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RMS Titanic
"I cannot imagine any condition which
would cause a ship to founder. I cannot
conceive of any vital disaster happening
to this vessel. Modern ship building has
gone beyond that."
-Captain Smith
April 10, 1912-April 15, 1912
Construction
• The Titanic had ambitions to be the largest
luxury liner at sea. She was made for the most
elite of passengers, and no expenses were
spared.
• The Titanic was built in Belfast, Ireland.
• The Titanic took three years to build and cost
over $7.5 million (about $123 million today)
• Over 15,000 people worked on the Titanic and
its sister ship, the Olympic. The average
worker earned about $10 per week.
A Marvel of her time
• The ship had 16 water tight
compartments as an added
safety feature. The ship
was built to stay afloat with
any two of the middle
compartments or four of
the first compartments
flooded. The Titanic was
considered unsinkable.
• The Titanic was made of
steel plates, 1 inch thick,
fastened together by over
3 million rivets.
• When it was moved from
Belfast, Ireland to
Southampton, England, it
was considered to be the
largest object ever moved
at the time.
Stunning Features
• It took nearly ten months for the
interior features (everything from
adding the top decks to making
sure there were enough pots and
pans) to be completed.
• Cosmetic appeal was largely
valued during this time; the
fourth funnel on the Titanic was
fake, but it made the ship look
grander.
• The Titanic had 64 lifeboats in the
original plans. This was not
aesthetically pleasing, so the final
number of lifeboats on board the
ship was 20.
Bad Omens?
• When the Titanic was embarking on its
maiden voyage, it nearly collided with
another ship. The ships came within
four feet of colliding.
• There was a fire burning in a boiler
room that had started several days
earlier. It was distinguished on the
third day of the voyage.
• Published in 1898, a book Futility
chronicled the fictional sinking (after
striking an ice berg) of a large luxury
liner sailing in the North Atlantic in the
month of April. The name of the ship
was the TITAN.
The Crew of the Titanic
The Titanic had over eight hundred and ninety-two crew
members including seamen, firemen, engineers,
stewards, and chefs. Only twenty-three women worked
on the ship.
People To Know
Name Position
Thomas Andrews The ship’s builder
Bruce Ismay White Star Line
Managing Director
Captain Smith Captain
Sailing on the Titanic
There were three classes of passengers on
the ship: First, Second, and Third.
Class Ticket Price # on Ship
1st $430-$3,300 329
2nd $65 average 285
3rd $35 average 710
First Class Passengers
• A typical first-class stateroom had a bed, sofa, wardrobe, dressing table,
and washbasin. Many first-class passengers shared a washroom.
• Two parlor suites with private decks were the most luxuriously decorated
staterooms ever build on an ocean liner.
• First class passengers had access to most of the boat and were served
fine meals at every sitting.
For Fun?
Play games
Attend a concert
Went swimming
Relax in the gymnasium
Second Class Passengers
• Although not as luxurious, many reputable families
stayed in second class. A twelve year old later
described her second-class cabin: “just like a hotel
room, it was so big. Everything was new. New!”
• Second class passengers were not to mingle with the
first class passengers.
For Fun?
Skip and play games on deck
Read books in the library
Played Cards
Walked around on the decks
Third Class Passengers
• The class with the most passengers, third class cabins could house up
to ten people with bunk beds.
• Third class had only two bathtubs for more than 700 passengers!
• Third class was also called “steerage” because it was usually in the
stern of the ship near the steering equipment. It was least expensive,
but also the least comfortable.
For Fun?
Played Cards
Danced or played
instruments
Walked and sat on
benches
Her True Purpose
Mail Room on a similar ship
Titanic was not only a passenger vessel, but also a Royal
Mail Ship, designated to carry mail for the British Royal Mail
Service.
No one could have guessed
her fate…
April 14, 1912
• The Titanic had received many wireless messages
warning her of icebergs. At one point, frustrated,
the wireless operator told the Californian, another
ship nearby, to “shut up” and stop talking about
icebergs.
• At 11:40 pm, the lookout in the crow’s nest,
Frederick Fleet, spotted an iceberg right ahead of
Titanic and alerted the bridge. (The crews
binoculars had been lost days before.)
Too Much, Too Late
First Office William Murdoch was in charge of the
ship and ordered the ship “hard to starboard,”
hoping to steer around the iceberg. The engines
were put into reverse.
The starboard side of Titanic struck the iceberg. A
series of holes was created below the waterline of
the ship.
The holes were so widely separated, five of the
watertight compartments were flooded. Titanic
could only stay afloat with 4 compartments
breached.
The Fatal Errors
• Some speculate that if the
Titanic would have hit the
iceberg head on, it either would
have stayed afloat, or there
would have been enough time
to get everyone safely off the
boat before sinking.
• Some also speculate that if Mr.
Murdoch would not have
reversed the engines, which
slowed down the speed at
which the Titanic could turn
away from the iceberg, the ship
may have missed the iceberg.
William Murdoch
• A mere 2 hours and 40
minutes after the Titanic
struck the iceberg, her
forward deck dipped
underwater.
• Cracking under the weight
of the water, the Titanic
snapped between the third
and fourth tunnel. After
bobbing in the water for
several minutes, the stern
disappeared into the vast
depths of the ocean.
The trauma of the
event caused many
differing eye witness
accounts, making it
difficult to say with
certainty exactly what
The survivors
were left to wait
for rescue until
4am, when the
Carpathia
arrived.
