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Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
Distribution Catalogue | 2015
OSCAR RIERA OJEDA
PUBLISHERS
Orop catalogue
Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
Distribution Catalogue | 2015
Orop catalogue
Orop catalogue
Orop catalogue
Orop catalogue
we have one clear mission: we
are determined to make a substantial cultural contribution with each
one of our books. We are an international team of designers, writers,
editors, and industry professionals with an extensive record of ac-
complishment, who are committed to the advancement of knowled-
ge in various fields of design and the production of quality books as
creative artifacts.
We believe that architecture and design are critically important dis-
ciplines that affect every aspect of our lives, from the monumen-
tal to the personal. We equally believe that the ideas enshrined in
these disciplines must be communicated to as wide an audience
as possible, in the most articulate and coherent manner possible.
Architects and designers are only as good as their ideas and, given
that they shape homes, neighborhoods, cities, and entire countries,
changing and improving lives even as they provoke and cause con-
troversy, they should be given an appropriate medium for them to be
heard, considered, and discussed. We want to provide this medium.
Although we have our own vision and direction, our role as publis-
hers is to give equal exposure to a wide variety of ideologies and
philosophies that consistently and intelligently aim to respond to the
realities and issues that affect the world we live in.
At Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
Contents
Displaced. Llonch + Vidalle Architecture
Beyond Petropolis. Designing a Practical Utopia in Nueva Loja
City Works 6. Student Work 2011-2012. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
The Landscape Architecture of Paul Sangha.
Campo Baeza. Complete Works
In Situ. George Ranalli, Works & Projects
Beyond Context. The Work of Atelier Arcau Architects
Sand to Spectacle. The Dubai Mall. DP Architects
Contemporanea. Giovanni Presutti
Sagrada Família. Gaudí’s Unfinished Masterpiece
Geometry, Construction and Site
WOW. Experiential Design for a Changing World
designwajskol.
The Legacy Project. New Housing New York
Best Practices in Affordable, Sustainable, Replicable Housing Design
Reconnaissance. Nic Lehoux
Object Lessons. Monuments in the Age
of Anti-Monumentality
Dialogues in Space. Wendell Burnette Architects
The Built Idea. Alberto Campo Baeza
City Works 8. Student Work 2013-2014. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
Clear Light. The Architecture of Lauretta Vinciarelli
Figures. Essays on Contemporary Architecture
City for City. City College Architectural Center 1995-2015
Surfaced. The Formation of Twisted Structures
The Work of SYSTEMarchitects
A Clear View. How Glass Buildings in the Inner City
Transformed a Neighborhood
Prototyping Architecture: The Solar Roofpod
An Educational Design — Build Research Project
City Works 7. Student Work 2012-2013. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
eastwest. Nabil Gholam Architects
The Bali Villas. Bedmar & Shi
Kerry Hill. Crafting Modernism
5 in Five – Second Revised Edition. Reinventing Tradition
in Contemporary Living. Bedmar & Shi
Make Alive. Prototypes for Responsive Architectures
City Sink. Carbon Cycle Infrastructure for our Built Environments
Ralph Johnson of Perkins + Will. Recent Works
Architecture with and without Le Corbusier.
José Oubrerie Architecte
Unexpect. The Works of Michael Ryan Architects
City Works 5. Student Work 2010-2011. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
Ineffable. Architecture, Computation and the Inexpressible
Concrete Ideas. Material to Shape a City
City Works 4. Student Work 2009-2010. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
Generic Specific Continuum. Julio Salcedo / Scalar Architecture
New Architecture in the Emerging World.
Projects by Andrew Bromberg, Aedas
5 in Five. Reinventing Tradition in Contemporary Living. Bedmar & Shi
States of Architecture in the Twenty-First Century.
New Directions from the Shanghai World Expo
City Works 3. Student Work 2008-2009. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
Heirlooms to Live In. Homes In a New Regional Vernacular
Hutker Architects
Research & Design. Faculty Work. The City College of
New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture
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New Titles Back List
New
Titles
Reconnaissance
Nic Lehoux
Nic Lehoux is a Canadian architectural photographer who works with archi-
tects that push the boundaries of design of the built environment. Nic is regu-
larly commissioned to document significant buildings around the world with
his unique eye, lighting, and sense of composition. His images are frequently
published in the international architectural press. His professional work puts a
particular emphasis on incorporating people within tightly-composed architec-
tural photographs. Nic is influenced by the concept of the “decisive moment”
– popularized by Henry Cartier-Bresson – which he adapts to the rigors of
architectural photography. His images therefore serve as a reflection on the
interaction of people with the built environment.
James Russell is the architecture critic for Bloomberg News. His commen-
taries also appear on the Bloomberg Muse website. He has been a regular
guest on Bloomberg radio and TV. For eighteen years, Russell was an editor
at Architectural Record magazine, the premier American journal for practicing
architects, which he helped to earn a National Magazine Award for General
Excellence (2003). His book, The Agile City: Building Well-being and Wealth in
an Era of Climate Change was published by Island Press in 2011. Russell ear-
ned a Masters of Architecture degree from Columbia University and a Bachelor
of Arts in Environmental Design degree from the University of Washington. He
also attended Evergreen State College.
Renzo Piano, the 1998 Pritzker Prize winner, is perhaps best known for his
controversial design of the Centre Georges Pompidou, located in the heart of
Paris and completed in 1978. Conceived in collaboration with English archi-
tect Richard Rogers, and described by Piano as “a joyful urban machine ... a
creature that might have come from a Jules Verne book,” Beaubourg, as it is
called, has become a cultural icon, expressive of Piano’s love of technology.
Born in Genoa in 1937, Piano comes from a family of builders. Following his
graduation from Milan Polytechnic Architecture School in 1964, he worked in
his father’s construction company and later was associated with the offices
of Louis Kahn in Philadelphia and Z. S. Mackowsky in London. He formed
Renzo Piano Building Workshop in 1980, which now has offices in Paris,
Genoa, and Berlin.
Vladimir Belogolovsky is the founder of New York-based Intercontinental
Curatorial Project, which focuses on organizing, curating, and designing ar-
chitectural exhibitions worldwide. Trained as an architect at Cooper Union in
New York, he has published over 150 articles in American, European, and
Russian publications, as well as several books including Felix Novikov for the
Masters of Soviet Architecture series, GreenHouse on leading sustainable pro-
jects, and Soviet Modernism: 1955-1985, which was coauthored with archi-
tect Felix Novikov. 
Photography by Nic Lehoux
Foreword by Renzo Piano
Introduction by James Russell
Interview by Vladimir Belogolovsky
Edited by Oscar Riera Ojeda
Reconnaissance presents a cross-section of the work of Canadian-born architecture photographer Nic Lehoux. The photographs featured
were taken throughout the past decade, presenting a selection of both personal and professional work. An overarching feature of this co-
llection is also one of Lehoux’s trademarks: a rare ability to capture people within the built environment at the decisive moment. • The book
includes several thematic essays, many of them exploring marginal environments in urban landscapes to depict a rapidly changing world. This
global outlook includes studies of Shanghai, where older sections of the city are disappearing at a frightening rate, and several different lo-
cations in the USA and Europe, where industrial urban areas are decaying at a similar pace. In another photo-essay, Lehoux uses his dis-
tinctive “selective focus” style to capture the essence of the ancient city of Matera in Italy. A further exhaustive photo-essay, on the 2010
Shanghai World Expo, includes both personal and professional elements. The work Lehoux has done for some of the world’s most influen-
tial and progressive architects is also featured within themes that dictate the essential strengths of his work: “Form” contains images of ar-
chitectural abstraction and compositional purity; “Light” is an exaltation of architecture’s most noble tool; “Texture” documents the varie-
ty and poetry of surfaces, while “Object” and “Space” depict the beauty of tangible and elusive shapes. • This book features over 200
original images and is produced as part of a joint project between Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers and the Architectural Photography Foundation.
It accompanies an exhibition of the photography featured, which, in 2012, toured through the Chinese cities of Beijing, Shanghai, and Shenzen.
