is all the more
captivating when covered with snow. Even
better with a glass of exquisite regional
red wine in your hand, which can now be
found on the menu at all of the proprietor’s
restaurants.
LA PETITE IVY is also dedicated to Ho’s
wife Ivana and their daughter Ivy Kim, who
both contributed to making Martin Ho’s
latest birthday wish come true: rest and
relaxation with family. And where better
to do just that than in his own little slice of
paradise in peaceful Mühldorf.
LA
PETITE IVY
Photos:Studiomato
lifestylehotels.net
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L OW E R AU S T R I A   /
WAC H AU   /   M Ü H L D O R F
5
rooms
1
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LH 12THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photos:LuigiCaputo / CatalinCucu
HOTEL
GOLDGASSE
To mark the centenary of the festival this
year, there will also be a state exhibition
that will see the museum transformed
into a stage. For six months, the Neue
Residenz will become a forum in which to
discover the rich history of the Salzburg
Festival and its performers, presenting art
interventions, enactments of stories and
film screenings. “The state exhibition is
the launch event to celebrate the 100-year
anniversary of the Salzburg Festival.
We are optimistic that this display will
offer both the citizens of Salzburg and
guests from all over the world fascinating
retrospectives and glimpses of the future,”
says festival president Helga Rabl-Stadler.
Over the last 100 years, there have
only been a handful of occasions when
Jedermann has not been performed at
the Salzburg Festival. From the very
beginning, the event has included operatic
productions and concerts, and this
programme has expanded every year since.
The main highlight is definitely still the
traditional rendering of Jedermann, which
was based on several medieval mystery
plays. To see it enacted on the steps in
front of the cathedral, or in the festival hall
during bad weather, never fails to be an
unforgettable experience.
PAYING HOMAGE
TO THE ARTS
Much older than the Salzburg Festival is a
stone building in a charming little alleyway
called Goldgasse. It is 700 years old and
now home to one of the city’s most stun-
ning and individual hotels: the Goldgasse,
a boutique hotel with just 16 rooms that
have all been designed around the theme of
the Salzburg Festival. They pay homage to
this enormous production, this event that
turns the entire city into a stage – a notion
that even director Max Reinholdt wished
to express from the outset. The rooms
in the Goldgasse are a stage in themselves
for modern features and contemporary
design objects. And just so you know –
this small-but-perfect retreat doesn’t just
provide cultural inspiration, it also offers
exceptional cuisine.
The production of Jedermann was staged in
the famous Cathedral Square in Salzburg
for the first time in 1920. The play about
the death of a rich man was directed by
Max Reinhardt who, along with the play’s
author Hugo von Hofmannsthal, was a
co-founder of the Salzburg Festival. The
character of Jedermann was played by
the most famous actor of the time in the
German-speaking world, Alexander Moissi,
while Jedermann’s lover Buhlschaft was
played by Johanna Terwin, Moissi’s wife in
real life.
of the
salzburg
festival
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One
of the city’s
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100years
LH 13THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
These charming boutique hotels in Salzburg’s old town
are worth a visit at any time of year. But during
the Salzburg Festival, the Hotel Stein and the Hotel Goldgasse
set the scene for an even more profound experience.
BLUE SKIES
OVER THE
BLUE LAGOON
Guests from across the globe with an
affinity for art are sure to be found at the
Stein boutique hotel, situated right on the
Salzach river in the old town. The hotel
underwent an extensive makeover in 2018
and has since followed the concept of
“Salzburg meets Venice”, evidence of which
includes the chandeliers and other pieces
by Venetian glass manufacturers Barovier
& Toso, a company that is also owned by
the hotel proprietor. Then there are the
fabrics by Rubelli, which certainly wouldn’t
look out of place in a Venetian palace. Even
from outside, directly in front of the hotel,
HOTEL
STEIN
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Incredible
view across
the city
you will be mesmerised by a work of art
by Austrian artist Brigitte Kowanz, who
in 2016 represented Austria at the Venice
Biennale and also showcased her works
there in 2017. Her pieces lead you into the
interior and create a stylistic connection
between the inside and the outside.
The colour blue dominates the décor,
representing both the colour of the sky
and that of the lagoon in Venice.
When you stroll back from Cathedral
Square, be it to the Goldgasse or the Stein,
you can be sure that you are in the perfect
place to recharge your batteries after an
intoxicating performance and to let the
experience of the epic productions last a
little longer.
Photos:EdmundBarr / CatalinCucu
LH 14THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
TAKE A FLYING CARPET RIDE
TO INNER PEACE
I opt for the Rose from Marrakech, a
75-minute oriental cleansing ritual using
an exclusive black olive soap combined
with a nourishing body peel. After I have
been covered in oil from head to toe,
I receive a traditional full body massage
that frees my body of any aches and pains
and clears my mind. After an extended
bath and a visit to the deep-cleansing
serail mud chamber, I am drawn to the
CHAI Oriental Tea Bar, where tea is served
alongside dried fruits. It’s a fitting end to
this day of oriental bathing. Any stressful
thoughts have long since been whisked
away on a flying carpet and I feel pleasantly
light. I stretch out on a lounger and doze off.
The water trickles soothingly from ornate
taps while I doze on the 40-degree hot
stone in the centre of the room, with com-
forting scents of amber, rose and verbena
blossom evoking images of the Orient
and stirring my nose and my senses. The
steam surrounding me makes everything
hazy, like a dream from one of the stories
in One Thousand and One Nights. Even
back in the time of the ancient sultans in
their palaces, they swore by the cleansing
effect and benefits for body and soul of the
traditional hammam, a ritual that offers
the ultimate in warmth, cleansing and
pure relaxation.
The Oriental World at the Therme
Geinberg is a sensory retreat and therefore
the ideal place to unwind and escape the
everyday. Following the warmth of the
steam bath and the richness of the olive
oil soap, stress quite literally slips away
from my body. Later on, the hammam
master reveals to me his knowledge of
secret rituals and oriental bathing culture,
while I succumb to the enchantment of
the Orient still further. The selection of
Turkish and Moroccan treatments on
offer is remarkable, and their names hint
at something quite spectacular: Emerald
of the Sultan, Ritual of the Sultan, Rose
from Marrakech or A Day in the Desert.
All treatments are carried out in accord-
ance with modern European standards.
Feel reborn in a Far Eastern paradise:
after experiencing fairy-tale treatments and
hammam rituals in the Oriental World at the Geinberg5
Private Spa Villas, you’ll be a new person.
one
thousand
and one
nights
A VILLA, A NATURAL BATHING POOL
AND A SAUNA – JUST FOR ME
The luxury Geinberg5
Private Spa Villas are
the perfect retreat for anyone who prefers
to keep their spa experience to themselves.
All 21 of the stylish suites and villas, the
biggest of which is 300 m², benefit from
their own private wellness area with a
Finnish sauna, steam bath, outdoor hot tub
with 36-degree thermal water, and an open
fireplace. After spending time in the sauna,
you can dive off the large terrace straight
into your own private bay in one of the two
3,300 m² natural bathing pools – that’s my
day tomorrow sorted. There’s also a team
of butlers on hand to tend to the personal
wellbeing of a small number of guests,
meaning you can enjoy the award-winning
GEINBERG5
PRIVATE
SPA VILLAS
cuisine from the Aqarium restaurant in
the privacy of your own villa. You can of
course do the same for your breakfast.
Even those who don’t want to leave their
villa will not want to miss out on the
Oriental World. While it may not be
possible to get there by flying carpet,
you can glide there in an electric car –
in line with the “green thinking” attitude
of the Geinberg5
.
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Photos:RobertMaybach / MatthiasWitzany / GregorHartl
LH 15THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
silent
flow
HOTEL
LEMONGARDEN
Photos:Hotel:ChristianHusar / Portrait:BenRakidzija
YOGA, MEDITATION AND POETRY
Ben Rakidzija isn’t just a trained yoga
teacher. He is also an educated philosopher
and historian, composes prose and
poems and organises the Lit.Eu literature
festival in Opatija, which authors Marie
Gamillscheg, Markus Orths and Franzobel
have all attended. “The aim of my lessons
is to promote a strong body and a clear
mind. Every class is different, every day
is new. I don’t force my students and try
to find a balance between strength and
relaxation,” says Ben, who in the evenings
doesn’t need much encouragement
to share stories about his many yoga
experiences.
The sun glitters through the tops of the
trees, the waves crash gently onto the
pebble beach and the soft breeze wafts past
the end of your nose. I experience all of
this in the new yoga pavilion on the private
beach at Hotel Lemongarden, from which
the beauty of the natural surroundings
can now be appreciated all the more
intensely. A programme for the first yoga
retreats at the Lemongarden has been put
together with the help of Ben Rakidzija.
The yoga teacher practises Silent Flow, a
free interpretation of Hatha yoga, Vinyasa
Flow, Yin yoga and Qigong. There are also
fascia training exercises and other forms
of movement. But why make it silent?
All of the classes take place in silence and
so offer the opportunity to really be at one
with yourself, no matter whether you’re
a beginner or an experienced yogi.
What don’t you mind hearing amongst the silence?
The roar of the sea, the twitter of birds, the chirping of
crickets … At Hotel Lemongarden on the Croatian island of
Brač, the silence is something quite special.
TRANCE-INDUCING LOUNGER
Between the morning and evening yoga
sessions and a refreshing dip in the sea,
it makes sense to spend plenty of time
in the private spa. Guests can enjoy the
Finnish sauna made out of cedar, a steam
room boasting a combination of light and
aromatherapy with lavender, lemon, lime
and orchid fragrances, and an experience
shower. Those who haven’t yet laid on one
of the ergonomically designed, blue illumi-
nated AlphaSphere loungers really must.
Developed by the Viennese artist known
as SHA, the lounger transports users into
a trance-like state thanks to a sea of tiny
vibrations, gentle electronic sounds and
changing coloured lighting inspired by
chromotherapy. Afterwards, you feel as
though you have been in another world,
where everything is beautiful and pink.
Luckily it is still beautiful when you come
round, only now it’s not pink but turquoise.
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It’s recommended that you stumble your
way straight to a Lemongarden aromather-
apy session and enjoy a relaxing massage
on a lounger using lemon and orange
essential oils. In this deeply relaxed state
you go to yoga again, then curl up in bed
afterwards with the blissful realisation
that the next day you will wake up feeling
just as good as when you went to sleep.
Whoever can’t make the Lemongarden
yoga retreats in May should absolutely
book them for September!
THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
D I R E C T O RY
L I F E S T Y L E H O T E L S
BRAMBERG  Wildkogel Resorts
FISS  Alpslodge Life.Style.Hotel.Fiss
FÜGEN  Alpina Zillertal family.lifestyle.hotel
GASCHURN  Montafon Lodge Luxury Lodgehotel und Spa
GEINBERG  Geinberg 5
Private Spa Villas
GRAZ  Augarten Art Hotel
GRAZ  Lendhotel
GRAZ  Roomz Graz
GROSSARL  Hotel Nesslerhof
HALLSTATT  Hallstatt Hideaway
KALS AM GROSSGLOCKNER  Gradonna Mountain Resort
KALTENBACH  Das Kaltenbach
KITZBÜHEL  Alpenhotel Kitzbühel am Schwarzsee
LÄNGENFELD  Naturhotel Waldklause
LEOGANG  Puradies
MARIA ALM  Hotel Eder
MARIA ALM  Hotel Sepp
MAYRHOFEN  ElisabethHotel Premium Private Retreat
MELLAU  Sonne Lifestyle Resort
MÖSERN  Nidum Casual Luxury Hotel
MÜHLDORF  LA PETITE IVY
NAUDERS  Aparthotel Arabella
OBERGURGL  Hotel The Crystal
OBERTAUERN  Hotel Panorama Obertauern
SAALBACH HINTERGLEMM  Alpin Juwel
SALZBURG CITY  Hotel Goldgasse
SALZBURG CITY  Hotel Stein
SALZBURG CITY  Hotel & Villa Auersperg
SCHLADMING  Stadthotel Brunner
SEEFELD  Das Max
SERFAUS  Alfa Hotel
SÖLDEN  Bergland Design and Wellnesshotel Sölden
STAINACH-PÜRGG  Gästehaus Krenn
TURRACHER HÖHE  Hollmann am Berg
UDERNS  Sportresidenz Zillertal
VIENNA  Hollmann Beletage
VIENNA  Hotel Das Tyrol
VIENNA  Hotel Schani Salon
VIENNA  Hotel Schani Wien
WAGRAIN  Sensum Suites Design Hotel
ZELL AM SEE  Eva Hof Lakeside Suites
ZELL AM SEE  Seehotel Bellevue
ZELL AM SEE  Senses Violett Suites
AUSTRIA
GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN  Das Graseck
NUREMBERG  art & business hotel
PIRNA  Laurichhof
SANKT ENGLMAR  Berghotel Maibrunn
STUTTGART  V8 Hotel
STUTTGART  V8 Hotel Classic
TIMMENDORFER STRAND  SAND
TIMMENDORFER STRAND  Hotel Seehuus
GERMANY
CHINA
NANJING  Kayumanis Nanjing Private Villas & Spa
FRANCE
PARIS  Hollmann Paris
SUTIVAN – BRAČ  Hotel Lemongarden
CROATIA
ALENTEJO  Sublime Comporta Country Retreat & Spa
ALGARVE  Vila Valverde
ALGARVE  Vila Vita Collection
CASCAIS  The Oitavos
MADEIRA  Quinta da Bela Vista
AMALFI COAST  Casa Angelina
AMALFI COAST  Relais Blu
BRIXEN  Hotel Pupp
CALABRIA  Praia Art Resort
CAMAIORE  Locanda al Colle
TIROLO NEAR MERANO  Der Küglerhof
ISSENGO  Gourmet & Boutiquehotel Tanzer
LAZISE  Quellenhof Luxury Resort
LIMONE SUL GARDA  EALA My Lakeside Dream
MERANO  Suiteseven Stadthotel Meran/o
MERANSEN  Hotel Gitschberg
MONTEFOLLONICO  Follonico
RIMINI  i-Suite
SICILY  Monaci delle Terre Nere
TRIESTE  Hollmann Trieste
ITALY
PORTUGAL
LUCERNE  Hotel des Balances
SAMNAUN  Alpinlodge & Spa
ZERMATT  Hotel Matterhorn Focus
SWITZERLAND
GIRONA  Lavida Hotel
MALLORCA  Convent de la Missio
MALLORCA  Fontsanta Hotel Thermal Spa & Wellness
MALLORCA  Hotel Can Simoneta
MALLORCA  Hotel Glòria de Sant Jaume
MALLORCA  Pleta de Mar
SPAIN
SRI LANKA
DICKWELLA SOUTH  UTMT – Underneath the Mango Tree
HUNGARY
BUDAPEST  Hotel Collect
BUDAPEST  Lanchid 19
SANTORINI  Myst Boutique Hotel
SANTORINI  Saint Santorini
GREECE
L I F E S T Y L E H O T E L S . N E T
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13THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
Photo:KojiFujii / NacasaandPartnersInc.
