SlideShare a Scribd company logo
Martin C. Harvey
Twitter:
@kitenet
@SoldierfliesRS
© Nigel Jones © Steven Falk
© Martin Harvey© Donald Hobern via Flickr CC
© Martin Harvey
© Steven Falk © Steven Falk © Steven Falk © Nigel Jones
© Steven Falk© Ian Andrews
The Soldierflies and Allies Recording Scheme collates biological records for 11 related Diptera families.
Top row (left to right): Soldierflies (Stratiomyidae); Horseflies (Tabanidae); Robberflies (Asilidae)
Middle row: Snipeflies (Rhagionidae); Stiletto-flies (Therevidae); Bee-flies (Bombyliidae); Water-snipeflies (Athericidae)
Bottom row: Hunchback-flies (Acroceridae); Awl-flies (Xylophagidae); Windowflies (Scenopinidae); Wood-soldierflies (Xylomyidae)
 Soldierflies, Stratiomyidae: 48 species
 Horseflies, Tabanidae: 30
 Robberflies, Asilidae: 28
 Snipeflies, Rhagionidae: 15
 Stiletto-flies, Therevidae: 14
 Bee-flies, Bombyliidae: 10
 Hunchback-flies, Acroceridae: 3
 Water-snipeflies, Athericidae: 3
 Awl-flies, Xylophagidae: 3
 Windowflies, Scenopinidae: 2
 Wood-soldierflies, Xylomyidae: 2
Excluding extinct and unconfirmed species, there are 158
species of soldierflies and allies on the current British list.
There are a few species that are widespread and can be found in a
range of habitats, but most are more specialist – you need to visit
lots of sites and habitats to see a large proportion of the group.
 Larvae are parasitoids of various other
insects, including bees
 Some very recognisable species, others
more tricky
© Steven Falk
The Dark-edged Bee-fly is probably the most well-known
species in the soldierflies group, and is a familiar visitor to
gardens in spring.
© Martin Harvey
© Martin Harvey
It’s rarer relative, the Dotted Bee-fly, looks similar when flying, but at
rest the wing markings are clearly different. It was known from Cambs
and Huntingdonshire up to the 1960s, and is currently increasing its
range in the south and west, so keep a look out for it in Beds.
© Martin Harvey
The Downland Villa was rare but widespread in southern Britain up
until the 1940s, and then went unrecorded for half a century until it was
found again in the Cotswolds in 2000. Since then it has been seen
more frequently, and is now known from a few neutral grasslands as
well as its typical chalk downland habitat. Another one to look out for.
 Many are brightly coloured
 Broad abdomen
 Small discal cell
 Mostly associated with wetlands
 Some found in gardens
© Nigel Jones
A widespread but localised species of well-vegetated wetland flushes.
Its bright colours are typical of many (but not all) soldierflies, the smart
military-style markings leading to the English name for the family.
© Nigel Jones
Other soldierflies are less obvious. The Dark-winged
Black and its relatives are small, rather dumpy, and
dark-coloured. Dark-winged Black is a widespread
species often found in gardens.
© Ombrosoparacloucycle via Flickr CC
© dnnya17 via Flickr CC
Even more widespread and common is the Broad
Centurion, which can be found in many habitats and will
breed among decaying organic matter in many places
including garden compost heaps. The males are bronzy-
green with eyes that meet at the top of the head, the
females are blue-green with a gap between the eyes.
Note also the characteristic hairy eyes of this species.
 50 species recorded, 362 records
 25 soldierflies
 1 bee-fly (Bombylius major, most recorded
species)
 Good wetland sites:
 Arlesey Glebe Meadow
 Fancott Meadows
 Duck End nature reserve near Ampthill
The national scheme database has yet to incorporate
all the records that are available for Beds, so the
figures here are on the low side.
 Recorded at Sandy
Warren RSPB Reserve
by Jon Cole in 1996
 Apparently rare
nationally, but hard to
find as an adult fly
 Larvae found under the
bark of pines
© Dick Belgers (via Wikimedia)
One of the rarer species known from a single
Jon Cole record in Beds. It would be good to
know if this species is still present.
© Nigel Jones
© Nigel Jones
This spectacular soldierfly is known from various places in Beds, and
can turn up in dry sites away from its preseumed wetland breeding
habitat. It is widespread and probably spreading further in Britain (but
has yet to be seen by the recording scheme organiser!).
Changing subject, this slide introduces the “Pantheon” website, which
is currently under development by Natural England. When launched
next spring it will provide a tool for finding out what the habitat
requirements are for invertebrate species in all the major orders.
Broad biotope:
wetland
Rarity score:
16
Guilds:
nectivore (adult),
saprophagous (larva)
Fidelity score
(seepages): A
Habitat:
running water /
peatland
Resources:
wetland
vegetation, base-
rich unshaded
seepages
All photos © Ian Andrews
This shows the type of information held in Pantheon, using the very rare
Barred Green Colonel (Odontomyia hydroleon) as an example.
Pantheon displays information in various reports and charts, based on
species lists that users can upload to the website. Watch out for further
details next year.
 Recording scheme started in 1976
 Scheme organisers to date: Tony
Irwin, Martin Drake, Simon
Hayhow, Martin Harvey
 Provisional atlas in 1991, based
on 21,000 records
 Now approaching 100,000
records
“British soldierflies and their allies” is a comprehensive guide to the
group, with identification keys, full species accounts, many illustrations
and much more. Alongside this, there are lots of online resources,
including this downloadable photo-guide to Dutch soldierflies (the
recording scheme website provides a translation of the text).
See also Steven Falk’s superb collection of Diptera photos on Flickr.
Information on identification resources and how to send in records, along
with newsletters and other information, is available from the recording
scheme website: www.brc.ac.uk/soldierflies-and-allies
The scheme website provides a downloadable
guide to bee-flies in genus Bombylius.