Book Size: 11 x 9.5 in / 279 x 241 mm
Box Size: 11.25 x 9.75 in / 286 x 248 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 294
Publication Date: October 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 400
Rights: World Rights Available
Editions:
.	Hardcover in box
	Price: US$ 75. Weight: 2.5 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12250-5-4
.	Hardcover, premium edition limited to forty sets
	 in clamshell box with five signed prints
	Price: US$ 4500. Weight: 3.4 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12252-9-0
17
Orop catalogue
Object
Lessons
Monuments in the Age
of Anti-Monumentality
Authored by Rodolphe el-Khoury and Robert Levit
Essays by Paulette Singley, Andrew Payne, Nader Tehrani,
Preston Scott Cohen, and Zeynep Çelik Alexander
Rodolphe el-Khoury and Robert Levit’s work take up the vexing problem of monuments and collective form. What is the form of the contemporary
collective? Within and through the monuments and environments of collective life, can we be free together and how can be make real the forms
of collective life? The work recognizes the pleasure in the binding form of the total figure and sees in this figure the impress of institutional life. But,
the press of individuals, the unruly thriving of difference, also unsettles the forms of the work: counter forms inhabit and disrupt the monumental
shape of their public buildings and spaces. • Responsive media register the input and actions of individuals and produce sensuous events within
and upon the body of their buildings. Conventions are recast through new parametric capacities in the production of architectural form, while
current developments in interactive media refashion perceptions of the fixity of the built environment. The work documented in this book reflects,
at a variety of scales, the tense relationship between community and individual. It inscribes this tension, between the one and the many, into the
body of architecture and the city. In addition to el-Khoury and Levit’s own theoretical treatment of their work, contributions by Nader Tehrani and
Scott Cohen, along with a number of other authors will assess the work in the context of contemporary and historical concerns of architecture.
Rodolphe el-Khoury and Robert Levit are partners in the design firm Khou-
ry Levit Fong. This book is a document of their architecture and urban design
work in this firm, and an account of the theoretical concerns that drive it.
Rodolphe el-Khoury is Dean of the Miami University School of Architecture. He
was Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto, Head of Architecture
at California College of the Arts, and associate professor at Harvard Graduate
School of Design. El-Khoury was trained as a historian and an architect; he conti-
nues to divide his time between scholarship and practice with Khoury Levit Fong.
His books on eighteenth-century European architecture include The Little House,
an Architectural Seduction, and See Through Ledoux; Architecture, Theatre and
the Pursuit of Transparency. Books on contemporary architecture and urbanism
include Monolithic Architecture, Architecture in Fashion, and States of Architec-
ture in the Twenty-first Century: New Directions from the Shanghai Expo.
Robert Levit is director of the Master of Architecture program and associate
professor of architecture at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Lands-
cape, and Design, University of Toronto. He was also the director of the Master
of Urban Design program at the University of Toronto, assistant professor at
the University of Michigan, and has been a visiting professor at the Harvard
Graduate School of Design. His design work has been recognized through
numerous awards and competitions. His articles on architecture including “Or-
nament: The Return of the Symbolic Repressed,” and “Design’s New Cate-
chism,” have become staples of the current debates on architecture.
Nader Tehrani is professor of architecture at MIT, where he served as the head
of the department from 2010-2014. He is also Principal of NADAAA, a practice
dedicated to the advancement of design innovation, interdisciplinary collabora-
tion, and an intensive dialogue with the construction industry. Tehrani received
a BFA and a BArch from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1985 and 1986
respectively. He continued his studies at the Architectural Association, where he
attended the post-graduate program in History and Theory. Upon his return to
the United States, Tehrani received a MAUD from the Harvard Graduate School
of Design in 1991.
Preston Scott Cohen is the former Chair of the Department of Architecture and
the Gerald M. McCue Professor of Architecture at Harvard University Graduate
School of Design and is principal of Preston Scott Cohen, Inc. of Cambridge,
MA. Projects recently completed include the Tel Aviv Museum of Art Amir Buil-
ding, the Goldman Sachs Arcade in New York, the Datong City Library, and
the Taiyuan Museum of Art. Presently, the firm is completing an addition to the
Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Mi-
chigan. Cohen has received numerous awards and honors including induction
as an academician at the National Academy of Art, an Annual Design Review
Award, the Travel and Leisure Best Museum Award, five Progressive Architectu-
re Awards, first prizes for seven international architectural competitions and an
Academy Award in Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
Zeynep Çelik Alexander is an architectural historian. Her work focuses on the
history of modern architecture since the Enlightenment with an emphasis on
German modernism. After being trained as an architect at Istanbul Technical Uni-
versity and Harvard Graduate School of Design, she received her PhD from the
History, Theory, and Criticism Program at MIT She has received research grants
from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC),
a postdoctoral fellowship from Columbia University, and pre-doctoral fellowships
from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National
Gallery of Art, Social Science Research Council (SSRC), Dedalus Foundation,
DAAD, and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin.
46 47184 185 296 297
82 83
SIBBESBORG ARChIPELAGO
Sibbesborg, Finland
City
C Sibbisorg: Urban archipelago. This
is an urban design for Sibbisborg, a
community one hour by car to the east
of helsinki. The mandate of the de-
sign is to plan for Sibbisborg’s growth
from a community of 3,000 to a city of
100,000 people. Our proposition, the
Sibbesborg archipelago, is a network
of neighborhoods, island-like in form,
but bound together in a larger urban
ensemble by shared networks of social
and physical infrastructure. Set within
the forested landscape, amidst agricul-
tural fields, wetlands, and coastline, these urban islands are linked but distinct neighbourhoods
that leave intact existing landscapes and permit, in the space between them, the constitution of a
new ecological and recreational network that is as vital to the metropolitan form as the islands of
the archipelago themselves. The islands are connected by roads, bike paths, parks, and the shared
social and economic institutions of schools, commerce and shopping, and linked to the larger
territory by regional transportation and new concentrations of employment and retail services.
Between these islands continuous ecological networks of habitat, hydrology, and farmland are
preserved, shaped, and stitched into a larger territorial ecology. New and re-purposed networks
of biking, walking, and hiking paths turn the natural amenities of the Sibbesborg region into an
attractive destination for recreation and tourism.
Urban Islands, Landscape, and Ecological Sustainability: The urban islands of the Sibbisborg
archipelago, positioned on high ground and nestled between working agricultural landscapes,
and between sites of historical or natural interest, in their leapfrogging pattern permit large and
continuous ecological corridors to be shaped. The movement of water through the region, the
territory’s hydrology, is preserved. Continuity of habitat is preserved for animal life. Wetlands
and designated sites of historical or natural interest, and working farmland are all left intact.
The landscape component of this proposal focuses on the open systems of the site, and proposes
a series of ecological and water management strategies and guidelines, starting from the large
scale level of the whole site, and moving into the smaller scale of streetscapes. The approach is to
balance the need for development, and the on-going socio- economic practices such as agricul-
ture on the site, with the need for preserving the ecological integrity of the site.
Bounded density and natural amenity: The archipelago of neighbourhoods in the new Sibbes-
borg is made possible by concentrating the new buildings in moderately dense islands of de-
velopment. Each island is comprised of a mixture of six story apartments that bound lower rise
town houses and/or walk-up duplexes and sometimes give way to single-family groupings.
Employment centres: While individual islands will provide smaller scale services, two town cen-
tre developments will include provisions for larger scale buildings with commercial uses. This
154 15594 95
NATURA
2000
SITE
NATURA
2000
SIPOO
RIVER,
DELTA,
BAY &
ESTU-
ARIES
BAY OF FINLAND
NATURA
2000
SITE
Primary
Corridors
Tertiary
Corridors
Primary
Connections
Secondary
Connections
developed over time
Secondary
Corridors develped
over time after the
primary corridors
To
Possible
National
Park
Contributing
Zones
Collection
Zones
Conveyance
Zones
Ground Water Areas
Watershed
Boundaries
Hydrological Zones
Drainage
Arrows
172 173178 179
Museum
M The Museum of Underwater antiquities is
to be housed within a building that is itself
an artifact of great cultural significance:
The Cereals Stock house Building. The
underlying structure, the silos themselves
provide the warp and the woof that orga-
nizes the collection of underwater antiq-
uities–bringing these antique artifacts into
intimate contact with the archaeology of a
more recent history—the now iconic re-
mains of port of piraeus’s 20th century in-
dustrial past in the form of the silos of The
Cereals Stock house building.
Excavation of Silos
how to convert the small cellular nature of the grain silos into spaces adequate to the museum?
taking a cue from the artistic inventions of Gordon Matta-Clark we have cut conic voids across
the tightly packed chambers of the silos. These voids provide a rich means of dramatic movement
through the museum. In each of the voids that have been cut escalators have been placed that pro-
vide for a pattern of movement choreographing through the whole building the six specified exhi-
bition themes, each of which occupies its own floor or, in the case of theme 5 and 6, share a floor.