It’s around eight metres tall and is made
exclusively out of materials that were no
longer needed following the demolition of
other houses: introducing the Kamikatz
Public House in the Japanese town of
Kamikatsu. Designed by architects Hiroshi
Nakamura & NAP, this building isn’t the
only innovation the town has to offer.
Over the last few years, its residents have
STYLE
p u b l i c
k a
m i k a
t z
h o u s e
The Kamikatz is home to a pub with
a small brewery.
KAMIKATSU.
devoted themselves to avoiding waste, and
in doing so have achieved a recycling rate
of over 80 per cent. In 2020, all reusable
waste should be put back into circulation,
and any remaining household waste will be
separated into 45 different categories.
14THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
The Japanese cities of Kobe
and Nagoya are part of the
international UNESCO Creative
Cities Network – and rightly so!
Eriko Esaka and Kenji Kondo
give us an insight into their
creative cultures.
What are your favourite design hotspots
in Nagoya?
The Toyota Municipal Museum of Art (8
Chome-5-1 Kozakahonmachi, Toyota, Aichi
471-0034, museum.toyota.aichi.jp) – the
architecture is just spectacular! I think the
Nagoya Innovators Garage (3 Chome-18-1
Sakae, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0008,
garage-nagoya.or.jp) is also pretty good.
And I love the city’s design, art and craft
markets, like the one along the Endoji
shopping street (6 Nagono, Nishi Ward,
Nagoya, Aichi 451-0042), the one in Hisaya
Park (3 Chome-6 Marunouchi, Naka
Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0002) or the
one near the International Design Center
(Design Center Bldg., 18-1, Sakae 3-Chome,
Naka-ku, Nagoya 460-0008, idcn.jp).
There’s also the Yaba-cho/Osu area, where
you’ll find clothing that follows the trends
of Japan’s subculture, like decora, goth,
visual kei and other alternative shops.
N A G O Y A
cities
How would you describe Nagoya’s
creative scene?
First and foremost, as a design city we
have three goals: supporting the next gen-
erations, respecting the environment and
creating a link between different cultures.
Nagoya boasts many art, design and archi-
tecture universities, as well as industrial
companies that operate on a global scale
– but hardly anyone knows about it! We
don’t promote ourselves anywhere near
enough and even the people that are here
aren’t aware of it. This is what we’re trying
to counteract, and we’re working more
and more with students and researchers in
order to establish a new mindset when it
comes to design in our society.
What’s so special about design in
Nagoya?
Nagoya is a city of “monozukuri”, or
“making things”. The origin of this creative
spirit is the Nagoya Castle, which was built
over 400 years ago by Ieyasu Tokugawa,
founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. At
that time, the city was a melting pot of
talented engineers, technicians, painters
and architects from across the country, and
it is their particular skills and works that
established Nagoya’s cultural heritage and
formed the basis of our regional crafts. This
spirit has been maintained throughout the
generations in our understanding of design.
Eventually, it resulted in the opening of the
International Design Center Nagoya.
E R I K O E S A K A
What’s the most recent design piece to
catch your attention?
Bouillon is a design studio led by Shunya
Hattori and Hiroki Nasu (design-bouillon.
jp), and I’m really impressed by their work.
They are interested in local manufacturers
and the history behind our region’s
industry, and they create simple yet
utterly beautiful products in their own
distinct style.
creative-nagoya.jp
ERIKO ESAKA
is Program Director of the UNESCO City of
Design Organizing Committee in Nagoya.
Photos:Honmaru_omotesyoin:Nacasa&PartnersInc. / Nagoya,UNESCOCityofDesign / shutterstock.com,TokyoSky / MasamiFujii
15THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
K O B E
K E N J I K O N D O
of design
worth being a part of and a community
that makes a stand for sustainable
development.
What’s your favourite museum?
The Kobe Fashion Museum (2 Chome-9-1
Koyochonaka, Higashinada Ward, Kobe,
Hyogo 658-0032, fashionmuseum.or.jp)!
It’s the first museum in Japan to specialise
in fashion, and is also an information and
cultural hub with three main functions:
museum, library and exhibition space.
Four or five times a year, the museum
plays host to special exhibitions, while
items in the permanent collection are
displayed in themed galleries. The library
is home to high-quality magazines and
books on the topic of fashion both in Japan
and around the world, and is open to the
public as well as those students, creators
and businesspeople who are active in the
fashion industry. The exhibition space in
the Orbis hall is open to the public for a
diverse range of exhibitions.
What’s your favourite design hotspot
in Kobe?
The Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum
(7 Chome-5-1 Kumochicho, Chuo Ward,
Kobe, dougukan.jp), which is the only
museum of its kind in Japan. Its aim is to
collect and preserve traditional carpentry
tools that are no longer used as a piece of
cultural heritage, and to pass them on to
the next generation through research and
exhibitions. The museum keeps alive the
spirit of making things that has been so
valued by the Japanese since ancient times.
Here you can enjoy typically harmonious
Japanese architecture, which isn’t symbolic
or assertive, but rather demonstrates the
subtle connection between people and
nature.
Where’s the best place to go shopping?
I would have to say Transit., which sells
items for the home with a focus on unique
light fittings, as well as imported goods.
They have three stores in Kobe, two in
Osaka and two online shops, and their
original light fittings have featured in
many TV series. All of their products
have been designed by Tatsuo Konno, the
director of upmarket interior design studio
ARTWORKSTUDIO (artworkstudio.co.jp).
What does the Design and Creative
Center Kobe have to offer?
The Design and Creative Center Kobe is
located near the port in Sannomiya, in the
city centre. The building was constructed
between 1927 and 1932 and has now been
converted from its original purpose as a
former testing centre for raw silk. It is in
paying homage to the original function of
this building – checking the quality of raw
silk – that the name KIITO came about, as
the word means “raw silk” in Japanese. We
develop many programmes using the title
“+Creative” as a method of resolving the
social issues facing our communities. As
part of this, we introduce new ideas that
challenge preconceived design concepts.
These activities are described as “social
design” in Japan, meaning that the world’s
social problems are being approached
through creative strength.
What unites the creative scene in Kobe?
In Kobe, lifestyles based on an open and
liberal cultural footing are encouraged,
meaning the assimilation of foreign
cultures, manufacturing processes and
crafts is actively supported. The process
of rebuilding the city following the Great
Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in 1995 taught
the city to strengthen deep interpersonal
connections, the spirit of helping each
other and other human affections.
It highlighted the fact that the city’s
traditional, inherent characteristics –
creativity through design – brought people
together, kindled hope for the future and
aided the rehabilitation of the city. Design
plays an important role in daily life and
makes topics such as environmental
protection and emergency management,
crime prevention, welfare and education,
which are all very close to home, more
visible, easier to communicate, more
relevant and more likely to inspire action.
How does the City of Design Kobe work?
With collaboration and participation.
My view is that design has a broader mean-
ing that doesn’t just encompass visible
shapes and colours, but also planning and
mechanisms for the formulation of design,
as well as purpose and ideas that lay the
foundations for design. Great designs can
attract and motivate people.
City of Design Kobe is a city where all
residents that make the most of the
benefits of the city can together create new
design attractions through collaboration
and participation in order to build a
strong community – a community that’s
He explains that “lighting isn’t a tool but
more like a partner that adds flair to your
life”. He is inspired by the interesting
shapes, materials and colours he encounters
on his travels.
Which design piece caught your
attention recently?
The items made out of Kobe leather
by Shinichi Yamauchi and his Kuli-Kuli
studio. He won first prize in the
SaloneSatellite Awards at the Salone
del Mobile Milano 2019 for his Kobe
Leather (kobeleather.or.jp) designs called
Shadow, Feeling of Warmth and Shape
of Memory. Cowhide from the Kobe beef
industry, which would normally not be
suitable for the manufacture of leather
goods, was repurposed by Yamauchi
to form an entirely new range of three
products: Shadow, a wallet that displays
an uneven surface; Feeling of Warmth,
a coin purse that changes colour with
changes in temperature; and Shape of
Memory, a bag made out of leather that
remembers its shape. In addition to design
and functionality, these items are examples
of the type of upcycling that is possible
thanks to the technical sophistication of
Japanese manufacturing. These products
aren’t just visually appealing – the design
involved in the manufacturing process is
impressive in itself.
kiito.jp
KENJI KONDO
works at the Design and Creative
Center Kobe.
Photos:ShunsukeIto / HirokiAndo
16THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
The location of the Hotel The Mitsui Kyoto
is not far from the site of the Nikō Castle.
The hotel aims to breathe new life into the
historic setting, but not without taking
its past into consideration. The former
Kajii-no-Miya Gate, built in 1703, has now
been restored and repaired to serve as the
entrance to the hotel, and to provide a
contrast with the contemporary aesthetic
of the building, which has been designed
by architect Akira Kuryu: “It’s about
respecting the grace and dignity of Kyoto,
but also being able to express it using
modern techniques.”
Photos:HotelTheMitsuiKyoto / MitsuiFudosanCo.,Ltd.
hotelthemitsui.com
T H E A C E U P I T S S L E E V E
Kyoto is one of the most famous cities
in the world and is admired for its
unparalleled social, creative, cultural and
architectural dynamics. For many decades,
it has been, and remains, an attraction
and a retreat, but also a muse for stars
such as David Bowie, John and Yoko, David
Byrne and Steve Jobs, Haruki Murakami
and Akira Kurosawa.
The Ace Hotel Kyoto will open in spring
2020 and is looking to further contribute
to this fertile and creative spirit for future
generations, while at the same time paying
homage to the rich imperial heritage of
the city.
The hotel ties in with the existing
buildings of the former Kyoto telephone
exchange, which were designed by
renowned architect Tetsuro Yoshida.
“The idea was to create a hotel that has
a connection with Kyoto and is open to the
local area. That first meant creating a lush
garden that linked the local community
with the guests,” says architect Kengo
Kuma about the project. The collaboration
between like-minded artists and crafts-
people is a token of love from the Ace Hotel
Kyoto to the city.
acehotel.com/kyoto
H E R I T A G E R E I N V E N T E D
in
new Golden temples that glitter in the sun, Shintō shrines,
zen gardens and seeing a geisha – that’s what summarises
Japan’s former imperial capital Kyoto. The latest news is that
the Ace Hotel group is opening its first location in Japan!
Also new on the scene is Hotel The Mitsui Kyoto,
which celebrates the beauty of Japan.
town
Renowned Hong Kong-based interior
designer André Fu and the team at his
AFSO design studio developed the concept
for the interior of the hotel’s main public
areas, including the lobby and the guest
rooms and suites. Drawing on the theme
of “Heritage reinvented”, Fu showcases
the authentic beauty of Kyoto and the old
town, and gives them a contemporary
twist using his own perspective and design
vocabulary. The result is a journey for the
senses through Kyoto’s traditions, heritage
and culture, with a touch of international
flair. The lobby mimics a poetic wooden
pavilion with intricate folded elements,
and is reminiscent of Kyoto’s bamboo
forests. In the centre, a ceramic statue by
Japanese sculptor Yukiya Izumita looks
down over the space.
17THE Stylemate
Issue No 01 | 2020
STYLE
cosmic
Yayoi Kusama spent her childhood in the
greenhouses and fields of her family’s
Nakatsutaya seed nursery, and this served
as the breeding ground for her lifelong
fascination with the natural world, which
is revealed in this exhibition. Through
this show, Kusama makes a virtual return
to the city of New York, where she lived
between 1958 and 1972 and produced her
most prominent works. “This once-in-a-
lifetime presentation will stand apart from
previous exhibitions of Yayoi Kusama’s
work because it is rooted in the artist’s
profound and enduring exploration of
nature and its countless manifestations
that evoke meanings that are both personal
and universal. Kusama often cites plant
life – specifically, a repeating pattern of
flowers – as the mythic origin of her
concepts of obliteration, infinity and
eternity she explores in her practice.
By integrating horticulture and her art,
our exhibition will illuminate the powerful
role of nature that pervades Kusama’s
dynamic oeuvre,” says Carrie Rebora
Barratt, President of The New York
Botanical Garden.
POLKA DOTS
AMONGST
THE MEADOW GRASSES
THE FAMOUS POLKA DOTS
USED BY JAPANESE ARTIST
YAYOI KUSAMA WILL BRING
A SPLASH OF COLOUR TO
THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL
GARDEN FROM MAY, WHEN
BOTH ICONIC AND NEW PIECES
BY THE CELEBRATED ARTIST
WILL BE WAITING TO BE
DISCOVERED IN A DISPLAY
ENTITLED KUSAMA:
COSMIC NATURE.
Multiple installations will be on display as
part of the comprehensive show, including
signature pieces such as her mirrored
environments and organic forms, colossal
polka-dotted sculptures, mesmerising
paintings of plants and flowers and their
diversity of colours and patterns. Several of
these pieces have been newly created and
will be displayed alongside archival works
that have never been publicly exhibited.
The installations will be complemented by
spectacular indoor and outdoor displays
created by the garden horticulturalists
that change with the seasons – tulips and
irises in spring will give way to masses of
pumpkins and autumn flowers. Kusama’s
plant-inspired polka dot sculptures will
engage in conversation with meadow
grasses, bluebells, water lilies and other
plants. Guest curator Mika Yoshitake is
delighted: “It is especially gratifying to
realise a Kusama exhibition of this scale at
The New York Botanical Garden, one of the
world’s premier museums of living plant
collections. For Kusama, cosmic nature is a
life force that integrates the terrestrial and
celestial orders of the universe from both
the micro- and macrocosmic perspectives
she examines in her practice. Nature is
not a mere source of inspiration, but
integral to the visceral effects of Kusama’s
artistic language in which organic growth
and the proliferation of life are made
ever-present.”