RMS Titanic Slideshow TPT Read Only.ppt

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RMS Titanic Slideshow TPT Read Only.ppt

  • 1. RMS Titanic "I cannot imagine any condition which would cause a ship to founder. I cannot conceive of any vital disaster happening to this vessel. Modern ship building has gone beyond that." -Captain Smith April 10, 1912-April 15, 1912
  • 2. Construction • The Titanic had ambitions to be the largest luxury liner at sea. She was made for the most elite of passengers, and no expenses were spared. • The Titanic was built in Belfast, Ireland. • The Titanic took three years to build and cost over $7.5 million (about $123 million today) • Over 15,000 people worked on the Titanic and its sister ship, the Olympic. The average worker earned about $10 per week.
  • 3. A Marvel of her time • The ship had 16 water tight compartments as an added safety feature. The ship was built to stay afloat with any two of the middle compartments or four of the first compartments flooded. The Titanic was considered unsinkable. • The Titanic was made of steel plates, 1 inch thick, fastened together by over 3 million rivets. • When it was moved from Belfast, Ireland to Southampton, England, it was considered to be the largest object ever moved at the time.
  • 4. Stunning Features • It took nearly ten months for the interior features (everything from adding the top decks to making sure there were enough pots and pans) to be completed. • Cosmetic appeal was largely valued during this time; the fourth funnel on the Titanic was fake, but it made the ship look grander. • The Titanic had 64 lifeboats in the original plans. This was not aesthetically pleasing, so the final number of lifeboats on board the ship was 20.
  • 5. Bad Omens? • When the Titanic was embarking on its maiden voyage, it nearly collided with another ship. The ships came within four feet of colliding. • There was a fire burning in a boiler room that had started several days earlier. It was distinguished on the third day of the voyage. • Published in 1898, a book Futility chronicled the fictional sinking (after striking an ice berg) of a large luxury liner sailing in the North Atlantic in the month of April. The name of the ship was the TITAN.
  • 6. The Crew of the Titanic The Titanic had over eight hundred and ninety-two crew members including seamen, firemen, engineers, stewards, and chefs. Only twenty-three women worked on the ship. People To Know Name Position Thomas Andrews The ship’s builder Bruce Ismay White Star Line Managing Director Captain Smith Captain
  • 7. Sailing on the Titanic There were three classes of passengers on the ship: First, Second, and Third. Class Ticket Price # on Ship 1st $430-$3,300 329 2nd $65 average 285 3rd $35 average 710
  • 8. First Class Passengers • A typical first-class stateroom had a bed, sofa, wardrobe, dressing table, and washbasin. Many first-class passengers shared a washroom. • Two parlor suites with private decks were the most luxuriously decorated staterooms ever build on an ocean liner. • First class passengers had access to most of the boat and were served fine meals at every sitting. For Fun? Play games Attend a concert Went swimming Relax in the gymnasium
  • 9. Second Class Passengers • Although not as luxurious, many reputable families stayed in second class. A twelve year old later described her second-class cabin: “just like a hotel room, it was so big. Everything was new. New!” • Second class passengers were not to mingle with the first class passengers. For Fun? Skip and play games on deck Read books in the library Played Cards Walked around on the decks
  • 10. Third Class Passengers • The class with the most passengers, third class cabins could house up to ten people with bunk beds. • Third class had only two bathtubs for more than 700 passengers! • Third class was also called “steerage” because it was usually in the stern of the ship near the steering equipment. It was least expensive, but also the least comfortable. For Fun? Played Cards Danced or played instruments Walked and sat on benches
  • 11. Her True Purpose Mail Room on a similar ship Titanic was not only a passenger vessel, but also a Royal Mail Ship, designated to carry mail for the British Royal Mail Service.
  • 12. No one could have guessed her fate…
  • 13. April 14, 1912 • The Titanic had received many wireless messages warning her of icebergs. At one point, frustrated, the wireless operator told the Californian, another ship nearby, to “shut up” and stop talking about icebergs. • At 11:40 pm, the lookout in the crow’s nest, Frederick Fleet, spotted an iceberg right ahead of Titanic and alerted the bridge. (The crews binoculars had been lost days before.)
  • 14. Too Much, Too Late First Office William Murdoch was in charge of the ship and ordered the ship “hard to starboard,” hoping to steer around the iceberg. The engines were put into reverse. The starboard side of Titanic struck the iceberg. A series of holes was created below the waterline of the ship. The holes were so widely separated, five of the watertight compartments were flooded. Titanic could only stay afloat with 4 compartments breached.
  • 15. The Fatal Errors • Some speculate that if the Titanic would have hit the iceberg head on, it either would have stayed afloat, or there would have been enough time to get everyone safely off the boat before sinking. • Some also speculate that if Mr. Murdoch would not have reversed the engines, which slowed down the speed at which the Titanic could turn away from the iceberg, the ship may have missed the iceberg. William Murdoch
  • 16. • A mere 2 hours and 40 minutes after the Titanic struck the iceberg, her forward deck dipped underwater. • Cracking under the weight of the water, the Titanic snapped between the third and fourth tunnel. After bobbing in the water for several minutes, the stern disappeared into the vast depths of the ocean. The trauma of the event caused many differing eye witness accounts, making it difficult to say with certainty exactly what
  • 17. The survivors were left to wait for rescue until 4am, when the Carpathia arrived.