The excavation of the silos provides a number of advantages. Like the boulevards that cut through
the diverse neighbourhoods of city binding them to the larger scale of the city as a whole, these
excavated passages in the building permit the visitor to the museum to recognize the unity of an
institution to be housed in what began as the non-communicating chambers of silos. Under the
original conditions each silo remained utterly segregated each from the next. The excavation is a
cross-cut, more violent than the methods of contemporary archaeological excavation, but related
to the act of uncovering, digging in, as it were, into the literally stratified material of the historical
record. here, the beauty of the internal organization of the silos is made visible to the museum vis-
itor, both from within the museum and from without through the act of cutting or, to put it more
thematically, through excavation.
The cross-cut voids opening up the silos
slicegreatglazedopeningsintotheouter
wall of The Cereals Stock Building. They
create fantastic views of the port from
within the museum and, from without,
reveal the complex internal spectacle
of people. They expose to view the silo
forms themselves and offer an X-ray of
sorts into the building of the new Muse-
um of Underwater antiquities.
WARP ANd WOOF: ThE MUSEUM OF
UNdERWATER ANTIQUITIES (2012)
piraeus, Greece
21
Book Size: 9 x 11 in / 228 x 279 mm
Box Size: 9.5 x 11.5 x 2 in / 241 x 292 x 50 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 304
Publication Date: October 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 250
Rights: World Rights Available
Editions:
.	Hardcover
	Price: US$ 55. Weight: 1.7 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12252-6-9
.	Hardcover, limited edition in clamshell box
	Price: US$ 70. Weight: 2.3 kg. ISBN: 978-988-13975-9-1
Orop catalogue
Foreword by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien
Essay by Robert McCarter
Introduction by Juhani Pallasmaa
Epilogue by Brian MacKay-Lyons
Edited by Oscar Riera Ojeda
Dialogues in Space: Process and Ideas in the Work of Wendell Burnette Architects is the first multi-project monograph on this American architect’s
selective body of work. The title alludes to the architect’s view that architecture is a constructed conversation between people, things, and time.
Six singular projects from the architect’s oeuvre are presented in-depth through the architect’s own words, drawings, and photography. Also
included is a comprehensive essay by the celebrated architectural writer/critic Robert McCarter entitled “Crafting Space: Composition and Cons-
truction in the Architecture of Wendell Burnette” that examines the “thinking and making” process behind the built and un-built work across fifteen
years of practice. The different typologies of the work explores authentic human experience through provocative spatial constructions – public
and private in diverse locales – that attempt to promote an expansive dialogue with our places, our environment, our communities, ourselves, and
our time. Through extensive research into the “art of building” – the specificity of place and locally appropriate construction systems, materials,
craft, and their infinite capacity to transcend mere construction – the work strives toward an architecture that is at once functional and poetic.
Wendell Burnette is a self-taught architect and principal of Wendell Burnette
Architects, established in 1996 after a three-year period at the Frank Lloyd Wright
School of Architecture and an eleven-year association with William Bruder. He
has been an assistant professor at the School of Architecture and Landscape Ar-
chitecture at Arizona State University since 2000. Wendell Burnette’s design phi-
losophy is grounded in distilling the essence of a project to create highly specific
architecture that is at once functional and poetic. Burnette has traveled widely
in Asia, Europe, Africa, Central and North America where he has assimilated a
personal perspective on the “art of place making.” The work of Wendell Burnette
Architects has been presented in over 100 publications worldwide including The
Burnette Studio/Residence, a single building monograph published by Rockport
Press and the Phaidon Atlas of World Architecture in 2004 and 2008.
Tod Williams and Billie Tsien have worked together for over thirty years. In
1986, they founded Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects on Central Park South in
New York City. The firm is known for institutional work that pays careful attention
to context, detail, and the subtleties of materials. Award winning projects include
the Neurosciences Institute, the American Folk Art Museum, Cranbrook Natato-
rium, the Phoenix Art Museum, Skirkanich Hall at the University of Pennsylvania,
and the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. Current work in construction
includes a new museum for the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, a performing
and visual arts center at the University of Chicago, the Asia Society headquarters
in Hong Kong, and two new skating rinks in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park.
Robert McCarter is a practicing architect, author, and professor. He is the
Ruth and Norman Moore Professor of Architecture at Washington Universi-
ty in St. Louis (since 2007), and he has previously taught at the University
of Florida and Columbia University, among others. His books include Frank
Lloyd Wright, (1997), William Morgan (2002), Louis I. Kahn (2005), On and By
Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles (2005), and Frank Lloyd
Wright: Critical Lives (2006), among a number of others. Books currently at
press include Alvar Aalto (2012), Architecture as Experience (2012, with Juhani
Pallasmaa), Wiel Arets at Work (2012), Atlas of 20th Century Architecture (2012,
with Adrian Forty and Jean-Louis Cohen), Carlo Scarpa (2013), and Aldo
van Eyck (2013).
Brian MacKay-Lyons is a Canadian architect best known for his designs for
houses on the coast of his native Nova Scotia and his use of Atlantic Canadian
vernacular materials and construction techniques. Mackay-Lyons was born of
part-Acadian heritage in Acadia, on the French Shore of southwest Nova Sco-
tia, and was strongly influenced by the region’s maritime landscape, architectu-
re, and functionalist design. He studied architecture at the Technical University
of Nova Scotia (graduated in 1978) and received his Master’s in Architecture
and Urban Design from the University of California, Los Angeles. He also stu-
died and worked in China, Japan, and Siena, Italy. In 1983, MacKay-Lyons
returned to Nova Scotia to work on vernacular designs and teach at Dalhousie
University, where he holds a full professorship in architecture.
Juhani Uolevi Pallasmaa (born September 14, 1936, Hämeenlinna, Finland) is
a Finnish architect and former professor of architecture and dean at the Helsinki
University of Technology. Among the many academic and civic positions he has
held are those of director of the Museum of Finnish Architecture 1978-1983, and
head of the Institute of Industrial Arts, Helsinki. He established his own architect’s
office – Arkkitehtitoimisto Juhani Pallasmaa KY – in 1983 in Helsinki. From 2001
to 2003, he was Raymond E. Maritz Visiting Professor of Architecture at Wash-
ington University in St. Louis, and in 2013 he received an honorary doctorate
from that university. In 2010-2011, Pallasmaa served as Plym Distinguished Pro-
fessor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and in 2012-2013 he
was scholar in residence at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin. Pallasmaa has also
lectured widely in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia.
Dialogues
in Space
Wendell Burnette Architects
25
Book Size: 9 x 9 in / 228 x 228 mm
Box Size: 9.5 x 9.5 x 2.5 in / 241 x 241 x 63 mm
Format: Square
Pages: 512
Publication Date: August 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 325
Ilustrations: 50
Rights: World Rights Available
Editions:
.	Hardcover
	Price: US$ 65. Weight: 2.2 kg. ISBN: 978-988-16194-3-3
.	Hardcover in box
	Price: US$ 85. Weight: 4.9 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12250-2-3
Orop catalogue
Authored by Alberto Campo Baeza
Alberto Campo Baeza is an architect (Escuela de Arquitectura de Madrid). He
wrote his doctoral thesis with Javier Carvajal and was a professor at the ETSAM
for more than twenty years. He has taught at the ETH in Zurich, EPFL in Lau-
sanne; the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia; the BAUHAUS in Weimar;
Kansas State University and other institutions in Dublin, Naples, Virginia, and Co-
penhagen. He spent a year as a research fellow at Columbia University in New
York (2001). He has published two collections of writing: La idea construída and
Pensar con las manos. He has also received many awards including the Torroja
for his Caja Granada building, and The Buenos Aires Biennial 2009 for his Nursery
for Benetton in Venice and his MA Museum in Granada. Recently, the American
Academy of Arts and Letters nominated Alberto Campo Baeza for the Arnold
W. Brunner Memorial Prize of 2010. His work has been exhibited at the Crown
Hall by Mies at Chicago’s IIT, the Palladio Basilica in Vicenza, the Urban Center
in New York, the Saint Irene Church in Istanbul, and the MA Gallery of Toto in
Tokyo. In 2010 his work was exhibited at the MAXXI Museum and in San Pietro
in Montorio, both in Rome. He believes in Architecture as a BUILT IDEA, and that
the principle components of Architecture are GRAVITY, which builds SPACE, and
LIGHT, which builds TIME.
The Built Idea
Alberto Campo Baeza
“Architects reveal the keys to Architecture in their drawings, their floor plans, sections and also in their writings. It is important to appreciate the
concise texts of Mies Van der Rohe or the more passionate expressions of Le Corbusier. And that is how I would like these texts, published
here today, to be understood.”