N A T U R E
KUSAMA:
COSMIC NATURE
On display between
9 May and 1 November 2020
New York Botanical Garden
nybg.org
Yayoi Kusama Museum (Tokyo)
Museum of Contemporary Art
honours Yayoi Kusama
yayoikusamamuseum.jp
Photos:YayoiKusama / ALONE,BURIEDINAFLOWERGARDEN,2014,76-3/8x76-3/8in.,AcryliconcanvasCollectionoftheartist,CourtesyofOtaFineArts,VictoriaMiro,andDavidZwirner / SummerFlower,1988,Acryliconcanvas,45.5x53cm,Collectionoftheartist
THE Stylemate - wabi sabi 01|2020 ENGLISH
THE Stylemate - wabi sabi 01|2020 ENGLISH
THE Stylemate - wabi sabi 01|2020 ENGLISH
THE Stylemate - wabi sabi 01|2020 ENGLISH
THE Stylemate - wabi sabi 01|2020 ENGLISH
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THE Stylemate - wabi sabi 01|2020 ENGLISH

  • 1. THESTYLEMATE.COM Photo:YayoiKusama Stylemate THE wabi - sabi NEWS ABOUT LIFE, STYLE & HOTELS ISSUE No 01 | 2020 thestylemate.com
  • 2. 2THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photo:Heldentheater Essentials Page 3 From sumo stables to yuzu baths Pages 4 – 7 Interview with Megumi Ito: magical moments Page 6 LIFE: Itadakimasu: three recommendations for Japanese cuisine in Europe Pages 8 – 10 Pearls from the misty lagoon Page 11 Franzobel Page 12 STYLE: Kamikatz Page 13 Cities of Design Kobe and Nagoya Pages 14 – 15 New in Town: Kyoto’s latest hotels Page 16 Cosmic Nature Page 17 Lost in fashion Pages 18 – 20 Column by Helder Suffenplan: Japan my Love! Page 21 Record-breaker Pages 22 – 23 HOTELS: LIFESTYLEHOTELS selection: Hotel Collect Page LH 01 The Kaltenbach Pages LH 02 – 03 Sportresidenz Zillertal Page LH 04 Alpinlodge & Spa Page LH 05 New Member: Designhotel Laurichhof Das Max Gästehaus Krenn Hotel Collect Pages LH 06 – 07 Bergland Design and Wellness Hotel, Sölden Page LH 08 Hotel des Balances Page LH 09 Art & Business Hotel Page LH 10 La Petite Ivy Page LH 11 Hotel Stein and Hotel Goldgasse Pages LH 12 – 13 Geinberg5 Private Spa Villas Page LH 14 Hotel Lemongarden Page LH 15 Directory lifestylehotels Page LH 16 IMPRINT Page 2 Wabi-sabi, finding beauty in imperfection, is a Japanese concept of aesthetic values that we really like and wish to embrace. This issue of THE Stylemate is dedicated to all things Japan and we have put together a selection of many beautiful things for you to enjoy, some of which are virtually perfect, while others are so interesting that that could be deemed as their version of beauty. The reason for orienting our focus on Japan and the Japanese culture is that this summer will see Tokyo playing host to the Olympic Games. Our cover is more unusual than sporty, but we think it is the perfect example of the concept of wabi-sabi. Successful Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama is known for her polka dots that have the capacity to put us into an almost trance-like state and convey the feeling of obsession, and this spring will be presenting a huge show in The New York Botanical Garden. Information and photos that have already been released to the press indicate that it will be something quite extraordinary. So we’re not just looking at Japan in Japan, but also at Japan around the world. In this respect, we have chatted to Vienna resident and lighting designer Megumi Ito, and asked an Austrian jeweller to show us some exciting Japanese pearls. We write about how we in Europe can be inspired by unusual culinary delicacies from Japan, and which designers and fashion stores in Tokyo you absolutely have and visit. Helder Suffenplan, a publicist living in Berlin, talks in his column about fragrance and his love of Japan – he will also report in future issues on the world of olfactory delights. And of course, we have the usual selection of hotels that are sure to inspire you to get out and travel. Thomas Holzleithner & Hardy Egger E D I T O R S IN THIS ISSUE Be sure to subscribe to THE Stylemate so you'll never miss an issue! thestylemate.com IMPRINT Media owner and publisher: Prime Time Touristik & Marketing GmbH, Schmiedgasse 38/1, 8010 Graz, Austria Editors: Thomas Holzleithner & Hardy Egger Editor-in-chief: Nina Prehofer Managing editor: Christin Maier-Erlach Cover photo: Yayoi Kusama Layout: VON K Brand Design Writers: Franzobel, Hedi Grager, Nora Palzenberger, Helder Suffenplan Copy editor: Katherine Nussey, Lisbeth Wild Advertising: office@thestylemate.com Printed by: Medienfabrik Graz, 8020 Graz Published in: Graz Publication: 3 x yearly
  • 3. 3THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:Karimoku / AxelArigato / f-p-design / Gressl / LouisVuitton / Vitra essentials T O KYO S T O O L Multi-award-winning design studio Drill Design was founded in Tokyo in 2001 by Yusuke Hayashi and Yoko Yasunishi, and they have since produced designs for big names such as Muji, Canon, Mercedes-Benz and Camper. The small Tokyo Stool is a direct reference to the national stadium in Tokyo, which was built for the 1964 Olympic Games. By using the old seats that would otherwise have ended up as waste, the stool embodies the heritage of the former stadium and the history behind it. The elegant wooden legs elevate the stool to become a fitting memorial. The 350 limited-edition pieces were made by Karimoku. drill-design.com, approx. €250 G E N E S I S T R I P L E Axel Arigato’s success story tells of a rapid rise to fame, with the Swedish online label transforming into an internationally recognised brand within a very short period of time. Minimalist Japanese aesthetics have had a strong influence on the brand run by Creative Director Max Svardh and CEO Albin Johansson. It’s all about the attempt to achieve more from less, and it’s something they succeeded in doing with their range of sneakers. The new Genesis Triple sneaker, with white leather base, cremino sole and contrasting tab, has an upper that draws inspiration from retro silhouettes but is set on a modern streamlined sole to create the perfect fusion of retro and contemporary. axelarigato.com, €205 M A R U T OM I S A K E S E T Urushi craftsmanship has been practised in Japan for almost 6,500 years and enables high-quality utensils to be made out of wood. Even today, urushi, a 100% natural lacquer derived from the sap of the Japanese urushi tree and processed by means of a unique and arduous traditional technique, continues to be extracted in Japan. The aim of the project by f/p design entitled Real Japan was to present this traditional Japanese craft to a wide audience and diversify it by means of modern designs. f-p-design.com L O U I S V U I T T ON B AG What would Japan be without eccentric accessories? The perfect accessory for a trip to Japan is the Louis Vuitton Video Cassette clutch in calfskin with its strap in monogram canvas. You can always rely on designer Nicolas Ghesquière to bring out an “it” accessory every season. Following in the footsteps of the futuristic Archlight trainers in 2018, the monogrammed handbag that looks like a small UFO and the Wallabee shoes comes the clutch that looks like a video tape from the 1980s. We love it! louisvuitton.com, €4,200 A KA R I BY V I T RA Japanese-American artist and designer Isamu Noguchi started creating the Akari Light Sculptures in the 1950s. He chose the name “akari”, a word that means “light” in Japanese, connoting both illumination and physical lightness. “The harshness of electricity is transformed through the magic of paper back to the light of our origin – the sun – so that its warmth may continue to fill our rooms at night,” explained Noguchi. Each Akari Light Sculpture is meticulously crafted by hand in the Ozeki workshop, a traditional family-run company based in Gifu, Japan. In a first step, bamboo rods are stretched across the original wooden forms designed by Noguchi to make the framework that determines the object’s shape. Washi paper, derived from the bark of the mulberry tree, is cut in strips and glued to the bamboo ribbing. After the glue has dried, the wooden form is removed and the shade can be folded. vitra.com, €789 S O U T H S E A D R E A M I NG These earrings by jewellery brand Gressl have got us in the mood for summer. The carved South Sea mother of pearl evokes images of white sandy beaches, while the fine chalcedony drops are reminiscent of the glittering blue-green of the sea. The jewellery is proof of goldsmith Barbara Gressl’s love of exceptional gemstones. The white gold earrings with brilliant-cut white stones will go just as well with a shirt, jeans and trainers as with a delicate, softly flowing dress. gressl.com, €3,950 F O R T H I S E D I T I O N
  • 4. 4THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photo:shutterstock.com,Dr.GiladFiskus BY NINA PREHOFER S T A B L E S F R O M S U M O Y U Z U B A T H S T O
  • 5. 5THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photo:shutterstock.com,Dziobek THE OLYMPIC TORCH IN GREECE WILL BE LIT ON 12 MARCH. AFTER THIS, IT WILL EMBARK ON A JOURNEY THROUGH JAPAN BEFORE THE OLYMPIC GAMES OPEN IN TOKYO ON 24 JULY. HERE WE PROVIDE A BRIEF INSIGHT INTO THE ISLAND COUNTRY’S SPORTING TRADITIONS, ANCIENT RITUALS AND NEW CUSTOMS. The Olympic Games captivate people. Competing, getting faster, higher, further; the emotions, the sweat, the tears … they’re all part of this major sporting event. The Summer Games in Tokyo this year have been described by the organisers as the Reconstruction Olympics, and will serve as a reminder of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, where an earthquake caused several nuclear meltdowns. There are some incidents that we just can’t forget. And nor should we. Another such event is the devastating aftermath of the Americans dropping two atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The bombs were given the seemingly harmless names of “Little Boy” and “Fat Man”, yet they brought horror to an entire nation. No, to the entire world. How strange, then, that we seem to think nothing of overlooking thoroughly unsettling images of “Little Rocket Man” Kim Jong-un with his finger on the button. DOHYŌ THE RING WHERE THE FIGHTS ARE HELD. Back to sport – traditional Japanese sport. Have you ever been to a sumo stable? No? Me neither, because it’s not that easy to get into one if you don’t speak Japanese. The sumo wrestlers’ accommodation is actually called a stable, or beya. It’s the name of the team the wrestlers fight for and is training centre and accommodation all in one. If you looked at it kindly, you could call it a residential community for men, but in reality it’s more like a bootcamp. Training starts early in the morning – warm up, stretch, wrestle. A strict hierarchy is in force, with the youngsters having to make breakfast, do the shopping and clean. The practices are archaic in accordance with the 2,000-year-old tradition. Ancient rituals are still followed to this day, and before a match starts, a lot of time is devoted to religious ceremony. The same can be said for kyudo, the Japanese art of archery. The impressive thing about this is the unbelievably slow sequences of movements that make it seem like a zen ritual. The bow and arrows are made out of the most intricately crafted bamboo. Kyudo, judo, kendo, sado, shodo – all of them names of sports that end with “do”, meaning “path” or “way”. All traditional Japanese “master” training is linked to meditation – you walk a path that you must first find, then master. SUMŌ A FORM OF WRESTLING ORIGINATING IN JAPAN. A FIGHT TYPICALLY LASTS AROUND TEN SECONDS.
  • 6. 6THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 ito-megumi.com Photos:HervèGoluza You like to work with Japanese materials like kimono fabrics and paper. What’s so magical about these materials? With kimonos, I’m fascinated by the patterns and colour combinations, and the fact that the quality is so good you can easily reuse the material. But it’s also the way in which we wear the kimono that I like so much. When it’s raining outside, we wear a fish pattern, for example; at a summer party we might have a hare and the moon. Japanese paper, on the other hand, just infuses a room with an unbelievably soft light and also seems to “purify” the air. When I work with bamboo, it makes me think of building a nest, like a bird would for its chicks. So a lamp made out of bamboo gives off a very emotional light. All of these materials are part of my memories of my childhood that I want to carry around with me always. I experience magical moments when I work with them. What qualities does a material need to have in order for you to enjoy working with it? It needs to be pure – synthetic materials make us and nature sick and broken. I like trying new things and usually work with something for as long as I need to in order to really know and understand it. That makes it sound as though I’m talking about a partnership … magical In the Hotel Sacher in Vienna, a five-metre- tall chandelier glitters with crystals that you applied individually by hand. How long did that take you? We applied the 4,000 crystals in a couple of days. I started early in the morning and spent the day and most of the night standing on a ladder. But it was a wonder- ful experience, and I had the best team in BWM Architekten and the Sacher. How do you work when you’re at home or in your studio? I mostly work in silence. I don’t have the radio or the TV on. It’s only when I’m totally alone that I can hear the stories of the great philosophers. My hands are busy, therefore so is my mind. It’s incredible when I see what can be created in a day. Which parts of growing up in the town of Kamakura will you never forget? The horizon, the sea, where I always went with my dog, and the fresh fish. I studied kendo for seven years and we all had to clean the dojo, the training room, before we started the class. I often had to spend a long time kneeling on the floor until it was my turn. Which elements of Japanese culture are also present in your new home in Vienna? Art nouveau has many Japanese influences and was strongly inspired by Japanese art, and I’ve studied and been shaped by both. Vienna is extremely beautiful and fairly small. The music is great and the appreciation of art and culture is just as important in Japan as it is in Vienna. I find that very comforting. moments Designer Megumi Ito makes unique light sculptures that illuminate hotels, bars and shops. She grew up in the historic town of Kamakura in Japan, but since completing her studies at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, it’s here that she now lives and works. To what extent does your heritage shape your way of working? I am never hectic when I work; I’m always very deliberate. What I do is meditative, and I have to create the right meaning behind everything. I love imperfect perfection. I try not to push my clients in a particular direction, nor to be too restrained. I always wait for the right moment to come. The lights you create are all one-off pieces. Would you not like to produce your designs on a larger scale? I’ve never had the opportunity to go into production, and no company has ever approached me to do so. Until recently, that is! I’m currently working on a range called MITO, from the Greek word “mythos”. It’s been like stepping into a new phase of my life, before which I asked myself what my current situation was – am I still really Japanese or have I become a bit more European? I realised that I am both and that my sense of self has evolved. Both cultures are also expressed in my work, and that’s what I’ve incorporated into the new range. But the reason I love the individual pieces so much is that I want to create the best light for each specific environment. That’s what I’m good at.