The scheme runs training courses, the next of which is
at the headquarters of the British Entomological and
Natural History Society near Reading on 19 November.
See: www.benhs.org.uk/event/workshop-
identifying-recording-soldierflies-allies/
The recording scheme takes part in the very active
“British Soldierflies and Allies” group on Facebook.
The preferred route for sending in records is to add them to iRecord (but the scheme
is also happy to accept spreadsheets and other formats). On iRecord we have set up
several project pages, including this one that shows all the records from the most
recent fortnight. One species, Twin-spot Centurion (Sargus bipunctatus) is still on the
wing in November.
Another iRecord project was set up to encourage people to record bee-flies in spring
2016. A small amount of publicity via Facebook and Twitter spread the word and
records came from many new recorders, often with photos to confirm the species.
 4,943 records
 On average:
 48 records per year since 1900
 171 records per year since 2000
 In 2016: 746 records and counting!
© Rob Ault (via Flickr CC)
This was very successful and produced many
more records than the average in previous years.
So there is lots of recording activity, but why do it? One answer
is that watching and recording wildlife is absorbing and fun, and
doesn’t really need any further justification. But when records are
sent in they can be put to very good use.
Recording scheme data is made accessible via the National
Biodiversity Network’s Gateway website: https://data.nbn.org.uk/
 15% under threat
 Critically Endangered /
Endangered / Vulnerable (24
species)
 41% rare
 Near Threatened / Nationally
Rare / Nationally Scarce (65
species)
 41% Least Concern
Barred Green Colonel, Odontomyia hydroleon
(Critically Endangered) © Ian Andrews
Recording scheme data was used to inform a recent review of
the conservation status of these species (Red List, Nationally
Scarce etc.). Such reviews are a fundamental part of
conservation in the UK – if we don’t know whether species are
common or rare, increasing or declining, we can’t take effective
decisions for conservation. And the only way to document rarity
is to gather together as many records as possible.
The recent “State of Nature” report highlighted worrying
declines in many species. Soldierflies and allies data formed a
small part of this analysis, alongside many other recording
schemes and other data sources.
Buglife is currently undertaking a project to identify “Important
Invertebrate Areas” across the UK. Soldierflies and allies data
has fed in to this process, again alongside many other recording
schemes.
Data from the recording scheme has also been
used in a number of recent research papers, and is
also made available to Local Environmental
Records Centres (via iRecord and the NBN) for use
within local planning and conservation contexts.
Your records can be put to work in many different
ways once they are collected together into a
recording scheme context.
Another valuable and immensely worthwhile use
of recording scheme data and information is to
inspire people to take an interest in the species
and natural world around them. Earlier in 2016 the
very imaginative teachers at Loose Primary
School in Kent got some of their classes to record
wildlife in the school grounds. One of the species
they found was the Dark-edged Bee-fly, and the
children were able to research the fly from the
recording scheme website, and their record to
iRecord – they were pleased to see their dot
appear on the map!
They even sent me some charming drawings of
Dark-edged Bee-fly!
Further bee-fly excitement arrived via Twitter in
2016, when this photo was circulated by Rob Mills.
This clearly shows the distinctive markings of the
bee-fly Anthrax anthrax, a species never confirmed
in Britain before.
© Rob Mills
 Found by Rob Mills
 Sutton, Cambs, August 2016
 First confirmed British record
 Dubious records from Leics, 1929 & 1930
 Spreading in the Netherlands, due to
popularity of bee hotels?
 What should we call it – Anthracite Bee-
fly?
The rather alarming name “Anthrax anthrax” derives from
the Greek word for coal, referring to the coal-black wing
markings. It doesn’t yet have an agreed English name, but
we are suggesting “Anthracite Bee-fly” as an appropriate
name to help explain the derivation. It has been spreading
in recent years on the near-continent, with many new
records in the Netherlands originating from cities where
people have set up ‘bee hotels’. Like many other bee-flies,
Anthrax is a parasitoid of bee nests.
Rob found the bee-fly investigating the bee hotel in his
garden in suburban Cambridgeshire – proof that you never
know what you’re going to find if you keep your eyes open!
© Rob Mills
 Look out for them, enjoy watching them,
and please send in your records!
 But also take time to study their natural
history and ecology
 Lots more still to find out
 Training course 19 November, Reading
 Join Dipterists Forum if you can
Many thanks to all the photographers who allowed me
to make use of their excellent photos, and especially to:
• Ian Andrews
• Judy Webb
• Nigel Jones
• Rob Mills
• Steven Falk
 Look out for them, enjoy watching them,
and please send in your records!
 Take time to study natural history and
ecology
 Lots more still to find out
 Training course 19 November
 Join Dipterists Forum
 Lunchtime demo of iRecord and
Pantheon
© Judy Webb
A final reminder that while there is much to learn about the
adult flies, there is even more to find out about their larvae.
The photo by Judy Webb shows a larva of the very rare
Clubbed General (Stratiomys chamaeleon). Judy has been
studying this species to find out how it lives and interacts
with other species (see notes in the latest Dipterists Forum
Bulletin). An excellent example of how, with dedication,
anyone can add to our knowledge of these fascinating flies.