Alberto Campo Baeza (born Valladolid, Spain, 1946) is one of the most important architects of the modern period. The Built Idea presents a
series of seminal texts in which he conveys his most deeply- held architectural ideas and convictions, exploring and explaining his foundational
influences and subjects such as the importance of light, the work of his contemporaries, and the future of architecture, as well as accounts
of his own work and personal anecdotes from a rich and successful life in architecture.
“To use words that express one’s intentions clearly is not just a convenience for architects. One wants to let people know the meaning behind
the things that are being made. My aim in publishing these texts is precisely that.”
This book also includes a photographic documentation of Campo Baeza’s greatest works along with architectural sketches, plans, and mo-
dels to provide a privileged insight into one of the greatest architectural minds working today.
“And the reasoning on which one bases one’s work in their attempt at Architecture is what is going to be reflected here in these texts, some
of it consciously, some unconsciously. Realizing the ideas expressed in these words in built works is of course the best proof that the ideas
are valid and the words true.”
29
Book Size: 6.5 x 8.5 in / 165 x 215 mm
Box Size: 6.75 x 8.75 x 1.3 in / 171 x 222 x 33 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 104
Publication Date: July 2015
Photographs: 16
Ilustrations: 5
Rights: World Rights Available
Editions:
.	English Language, softcover with 3/4 flaps
	Price: US$ 15. Weight: 0.3 kg. ISBN: 978-988-15125-3-6
.	Chinese Language, softcover with 3/4 flaps
	Price: US$ 15. Weight: 0.3 kg. ISBN: 978-988-13975-2-2
.	English Language, hardcover in clamshell box
	Price: US$ 25. Weight: 1.0 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12251-2-2
Orop catalogue
City Works 8
Student Work 2013-2014
The City College of New York
Bernard and Anne Spitzer
School of Architecture
Foreword by George Ranalli
Edited by Nandini Bagchee
Design/Production Coordinators:
Salvatore Cosenza and Sarah Holtzer
City Works 8 is the eighth book in an annual series that documents the work produced by the students of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer
School of Architecture at The City College of New York. This collection of projects in the interrelated disciplines of architecture, urban design,
and landscape architecture brings together the prescient questions of environmental and social sustainability. The unique position of being
a publically funded school in a diverse and didactic city provides fertile ground for exploration of the past and the future. Collaborating with
educators and professionals locally and internationally allows for a perspective that is creative but grounded in solving everyday problems
with precision and ingenuity. The generous studio and gallery spaces within the Spitzer School of Architecture are conducive of many large-
scale installations and engaging exhibits. Student-run journals, rooftop screenings and discussions complement the lecture series spon-
sored by the school. This book brings together the models, drawings, research, and spirited actions of a group of designers and thinkers
positioned to make significant contributions to the built environment.
A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
Nandini Bagchee, founded this practice in 2005. She is licensed to practice
architecture in New York State. Prior to starting her own firm, Nandini worked
with architectural firms in New York and with the international practice of Herzog
and De Meuron on the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis. Her architectural work
has been exhibited in galleries such as the Storefront for Art and Architecture
in New York. In 2009, she received grants from the Lower Manhattan Cultural
Council to coordinate an architectural competition for the project, “Peace Pen-
tagon: A Call to Action.” This project, intended to garner community support
was presented to a public audience in the form of an exhibition in four different
venues in April 2010. Nandini Bagchee is a full-time assistant professor at the
Spitzer School of Architecture in New York. She coordinates and teaches un-
dergraduate design studios and seminars on urbanism in the Middle East and
Asia. She has presented her work and lectured at the Bauhaus University in
Weimar and the BNCC Architecture College in Pune. Nandini Bagchee holds
a Bachelors degree from the Cooper Union and a Masters degree from the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
George Ranalli has been Dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Ar-
chitecture at City College since 1999. He received his Bachelor of Architecture
from the Pratt Institute (1972) and Master of Architecture from the Graduate
School of Design at Harvard University (1974). He was Professor of Architecture
at Yale University (1976-1999), and the William Henry Bishop Chaired Professor
in Architectural Design (1988-1989). He recently completed his fourth monogra-
ph, Saratoga, devoted to his Saratoga Avenue Community Center for the New
York City Housing Authority. His architectural and design work has been exhibi-
ted in the US and Europe and published internationally in numerous journals.	
33
Edition: Softcover with 3/4 flaps
Book Size: 8 x 10 in / 203 x 255 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 248
Publication Date: June 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 265
Ilustrations: 515
Weight: 1.1 kg
Rights: World Rights Available
Price: US$ 30
ISBN: 978-988-13975-8-4
Orop catalogue
Clear Light
The Architecture of
Lauretta Vinciarelli
“Although much of my work is architectural in character, I do not represent real spaces. Rather, my work has its origins in the spaces I have
abandoned – the mood of Rome and the landscape of Texas – and the paintings are of spaces I know that look nothing like what I paint …
They are essentially meditations on essences of architecture like enclosure, surface and light.” • Born in Italy in 1943, Lauretta Vinciarelli
passed away in New York in 2011. Trained as an architect in Rome but a watercolorist by vocation, her works reside in numerous private col-
lections and among the holdings of prominent institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery in Wash-
ington DC, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Noted for their luminous qualities of color and light, her depictions of imagined
spaces open up a world of enclosed rooms, sweeping landscapes, watery materiality, and atmospheric ephemerality. Describing her work,
a noted theorist and critic once said, “They are not architecture exactly, but evidence that it exists.” This book brings together paintings from
1981 onwards in the most complete collection of Vinciarelli’s work to date. It also includes texts from knowledgeable commentators and for
the first time presents sketch materials that provide insight into Vinciarelli’s working methodology. Vinciarelli’s technique often operated at
the very limits of her medium; sometimes even to the point of failure. In these paintings, color is used as a device for shaping space, with
watercolor the chosen medium for its rich portrayal of light and the conceptual simplicity of the act of mixing paste with water.
A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
Lauretta Vinciarelli was an architect and artist who has artwork and drawings
in the permanent collections of the National Gallery in Washington, DC; the Mu-
seum of Modern Art in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art;
the Archive of the Biennale of Venice, and the Italian Archive of Drawings, as
well as in private collections. She exhibited in the 2002 Whitney Biennial and
was represented by Henry Urbach Architecture in New York. Until 2000 she
also taught at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning
and Preservation.
Peter Rowe is Raymond Garbe Professor of Architecture and Urban Design
at the Graduate School of Design and a Harvard University Distinguished
Service Professor. He served as Dean of the Faculty of Design from 1992
to 2004. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 1985 he was Director of the
School of Architecture at Rice University in Houston, Texas also serving as
Vice President of Rice Center and Environmental Program Director of the
Southwest Center for Urban Research. The author of many articles on ar-
chitecture, urban design, and planning, Rowe is also the author, co-author,
or editor of numerous books, most recently including: Building Barcelona: A
Second Renaixenca, 2006, Emerging Architectural Territories in East Asian
Cities, and Urban Intensities: Contemporary Housing Types and Territories,
2014. He was Lauretta Vinciarelli’s husband from 1993.
George Ranalli has been Dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Ar-
chitecture at City College since 1999. He received his Bachelor of Architecture
from the Pratt Institute (1972) and Master of Architecture from the Graduate
School of Design at Harvard University (1974). He was Professor of Architecture
at Yale University (1976-1999), and the William Henry Bishop Chaired Professor
in Architectural Design (1988-1989). He recently completed his fourth monogra-
ph, Saratoga, devoted to his Saratoga Avenue Community Center for the New
York City Housing Authority. His architectural and design work has been exhibi-
ted in the US and Europe and published internationally in numerous journals.	
Michael Sorkin received his architectural training at Harvard and MIT and
holds degrees from the University of Chicago and Columbia. He is the princi-
pal of the Michael Sorkin Studio in New York City. He is founding president of
Terreform, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and urban interven-
tion. He is president of the Institute for Urban Design; Distinguished Professor
of Architecture and the Director of the Graduate Urban Design Program at
The City College of New York (where he has taught since 2000), Professor of
Urbanism and Director of the Institute of Urbanism at the Academy of Fine Arts
in Vienna (1993 to 2000), and he has been a professor at numerous schools
of architecture. He lectures around the world, is the author of several hundred
articles, and is currently a contributing editor at Architectural Record.