  • 7. 7THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:shutterstock.com:2630ben / lusia83 But the “path” doesn’t only need to be followed in sport – you even have to go down it for tea. Introducing sado, the prestigious tea ceremony and ritualised preparation of powdered green tea, or matcha, in the presence of guests. A tea house is always surrounded by a garden that you have to walk through and forms part of the ritual. The ceremony involves many steps and strict processes that need to be observed, including cleaning the mouth and hands to wash away all evils before entering the minimalist tea house, and stooping through a low entrance doorway to show humility. The tea master prepares all of the utensils in a way that aids the harmonious execution of the processes. It’s not only tea that will finally be handed out, but small dishes of food as well. Kyuto-Ryu is a newly established, modern type of tea ceremony that can be held in an office kitchen or a shop during a lunch break. You still kneel on the floor, but the crockery you use is much less valuable – normally an everyday office coffee cup. Despite this, the pared-back variation still offers the opportunity to relax during the hectic working day and provides a caffeine hit for the afternoon ahead. HINKAKU WHAT SUMO WRESTLERS HAVE TO DISPLAY. IT MEANS DIGNITY. IT MEANS NOT CELEBRATING WHEN YOU WIN, AND NOT COMPLAINING WHEN YOU LOSE. YOKOZUNA THE HIGHEST- RANKING SUMO WRESTLER. HAS TO SHOW IMMENSE STRENGTH IN COMBAT. WEARS A HEAVY ROPE, OR TSUNA, AS A SYMBOL OF HIS RANK. Japan has such an abundance of traditions, rituals and customs that you could probably spend an awfully long time looking into all the details. They also offer a great number of opportunities for you to put your foot in it when you’re there visiting. Space in Japan is divided up according to what is clean and what is not. The house is classed as clean, the outside is not, meaning you must always take your shoes off before going into someone’s home. The only room in a house that isn’t clean is the bathroom – toilet slippers are provided for this purpose. Just never make the mistake of forgetting to take them off when you come out. Or bowing incorrectly in greeting. There is a hierarchy to observe – older above younger, guests above hosts, men above women. Remember not to bow too low to hotel employees, as they will then have to bow even lower the next time they see you. And if you’re wondering why there’s no room number four, it’s because it brings bad luck. If you’re eating with others, don’t help yourself to another drink, but rather wait for a companion to serve you one, otherwise you could be seen as a drunk. If you’ve had enough, leave your glass half full. CHANKONABE A STEW FOR SUMO WRESTLERS THAT IS HIGH IN PROTEIN AND FAT, THEREBY PRO- MOTING WEIGHT GAIN. IT CONTAINS ONLY TWO-LEGGED ANIMALS, THE IDEA BEING THAT SUMO WRESTLERS SHOULD ALWAYS BE ON TWO FEET AS WELL. SENIOR WRESTLERS CAN POLISH OFF UP TO TEN LARGE PLATEFULS IN ONE LUNCH SITTING. CHONMAGE THE TRADITIONAL JAPANESE MEN’S HAIRCUT. PREVIOUSLY FAVOURED BY SAMURAIS, NOW ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY WORN BY SUMO WRESTLERS. IT INVOLVES COVERING LONG HAIR WITH CHAMOMILE OIL AND TYING IT UP WITH A WAX BAND IN A FORWARD- FACING PONYTAIL. Even while living in Vienna, lamp designer Megumi Ito still follows rituals from her native Japan. “I only start working once my space, the kitchen and the bathroom are clean. I scatter salt in the corridor and in the corners of the rooms to keep bad energy at bay.” In addition to this, Ito cleanses the rooms in the morning with incense sticks and spends every evening in the bath. The most important bath, though, is the one before the winter solstice, or touji. On this night, it is tradition to take a bath with slices of yuzu, a fruit that is similar to the lemon but which tastes slightly sweeter. It has been recognised for its health-promoting properties for centuries and is packed with vitamins. “During this bath, we soak up the powers of the citrus fruit and remain healthy throughout the winter months. Yuzu has a cleansing effect and the fragrance is very strong and lasts a long time, so the body stays fresh and free of bacteria,” explains the designer. Internalised values are just as important to Megumi Ito as the rituals – how to be thankful and show gratitude, how to be gentle and be able to listen and respond, and knowing which words to use, as every word has its own power. Just one more thing – if you’re not happy with the outcome of a sumo fight, you can throw your zabuton cushion into the ring. Just for fun. YORIKIRI, OSHIDASHI AND HATAKIKOMI DIFFERENT WAYS OF WINNING A FIGHT. THERE ARE 82 DIFFERENT WAYS IN TOTAL.
  • 8. 8THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 I Y O A A L T O iyo.it ITADAKIMASU* Photos:MaurizioLai Precious materials, clean lines and custom design features characterise this restaurant, where Japan is given an original and unconventional new twist. The IYO AALTO is a Japanese restaurant in Milan that was designed by Italian architect Maurizio Lai. It’s the second restaurant to be opened by the group following the IYO Taste Experience, the only Japanese restaurant in Italy to have been awarded a Michelin star. The furniture was developed exclusively in collaboration with Poliform Contract, and the resulting subtle traditional references, contemporary and clean design language, and the interplay of materials and light create a sense of excitement. At the sushi counter, sushi master Masashi Suzuki demonstrates his vast knowledge of edomae sushi – an ancient technique that is rarely found outside Tokyo. The name is derived from “edo”, the former name of the Japanese capital, and “mae”, which roughly translates as “style”. In this method of preparation, the fish is marinated for a couple of days in soy sauce, salt or vinegar and preserved, rather than being served fresh. Delicious! MILAN LifeexpectancyinJapanisremarkablyhigh,and thatcouldhavesomethingtodowithJapanesecuisine. ITADAKIMASU*
  • 9. 9THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 kikko.at Photos:SandraJedliczka K I K K O B Ā How could you possibly imagine Vienna without Japanese restaurant Mochi? For many years, it has delighted the taste buds of its guests, and tables are still highly sought after – the Falter newspaper recommends visiting out of peak times. But there’s good news – the Mochi has now introduced a new member of the family! With the opening of Kikko Bā, the restaurant’s own Kikko sake, which has long been a regular on the menu of the original restaurant, has found a new home in the Fourth District of the city. The sake and wine bar, which also offers a varying selection of snacks and natural wines from around the world, was originally planned as a pop-up, but it’s now been decided that it’s here to stay. Creative Japanese fusion dishes are whipped up in a tiny kitchen, including the ever-popular sandos (top-notch Japanese sandwiches), crispy fried octopus with mojo rojo made out of grilled peppers, garlic and olive oil, and particularly spicy patatas bravas: potatoes that are crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside, and accompanied by Japanese curry sauce and mayo. Finally, you can wash it all down with carefully selected natural wines, perfectly mixed drinks, beer or sake. VIENNA Luckilyit’salsopossibletoenjoydeliciousJapanesefood outsideofJapan.Herearethreerecommendations.
  • 10. 10THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:JuleMüller / RobertRieger Y O S H I D A GRAZ yoshida.at “Beauty, perfection and passion – that’s all you need to understand about the Japanese way of living,” says Margarethe Yoshida, who lived in Japan for 16 years and learnt the art of reducing everything down to the essential. For some time now, she has been passing on her knowledge of all things related to Japanese cuisine through various cooking courses at her home on Ruckerlberg in Graz, Austria. Here you can learn about the authentic preparation of butajiru, onigiri, tamagoyaki and many other dishes. Yoshida grows specific plants like shiso or myoga (the ginger flower bud) in her garden, and stocks up on organic wine in the fridge. If you don’t feel like doing the work yourself, you can devote yourself to listening and watching. Individually tailored cooking courses can be enjoyed by up to eight people at a time. The Gault-Millau website describes Margarethe Yoshida’s kitchen as “perhaps the best Japanese restaurant in Austria, although strictly speaking it’s not actually a restaurant”. If that’s not a compliment, we don’t know what is! *Theword“itadakimasu”isroughlyequivalenttotheFrench“bonappétit”,orsomethinglike“let’seat”inEnglish,andissaidbeforeevery mealwithyourhandstogetherasifinprayer.Itcanbetranslatedas“Ihumblyreceive”–alovelyexampleofthespiritualsideofJapanese culture.Incidentally,attheendofthemeal,yousay“gochisousamadesu”inthanksforthedeliciousfood.
  • 11. ADVERTORIALTHE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 ADVERTORIAL gressl.com BY HEDI GRAGER Photos:Gressl Barbara Gressl has established herself as a diamond and gemstone consultant with a 24-carat reputation stretching far beyond the borders of Austria. She has been a specialist member of the Austrian Gemmological Association since 1995, and in 2019 was nominated for a Schmuckstars award. Gressl discovered her love for rare stones and pearls at a young age, as her parents ran a specialist jewellers in Köflach in eastern Austria. For the last ten years, she has run her own studio on Stempfer- gasse in Graz, where she displays selected pieces of her goldsmithing work. In specialist circles, Gressl is considered an expert on Kasumigaura pearls, a Japanese cultivated freshwater pearl. “‘Kasumigaura’ means ‘misty lagoon’ and it’s a lake around 55 miles north-east of Tokyo,” she explains to me during my visit to her studio in Graz. “I discovered this rare type of pearl Pearls from the misty lagoon Gold- and silversmith Barbara Gressl is globally renowned as an expert on Kasumigaura pearls, a Japanese cultivated freshwater pearl. She displays precious pearl items in her studio on Stempfergasse in Graz, Austria, as well as other special pieces of jewellery. by accident a few years ago at a Japanese dealer in Munich. They are only available in small quantities, and even then not on the open pearl market.” Gressl gets hers from Japanese pearl cultivator Kazuhisa Yanase, who will only hand them over to selected dealers with many years of experience of working with pearls. “That I can get them at all is a reward in itself,” comments the pearl expert with a proud smile. “The main characteristic of these pearls is their intense metallic lustre, which delicately overlays their natural pink and peach tones.” She reveals a few more interesting details: “Very rarely do you find a perfectly round pearl. Cultivators implant a nucleus bead into the oyster, which is lowered back into the lake in a basket and regularly pulled up and cleaned of any plankton. Because of this constant up and down, the bead isn’t able to grow steadily and uniformly, so after two or three years you get these baroque-style pearls.” Akoya cultivated pearls are also beautiful. They are one of the oldest known types of pearl and stand out because of their perfectly round shape and brilliant lustre. Their colours range from cream to pinkish-white to champagne. While only 32 kilos of Kasumigaura pearls can be harvested each year, with a diameter of up to 16 millimetres, the white Akoya cultured pearls have a yield of around 14 tonnes and a diameter of between 2 and 12 millimetres. Barbara Gressl is also proud that she once had the chance to meet cultivator Kazuhisa Yanase. “He came over to me because he had seen one of my rather different jewellery pieces. I had a perfect and stunning pearl with a pink, almost purple shimmer to incorporate in a piece of jewellery that would then be presented at a big international jewellery trade fair. I created a large platinum pendant in which the pearl appeared to float freely. It really was a huge honour,” smiles the likeable jewellery designer. Gressl particularly likes combining the stunning Kasumigaura pearls with the warm tones of rose gold. “Any woman can wear this flattering warm shade. But it doesn’t always have to be gold – I think the pearls go just as well with natural materials such as buffalo horn or Macassar ebony, and of course with sumptuous gemstones like champagne diamonds or pink tourmaline.” Barbara Gressl is bursting with creative ideas. “I have far more ideas than I could ever possibly make,” she grins, continuing: “I also get great joy from responding to the demands of individual customers.” Her concluding piece of advice: “I believe there will be fewer and fewer high-quality pearls in future due to environmental factors, so it is important to make sure you are buying absolutely perfect pearls.”
  • 12. 12THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 F RA N Z O B E L Photo:DirkSkiba LIFE That was something I wanted to experience. Of course, I should have been suspicious when I asked my Japanese friend about it and they said it would be better to do that in spring, but by that point my flight was already booked. Tokyo is overwhelming. Modern glass architecture and enormous skyscrapers tower above narrow twisting alleyways. At street level it smells of rice cakes. People in uniform are smiling at you everywhere you turn, bending at a precisely defined angle, arigato gozaimasu, even at the bottom of escalators – as if they want to thank you for trusting the contraption. The food is unlike anywhere else: cooked fish eggs, crab foetuses, lotus roots, fermented soy beans, leaves, algae, fish heads stuffed with ginger, and much more, but no sign of the sumo wrestlers. When can I meet them? You’d be better off trying Kyoto. Japan is clean. No trace of graffiti. Not a hint of vandalism, no words of wisdom scrawled on the toilet walls. The public toilets have heated seats. And the trains – oh, the trains! The front of the locomotive looks like a bobsled, they arrive bang on time and a delay of even 15 seconds requires a written report – a one-minute delay leads to a newspaper article, and three minutes will have the driver wanting to commit harakiri. Young- sters roam about Kyoto in bizarre outfits. Manga festival! And what about the sumo wrestlers? You’d be better off trying Kobe. The people are short, slim and decidedly elegant. Their tiny noses make them look a bit like fish. They all adore their work. Even if a member of their family dies, work takes priority. A birth should also preferably take place outside of working hours. It goes without saying that you should arrive before your boss, leave after them and not use up your holiday allowance. Kobe is famous for its beer-massaged cattle, who spend their days listening to Mozart. I meet Mr Takanake, who will help me. While we’re eating, he accidentally touches the hot food warmer on the table. Beads of sweat start to form on his forehead, he bites his tongue but tries not to let his pain show. Discipline is everything. Never lose face. He spends the rest of the evening cooling his hand on a damp napkin. I discover that the Meriken harbour area is named after an epic love story between Mary and Ken – or is it based on a poor understanding of the word “American”? And what about the sumo wrestlers? You’d be better off trying Hiroshima. Like all other cities, Hiroshima, which was once totally destroyed by the atomic bomb, also has a huge red Ferris wheel. I meet Mrs Kagamura, whose look resembles a tadpole. She invites me to try a regional speciality, okonomiyaki, which is a type of cabbage pancake. As for the sumo wrestlers, they should be in Nagoya. There I meet Mr Mitsura, who invites me to a baseball game. There’s nothing you’d really class as action in the four-hour game, but the crowds are still beside themselves, holding the mascots of the various hitters high in the air. And what about the sumo wrestlers? I’m sent to Kagoshima. From there I travel on to Osaka, Atami and Sapporo, where I finally realise that while the Japanese are incredibly welcoming people, there’s just one thing they can’t manage: saying no. And what about the sumo wrestlers? They’re currently on a promotional tour in Europe. I learn this from an Austrian judoka I meet on the return flight, and what he tells me is far more fascinating than any sumo wrestler. But that’s another story. Apparently, in Japan you can go and watch sumo wrestlers training then have breakfast with them afterwards. sumos in japan chasing Franzobel is an Austrian writer. He has published numerous plays, works of prose and poems. His plays have been produced in countries including Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Denmark, France, Poland, Romania, Ukraine, Italy, Russia and the USA. His great historical adven- ture novel “Das Floß der Medusa” (published by Zsolnay) was awarded the Bayerischer Buchpreis (Bavarian Book Award) 2017 and was on the shortlist for the German Book Prize 2017.