More Related Content

What's hot

Averting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threat
Averting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threatAverting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threat
Averting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threat
mgray11
 
The aquila#1
The aquila#1The aquila#1
The aquila#1
Larry James
 
Evolution lecture 4 & 5
Evolution lecture 4 & 5Evolution lecture 4 & 5
Evolution lecture 4 & 5
Aftab Badshah
 
Anth117P lab report
Anth117P lab reportAnth117P lab report
Anth117P lab report
Elizabeth Castrejon
 
FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1
FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1
FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1
Michelle Carroll
 
Zoonotic Diseases: Ebola in Africa
Zoonotic Diseases: Ebola in AfricaZoonotic Diseases: Ebola in Africa
Zoonotic Diseases: Ebola in Africa
Antoinette Rivera, CIH, CIG
 
Creatures from the deep
Creatures from the deepCreatures from the deep
Creatures from the deep
Xenia Y
 
Modern concept of natural selection
Modern concept of natural selectionModern concept of natural selection
Modern concept of natural selection
Shehzad Max
 
A Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean Island
A Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean IslandA Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean Island
A Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean Island
millerjeremya
 
Conservation program for endangered species
Conservation program for endangered speciesConservation program for endangered species
Conservation program for endangered species
SHUBHAM PATIDAR FISHERIES ADDAA
 
Emma clapham the blue dart frog!
Emma clapham the blue dart frog!Emma clapham the blue dart frog!
Emma clapham the blue dart frog!
Mrs Seo
 
WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016
WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016
WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016
Dana Michaels
 
3B.3 Conservation Categories
3B.3 Conservation Categories3B.3 Conservation Categories
3B.3 Conservation Categories
Hawkesdale P12 College
 
Terrestrial mammals in usc museum
Terrestrial mammals in usc museumTerrestrial mammals in usc museum
Terrestrial mammals in usc museum
Julius Manolong
 
THESIS-FINAL PAPER
THESIS-FINAL PAPERTHESIS-FINAL PAPER
THESIS-FINAL PAPER
Amanda Cox
 
A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...
A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...
A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...
mgray11
 
The Projects of The Virtual Museum
The Projects of The Virtual Museum The Projects of The Virtual Museum
The Projects of The Virtual Museum
Megan Loftie-Eaton
 