213212
1996 Spatial reverb 1996 Neon light
233232
6968
red room (3 of 3)
1990
Windsor and Newton watercolor on paper
Paper size: 30 x 22 1/2 in
Image size: 27 x 14 1/2 in
Private Collection
red room (2 of 3)
1990
Windsor and Newton watercolor on paper
Paper size: 30 x 22 1/2 in
Image size: 27 x 14 1/2 in
Private Collection
8988
Per ilaria V
1993
Windsor and Newton watercolor on paper
22 x 30 in
Private Collectio
54
76
Introduction by George Ranalli
Essays by Peter Rowe, Camille Farey,
Michael Sorkin, and Ida Panicell
37
Edition: Hardcover in clamshell box
Book Size: 8.46 x 11 in / 215 x 280 mm
Box Size: 8.85 x 11.4 x 1.37 in / 225 x 290 x 35 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 296
Publication Date: May 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 6
Ilustrations: 260
Weight: 2.6 kg
Rights: World Rights Available
Price: US$ 65
ISBN: 978-988-16195-9-4
Orop catalogue
Figures
Essays on Contemporary
Architecture
Authored by Rodolphe el-Khoury
Introduction by George Baird
The essays consider the contemporary architectural scene from a variety of perspectives in theory and practice. They include seminal pieces
that framed important debates in the field, such as the introduction to the exhibition catalogue Monolithic Architecture, as well as observations
on buildings and practices from around the world, from Santiago, to Beirut and Beijing. Together, the polemical provocations and interpreti-
ve insights construct a critical panorama of a global architectural landscape in rapid transformation since the 1990s. • The book is divided
into there parts. “Polemics” addresses broad issues and trends with essays that claim a position in current debates. “Agents” examines the
oeuvres of particular architects, with pieces that situate their work in relation to such debates. “Artifacts” takes on single buildings, instances
where ideas are sedimented into form to situate current architectural discussions in concrete objects.
Rodolphe el-Khoury is Dean of the Miami University School of Architecture. He
was Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto, Head of Architecture
at California College of the Arts, and associate professor at Harvard Graduate
School of Design. El-Khoury was trained as a historian and an architect; he conti-
nues to divide his time between scholarship and practice with Khoury Levit Fong.
His books on eighteenth-century European architecture include The Little House,
an Architectural Seduction, and See Through Ledoux; Architecture, Theatre and
the Pursuit of Transparency. Books on contemporary architecture and urbanism
include Monolithic Architecture, Architecture in Fashion, and States of Architec-
ture in the Twenty-first Century: New Directions from the Shanghai Expo.
George Baird was born and grew up in Toronto. After graduating from the Uni-
versity of Toronto in 1962, he worked for two years for Toronto architect Jerome
Markson. In 1964, he commenced graduate studies in architecture at University
College, in London, England, and went on to teach architectural theory and
design at the Royal College of Art, and the Architectural Association School of
Architecture in London, returning to Toronto in 1967. In 1968 he founded his
architectural practice, and joined the faculty of architecture at the University of
Toronto. He has been active in architecture, urban design, and heritage pre-
servation in Toronto, across Canada, and abroad since that time. A principal
author of the pioneering 1974 urban design study “On building downtown,”
he acted also as a key advisor to Toronto’s St. Lawrence Neighbourhood site
planning team, strongly recommending both the extension of the street grid
of the original city, and the creation of what is now known as Esplanade Park.
In 1992, Baird was the winner of the Toronto Arts Foundation’s Architecture
and Design Award, and in 1999, he was invited to deliver the annual Kilbourn
Lecture for Heritage Toronto. In 2001, he received the order of Da Vinci Medal
from the Ontario Association of Architects. He received the RAIC Gold Medal in
2010 and the Topaz Medal for excellence in architectural education in 2012. He
is the author/editor of numerous books, including Meaning in Architecture (with
Charles Jencks, 1968), Alvar Aalto, (1969), The Space of Appearance, (1995),
Queues, Rendezvous, Riots (with Mark Lewis, 1995). In 1993, he joined the
faculty of the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was
the G. Ware Travelstead Professor of Architecture, and Director of the MArch I
and MArch II Programs. From 2005 to 2009 George was Dean of the Faculty of
Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto.
8180
“FOR JOHNSON,ARCHITECTURAL
SIGNIFICATION CONSISTS IN
SHAPING INTELLIGIBLE AND
MEMORABLE FIGURES FROM THE
BUILDING’S FUNCTIONAL AND
CONSTRUCTIONAL LOGIC”
2120
BIOMIMICRY
What is the “life” in “Better City/ Better Life”? The historian and theorist
of scientific culture, Eugene Thacker has described the Western concep-
tion of life as developing in three major episodes corresponding to three
distinct models: life as soul (Aristotle), life as meat (Descartes), life as
pattern (the cybernetic conception of life as organized information). The
idea of life arising from the cybernetic homology between living systems
and information systems has had a strong hold on the contemporary ar-
chitectural imagination for several decades (in no small part owing to
the ubiquity of computer aided design).
This cybernetic conception of life has powerfully influenced the contem-
porary conception of the building as an animate or quasi-animate entity.
Since the early nineties, that conception can be said to have advanced in
three stages: the first stage (represented by the work of architects like
Bernard Cache and Greg Lynn) imagined the building form as the em-
pirical trace of a process of virtual morphogenesis. The second stage,
represented by architects like MY STUDIO/Howeler+Yoon, Khoury Levit
Fong, and Mark Goulthorpe, exploited the potentials of embedded tech-
nologies to re-conceive the built work as artificial sensorium. At the
third stage, largely enabled by digital parametric modeling, the building
is conceived, in conformity with Thacker’s third paradigm (life=pattern),
as the aggregate produced by the patterning of micrological elements.
These stages are less consecutive than cumulative, since strong residues
of the earlier stages can be observed in even the most daring and radical
examples of the later ones. In the Shanghai Expo, vestiges of all three
are apparent, although it is perhaps the fascination with the patterns
produced by the dense but carefully regulated distribution of a micro-el-
ement across a surface or field that produces the most novel and ingenu-
ous expressions of this vitalism. It is here, also, that these vitalist preoc-
cupations begin to encroach on our second theme, surface.
The treatment of both the interior and exterior surfaces of the U.K. Pa-
vilion are exemplary in this regard. The Seed Cathedral, situated at the
centre of a deftly terraced landscape, consists of a steel and timber com-
posite structure pierced by 60,000 fibre optic filaments, 20 mm square
in section, which are encased in aluminum sleeves. By day, the filaments
- STATES OF ARCHITECTURE: SIX PAVILIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI
6766
168 169steelbandprojects
Implantés sur parc d’activités
tertiaire, les deux bâtiments
Steel Band qui en assurent la
composition, sont inscrits entre
la cité qui s’étend et les terres
agricoles.
Implantés sur parc d’activités
tertiaire, les deux bâtiments
Steel Band qui en assurent la
composition.
Implantés sur parc d’activités
tertiaire, les deux bâtiments
Steel Band qui en assurent la
composition.
1
- RALPH
JOHNSON’S
PERFORMATIVE
ICONS
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN RALPH JOHNSON OF PERKINS + WILL;
RECENT WORK, OSCAR RIERA OJEDA PUBLISHERS, 2012
7372- RALPH JOHNSON’S PERFORMATIVE ICONS
Johnson builds the civic character of the courthouse by figu-
ratively capturing and monumentalizing its environmental
logic. Herein lies his main contribution to the current dis-
cussions around sustainable design: in the capacity to tease
outasymbolicresonancefromenvironmentalperformance.
Take, as another example, the Al Shark Tower project.
The environmental agenda is here stated more explicitly
with the literal greening of the building. A strategy for a
sustainable rapport with Dubai’s desert climate here fa-
vors a permeable building envelope with passive cooling
and ventilation capabilities. The design strategy which
includes a layer of living plant material as part of a breath-
ing skin generates a unique building form with a continu-
ous spiraling garden carved into the mass of the high-rise
structure. A process designed for efficiently regulating
environmental recourses is pushed beyond its performa-
tive logic to yield a cultural surplus. Sustainability shapes
the building into an intelligible icon.
ABOVE. Provide Caption.
ABOVE. Provide Caption.
RIGHT. Los Angeles United States Courthouse:
Diagram of Constituent Parts.
NEXT PAGE. Los Angeles United States Courthouse:
Diagram of Constituent Parts.
73
9594
modernist phobias about symbolic form, he could always counter that his
forms were derived from the more acceptable circumstances of plan form.
Today, roof and profile are back, but often enough through the exercise
of a willful arbitrariness. The refashioning in consciousness of symbol
as logo lends a patina of contemporaneity to formerly censured forms of
iconicity. By borrowing from the world of logos and branding architects
also accept, even delight in the pleasures, and finally, in the limits of the
arbitrary form (Big, Plot, OMA). Authorial expressionism, such as that of
Frank Gehry, presents a corollary phenomenon to the arbitrary logo-like
profiles of shape architecture. Artistic expression, arbitrary in its own
fashion, shares with logo what for modernist ethics is a freedom from
conventional symbolic forms and from historical idioms of architecture.