  • 13. Photo:HotelCollect Developed for couples looking for a glamorous city break or as a second home for business travellers and urban adventurers, the Hotel Collect in Budapest boasts a contemporary design and a timeless feel. The people behind the hotel are also the owners of a home décor store and love to share their passion for design. The hotel is their dream project, and it’s thanks to their passion that unique furniture pieces and artworks from their private collection can be found in the hotel – iconic pieces that elegantly complement the modernist styling and French influences. L I F E S T Y L E HO T E L S LIFESTYLEHOTELS.NET H O T E L C O L L E C T, B U DA P E S T R E A D M O R E ON PAG E L H 0 7 Selection01 | 2020
  • 14. LH 02THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 How do you know when you've done everything right as a hotel owner? When guests no longer know which day of the week it is – they’re in true holiday mode and can really switch off. What is the best thing about nature for you, and how do you maintain your connection with the natural world? A passion for the mountains runs in the family – my great-grandfather used to make a living as a renowned mountain guide in the Tyrolean Alps. My soul lights up when I wake up in the morning, look out the window and can see the unparalleled mountain landscape and the Zillertal countryside right in front of me. What's particularly interesting about our location to those who don't enjoy the hot weather is that we border the forest. In the summer, this helps to maintain a comfortable temperature, to the point where we don’t need air conditioning in the rooms. That in turn makes a substantial contribution to our efforts to operate more sustainably. As a hotel owner and host, when do you get to go on holiday yourself? I get asked this question a lot by our guests. The answer is quite simple. Whenever I go on a hike in the Tyrolean mountains – either with other mountain enthusiasts or on my own – it feels like a proper holiday experience. The recreational value is huge and it allows me to really recharge my batteries for everyday life. People are often rather taken aback when I tell them during a mountain tour that it feels like I’m on holiday in that moment. You built The Kaltenbach from nothing in the middle of the countryside. What were you looking to achieve? A unique new hotel concept with the perfect combination of much-needed privacy and the luxury of an upmarket four-star hotel. The result is like a typical Tyrolean mountain village, characterised by fascinating architecture and placed right at the heart of nature – we call it our power place. We’ve received several awards for it. A power place allows you to achieve calmness, gain strength or expand your consciousness. You live in a power place. What is so special about this location? It’s not just that it’s a power place it’s the symbiosis of architecture, design and being the perfect starting point for activities in and around the mountain village, as well as cultural city excursions and sightseeing. Our motto “Feel right at home” is something our guests also experience – we’re not just saying that, it’s proven by the fact that they come back time after time. Stephan Haas spent more than two decades working in senior management at a bank before leaving it all behind and becoming a hotel owner. The result is The Kaltenbach, which offers the perfect combination of much-needed privacy and luxury. the ultimate day- dream THE KALTENBACH
  • 15. LH 03THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 What are your five favourite places in and around the hotel? It’s natural to have favourite places that you’re drawn to because they radiate some kind of special energy. But now that I’ve started thinking about it, I’m finding it hard to choose. As a mountain guide with many years of experience, I would say that there is a really special moment when you reach the top of a mountain – you see the cross at the summit, in varying shapes and conditions, marked by the weather and the climate. That never fails to be a defining experience. You take a moment to pause and be thankful. What do you daydream about? Even though it’s also the most popular image of the Zillertal on Instagram, the view from the suspension bridge at the Olperer Hut is really something spectacu- lar, above the turquoise lake and with the enormous mountains in the background. Guests always feel the special atmosphere when they go there, as well. Joy, inner peace and glittering eyes are always proof for us as hosts and friends that they’re in the right spot in the world. Which experiences should absolutely not be missed during a stay in the Ziller Valley? That’s one of the most difficult questions because I find it almost impossible to choose. There are many reasons why Zill- ertal is one of the most active valleys in the world, bursting as it is with destinations that will provide unforgettable experiences for the whole family – for example the Spruce Tree Castle in the Zillertal Arena, or the birds of prey display at the Adlerbühne in Mayrhofen, which is ideal for nature enthusiasts. Nature’s Ice Palace at the Hintertux glacier is a guaranteed adren- aline rush and an incredible adventure. Mountain lovers yearn for many different things, but one thing is certain: those who stay with us at The Kaltenbach enjoy maximum holiday time. lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A T Y RO L   /   H O C H Z I L L E R TA L 45 rooms, apartments and suites 5,000 m2 nature garden
  • 16. LH 04THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 SPORTRESIDENZ ZILLERTAL ****S Photos:“BECKNAPHOTO” / ThomasEberharter. This cosiness begins as soon as you get into your room with its own infrared sauna, or private traditional sauna if you’re in a suite. Anyone wanting to venture a little further will find plenty of space in the Cloud7 wellness area, which caters to all requirements. Whether you’re in the sauna, the steam room, the relaxation room, the hot tub or on one of the terraces, you are guaranteed to find a quiet moment to yourself and become aware of just how extensive the Sportresidenz is with so few rooms. In the heated infinity pool on the roof, you can allow the day to fade away and think about the following day, which will once again offer plenty of opportunities to work the body and calm the mind. Sport, sport and more sport! The Zillertal in Austria’s Tyrol region is a real sporting paradise, so it’s fitting that the Sportresidenz should offer the best in working the body and calming the mind. The cuisine will also keep you on your toes, with a new six-course menu every day. GOING FOR GOLD Also keeping active is head chef Willy, who offers a new six-course menu every day in the Genusswerkstatt restaurant. He cooks predominantly using ingredients from the region and turns them into local dishes with international influences, and it’s these dishes that have already earnt the ambitious chef an award. Everything from the abundant and inviting breakfast buffet and afternoon snacks to the gourmet evening meals can be made to take into account any allergies or intolerances, and vegan or vegetarian options are also available. Those who like a sense of routine even on holiday will appreciate being able to keep “their” table in the restaurant throughout their stay so that no one else is able to sit there. MORE SPACE, FEWER PEOPLE What makes a stay at the Sportresidenz even more enjoyable is that despite its size, there are only 33 rooms and suites, mean- ing you can really feel at home here and benefit from a warm and personal service. The high-quality construction makes for a cosy, intimate and relaxing atmosphere. The right setup, the right grip, a graceful swing and the little white ball is sent flying high over the lush green fairway. It’s not just the Zillertal that keeps you active – the Sportresidenz Zillertal boutique hotel certainly also lives up to its name. The hotel sits right on the edge of an 18-hole championship golf course, which is sure to delight amateurs and professionals alike. And for anyone who still wants more after an arduous game, there’s the opportunity to watch other golfers reach the island green from the hotel. But sport doesn’t only have to mean golf. Those who like to keep it simple can explore the countless hiking and mountain biking trails, get a lungful of fresh mountain air and marvel at the panoramic views. On the other hand, if you want to show off your adventurous side, there are more extreme activities like rafting, canyoning and paragliding. Winter, of course, sees both aspiring and experienced skiers and cross-country skiers quenching their sporting thirst. Providing enrichment for the body, mind and soul are the yoga, Qigong, Pilates and meditation sessions that form part of the comprehensive activities programme at the Sportresidenz. Or you could go for aqua aerobics or a fitness class. If you haven’t yet tried singing bowls for relaxation, it’s a real must. When the tone of the bell vibrates through the body, you feel every single wave. It’s surprising how cleansing a treatment using sound can feel. hole in one lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A T Y RO L   /   Z I L L E R TA L 33 rooms On the golf course
  • 17. LH 05THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:Alpinlodge&Spa Set amidst the spectacular Engadin mountain landscape on the sunny side of the Samnaun valley, you will find the design hotel Alpinlodge & Spa*****. Claudia and Hansjörg Kolednik have been its owners and hosts for over ten years, but their biggest success has been the 27 years as owners of architectural firm artis plan ag, which has made a name for itself on many national and international projects. architecture that evokes emotions artisplan.com alpinlodge.ch S W I T Z E R L A N D S A M N AU N   /   RAVA I S C H 3 exclusive apartments Alpine spa with infinity pool They say that people should always be the focus. How is that expressed in architecture and design? HK: We accommodate the needs and desires of people. What do we need in order to experience wellbeing? That’s what we measure ourselves against. What’s more, we connect with each project on an individual level so that everything is tailo- red to that specific set of requirements. Every building has a unique selling point that sets it apart from the rest and that’s what makes it a one-of-a-kind solution for customers and guests. First an architectural firm, then luxury holiday apartments – why did you want to become hosts? CK: My parents had a guesthouse, so even when I was a child I was dealing with guests and I am a passionate host. What did you place particular emphasis on when designing and planning the Alpinlodge? HK: The surroundings and the landscape had to take centre stage to bring the associated emotions into the interior totally unfiltered. The rooms are flooded with light and the materials possess an Alpine charm. You are the hosts of luxury five-star apartments and owners of architectural firm artis plan ag. What are the best things about the two worlds? Claudia Kolednik: Thanks to the direct contact we have with our guests at the Alpinlodge, we can take on board their needs and suggestions and feed them straight into the plans we’re working on, allowing for cross-fertilisation between the two worlds. A major advantage for us is that we stay up to date with design trends because we move through life with our eyes wide open and draw constant inspiration from our travels and attending international trade shows. Which type of design do you prefer? Hansjörg Kolednik: Contemporary, uncomplicated architecture combined with a corresponding interior design concept that takes into account our Alpine location. We endeavour to open up spaces with lots of glass and to highlight features in the best possible way with customised lighting solutions. Through the use of natural materials like wood, steel, stone and glass, we create cosy yet open rooms that promote a sense of wellbeing. This has been confirmed to us in extremely positive feedback from our guests. As a guest recently said: “You were way ahead of your time!” That gives us real motivation for the future. What knowledge and experiences of hotel projects for other clients were you able to bring to the Alpinlodge? HK: Actually, it was the other way around! We tried out a lot of new things at the Alpinlodge so we could see how it might work with customers. In our building we used materials like reclaimed timber in the bathroom areas to find out whether it would be suitable for use in a hotel environment. The Alpinlodge is celebrating its tenth anni- versary this year. Which of its assets would you identify as being the most important? CK and HK: Definitely our alpinSpa with the panoramic infinity pool on the third floor and the magical view of the moun- tains. Going for a swim there is like being in a warm mountain lake. Other things that have proved popular are the high ceilings like those in turn-of-the-century stately homes. Which artistic details in the Alpinlodge still make you smile after ten years? CK: I couldn’t possibly choose – everything! The wealth of details is always appreciated by our guests, and this feedback gives us incentive and motivation. What’s the main philosophy of the Alpinlodge? CK: The enjoyment of relaxation. As a small but luxury design hotel, we want to make sure our guests enjoy an unforgetta- ble break. An anniversary is always an occasion to look towards the future. What do you see in store for the architectural firm and the Alpinlodge? CK and HK: It’s important to us to evoke positive emotions and to surprise our guests and customers. To put it in the words of Charles Eames: “The role of a designer is that of a very good, thoughtful host who anticipates the needs of their guests.” This is our ultimate goal. ALPINLODGE & SPA *****