Modern concept of natural selection2
Modern concept of natural selection2Modern concept of natural selection2
Modern concept of natural selection2
Aftab Badshah
 
Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North America
Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North AmericaBatrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North America
Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North America
mgray11
 
Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...
Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...
Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...
mgray11
 

What's hot (20)

Averting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threat
Averting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threatAverting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threat
Averting a biodiversity crisis: AmphibiaWeb addresses the new Bsal threat
 
The aquila#1
The aquila#1The aquila#1
The aquila#1
 
Evolution lecture 4 & 5
Evolution lecture 4 & 5Evolution lecture 4 & 5
Evolution lecture 4 & 5
 
Anth117P lab report
Anth117P lab reportAnth117P lab report
Anth117P lab report
 
FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1
FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1
FRTE - Carroll - Assignment 11_DTCcomments-1
 
Zoonotic Diseases: Ebola in Africa
Zoonotic Diseases: Ebola in AfricaZoonotic Diseases: Ebola in Africa
Zoonotic Diseases: Ebola in Africa
 
Creatures from the deep
Creatures from the deepCreatures from the deep
Creatures from the deep
 
Modern concept of natural selection
Modern concept of natural selectionModern concept of natural selection
Modern concept of natural selection
 
A Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean Island
A Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean IslandA Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean Island
A Multi-Taxon Cyberdiversity Inventory of a Small Caribbean Island
 
Conservation program for endangered species
Conservation program for endangered speciesConservation program for endangered species
Conservation program for endangered species
 
Emma clapham the blue dart frog!
Emma clapham the blue dart frog!Emma clapham the blue dart frog!
Emma clapham the blue dart frog!
 
WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016
WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016
WNS-A Spreading Mystery_OC-SO2016
 
3B.3 Conservation Categories
3B.3 Conservation Categories3B.3 Conservation Categories
3B.3 Conservation Categories
 
Terrestrial mammals in usc museum
Terrestrial mammals in usc museumTerrestrial mammals in usc museum
Terrestrial mammals in usc museum
 
THESIS-FINAL PAPER
THESIS-FINAL PAPERTHESIS-FINAL PAPER
THESIS-FINAL PAPER
 
A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...
A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...
A brief introduction to Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) and the thre...
 
The Projects of The Virtual Museum
The Projects of The Virtual Museum The Projects of The Virtual Museum
The Projects of The Virtual Museum
 
Modern concept of natural selection2
Modern concept of natural selection2Modern concept of natural selection2
Modern concept of natural selection2
 
Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North America
Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North AmericaBatrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North America
Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans: Determining the Risk to North America
 
Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...
Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...
Risk Assessment of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans Introduction into the Un...
 

Similar to Soldierflies and bee-flies

Red Kite Conservation book
Red Kite Conservation bookRed Kite Conservation book
Red Kite Conservation book
Jade Aldworth
 
Presentation1
Presentation1Presentation1
Presentation1
Taylor Kelly
 
p-14-Conservation-1
p-14-Conservation-1p-14-Conservation-1
p-14-Conservation-1
Ellie Mayhew
 
A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...
A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...
A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...
Alexander Decker
 
18 invasive spp
18 invasive spp18 invasive spp
18 invasive spp
dompiazza
 
Jonathan Cox, Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017
Jonathan Cox,  Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017Jonathan Cox,  Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017
Jonathan Cox, Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017
Matthew Chatfield
 
Measuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processes
Measuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processesMeasuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processes
Measuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processes
AlivieAbascar
 
10 biodiversity1
10 biodiversity110 biodiversity1
10 biodiversity1
dompiazza
 
Amibio biodivriede2010
Amibio biodivriede2010Amibio biodivriede2010
Amibio biodivriede2010
Klaus Riede
 
fulltext(1)
fulltext(1)fulltext(1)
fulltext(1)
Jonathan Mawdsley
 
What's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlands
What's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlandsWhat's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlands
What's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlands
Ohio Environmental Council
 
Todd Witcher_Discover Life in America
Todd Witcher_Discover Life in AmericaTodd Witcher_Discover Life in America
Todd Witcher_Discover Life in America
Ethiel Garlington
 
Freshwater Matters September2013
Freshwater Matters September2013Freshwater Matters September2013
Freshwater Matters September2013
Lancaster University
 
Kiwi Forest Birds
Kiwi Forest BirdsKiwi Forest Birds
Kiwi Forest Birds
Amanda Hengel
 
Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大
Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大
Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大
Nekumi Kida
 
CSIP_leaflet
CSIP_leafletCSIP_leaflet
CSIP_leaflet
David Yardley
 
Herps 2017
Herps   2017Herps   2017
Herps 2017
cvadheim
 
Research Paper
Research PaperResearch Paper
Research Paper
Kevin Marino
 
Swarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet Ecology
Swarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet EcologySwarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet Ecology
Swarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet Ecology
Annika Binet
 
Encouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic Farm
Encouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic FarmEncouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic Farm
Encouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic Farm
acornorganic
 

Similar to Soldierflies and bee-flies (20)

Red Kite Conservation book
Red Kite Conservation bookRed Kite Conservation book
Red Kite Conservation book
 
Presentation1
Presentation1Presentation1
Presentation1
 
p-14-Conservation-1
p-14-Conservation-1p-14-Conservation-1
p-14-Conservation-1
 
A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...
A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...
A preliminary survey of insect fauna around the lake chad basin area of borno...
 
18 invasive spp
18 invasive spp18 invasive spp
18 invasive spp
 
Jonathan Cox, Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017
Jonathan Cox,  Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017Jonathan Cox,  Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017
Jonathan Cox, Isle of Wight Recorders Conference 2017
 
Measuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processes
Measuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processesMeasuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processes
Measuring Biodiversity.pptx_Methods&processes
 
10 biodiversity1
10 biodiversity110 biodiversity1
10 biodiversity1
 
Amibio biodivriede2010
Amibio biodivriede2010Amibio biodivriede2010
Amibio biodivriede2010
 
fulltext(1)
fulltext(1)fulltext(1)
fulltext(1)
 
What's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlands
What's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlandsWhat's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlands
What's all the the buzz about mosquitos and wetlands
 
Todd Witcher_Discover Life in America
Todd Witcher_Discover Life in AmericaTodd Witcher_Discover Life in America
Todd Witcher_Discover Life in America
 
Freshwater Matters September2013
Freshwater Matters September2013Freshwater Matters September2013
Freshwater Matters September2013
 
Kiwi Forest Birds
Kiwi Forest BirdsKiwi Forest Birds
Kiwi Forest Birds
 
Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大
Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大
Biodiversity - About Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus) 海象老大
 
CSIP_leaflet
CSIP_leafletCSIP_leaflet
CSIP_leaflet
 
Herps 2017
Herps   2017Herps   2017
Herps 2017
 
Research Paper
Research PaperResearch Paper
Research Paper
 
Swarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet Ecology
Swarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet EcologySwarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet Ecology
Swarming and Hibernation Project Proposal Annika Binet Ecology
 
Encouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic Farm
Encouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic FarmEncouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic Farm
Encouraging swifts and swallows on the Organic Farm
 

Recently uploaded

Promoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland management
Promoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland managementPromoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland management
Promoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland management
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...
Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...
Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...
Joshua Orris
 
Global Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation Atlas
Global Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation AtlasGlobal Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation Atlas
Global Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation Atlas
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...
Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...
Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...
Joshua Orris
 
Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...
Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...
Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...
Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...
Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...
Open Access Research Paper
 
Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.
Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.
Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.
EpconLP
 
ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.
ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.
ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.
tiwarimanvi3129
 
Enhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland management
Enhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland managementEnhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland management
Enhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland management
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Global Climate Change and global warming
Global Climate Change and global warmingGlobal Climate Change and global warming
Global Climate Change and global warming
ballkicker20
 
How about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shop
How about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shopHow about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shop
How about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shop
laozhuseo02
 
Peatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge Education
Peatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge EducationPeatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge Education
Peatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge Education
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Climate Change All over the World .pptx
Climate Change All over the World  .pptxClimate Change All over the World  .pptx
Climate Change All over the World .pptx
sairaanwer024
 
一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理
一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理
一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理
zm9ajxup
 
Overview of the Global Peatlands Assessment
Overview of the Global Peatlands AssessmentOverview of the Global Peatlands Assessment
Overview of the Global Peatlands Assessment
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...
Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...
Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...
Open Access Research Paper
 
Peatlands of Latin America and the Caribbean
Peatlands of Latin America and the CaribbeanPeatlands of Latin America and the Caribbean
Peatlands of Latin America and the Caribbean
Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)
 
Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...
Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...
Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...
Open Access Research Paper
 
world-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptx
world-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptxworld-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptx
world-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptx
mfasna35
 
Wildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environment
Wildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environmentWildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environment
Wildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environment
amishajha2407
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Promoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland management
Promoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland managementPromoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland management
Promoting Multilateral Cooperation for Sustainable Peatland management
 
Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...
Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...
Optimizing Post Remediation Groundwater Performance with Enhanced Microbiolog...
 