The interest that logo architecture and expressionist practices take in the
return of the roof profile is something that we share. However, we are
also invested in the roof as a habitable realm, a condition that played so
central a role in Le Corbusier's "five points." And even more pointedly
we are committed to the relationship between roof and climactic setting
that withdrew in favor of a disavowed conformity to stylistic orthodoxy.
In Liwan Bayrut we have made a building figure in which a very plastic
roof form is created. This form possesses the iconicity of the logo, yet
it is not arbitrary. It is a theater, a roman bowl, structural in character
(a tensile net) and energy efficient in its geometry and orientation. It is
an intense social form whose shape is the shape of the roof. Its archaic
familiarity and its technical modernity combine with its provision for a
real social invention germane to a contemporary institution.
Likewise in the Phoenix sun -shading infrastructure and in Beirut's Mar-
tyrs' Square we have sought to combine technical innovation with icono-
graphic intent. And, we eschew what we consider an erroneous distinc-
tion between socially and environmentally performative architectural
form and symbolic form, which means that we consider these works
to be equally committed to an environmentally responsible shaping of so-
cial experience as they are to providing symbolic forms of the social world
they hope to make. In aligning these goals our work escapes from the col-
lapse of practice into the immaterial discursive forms of the logo and of
technique into a self-unaware and thus benighted form of technicality.
- SMART FIGURE / SENSIBLE GROUND: ANDREW BROMBERG
ABOVE. Provide Caption
- SMART
FIGURE /
SENSIBLE
GROUND:
ANDREW
BROMBERG
FOREWORD GEORGE BAID
- STATES OF
ARCHITECTURE:
SIX PAVILIONS
FROM THE
SHANGHAI
WORLD EXPO*
EXCERPTED FROM STATES OF ARCHITECTURE IN THE TWENTY-
FIRST CENTURY: NEW DIRECTIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI WORLD
EXPO, OSCAR RIERA OJEDA PUBLISHERS, 2011.
* WRITTEN IN COLLABORATION WITH ANDY PAYNE.
3736
6160
139on the crestprojects138
1—REstAuRAnt
2—KItchEn
3—FOOd dIVIsIOn
4—mEAt WORKROOm
5—PAstRy dIVIsIOn
6—BAKERy dIVIsIOn
139on the crestprojects138
1—REstAuRAnt
2—KItchEn
3—FOOd dIVIsIOn
4—mEAt WORKROOm
5—PAstRy dIVIsIOn
6—BAKERy dIVIsIOn
ABOVE. Provide Caption
RIGHT. Provide Caption
floating, un-rooted above the landscape, they are abstract artifacts that
embody a regional mentalité, more so than an architectural tradition.
Something about them is unmistakably Breton, but that same je ne sais
quoi—shall we say the unsentimental indexicality—is what also binds
them, paradoxically, to the universal project of modernity.
The regional character of Atelier Arcau is not a cultivated aesthetic: it is
neither an affirmation of a cultural heritage, nor a deliberate resistance to
its erosion by global currents. Atelier Arcau’s architecture is of a particu-
lar place, because buildings such as Steel Band, Architectural Digest , and
RailwaySentinel,arebluntandunmediated—anti-aesthetic—expressions
of the sites, situations, and material resources that shape them in Vannes,
Ploufragan, and Nantes.
5756
“DESIGN IS HERE ENABLING A
BOLD CONCEPTUAL AND MATERIAL
CLARITY INSTEAD OF PACKAGING A
POLISHED PRODUCT”
4342- STATES OF ARCHITECTURE: SIX PAVILIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI
BSA is partnered with Knippers Helbig Advanced Engineering Stuttgart for
the innovative design and engineering. Together they continue a German
traditionoflightweightconstructionthatdevelopedwithFreiOtto’sground-
breakingworks.MuchliketheGermanPavilionattheWorldExposition1967
in Montreal and the Munich Olympic stadium—formative precedents that
defined the genre—the Expo Axis how advanced computation and material
research align to produce structures of increasing elegance and efficiency.
CORPORATE PAVILION
A dense infrastructural matrix envelops a collection of irregularly shaped
spaces, unifying divers programs and volumes into a rectangular block.
This is a recurrent compositional strategy at the Expo and a compelling
model for urban buildings in general. It is a way to transition form in-
creasingly complex programs and interior configurations to a consoli-
dated mass and iconic presence on the street.
The building pays homage to the groundbreaking Centre George Pompi-
douof1976withitsexposedinfrastructureandductwork.Inlieuofmassive
structural members and conduits the Corporate Pavilion presents a filigree
ofinfrastructure.WhiletheCentreGeorgesPompidouflauntedtechnology
in the form of colossal machinery this pavilion appeals to a different tech-
nological paradigm: information technology and miniaturization.
The building is enveloped in a mist of technology: a cloud-like distribution
of miniaturized structure, electronics and digital bits. This steel and sili-
con filigree features arrays of sensors and actuators that enable the build-
ing envelope to respond to ambient conditions and accordingly enhance its
environmental performance. Embedded misters for instance produce an
actual cloud of cooling vapor that regulates the ambient temperature. This
climate-control device responsively boosts the environmental performance
of the building while visually enhancing the foamy character of the façade.
Embedded LEDs transform the building into an active digital display con-
trolled by computers that alter the appearance of the building in a variety
of automated or programmed ways, further underscoring the shit from the
iconography of the machine to the atmospherics of the information age.
RIGHT. Provide Caption
41
Edition: Hardcover in slipcase
Book Size: 6.5 x 8.5 in / 165 x 215 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 400
Publication Date: May 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 215
Ilustrations: 115
Weight: 1.6 kg
Rights: World Rights Available
Price: US$ 35
ISBN: 978-988-12249-5-8
Orop catalogue
City for City
City College
Architectural Center
1995-2015
Achva Benzinberg Stein, FASLA, is a professor and practicing professional
who has taught and worked in the US, Europe, Israel, India, and China. Her
projects with neighborhood groups, public agencies, and non-profit organiza-
tions concentrate on meeting social needs while seeking to heal the damage
of poorly managed urban development. Her landscape designs, which have
won numerous awards from the American Society of Landscape Architects
include designs for school grounds, large-scale housing projects, parks, pla-
ygrounds, hotels, community gardens, and private residences. She has won
many awards, including the 1994 Chrysler Award for Innovation in Design, and
has twice been the recipient of Fulbright grants.
Lance Jay Brown was educated at the Cooper Union for the Advancement
of Science and Art and holds two Masters degrees from the Harvard Graduate
School of Design. He is an ACSA Distinguished Professor at he Spitzer School
of Architecture at The City College of New York and a Fellow of the American
Institute of Architects and the Institute for Urban Design. He was 2005 Chair of
the AIA National Regional and Urban Design Committee. From 1979 to 1983
he served as Design Excellence Director of the Design Arts Program of the
National Endowment for the Arts in Washington. In 2007 he was awarded the
highest honor given for an architectural educator in the United States, the AIA/
ACSA Topaz Medallion. He was the Professional Advisor of the NHNY Ideas
Competition and founding member of the New Housing New York Steering
Committee. His recently co-authored book, Urban Design For An Urban Cen-
tury, was released in 2009.
City for City presents examples of the work of The City College Architectural Center over the past fifteen years. The projects selected are
grouped under the categories of exhibitions, visioning exercises, planning and urban design studies, and also include a few examples of
assignments for implementation. The work was developed at the request of the affected communities and undertaken with their full partici-
pation. The projects were financed in various ways, from pro-bono studies to grant-supported efforts. These grants and the special support
from state and municipal entities enable the center to develop the projects in greater depth. City for City illustrates the value of cooperative
community-based work in which both sides learn and share in the experience. Such interactions offer valuable insights for both students and
faculty not normally found in traditional architectural practices.
A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
NORTHERN MANHATTAN
HERITAGE PLAN
DATE OF PROJECT:
2002 - 2004
PARTNERS:
Project Funded by a grant from the
National Endowment for the Arts.
The CCAC conducted a study of strategic planning
and urban design opportunities around heritage-based
themes in Northern Manhattan, primarily in the
neighborhoods of Manhattanville, West Harlem /
Hamilton Heights, Washington Heights, and Inwood,
with the goal of finding ways to engage the Northern
Manhattan community’s history and heritage as a basis
for strategizing about its future.
The intention of the study was to:
- Foster discussion around a range of challenging issues
that inevitably emerge from a community defining its
history and contemporary identity.
- Produce a final report for broad public distribution that
would document research and findings and suggestions
for coherent themes and area boundaries.