  • 18. LH 06THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:HotelMax:ArchivMarcati / HotelLaurichhof:www.seidelstudios.de DAS MAX DESIGNHOTEL LAURICHHOF Have you ever been to Pirna? Where is it, you ask? It’s in the Saxon Switzerland region of Germany, of course! You don’t know where that is either? Then it really is time for a trip to the Laurichhof design hotel to meet the Seidel family. “Creativity never sleeps. If you let it in, if you live by it, you will see what joy people can experience when they give in to abstract thinking. You will want to take it by the hand and be led into a dream world. We are capable of so much more than simply experiencing the day to day and clinging on to the obvious and what has always been,” believes owner and interior designer Annette Katrin Seidel. And that’s exactly what pushed her and her son Franz Philip Seidel, an architecture student, to conceive the Laurichhof in Pirna. A HOTEL THAT DOUBLES AS A SHOWROOM Stemming from the family love of design and architecture – her husband Uwe is an architect – Annette has created a place that aims to be as inspiring as a showroom and as comfortable as a beautiful home. Each of the suites tells a different story, brings a different style to life, and every last detail, right down to the plug sockets, has been carefully considered. Take the Big in Japan suite – the bamboo-effect wooden flooring and the bathroom tiles that look like origami join forces to pay homage to the Japanese way of life. Guests that like their suites so much that they want to take them home are in the right place: everything you find in the suites, from individual pieces of furniture to entire Laurichhof concepts, can be replicated within your own four walls. Those who manage to leave their suite, or the Laurichhof in general, which offers delicious meals in its Lazy Laurich restaurant, will discover the stunning and idyllic beauty of its location right on the banks of the Elbe between the cultural hubs of Dresden and Prague. The Saxon Switzerland National Park is sure to calm the soul thanks to its rugged sandstone cliffs, bubbling streams and sandy trails. At that point you won’t just know about Pirna, you’ll love it. home suite home lifestylehotels.net G E R M A N Y S AXON S W I T Z E R L A N D   /   P I R N A 27 individual suites Rooms that tell a story NEW MEMBER urban. rural. max and colours have been styled together to create a “happy” ambience. The spa area and roof terrace invite you to sit back and chill, while at the 24-hour honesty bar guests can mix up their drinks around the clock, as the name suggests. Arrival is simple, check-in is uncomplicated and flexible. Seefeld itself has a lot to offer for nature enthusiasts and city lovers in equal measure, with cool bars and restaurants demonstrating the benefit of being in a popular destination. And for those who still love the traditional side of things, you can find that too. Speak to any Austrian about Seefeld in Tyrol and they’ll probably all have a similar image in their heads. Nestled on a plateau between the Wetterstein and Karwendel mountain ranges, it was used several times as a venue for the Winter Olympics, evoking images of classic winter tourism, idyllic Tyrolean mountain land- scapes and quaint chalets. Architect Alex- ander Meissl has a couple of other words in mind when he talks about his home town: “For a long time, I felt it was just a tourist destination with an overload of chalets in a too-obvious traditional regional style, with a smattering of Bavarian-baroque elements, and they seemed like caricatures of architecture in my eyes. Considering the hotel industry is the future, I didn’t want anything to do with that image.” Luckily times have changed and provided an opening for a hotel like the dasMAX boutique hotel developed by Meissl. FREEDOM, INDIVIDUALITY AND A HEALTHY DOSE OF MODERN DESIGN dasMAX now offers a combination of both a typical Alpine destination and modern urban design. The stylish BoConcept rooms provide everything you could possibly need and only lack the things you don’t. Different materials, shapes “Do more of what makes you happy” – that’s the motto of the dasMAX hotel in Seefeld. You can feel the vibe, and that’s why dasMAX makes us happy too. AU S T R I A T Y RO L   /   S E E F E L D 19 rooms in prime location Stylish roof terrace with sauna lifestylehotels.net
  • 19. LH 07THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:GästehausKrenn:ArminWalcher / HotelCollect:HotelCollect GÄSTEHAUS KRENN HOTEL COLLECT I have to say, rarely have I arrived somewhere as beautiful as Pürgg im Ennstal in the Styria region of Austria. Who would have thought? The delightful, small, charming district of Pürgg totally stole my heart, and the view of the Grimming mountain range took my breath away. But the fact that I lost my heart to Pürgg wasn’t just down to the wildly romantic surroundings; it was mostly thanks to the Gästehaus Krenn and Valerie and Theresia Graf, who along with their team nurture constant interaction with their guests. The way they have styled the interior of the guesthouse makes for a charming mix of detailed pieces just waiting to be discovered. Modern and linear items are paired with more traditional pieces and hand-picked antiques for an effect that is not forced but rather homely. Designer vases stand fall in love with pürgg lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A E N N S TA L   /   P Ü RG G 4 double rooms 3 suites From a grocery store to e-bikes alongside hand-woven baskets, butchers’ blocks next to sumptuous velvet wingback chairs. The bedding and towels are made out of linen and create both a traditional and contemporary feel. The garden level of the guesthouse provides an impressive and grand open-plan living space that resembles an extended living room, and from here you can move into the fabulous garden and the covered loggia. In the library, guests can expect to find a good selection of literature, crime novels and magazines that you can grab and take with you into the garden. The love of the written word is accompanied by the same sentiment towards art, with the walls bedecked with works by young artists. I could spend between now and forever daydreaming about the mouth-watering meals at the guesthouse, which encour- agingly included vegetarian dishes and were complemented by homemade bread and fresh regional ingredients, handmade mustard creations from Senferei Anna- Max, delicious organic muesli from Zagler Müslibär and pesto products from Taschler im Glas in the grocery store. I simply don’t have the room on this page to tell you more. The premise of any guesthouse is that “You arrive as a guest and leave as a friend” – nowhere is this more true than in the unremarkable-sounding district of Pürgg and the Gästehaus Krenn. an eclectic mix modern colours such as petrol blue, ochre and rust combined with expansive mirrors and bold stone elements to stunning effect. The bathrooms are limited to black, white and grey. The small courtyard features an interplay of Moroccan and French influences, while the lobby bar provides the perfect setting for sipping on a glass of Prosecco before you head out. Anyone who feels the need for a TV when they visit this city should be ashamed of themselves … But there are TVs in the rooms, and they even have Netflix. If you find yourself on the chain bridge as the sun’s setting, you’ll be rewarded with a truly spectacular ambience. A pastel-coloured sky extends across the Danube, which runs through the middle of the city, and if you wait until it’s dark, the lights from the houses and the bridges start to dance on the surface of the water. Beyond the western bank lie the hills of Buda, which look down on medieval cobblestones and the brightly coloured Matthias Church. On the other side of the river in Pest, elegant 19th-century houses line up next to one another and today play host to a vast array of shops, bars and cafés. For a city break, you’re best off at the Collect boutique hotel, which gets guests in the mood for such a cool city with its blend of eclectic modernist styling and French influences. Ideally situated next to the Károlyi Garden and only a short distance from the highly recommended Hungarian National Museum, the Collect is the perfect hangout for culturally refined design enthusiasts. You feel as though you have lost all sense of time, as everything seems to take on a timeless quality in this atmospheric space. The rooms showcase a variety of designs, with furniture in Budapest is known as the Paris of the east, and not without good reason. The hugely diverse city on the Danube is unexpected. The best starting point for your voyage of discovery? The new Hotel Collect. lifestylehotels.net H U NG A RY B U DA P E S T 16 rooms/suites Modernist luxury with a French influence
  • 20. LH 08THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:eye5.li // ChristophSchöch BERGLAND DESIGN AND WELLNESS HOTEL SÖLDEN and strengthen the body’s own self-healing capabilities,” comments Julia Keimling. In the Sky Spa, you experience a commit- ment to the regional and the sustainable through the application of carefully selected natural beauty products and extraordinary treatments, meaning the skin and the soul have everything they need. If you require a bit of “fast” after all the “slow”, pay a visit to the Electric Mountain Festival in spring and show off your new-found spa glow. But don’t go to bed too late! There are scientists who claim to have discovered that skin cell renewal occurs at around 11pm, and it will only happen if you’re already asleep by that time. But no matter what time you snuggle down in your hotel bed, even sleep feels more restful here at the Bergland. Too many thoughts whizzing around in your head? Had enough of the noise of the city? Leave your stresses behind and join us at the Bergland Design and Wellness Hotel Sölden, where you can take it slow on your way to achieving total relaxation and a fresh glow. Those who manage to make their days as balanced and as stress-free as possible will not only achieve a greater sense of relaxation, but also a more radiant skin. It’s especially easy to enjoy a day without stress at the Bergland – set amongst nature, surrounded by tasteful décor, there’s no option but to float your way blissfully from morning to night. ANCIENT KNOWLEDGE, NEW GLOW The origins of the hot stone massage can be traced back more than 2,000 years. Now, in the Ötztal Alpine valley, the ancient practice has been studied in depth and reinterpreted afresh at the Sky Spa. “We complement the traditional lava stones with the power of local granite and arnica oil in order to both fully activate “I think that people should be considered as a whole being, and that we are all unique in the sense of our body, mind and soul. For this reason, our approach is to offer treatments that strive to meet the indi- vidual needs of each guest,” explains Julia Keimling, Spa Manager at the Bergland Design and Wellness Hotel in Sölden in the Austrian Tyrol region. This is the perfect complement for the new “slow ageing” lifestyle trend, which isn’t a case of not growing any older – what a nightmare! – but rather living as your best self at every age. At the heart of it is positive thinking, avoiding stress and an overall good feeling. Products that can give you a glowing complexion while limiting their impact on the environment play a supporting role in this. NATURAL BEAUTY FOR EVERY SKIN TYPE In the Sky Spa at the Bergland, they know just how to help their guests achieve this feeling of slow ageing, offering relaxing and nourishing wellbeing packages using the hotel’s own Natural Alpine range of products. Why not try a deeply moistur- ising and refreshing arnica salt peel to soften and clear the skin of dead skin cells? Or how about a hayflower bath so you can soak up the power of nutrient-rich grasses and meadow flowers, or a zeolite head massage using a dense ball of sheep’s wool for an incredible feeling of deep relaxation? However, it’s not just the approach to self-care that is slowing down these days. slow ageing lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A T Y RO L   /   S Ö L D E N 86 rooms/suites FIS Alpine Ski World Cup location and Sky Spa
  • 21. LH 09THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:HoteldesBalances,Lucerne PETER E. BÜSSER HOTEL DES BALANCES take a walk on the cultural side You’re located on the banks of the Reuss with views of the Jesuit Church, the Chapel Bridge and the mountains in the background. Why would you even need to leave the hotel? The location in the centre of Lucerne’s old town, right on the Reuss, is certainly unique. From the rooms and suites or from the restaurant terrace, you can enjoy a simply breathtaking view of the mountain landscape, the Chapel Bridge – the landmark of the city – and the Jesuit Church. But ultimately it is the whole package that sets our hotel apart from the rest: the stylish décor, the charm of the building, the cosy atmosphere, the creative culinary offering and particularly our personal service. All of Lucerne’s most famous sights are within a short walk of the hotel. A stroll through the quaint old town is always worth it, as is a visit to the weekly market on the edge of the Reuss. Or why not head to the theatre, out on a boat or take a trip up Pilatus or Rigi? It’s all on our doorstep. It’s not just the Hotel des Balances that’s steeped in history – the city of Lucerne simply oozes tradition. What are your own cultural and historical highlights? The Hotel des Balances has a truly rich heritage stretching all the way back to 1199. At that time, an inn stood on this spot, then later the nobility would meet here for tea, and in the 1960s renowned Swiss cabaret artist Emil Steinberger began his stage career here. The building itself is also famous for its façade murals painted in the style of German renaissance artist Hans Holbein, and it is one of the most-photographed spots in Lucerne. Today, the Hotel des Balances displays the ultimate harmony of historical structure and contemporary design. In more recent history, the development of KKL Luzern, the city’s culture and congress centre, is a milestone that really puts Lucerne in the international spotlight. It’s not just the architecture by Jean Nouvel that draws people in – the acoustics of the Concert Hall also attract prominent artists from around the world year after year. It is both an architectural and a cultural asset for the city and for our guests. Guests at your hotel can expect a comple- mentary programme of events, from jazz piano to talks by female speakers. What can they look forward to this spring? We will mainly be spoiling our guests with a culinary assortment of spring delicacies. Our pianist will also be playing in the bar and lounge every week. Then we have an interesting selection of female speakers here once a month to discuss some hot topics, and the events are always well attended – even by men. Peter E. Büsser has been successfully running the Hotel des Balances in picturesque Lucerne for over thirty years. And who can blame him for not wanting to leave when the city is so rich in culture, including his own historic building? You yourself have been at the Hotel des Balances for many years. What have you always placed the most emphasis on? The details and the quality of service. I want to offer our guests an enjoyable and decadent experience that they won’t forget in a hurry. That includes creating a pleasant atmosphere in which both guests and employees feel comfortable, an atmosphere where you can meet and chat with people informally. I attach great importance to employees who love their job and who love people. I have run the hotel with a high degree of trust and respect for over thirty years now, and it’s thanks to my incredible team that I can hand over authority and responsibility without reservation – it’s a method that’s proved itself successful for many years. Which moment will always stay with you? There are two: first of all, the fire on the Chapel Bridge in 1993. We could see the flames from up close in the hotel – that was a tragic moment. Then in 2005 we spent over a million francs on renovating our restaurant. Just two months later, there was a flood and we were knee-deep in water. We had to start the renovations all over again. lifestylehotels.net S W I T Z E R L A N D L U C E R N E 56 rooms Situated on the Reuss in the heart of Lucerne’s old town What will be important in the future? An undamaged environment – we do our bit to take care of it, and we also try to encourage our guests to be more aware of how they use resources. In addition to that, I want to increase the use of the Hotel des Balances as a venue for meetings and other events. Our stunning rooms are perfect for this purpose.