Global Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation Atlas
Global Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation AtlasGlobal Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation Atlas
Global Peatlands Map and Hotspot Explanation Atlas
 
Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...
Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...
Evolving Lifecycles with High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) and 3-D...
 
Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...
Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...
Improving the Management of Peatlands and the Capacities of Stakeholders in I...
 
Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...
Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...
Microbial characterisation and identification, and potability of River Kuywa ...
 
Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.
Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.
Epcon is One of the World's leading Manufacturing Companies.
 
ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.
ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.
ENVIRONMENT~ Renewable Energy Sources and their future prospects.
 
Enhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland management
Enhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland managementEnhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland management
Enhanced action and stakeholder engagement for sustainable peatland management
 
Global Climate Change and global warming
Global Climate Change and global warmingGlobal Climate Change and global warming
Global Climate Change and global warming
 
How about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shop
How about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shopHow about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shop
How about Huawei mobile phone-www.cfye-commerce.shop
 
Peatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge Education
Peatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge EducationPeatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge Education
Peatland Management in Indonesia, Science to Policy and Knowledge Education
 
Climate Change All over the World .pptx
Climate Change All over the World  .pptxClimate Change All over the World  .pptx
Climate Change All over the World .pptx
 
一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理
一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理
一比一原版(UMTC毕业证书)明尼苏达大学双城分校毕业证如何办理
 
Overview of the Global Peatlands Assessment
Overview of the Global Peatlands AssessmentOverview of the Global Peatlands Assessment
Overview of the Global Peatlands Assessment
 
Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...
Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...
Improving the viability of probiotics by encapsulation methods for developmen...
 
Peatlands of Latin America and the Caribbean
Peatlands of Latin America and the CaribbeanPeatlands of Latin America and the Caribbean
Peatlands of Latin America and the Caribbean
 
Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...
Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...
Kinetic studies on malachite green dye adsorption from aqueous solutions by A...
 
world-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptx
world-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptxworld-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptx
world-environment-day-2024-240601103559-14f4c0b4.pptx
 
Wildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environment
Wildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environmentWildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environment
Wildlife-AnIntroduction.pdf so that you know more about our environment
 