- Recommend next steps for design, preservation, and
educational programs and for identifying and attracting
needed resources.
Some particular objectives of the study and overall
heritage plan included:
- Identifying historical and cultural themes and subjects
that link places, events, activities, and people as part
of the visible and past fabric of Northern Manhattan’s
varied communities.
- Identifying public places where design, quality, and
amenities can be enhanced and improved.
- Suggesting strategies to improve selected public
places and areas in order to strengthen the present-day
experience of place and heritage.
CHAPTER 03
Previous page. Gun Hill Road model
This page. Gun Hill Road model
P. 197P. 196 URBAN DESIGN STUDIESURBAN DESIGN STUDIES
ROCKAWAY
BEACH BRANCH
GREENWAY
DATE OF PROJECT:
2008 - 2009
PARTNERS:
Rockaway Beach Branch
Greenway Committee.
The Rockaway Beach Branch Greenway Committee asked
the CCAC to map and document their Rails to Trails project,
consisting of a portion of the disused Long Island Railroad
line running from Rego Park to Ozone Park in Queens.
The CCAC created a preliminary design for the greenway
and prepared an informational brochure addressed to the
community surrounding the trail to help start the funding
campaign for the development phase of the project.
The Rockaway Beach Branch railway was built in 1880.
It connected New York City residents to the Ocean Beaches
of the Rockaway Peninsula, providing urban dwellers with
access to the sea and its recreational opportunities. The
right-of-way was abandoned by the Long Island Railroad
in 1962. The train tracks and the adjacent land have
become derelict open space. This vacant, forgotten land
can be turned into a linear urban oasis.
CHAPTER 01
AMSTERDAM AVENUE
MODEL
P. 91P. 90 EXHIBIT EXHIBIT
Text and Introduction by Achva Benzinberg Stein
Preface by Lance Jay Brown
45
Edition: Hardcover with 3/4 flaps in clamshell box
Book Size: 8 x 10 in / 203 x 254 mm
Box Size: 8.25 x 10.25 x 1.5 in / 209 x 260 x 38 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 240
Publication Date: May 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 200
Ilustrations: 140
Weight: 1.7 kg
Rights: World Rights Available
Price: US$ 35
ISBN: 978-988-16194-1-9
Orop catalogue
Surfaced
The Formation of
Twisted Structures
The Work of
SYSTEMarchitects
Essays by Chee Pearlman, Carolina Miranda,
and Paul Chatterton
Contributions by writer, editor, and curator Chee Pearlman,
arts journalist Carolina Miranda, architectural critic Vladimir
Belogolovsky, and architectural historian Elisabetta Terragni
Architectural structures create the environment in which they are situated, while at the same time describing that environment. Complex forms,
such as the twist, offer the architect a tool to shape an environment with a visible smoothness that disguises the space’s complexity and
precision. But twisted structures present a double-challenge for architects and builders. To create such structures, it is necessary not only to
design them, but to design the method of constructing them. For some geometries, it is enough to take a conventional building method, or an
already extant tool and modify it slightly. But more often than not, completely new tools and methods need to be figured out. This process of
re-engineering, rethinking, and reimagining leads to an increasing and progressively more intimate awareness of material, texture, and detail.
• This book charts the journey of SYSTEMarchitects from the folded geometries of the seminal BURST house exhibited at MOMA’s renowned
2008 show to the curves, tucks and twisted spaces that followed. It records five years of experimentation with pre-fabricated and iterative te-
chniques, low cost materials, and algorithmic design all in service of projects made for everyday use. It examines the role of parametric design
in the domestic sphere, and It explores twisted volumes, from large scale structures to the very surface of the twist itself, offering a whole new
animated direction for architecture.
A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
220 221Pied-á-Terrematerial+depth
1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology
2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software1
2
38 39Burst*003form+use
1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology pervasive
2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software
6
2
11
40 41Burst*003form+use
1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology pervasive
2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software
3 we were using at the time. As the software and our facility with the software progressed
4 so did the experimentation with materials.1
1
4
3
2
perforation+pattern aA SHELTER140 141
1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology
2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software
1 2
cMcF156 157perforation+pattern
1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology
2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software
3 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology
4 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software
5 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software
1 2
3
4
5
10 11
acknowledgements.
This book looks particularly at the design activities of
SYSTEM over the past six years, none of which would have
been possible without the 12 years that came before. We
have limited the projects of those years to BURST*003
and 008, Wellfleet, and fulcrumSTAIR in an attempt to
contextualize the ideas that influence the current activities.
This book would not have been possible without the
support and counsel of the dean of architecture of
the great City College of New York, George Ranalli,
who gave me the idea for the book, the space to
write it and the belief that I could pull it off.
Making the book took enormous effort for many. It would
not have happened without the guidance, wordsmith skills
and countless hours of my wife, Belinda Luscombe. Not
only did she agree to upend our family schedule but she
organized the space we needed to think clearly about
the book. I must thank our children Spike and Ginger
for their patience while our minds were elsewhere.
Jamie Edindjiklian, Alanna Lauter, Florian Gjoka, Nick
Napoli and Robert Baker from SYSTEM’s office were
invaluable and I’m profoundly grateful to them.
I thank the interviewers who engaged with the work
during their busy schedules, Vladimir Belogolovsky for
the idea, the journalists Chee Pearlman and Carolina
Miranda, and the environmental activist Paul Chatterton.
The work at SYSTEM is always a labor of love and devotion
and the hours people have put in reflect that. Douglas
Gauthier and I worked side by side for many hard but fun
years. Henry Grosman devoted years of his life to the
making of the BURST* projects, and Chris Knapp, Sarkis
Areklyavan, Barry Bergdoll, Peter Christensen, Cristobal
Correa, Katherine Keltner and John Fuller gave us such
important support. I remain deeply indebted to Stacey
Greenwald and Martin Cook, true friends who have helped
us out at key moments. Robert Baker (again), Charles
Kwan and Jesse Lee Wilson have given their time, energy
and talent in a way that is humbling and inspiring.
My colleague at the Mercer Street studio, Maggie
Mahboubian told me early on in the practice to find
great makers and design for them. The great makers
we have found and continue to design for include Sue
Wantz at Paul C. Steck, Armando Saca at Millennium
Steel, Corey Akers at Precision Metals, Laserfab, Perry
Randazzo, and Art Kozyr, Bill Young, Robert Bridges at
eFab Local, and the guys on site with the awe-inspiring
hands Tommy Kozlowski and Richard Wilson.
Supportive clients are the lifeblood of any architecture
practice, most crucially because they engage with the
thinking of the projects and improve them. Without the
faith and loyalty of clients, all buildings are just dreams.
I am honored to have worked with Andrew Katay and
Catriona Grant, Douglas and Michelle Monticello, Caroline
McFadden, Jeff and Susan Rubenstein, Michel Gainet,
Dalton Conley, Milind Sojwal and All Angels Church,
Michelle deMilly and Andy Breslau, Ross Whelan and
Mark Cooper. They have each taught me so much.
Jeremy Edmiston
SYSTEMarchitects
238 239
	
	
lattice 3N176 177perforation+pattern
cMcF154 155perforation+pattern
The lobby of a penthouse apartment in a new high-rise residential building in New York City
presented an interesting challenge. The space had a utility and it met all the many regula-
tions of the building co-operative board, but it needed character. We were only permitted to
use paint, so we decided to work with qualities of paint that enhance surface. The pattern we
devised envelops the floor, walls and ceiling in a pattern of matte, low sheen, and high gloss
finishes. The new surface is immediately transformative but the subtleties of the articulation
almost defy documentation. Photographer Albet Velska painstakingly adjusted the lighting to
pick up the surface changes and compiled an image of over 20 different images to reveal the
interactions between the light and paint.
The pattern continued on the terraces as outdoor furniture, where the surface becomes per-
forated and articulates the uses of the space.
3.2 cMcF
1 This was largely a response to
the flat sheet technology
2 in the building industry, and the
rudimentary software
1 2
	
perforation+pattern3
182 183UNhistorictownHOUSEmaterial+depth
The Landmark Preservation Commission (LPC) was established in New York to preserve
historic buildings after the McKim, Mead and White-designed Penn Station was pulled down.
The Commission has jurisdiction over the site of a townhouse that SYSTEM was commissio-
ned to renovate and enlarge in 2010. An odd leftover, the lot is only 25-ft. deep and has buil-
dings on three sides, but has almost 40 feet of street frontage. The current house does not
meet the basic standards of cross ventilation, light and open green space that are required
for residential habitation, yet is in a very desirable Manhattan neighborhood. Tribeca was
originally built for manufacturing, trade and warehousing when that part of the Hudson River
was a thriving shipping port. The 10-story building across the narrow street is now used for
offices and movie production. Our site had little or no privacy or sense of domesticity, parti-
cularly as the building is only one room deep.