  • 22. LH 10THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:UweMühlhäuser ART & BUSINESS HOTEL INDIVIDUALITY AND RELAXATION The art & business hotel is an easy two- minute walk from the main train station and located on the edge of the historic old town of Nuremberg, making it practical and a real time-saver. But despite all the practicalities, it’s important not to forget individuality and a need for relaxation. “We only display original artworks by regional Franconian artists.” There’s even a whole wall that’s a work of art – the gold leaf concrete wall, which was created back in 1972. Sculptures line the hotel corridors and its cosy garden. A kinetic wind chime by Hans Karl Busch exerts a soothing pull. Anyone wanting to brush up on their knowledge of wine should attend one of the wine tastings that take part throughout the year and cover a range of themes. Because the opportunity for a little time out from work should never be missed. Do you travel for business three or more times a month? If so, all the more reason to find a place that makes your stay as comfortable as possible, and perhaps even a bit more. A CHEERY “GOOD MORNING” SETS YOU UP FOR THE DAY Get your day off to a great start in a light- flooded room with a view of the art garden, with an open and cheery “Good morning” and dishes made on the premises from the finest ingredients. Jams, pastries, confectionery, salads, desserts, antipasti, fruit yoghurts, porridge, muesli, different types of bread, homemade gluten-free bread and much more pile up on a table that threatens to sag under the weight. The best bit? Almost all of it has been made at the hotel. The meat products come from a gourmet butcher, some of the cheeses come from a master cheesemaker in Erlangen. The eggs are delivered from a farm, the vegetables come straight from the surrounding Knoblauchsland region. Gluten-free or vegan dishes are readily available. With everything appetisingly laid out in small individual portions, guests are able to enjoy a stress-free start to the day. “When guests stay with us, they will find a cleanly designed space with a feel-good vibe and pleasant atmosphere. Ultimately, when you’re travelling on business and are away from your family, it’s important to feel welcome,” believes Stephanie Hirschfelder from the family-run art & business hotel in Nuremburg. What else can guests expect? “Aesthetics, aspiration, comfort, functionality and of course a high level of professionalism.” Surveys show that business travellers have very clear requirements. At the top of the wish list are flexible check-in and check-out times, and a room with a desk where they can get their work done. No less important is their appetite for healthy, balanced meals, and particular attention is paid to this last point at the art & business hotel. business not as usual lifestylehotels.net G E R M A N Y N U R E M B E RG 49 rooms art and wine
  • 23. LH 11THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 MODERN ART WITHIN ANCIENT WALLS The entire hotel is devoted to modern art, and there are countless pieces from Martin Ho’s private collection on display not just on the walls, but also as little surprises in between. “Even at the entrance to the hotel, I’m greeted by one of Erwin Wurm’s sausage sculptures, which always brings a smile to my face,” reveals the art collector. The effect on the guests is much the same when they are surrounded by works by Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons, Daniel Richter and Jonathan Meese, to name but a few, during their stay beneath the vaulted gothic ceilings. Each of the five individually designed guest rooms is also dedicated to a theme, art movement or artist – for example, the Pop room follows the principles of pop art, the Copenhagen room is inspired by designer and architect Arne Jacobsen and the deluxe Bukkake What does a relentless businessman buy himself for his 32nd birthday? With galleries, restaurants and clubs already in his portfolio, Martin Ho was still missing something: a hotel. He had always wanted to join the ranks of hoteliers, although when he was younger it was more an idyllic treehouse in Sapa, Vietnam, on the border with China that he had in mind. But the newcomer to the hotel scene has now found a similar sense of tranquillity in Wachau in Lower Austria. In autumn 2018, just in time for his birthday, he opened LA PETITE IVY in the historic Trenninghof building. The boutique hotel promotes itself as a place of relaxation and deceleration away from the big-city hustle and bustle of Vienna, and brings together all of Ho’s passions under its 717-year-old roof: cuisine, individuality, design and art. With the opening of boutique hotel LA PETITE IVY, Martin Ho has fulfilled a lifelong dream. Art-loving guests visit the haven in the Wachau region of Austria to indulge in peace and contemplation. ho-tel room, with its freestanding bath and private balcony with panoramic view, pays tribute to artist Nobuyoshi Araki. GEARED UP TO WIND DOWN That being said, it’s not just boasts of art and design that entice guests to visit this countryside gem. In addition to the impressive sculpture park, nestled amongst the idyllic hills of the Wachau region those seeking relaxation will also find a pool, an in-house bar and a library. In the colder months, it’s best to withdraw to the small, exclusive spa area with its steam and infrared saunas. Alternatively, you could flick through a good book by the cosy fireplace, lost in thought, allowing your gaze to wander to the spectacular Wachau landscape, which is all the more captivating when covered with snow. Even better with a glass of exquisite regional red wine in your hand, which can now be found on the menu at all of the proprietor’s restaurants. LA PETITE IVY is also dedicated to Ho’s wife Ivana and their daughter Ivy Kim, who both contributed to making Martin Ho’s latest birthday wish come true: rest and relaxation with family. And where better to do just that than in his own little slice of paradise in peaceful Mühldorf. LA PETITE IVY Photos:Studiomato lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A L OW E R AU S T R I A   / WAC H AU   /   M Ü H L D O R F 5 rooms 1 private gallery
  • 24. LH 12THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photos:LuigiCaputo / CatalinCucu HOTEL GOLDGASSE To mark the centenary of the festival this year, there will also be a state exhibition that will see the museum transformed into a stage. For six months, the Neue Residenz will become a forum in which to discover the rich history of the Salzburg Festival and its performers, presenting art interventions, enactments of stories and film screenings. “The state exhibition is the launch event to celebrate the 100-year anniversary of the Salzburg Festival. We are optimistic that this display will offer both the citizens of Salzburg and guests from all over the world fascinating retrospectives and glimpses of the future,” says festival president Helga Rabl-Stadler. Over the last 100 years, there have only been a handful of occasions when Jedermann has not been performed at the Salzburg Festival. From the very beginning, the event has included operatic productions and concerts, and this programme has expanded every year since. The main highlight is definitely still the traditional rendering of Jedermann, which was based on several medieval mystery plays. To see it enacted on the steps in front of the cathedral, or in the festival hall during bad weather, never fails to be an unforgettable experience. PAYING HOMAGE TO THE ARTS Much older than the Salzburg Festival is a stone building in a charming little alleyway called Goldgasse. It is 700 years old and now home to one of the city’s most stun- ning and individual hotels: the Goldgasse, a boutique hotel with just 16 rooms that have all been designed around the theme of the Salzburg Festival. They pay homage to this enormous production, this event that turns the entire city into a stage – a notion that even director Max Reinholdt wished to express from the outset. The rooms in the Goldgasse are a stage in themselves for modern features and contemporary design objects. And just so you know – this small-but-perfect retreat doesn’t just provide cultural inspiration, it also offers exceptional cuisine. The production of Jedermann was staged in the famous Cathedral Square in Salzburg for the first time in 1920. The play about the death of a rich man was directed by Max Reinhardt who, along with the play’s author Hugo von Hofmannsthal, was a co-founder of the Salzburg Festival. The character of Jedermann was played by the most famous actor of the time in the German-speaking world, Alexander Moissi, while Jedermann’s lover Buhlschaft was played by Johanna Terwin, Moissi’s wife in real life. of the salzburg festival lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A S A L Z B U RG 16 Salzburg Festival-themed rooms One of the city’s best restaurants 100years
  • 25. LH 13THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 These charming boutique hotels in Salzburg’s old town are worth a visit at any time of year. But during the Salzburg Festival, the Hotel Stein and the Hotel Goldgasse set the scene for an even more profound experience. BLUE SKIES OVER THE BLUE LAGOON Guests from across the globe with an affinity for art are sure to be found at the Stein boutique hotel, situated right on the Salzach river in the old town. The hotel underwent an extensive makeover in 2018 and has since followed the concept of “Salzburg meets Venice”, evidence of which includes the chandeliers and other pieces by Venetian glass manufacturers Barovier & Toso, a company that is also owned by the hotel proprietor. Then there are the fabrics by Rubelli, which certainly wouldn’t look out of place in a Venetian palace. Even from outside, directly in front of the hotel, HOTEL STEIN lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A S A L Z B U RG 56 rooms/suites Incredible view across the city you will be mesmerised by a work of art by Austrian artist Brigitte Kowanz, who in 2016 represented Austria at the Venice Biennale and also showcased her works there in 2017. Her pieces lead you into the interior and create a stylistic connection between the inside and the outside. The colour blue dominates the décor, representing both the colour of the sky and that of the lagoon in Venice. When you stroll back from Cathedral Square, be it to the Goldgasse or the Stein, you can be sure that you are in the perfect place to recharge your batteries after an intoxicating performance and to let the experience of the epic productions last a little longer. Photos:EdmundBarr / CatalinCucu
  • 26. LH 14THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 TAKE A FLYING CARPET RIDE TO INNER PEACE I opt for the Rose from Marrakech, a 75-minute oriental cleansing ritual using an exclusive black olive soap combined with a nourishing body peel. After I have been covered in oil from head to toe, I receive a traditional full body massage that frees my body of any aches and pains and clears my mind. After an extended bath and a visit to the deep-cleansing serail mud chamber, I am drawn to the CHAI Oriental Tea Bar, where tea is served alongside dried fruits. It’s a fitting end to this day of oriental bathing. Any stressful thoughts have long since been whisked away on a flying carpet and I feel pleasantly light. I stretch out on a lounger and doze off. The water trickles soothingly from ornate taps while I doze on the 40-degree hot stone in the centre of the room, with com- forting scents of amber, rose and verbena blossom evoking images of the Orient and stirring my nose and my senses. The steam surrounding me makes everything hazy, like a dream from one of the stories in One Thousand and One Nights. Even back in the time of the ancient sultans in their palaces, they swore by the cleansing effect and benefits for body and soul of the traditional hammam, a ritual that offers the ultimate in warmth, cleansing and pure relaxation. The Oriental World at the Therme Geinberg is a sensory retreat and therefore the ideal place to unwind and escape the everyday. Following the warmth of the steam bath and the richness of the olive oil soap, stress quite literally slips away from my body. Later on, the hammam master reveals to me his knowledge of secret rituals and oriental bathing culture, while I succumb to the enchantment of the Orient still further. The selection of Turkish and Moroccan treatments on offer is remarkable, and their names hint at something quite spectacular: Emerald of the Sultan, Ritual of the Sultan, Rose from Marrakech or A Day in the Desert. All treatments are carried out in accord- ance with modern European standards. Feel reborn in a Far Eastern paradise: after experiencing fairy-tale treatments and hammam rituals in the Oriental World at the Geinberg5 Private Spa Villas, you’ll be a new person. one thousand and one nights A VILLA, A NATURAL BATHING POOL AND A SAUNA – JUST FOR ME The luxury Geinberg5 Private Spa Villas are the perfect retreat for anyone who prefers to keep their spa experience to themselves. All 21 of the stylish suites and villas, the biggest of which is 300 m², benefit from their own private wellness area with a Finnish sauna, steam bath, outdoor hot tub with 36-degree thermal water, and an open fireplace. After spending time in the sauna, you can dive off the large terrace straight into your own private bay in one of the two 3,300 m² natural bathing pools – that’s my day tomorrow sorted. There’s also a team of butlers on hand to tend to the personal wellbeing of a small number of guests, meaning you can enjoy the award-winning GEINBERG5 PRIVATE SPA VILLAS cuisine from the Aqarium restaurant in the privacy of your own villa. You can of course do the same for your breakfast. Even those who don’t want to leave their villa will not want to miss out on the Oriental World. While it may not be possible to get there by flying carpet, you can glide there in an electric car – in line with the “green thinking” attitude of the Geinberg5 . lifestylehotels.net AU S T R I A I N N V I E R T E L   /   G E I N B E RG 21 suites Private butler service Photos:RobertMaybach / MatthiasWitzany / GregorHartl
  • 27. LH 15THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 silent flow HOTEL LEMONGARDEN Photos:Hotel:ChristianHusar / Portrait:BenRakidzija YOGA, MEDITATION AND POETRY Ben Rakidzija isn’t just a trained yoga teacher. He is also an educated philosopher and historian, composes prose and poems and organises the Lit.Eu literature festival in Opatija, which authors Marie Gamillscheg, Markus Orths and Franzobel have all attended. “The aim of my lessons is to promote a strong body and a clear mind. Every class is different, every day is new. I don’t force my students and try to find a balance between strength and relaxation,” says Ben, who in the evenings doesn’t need much encouragement to share stories about his many yoga experiences. The sun glitters through the tops of the trees, the waves crash gently onto the pebble beach and the soft breeze wafts past the end of your nose. I experience all of this in the new yoga pavilion on the private beach at Hotel Lemongarden, from which the beauty of the natural surroundings can now be appreciated all the more intensely. A programme for the first yoga retreats at the Lemongarden has been put together with the help of Ben Rakidzija. The yoga teacher practises Silent Flow, a free interpretation of Hatha yoga, Vinyasa Flow, Yin yoga and Qigong. There are also fascia training exercises and other forms of movement. But why make it silent? All of the classes take place in silence and so offer the opportunity to really be at one with yourself, no matter whether you’re a beginner or an experienced yogi. What don’t you mind hearing amongst the silence? The roar of the sea, the twitter of birds, the chirping of crickets … At Hotel Lemongarden on the Croatian island of Brač, the silence is something quite special. TRANCE-INDUCING LOUNGER Between the morning and evening yoga sessions and a refreshing dip in the sea, it makes sense to spend plenty of time in the private spa. Guests can enjoy the Finnish sauna made out of cedar, a steam room boasting a combination of light and aromatherapy with lavender, lemon, lime and orchid fragrances, and an experience shower. Those who haven’t yet laid on one of the ergonomically designed, blue illumi- nated AlphaSphere loungers really must. Developed by the Viennese artist known as SHA, the lounger transports users into a trance-like state thanks to a sea of tiny vibrations, gentle electronic sounds and changing coloured lighting inspired by chromotherapy. Afterwards, you feel as though you have been in another world, where everything is beautiful and pink. Luckily it is still beautiful when you come round, only now it’s not pink but turquoise. lifestylehotels.net C ROAT I A S U T I VA N   /   B RAČ 28 suites/ maisonettes 12 rooms It’s recommended that you stumble your way straight to a Lemongarden aromather- apy session and enjoy a relaxing massage on a lounger using lemon and orange essential oils. In this deeply relaxed state you go to yoga again, then curl up in bed afterwards with the blissful realisation that the next day you will wake up feeling just as good as when you went to sleep. Whoever can’t make the Lemongarden yoga retreats in May should absolutely book them for September!
  • 28. THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 D I R E C T O RY L I F E S T Y L E H O T E L S BRAMBERG  Wildkogel Resorts FISS  Alpslodge Life.Style.Hotel.Fiss FÜGEN  Alpina Zillertal family.lifestyle.hotel GASCHURN  Montafon Lodge Luxury Lodgehotel und Spa GEINBERG  Geinberg 5 Private Spa Villas GRAZ  Augarten Art Hotel GRAZ  Lendhotel GRAZ  Roomz Graz GROSSARL  Hotel Nesslerhof HALLSTATT  Hallstatt Hideaway KALS AM GROSSGLOCKNER  Gradonna Mountain Resort KALTENBACH  Das Kaltenbach KITZBÜHEL  Alpenhotel Kitzbühel am Schwarzsee LÄNGENFELD  Naturhotel Waldklause LEOGANG  Puradies MARIA ALM  Hotel Eder MARIA ALM  Hotel Sepp MAYRHOFEN  ElisabethHotel Premium Private Retreat MELLAU  Sonne Lifestyle Resort MÖSERN  Nidum Casual Luxury Hotel MÜHLDORF  LA PETITE IVY NAUDERS  Aparthotel Arabella OBERGURGL  Hotel The Crystal OBERTAUERN  Hotel Panorama Obertauern SAALBACH HINTERGLEMM  Alpin Juwel SALZBURG CITY  Hotel Goldgasse SALZBURG CITY  Hotel Stein SALZBURG CITY  Hotel & Villa Auersperg SCHLADMING  Stadthotel Brunner SEEFELD  Das Max SERFAUS  Alfa Hotel SÖLDEN  Bergland Design and Wellnesshotel Sölden STAINACH-PÜRGG  Gästehaus Krenn TURRACHER HÖHE  Hollmann am Berg UDERNS  Sportresidenz Zillertal VIENNA  Hollmann Beletage VIENNA  Hotel Das Tyrol VIENNA  Hotel Schani Salon VIENNA  Hotel Schani Wien WAGRAIN  Sensum Suites Design Hotel ZELL AM SEE  Eva Hof Lakeside Suites ZELL AM SEE  Seehotel Bellevue ZELL AM SEE  Senses Violett Suites AUSTRIA GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN  Das Graseck NUREMBERG  art & business hotel PIRNA  Laurichhof SANKT ENGLMAR  Berghotel Maibrunn STUTTGART  V8 Hotel STUTTGART  V8 Hotel Classic TIMMENDORFER STRAND  SAND TIMMENDORFER STRAND  Hotel Seehuus GERMANY CHINA NANJING  Kayumanis Nanjing Private Villas & Spa FRANCE PARIS  Hollmann Paris SUTIVAN – BRAČ  Hotel Lemongarden CROATIA ALENTEJO  Sublime Comporta Country Retreat & Spa ALGARVE  Vila Valverde ALGARVE  Vila Vita Collection CASCAIS  The Oitavos MADEIRA  Quinta da Bela Vista AMALFI COAST  Casa Angelina AMALFI COAST  Relais Blu BRIXEN  Hotel Pupp CALABRIA  Praia Art Resort CAMAIORE  Locanda al Colle TIROLO NEAR MERANO  Der Küglerhof ISSENGO  Gourmet & Boutiquehotel Tanzer LAZISE  Quellenhof Luxury Resort LIMONE SUL GARDA  EALA My Lakeside Dream MERANO  Suiteseven Stadthotel Meran/o MERANSEN  Hotel Gitschberg MONTEFOLLONICO  Follonico RIMINI  i-Suite SICILY  Monaci delle Terre Nere TRIESTE  Hollmann Trieste ITALY PORTUGAL LUCERNE  Hotel des Balances SAMNAUN  Alpinlodge & Spa ZERMATT  Hotel Matterhorn Focus SWITZERLAND GIRONA  Lavida Hotel MALLORCA  Convent de la Missio MALLORCA  Fontsanta Hotel Thermal Spa & Wellness MALLORCA  Hotel Can Simoneta MALLORCA  Hotel Glòria de Sant Jaume MALLORCA  Pleta de Mar SPAIN SRI LANKA DICKWELLA SOUTH  UTMT – Underneath the Mango Tree HUNGARY BUDAPEST  Hotel Collect BUDAPEST  Lanchid 19 SANTORINI  Myst Boutique Hotel SANTORINI  Saint Santorini GREECE L I F E S T Y L E H O T E L S . N E T We offer hand-picked, independent and stylish hotels for design-oriented globetrotters and sophisticated travellers. Direct contact with the hotel First-hand information Best price Best availability LIFESTYLEHOTELS Book directly. Enjoy benefits!