Soldierflies and bee-flies

  • 2. © Nigel Jones © Steven Falk © Martin Harvey© Donald Hobern via Flickr CC © Martin Harvey © Steven Falk © Steven Falk © Steven Falk © Nigel Jones © Steven Falk© Ian Andrews The Soldierflies and Allies Recording Scheme collates biological records for 11 related Diptera families. Top row (left to right): Soldierflies (Stratiomyidae); Horseflies (Tabanidae); Robberflies (Asilidae) Middle row: Snipeflies (Rhagionidae); Stiletto-flies (Therevidae); Bee-flies (Bombyliidae); Water-snipeflies (Athericidae) Bottom row: Hunchback-flies (Acroceridae); Awl-flies (Xylophagidae); Windowflies (Scenopinidae); Wood-soldierflies (Xylomyidae)
  • 3.  Soldierflies, Stratiomyidae: 48 species  Horseflies, Tabanidae: 30  Robberflies, Asilidae: 28  Snipeflies, Rhagionidae: 15  Stiletto-flies, Therevidae: 14  Bee-flies, Bombyliidae: 10  Hunchback-flies, Acroceridae: 3  Water-snipeflies, Athericidae: 3  Awl-flies, Xylophagidae: 3  Windowflies, Scenopinidae: 2  Wood-soldierflies, Xylomyidae: 2 Excluding extinct and unconfirmed species, there are 158 species of soldierflies and allies on the current British list.
  • 4. There are a few species that are widespread and can be found in a range of habitats, but most are more specialist – you need to visit lots of sites and habitats to see a large proportion of the group.
  • 5.  Larvae are parasitoids of various other insects, including bees  Some very recognisable species, others more tricky
  • 6. © Steven Falk The Dark-edged Bee-fly is probably the most well-known species in the soldierflies group, and is a familiar visitor to gardens in spring.
  • 7. © Martin Harvey © Martin Harvey It’s rarer relative, the Dotted Bee-fly, looks similar when flying, but at rest the wing markings are clearly different. It was known from Cambs and Huntingdonshire up to the 1960s, and is currently increasing its range in the south and west, so keep a look out for it in Beds.
  • 8. © Martin Harvey The Downland Villa was rare but widespread in southern Britain up until the 1940s, and then went unrecorded for half a century until it was found again in the Cotswolds in 2000. Since then it has been seen more frequently, and is now known from a few neutral grasslands as well as its typical chalk downland habitat. Another one to look out for.
  • 9.  Many are brightly coloured  Broad abdomen  Small discal cell  Mostly associated with wetlands  Some found in gardens
  • 10. © Nigel Jones A widespread but localised species of well-vegetated wetland flushes. Its bright colours are typical of many (but not all) soldierflies, the smart military-style markings leading to the English name for the family.
  • 11. © Nigel Jones Other soldierflies are less obvious. The Dark-winged Black and its relatives are small, rather dumpy, and dark-coloured. Dark-winged Black is a widespread species often found in gardens.
  • 12. © Ombrosoparacloucycle via Flickr CC © dnnya17 via Flickr CC Even more widespread and common is the Broad Centurion, which can be found in many habitats and will breed among decaying organic matter in many places including garden compost heaps. The males are bronzy- green with eyes that meet at the top of the head, the females are blue-green with a gap between the eyes. Note also the characteristic hairy eyes of this species.
  • 13.  50 species recorded, 362 records  25 soldierflies  1 bee-fly (Bombylius major, most recorded species)  Good wetland sites:  Arlesey Glebe Meadow  Fancott Meadows  Duck End nature reserve near Ampthill The national scheme database has yet to incorporate all the records that are available for Beds, so the figures here are on the low side.
  • 14.  Recorded at Sandy Warren RSPB Reserve by Jon Cole in 1996  Apparently rare nationally, but hard to find as an adult fly  Larvae found under the bark of pines © Dick Belgers (via Wikimedia) One of the rarer species known from a single Jon Cole record in Beds. It would be good to know if this species is still present.
  • 15. © Nigel Jones © Nigel Jones This spectacular soldierfly is known from various places in Beds, and can turn up in dry sites away from its preseumed wetland breeding habitat. It is widespread and probably spreading further in Britain (but has yet to be seen by the recording scheme organiser!).
  • 16. Changing subject, this slide introduces the “Pantheon” website, which is currently under development by Natural England. When launched next spring it will provide a tool for finding out what the habitat requirements are for invertebrate species in all the major orders.
  • 17. Broad biotope: wetland Rarity score: 16 Guilds: nectivore (adult), saprophagous (larva) Fidelity score (seepages): A Habitat: running water / peatland Resources: wetland vegetation, base- rich unshaded seepages All photos © Ian Andrews This shows the type of information held in Pantheon, using the very rare Barred Green Colonel (Odontomyia hydroleon) as an example.
  • 18. Pantheon displays information in various reports and charts, based on species lists that users can upload to the website. Watch out for further details next year.
  • 19.  Recording scheme started in 1976  Scheme organisers to date: Tony Irwin, Martin Drake, Simon Hayhow, Martin Harvey  Provisional atlas in 1991, based on 21,000 records  Now approaching 100,000 records
  • 20. “British soldierflies and their allies” is a comprehensive guide to the group, with identification keys, full species accounts, many illustrations and much more. Alongside this, there are lots of online resources, including this downloadable photo-guide to Dutch soldierflies (the recording scheme website provides a translation of the text). See also Steven Falk’s superb collection of Diptera photos on Flickr.
  • 21. Information on identification resources and how to send in records, along with newsletters and other information, is available from the recording scheme website: www.brc.ac.uk/soldierflies-and-allies
  • 22. The scheme website provides a downloadable guide to bee-flies in genus Bombylius.
  • 23. The scheme runs training courses, the next of which is at the headquarters of the British Entomological and Natural History Society near Reading on 19 November. See: www.benhs.org.uk/event/workshop- identifying-recording-soldierflies-allies/
  • 24. The recording scheme takes part in the very active “British Soldierflies and Allies” group on Facebook.
  • 25. The preferred route for sending in records is to add them to iRecord (but the scheme is also happy to accept spreadsheets and other formats). On iRecord we have set up several project pages, including this one that shows all the records from the most recent fortnight. One species, Twin-spot Centurion (Sargus bipunctatus) is still on the wing in November.
  • 26. Another iRecord project was set up to encourage people to record bee-flies in spring 2016. A small amount of publicity via Facebook and Twitter spread the word and records came from many new recorders, often with photos to confirm the species.
  • 27.  4,943 records  On average:  48 records per year since 1900  171 records per year since 2000  In 2016: 746 records and counting! © Rob Ault (via Flickr CC) This was very successful and produced many more records than the average in previous years.
  • 28. So there is lots of recording activity, but why do it? One answer is that watching and recording wildlife is absorbing and fun, and doesn’t really need any further justification. But when records are sent in they can be put to very good use.
  • 29. Recording scheme data is made accessible via the National Biodiversity Network’s Gateway website: https://data.nbn.org.uk/
  • 30.  15% under threat  Critically Endangered / Endangered / Vulnerable (24 species)  41% rare  Near Threatened / Nationally Rare / Nationally Scarce (65 species)  41% Least Concern Barred Green Colonel, Odontomyia hydroleon (Critically Endangered) © Ian Andrews Recording scheme data was used to inform a recent review of the conservation status of these species (Red List, Nationally Scarce etc.). Such reviews are a fundamental part of conservation in the UK – if we don’t know whether species are common or rare, increasing or declining, we can’t take effective decisions for conservation. And the only way to document rarity is to gather together as many records as possible.
  • 31. The recent “State of Nature” report highlighted worrying declines in many species. Soldierflies and allies data formed a small part of this analysis, alongside many other recording schemes and other data sources.
  • 32. Buglife is currently undertaking a project to identify “Important Invertebrate Areas” across the UK. Soldierflies and allies data has fed in to this process, again alongside many other recording schemes.
  • 33. Data from the recording scheme has also been used in a number of recent research papers, and is also made available to Local Environmental Records Centres (via iRecord and the NBN) for use within local planning and conservation contexts. Your records can be put to work in many different ways once they are collected together into a recording scheme context.
  • 34. Another valuable and immensely worthwhile use of recording scheme data and information is to inspire people to take an interest in the species and natural world around them. Earlier in 2016 the very imaginative teachers at Loose Primary School in Kent got some of their classes to record wildlife in the school grounds. One of the species they found was the Dark-edged Bee-fly, and the children were able to research the fly from the recording scheme website, and their record to iRecord – they were pleased to see their dot appear on the map!
  • 35. They even sent me some charming drawings of Dark-edged Bee-fly!
  • 36. Further bee-fly excitement arrived via Twitter in 2016, when this photo was circulated by Rob Mills. This clearly shows the distinctive markings of the bee-fly Anthrax anthrax, a species never confirmed in Britain before. © Rob Mills
  • 37.  Found by Rob Mills  Sutton, Cambs, August 2016  First confirmed British record  Dubious records from Leics, 1929 & 1930  Spreading in the Netherlands, due to popularity of bee hotels?  What should we call it – Anthracite Bee- fly? The rather alarming name “Anthrax anthrax” derives from the Greek word for coal, referring to the coal-black wing markings. It doesn’t yet have an agreed English name, but we are suggesting “Anthracite Bee-fly” as an appropriate name to help explain the derivation. It has been spreading in recent years on the near-continent, with many new records in the Netherlands originating from cities where people have set up ‘bee hotels’. Like many other bee-flies, Anthrax is a parasitoid of bee nests.
  • 38. Rob found the bee-fly investigating the bee hotel in his garden in suburban Cambridgeshire – proof that you never know what you’re going to find if you keep your eyes open! © Rob Mills
  • 39.  Look out for them, enjoy watching them, and please send in your records!  But also take time to study their natural history and ecology  Lots more still to find out  Training course 19 November, Reading  Join Dipterists Forum if you can Many thanks to all the photographers who allowed me to make use of their excellent photos, and especially to: • Ian Andrews • Judy Webb • Nigel Jones • Rob Mills • Steven Falk
  • 40.  Look out for them, enjoy watching them, and please send in your records!  Take time to study natural history and ecology  Lots more still to find out  Training course 19 November  Join Dipterists Forum  Lunchtime demo of iRecord and Pantheon © Judy Webb A final reminder that while there is much to learn about the adult flies, there is even more to find out about their larvae. The photo by Judy Webb shows a larva of the very rare Clubbed General (Stratiomys chamaeleon). Judy has been studying this species to find out how it lives and interacts with other species (see notes in the latest Dipterists Forum Bulletin). An excellent example of how, with dedication, anyone can add to our knowledge of these fascinating flies.