  • 29. 13THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 Photo:KojiFujii / NacasaandPartnersInc. It’s around eight metres tall and is made exclusively out of materials that were no longer needed following the demolition of other houses: introducing the Kamikatz Public House in the Japanese town of Kamikatsu. Designed by architects Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP, this building isn’t the only innovation the town has to offer. Over the last few years, its residents have STYLE p u b l i c k a m i k a t z h o u s e The Kamikatz is home to a pub with a small brewery. KAMIKATSU. devoted themselves to avoiding waste, and in doing so have achieved a recycling rate of over 80 per cent. In 2020, all reusable waste should be put back into circulation, and any remaining household waste will be separated into 45 different categories.
  • 30. 14THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 The Japanese cities of Kobe and Nagoya are part of the international UNESCO Creative Cities Network – and rightly so! Eriko Esaka and Kenji Kondo give us an insight into their creative cultures. What are your favourite design hotspots in Nagoya? The Toyota Municipal Museum of Art (8 Chome-5-1 Kozakahonmachi, Toyota, Aichi 471-0034, museum.toyota.aichi.jp) – the architecture is just spectacular! I think the Nagoya Innovators Garage (3 Chome-18-1 Sakae, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0008, garage-nagoya.or.jp) is also pretty good. And I love the city’s design, art and craft markets, like the one along the Endoji shopping street (6 Nagono, Nishi Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 451-0042), the one in Hisaya Park (3 Chome-6 Marunouchi, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0002) or the one near the International Design Center (Design Center Bldg., 18-1, Sakae 3-Chome, Naka-ku, Nagoya 460-0008, idcn.jp). There’s also the Yaba-cho/Osu area, where you’ll find clothing that follows the trends of Japan’s subculture, like decora, goth, visual kei and other alternative shops. N A G O Y A cities How would you describe Nagoya’s creative scene? First and foremost, as a design city we have three goals: supporting the next gen- erations, respecting the environment and creating a link between different cultures. Nagoya boasts many art, design and archi- tecture universities, as well as industrial companies that operate on a global scale – but hardly anyone knows about it! We don’t promote ourselves anywhere near enough and even the people that are here aren’t aware of it. This is what we’re trying to counteract, and we’re working more and more with students and researchers in order to establish a new mindset when it comes to design in our society. What’s so special about design in Nagoya? Nagoya is a city of “monozukuri”, or “making things”. The origin of this creative spirit is the Nagoya Castle, which was built over 400 years ago by Ieyasu Tokugawa, founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. At that time, the city was a melting pot of talented engineers, technicians, painters and architects from across the country, and it is their particular skills and works that established Nagoya’s cultural heritage and formed the basis of our regional crafts. This spirit has been maintained throughout the generations in our understanding of design. Eventually, it resulted in the opening of the International Design Center Nagoya. E R I K O E S A K A What’s the most recent design piece to catch your attention? Bouillon is a design studio led by Shunya Hattori and Hiroki Nasu (design-bouillon. jp), and I’m really impressed by their work. They are interested in local manufacturers and the history behind our region’s industry, and they create simple yet utterly beautiful products in their own distinct style. creative-nagoya.jp ERIKO ESAKA is Program Director of the UNESCO City of Design Organizing Committee in Nagoya. Photos:Honmaru_omotesyoin:Nacasa&PartnersInc. / Nagoya,UNESCOCityofDesign / shutterstock.com,TokyoSky / MasamiFujii
  • 31. 15THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 K O B E K E N J I K O N D O of design worth being a part of and a community that makes a stand for sustainable development. What’s your favourite museum? The Kobe Fashion Museum (2 Chome-9-1 Koyochonaka, Higashinada Ward, Kobe, Hyogo 658-0032, fashionmuseum.or.jp)! It’s the first museum in Japan to specialise in fashion, and is also an information and cultural hub with three main functions: museum, library and exhibition space. Four or five times a year, the museum plays host to special exhibitions, while items in the permanent collection are displayed in themed galleries. The library is home to high-quality magazines and books on the topic of fashion both in Japan and around the world, and is open to the public as well as those students, creators and businesspeople who are active in the fashion industry. The exhibition space in the Orbis hall is open to the public for a diverse range of exhibitions. What’s your favourite design hotspot in Kobe? The Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum (7 Chome-5-1 Kumochicho, Chuo Ward, Kobe, dougukan.jp), which is the only museum of its kind in Japan. Its aim is to collect and preserve traditional carpentry tools that are no longer used as a piece of cultural heritage, and to pass them on to the next generation through research and exhibitions. The museum keeps alive the spirit of making things that has been so valued by the Japanese since ancient times. Here you can enjoy typically harmonious Japanese architecture, which isn’t symbolic or assertive, but rather demonstrates the subtle connection between people and nature. Where’s the best place to go shopping? I would have to say Transit., which sells items for the home with a focus on unique light fittings, as well as imported goods. They have three stores in Kobe, two in Osaka and two online shops, and their original light fittings have featured in many TV series. All of their products have been designed by Tatsuo Konno, the director of upmarket interior design studio ARTWORKSTUDIO (artworkstudio.co.jp). What does the Design and Creative Center Kobe have to offer? The Design and Creative Center Kobe is located near the port in Sannomiya, in the city centre. The building was constructed between 1927 and 1932 and has now been converted from its original purpose as a former testing centre for raw silk. It is in paying homage to the original function of this building – checking the quality of raw silk – that the name KIITO came about, as the word means “raw silk” in Japanese. We develop many programmes using the title “+Creative” as a method of resolving the social issues facing our communities. As part of this, we introduce new ideas that challenge preconceived design concepts. These activities are described as “social design” in Japan, meaning that the world’s social problems are being approached through creative strength. What unites the creative scene in Kobe? In Kobe, lifestyles based on an open and liberal cultural footing are encouraged, meaning the assimilation of foreign cultures, manufacturing processes and crafts is actively supported. The process of rebuilding the city following the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in 1995 taught the city to strengthen deep interpersonal connections, the spirit of helping each other and other human affections. It highlighted the fact that the city’s traditional, inherent characteristics – creativity through design – brought people together, kindled hope for the future and aided the rehabilitation of the city. Design plays an important role in daily life and makes topics such as environmental protection and emergency management, crime prevention, welfare and education, which are all very close to home, more visible, easier to communicate, more relevant and more likely to inspire action. How does the City of Design Kobe work? With collaboration and participation. My view is that design has a broader mean- ing that doesn’t just encompass visible shapes and colours, but also planning and mechanisms for the formulation of design, as well as purpose and ideas that lay the foundations for design. Great designs can attract and motivate people. City of Design Kobe is a city where all residents that make the most of the benefits of the city can together create new design attractions through collaboration and participation in order to build a strong community – a community that’s He explains that “lighting isn’t a tool but more like a partner that adds flair to your life”. He is inspired by the interesting shapes, materials and colours he encounters on his travels. Which design piece caught your attention recently? The items made out of Kobe leather by Shinichi Yamauchi and his Kuli-Kuli studio. He won first prize in the SaloneSatellite Awards at the Salone del Mobile Milano 2019 for his Kobe Leather (kobeleather.or.jp) designs called Shadow, Feeling of Warmth and Shape of Memory. Cowhide from the Kobe beef industry, which would normally not be suitable for the manufacture of leather goods, was repurposed by Yamauchi to form an entirely new range of three products: Shadow, a wallet that displays an uneven surface; Feeling of Warmth, a coin purse that changes colour with changes in temperature; and Shape of Memory, a bag made out of leather that remembers its shape. In addition to design and functionality, these items are examples of the type of upcycling that is possible thanks to the technical sophistication of Japanese manufacturing. These products aren’t just visually appealing – the design involved in the manufacturing process is impressive in itself. kiito.jp KENJI KONDO works at the Design and Creative Center Kobe. Photos:ShunsukeIto / HirokiAndo
  • 32. 16THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 The location of the Hotel The Mitsui Kyoto is not far from the site of the Nikō Castle. The hotel aims to breathe new life into the historic setting, but not without taking its past into consideration. The former Kajii-no-Miya Gate, built in 1703, has now been restored and repaired to serve as the entrance to the hotel, and to provide a contrast with the contemporary aesthetic of the building, which has been designed by architect Akira Kuryu: “It’s about respecting the grace and dignity of Kyoto, but also being able to express it using modern techniques.” Photos:HotelTheMitsuiKyoto / MitsuiFudosanCo.,Ltd. hotelthemitsui.com T H E A C E U P I T S S L E E V E Kyoto is one of the most famous cities in the world and is admired for its unparalleled social, creative, cultural and architectural dynamics. For many decades, it has been, and remains, an attraction and a retreat, but also a muse for stars such as David Bowie, John and Yoko, David Byrne and Steve Jobs, Haruki Murakami and Akira Kurosawa. The Ace Hotel Kyoto will open in spring 2020 and is looking to further contribute to this fertile and creative spirit for future generations, while at the same time paying homage to the rich imperial heritage of the city. The hotel ties in with the existing buildings of the former Kyoto telephone exchange, which were designed by renowned architect Tetsuro Yoshida. “The idea was to create a hotel that has a connection with Kyoto and is open to the local area. That first meant creating a lush garden that linked the local community with the guests,” says architect Kengo Kuma about the project. The collaboration between like-minded artists and crafts- people is a token of love from the Ace Hotel Kyoto to the city. acehotel.com/kyoto H E R I T A G E R E I N V E N T E D in new Golden temples that glitter in the sun, Shintō shrines, zen gardens and seeing a geisha – that’s what summarises Japan’s former imperial capital Kyoto. The latest news is that the Ace Hotel group is opening its first location in Japan! Also new on the scene is Hotel The Mitsui Kyoto, which celebrates the beauty of Japan. town Renowned Hong Kong-based interior designer André Fu and the team at his AFSO design studio developed the concept for the interior of the hotel’s main public areas, including the lobby and the guest rooms and suites. Drawing on the theme of “Heritage reinvented”, Fu showcases the authentic beauty of Kyoto and the old town, and gives them a contemporary twist using his own perspective and design vocabulary. The result is a journey for the senses through Kyoto’s traditions, heritage and culture, with a touch of international flair. The lobby mimics a poetic wooden pavilion with intricate folded elements, and is reminiscent of Kyoto’s bamboo forests. In the centre, a ceramic statue by Japanese sculptor Yukiya Izumita looks down over the space.
  • 33. 17THE Stylemate Issue No 01 | 2020 STYLE cosmic Yayoi Kusama spent her childhood in the greenhouses and fields of her family’s Nakatsutaya seed nursery, and this served as the breeding ground for her lifelong fascination with the natural world, which is revealed in this exhibition. Through this show, Kusama makes a virtual return to the city of New York, where she lived between 1958 and 1972 and produced her most prominent works. “This once-in-a- lifetime presentation will stand apart from previous exhibitions of Yayoi Kusama’s work because it is rooted in the artist’s profound and enduring exploration of nature and its countless manifestations that evoke meanings that are both personal and universal. Kusama often cites plant life – specifically, a repeating pattern of flowers – as the mythic origin of her concepts of obliteration, infinity and eternity she explores in her practice. By integrating horticulture and her art, our exhibition will illuminate the powerful role of nature that pervades Kusama’s dynamic oeuvre,” says Carrie Rebora Barratt, President of The New York Botanical Garden. POLKA DOTS AMONGST THE MEADOW GRASSES THE FAMOUS POLKA DOTS USED BY JAPANESE ARTIST YAYOI KUSAMA WILL BRING A SPLASH OF COLOUR TO THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN FROM MAY, WHEN BOTH ICONIC AND NEW PIECES BY THE CELEBRATED ARTIST WILL BE WAITING TO BE DISCOVERED IN A DISPLAY ENTITLED KUSAMA: COSMIC NATURE. Multiple installations will be on display as part of the comprehensive show, including signature pieces such as her mirrored environments and organic forms, colossal polka-dotted sculptures, mesmerising paintings of plants and flowers and their diversity of colours and patterns. Several of these pieces have been newly created and will be displayed alongside archival works that have never been publicly exhibited. The installations will be complemented by spectacular indoor and outdoor displays created by the garden horticulturalists that change with the seasons – tulips and irises in spring will give way to masses of pumpkins and autumn flowers. Kusama’s plant-inspired polka dot sculptures will engage in conversation with meadow grasses, bluebells, water lilies and other plants. Guest curator Mika Yoshitake is delighted: “It is especially gratifying to realise a Kusama exhibition of this scale at The New York Botanical Garden, one of the world’s premier museums of living plant collections. For Kusama, cosmic nature is a life force that integrates the terrestrial and celestial orders of the universe from both the micro- and macrocosmic perspectives she examines in her practice. Nature is not a mere source of inspiration, but integral to the visceral effects of Kusama’s artistic language in which organic growth and the proliferation of life are made ever-present.” N A T U R E KUSAMA: COSMIC NATURE On display between 9 May and 1 November 2020 New York Botanical Garden nybg.org Yayoi Kusama Museum (Tokyo) Museum of Contemporary Art honours Yayoi Kusama yayoikusamamuseum.jp Photos:YayoiKusama / ALONE,BURIEDINAFLOWERGARDEN,2014,76-3/8x76-3/8in.,AcryliconcanvasCollectionoftheartist,CourtesyofOtaFineArts,VictoriaMiro,andDavidZwirner / SummerFlower,1988,Acryliconcanvas,45.5x53cm,Collectionoftheartist