The argument we made successfully to the LPC was that our building was to be made from
materials characteristic of the historic neighborhood—brick, steel, glass, and cast iron—but
used in a revolutionary fashion.
The windows are carefully angled to increase the views up and down the street while decrea-
sing the view into the house from the commercial building across the way. This has the effect
of turning the brick façade into a continuous twisting surface as the angled windows nego-
tiate with the street. The bricks become like drapery, corbelling from their cast iron base up
to the overhanging cornice.
After construction experiments with robotic bricklayers and backup walls made of plywood
or honeycombed plastic, we decided to build with brick hand-laid onsite against a permanent
foam template that is CNC cut to form every brick course and position every brick. The foam
insulates, helps with the waterproofing and prevents damage from condensation between
the walls. The interior of the façade is also brick, creating a four wythe wall where one of the
interior wythes is foam. This makes the wall highly insulating and eliminates street noise.
Balconies extend beyond the façade and provide small outdoor spaces nestled in and jutting
out from the brick wall. They’re conceived as a second fabric swelling out from the brick
surface, extending the habitable space through the wall, their balustrades screening the
interior even further.
In the interior, the twisting geometry of the façade imparts an intimate domestic scale to the
interior spaces. The curves and kinks create alcoves, cubbies and nooks that can be perso-
nalized. One might be a window seat, another a place for a plant, another a spot to talk on the
phone or look out the window. Thus an otherwise commercial and impersonal environment
can be made more intimate and domestic without the necessity of drawn shades.
4.1 UNhistorictownHOUSE
With Robert Baker
1 This was largely a response to
the flat sheet technology
2 in the building industry, and the
rudimentary software
3 This was largely a response to
the flat sheet technology
4 in the building industry, and the
rudimentary software
5 This was largely a response to
the flat sheet technology
6 in the building industry, and the
rudimentary software
7 This was largely a response to
the flat sheet technology
8 in the building industry, and the
rudimentary software
9 This was largely a response to
the flat sheet technology
1
4
5
8 9
7
32
6
Chee Pearlman, former editor-in-chief of I.D. Magazine, is the director of Chee
Company, a New York-based editorial and design consultancy. She is also
curator of the Curry Stone Design Prize, an annual $100,000 grant that recog-
nizes innovative designers creating social impact solutions. A journalist, confe-
rence director, and curator for more than twenty years, she has contributed to
The New York Times, Newsweek, Travel + Leisure, Wired, Popular Science, and
Architects Newspaper. Chee has been the program director of the Art Center
College of Design Conference for six years and has co-edited several books
including Spectacle by David Rockwell and Bruce Mau, Made You Look, by
Stefan Sagmeister, and Perverse Optimist by Tibor Kalman. She founded and
co-chaired the Chrysler Design Award for its ten-year duration, and curated the
groundbreaking “Voting Booth Project” exhibition at The New School. She has
served on innumerable juries, is an advisor to the TED conference and a board
member of the Art Directors Club. Chee is a 2011 Harvard Loeb Fellow and is
currently developing a conference in and about Detroit entitled “Urban Craft:
Solutions from the Edge.”
Carolina A. Miranda is freelance magazine writer and radio reporter who has
produced stories on culture and travel for Time, ARTnews, Art in America, Fast
Company, NPR’s All Things Considered, and PRI’s Studio 360. She has also
served as a contributing art critic and reporter for New York Public Radio,
appearing regularly on affiliate stations WNYC and WQXR. Over the course
of her career, she has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark de-
sign, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art
in museums, and the growing intersection between video games and fine art.
She blogs about art and culture at C-Monster.net and was named one of nine
people to follow on Twitter by The New York Times.
Paul Chatterton is the deputy leader of the Forest and Climate division of
the World Wildlife Fund and was formerly its Conservation director in Papua
New Guinea. He is a lifelong environmental activist. As director for REDD +
Landscapes, Paul has designed and initiated WWF’s major activities at scale
in the Amazon, Borneo, and Congo, has led strategic planning globally and
is responsible for aligned implementation across over twenty countries. Paul
has previously managed WWF’s international efforts in Austria, the pacific,and
Papua New Guinea, and before this ran his own company consulting on sustai-
nable development and stakeholder participation in the Asia Pacific region.	
49
Edition: Softcover with 3/4 flaps in slipcase
Book Size: 8 x 10 in / 203 x 255 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 240
Publication Date: May 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 300
Ilustrations: 120
Weight: 1.7 kg
Rights: World Rights Available
Price: US$ 45
ISBN: 978-988-12252-3-8
Orop catalogue
A Clear View
How Glass Buildings in
the Inner City Transformed
a Neighborhood
Suzane Reatig, FAIA, founded her practice in 1989 and for the last twenty-five
years has been altering the Shaw neighborhood lot by lot, house by house, and
alley by alley. The cumulative impact on the quality of the urban environment has
been staggering. Every project has attracted newcomers to the neighborhood
while long-time residents have begun to take renewed interest in their own ho-
mes and streets. Through building open, transparent, and inviting buildings in a
community historically plagued with crime and blight, Suzane took an active role
in improving the neighborhood and presenting a new image to the community
and to the city. Today Shaw realizes an increase in property ownership as well
as an increase in community involvement by both newcomers and long-time
residents. A genuine love of place making and commitment to the needs of her
clients has resulted in a long list of awards, publications, and speaking engage-
ments, inspiring frequent pilgrimage to her built work. In a 2010 cover story for
the Washington Business Journal’s OnSite magazine, Reatig was labeled “the
best architect in D.C. you don’t know.” She is an inspiration for her peers and a
tireless mentor and role model for younger practitioners.
Thomas S. Shiner, FAIA, IDSA, a native of Washington, DC, is an architect
devoted to discussing an urban vision for his city. Tom studied in Blacksburg
and Copenhagen. He apprenticed in Switzerland and the Netherlands. His
largest projects are in Berlin, where he worked with a partner office to com-
plete two renovations of historic buildings. Presently, Tom works in both studio
and workshop to run an enterprise, MUSEUM & LIBRARY FURNITURE, a
company specializing in designing and building furniture for museums and
cultural institutions.
Introduction by Suzane Reatig
Preface by Thomas S. Shiner
A Clear View is the first book published by Washington, DC–based architect Suzane Reatig, FAIA. Exploring new interpretations of small-
scale urban infill housing, it addresses the changing needs and the real demands of city dwellers. Filling the void in the urban puzzle, in
narrow and constrained sites, all of Reatig’s new structures ensure comfortable and safe spaces. • The majority of the work in this book is
located in one neighborhood of Washington, DC, Shaw, demonstrating the powerful effect architecture can have on transforming and re-
viving a neighborhood. • Through the use of simple materials and innovative clear design, Reatig reveals how community can be achieved
among inhabitants without giving up privacy or independence. All projects share the same spirit; they are imaginative, rigorous, and give
priority and value to their inhabitants and enhance their quality of life. Each project has its own unmistakable identity.
The layout arrangement of the four
apartments around a courtyard
not only provides ample natural
light, cross ventilation, and triple
exposure, but also promotes
communal outdoor living.
— 67
LEFT Second floor living (444 N Street NW)
RIghT View of court from stairs (442 N Street NW)
40 — THE METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH
LEFT Glass and masonry: heaven and earth
RIghT A beacon of light for the neighborhood
AbOvE Top unit private roof deck
RIghT Alley façade with parking
86 — n street lofts
— 21
ASHLAND AVENUE
1505 Ashland Avenue, Baltimore MD
Ashland Avenue is the only work in this book not located in the Shaw neighborhood
of Washington DC. Since it encompasses many of the urban housing design chal-
lenges and solutions common in our work, we chose to include it.
The city of Baltimore awarded a vacant lot to our client, a non-profit organization,
with the stipulation that the client construct affordable housing. The lot, adjacent
to one of the client’s churches and surrounded by dilapidated buildings, vacant lots
and crime activities presented two challenges.
The first, a long and narrow site that stretches an entire city block of Baltimore, was
zoned for townhouse construction. As street exposure was limited, traditional street-
facing row houses would have allowed the construction of only three townhouses;
two on the north side and one on the south side with no access to a parking area.
To maximize the number of townhouse units and to utilize the potential of the un-
usually long site, we configured an E-shaped layout with eight attached, two and
three story townhouses wrapping around two courtyards. The units span the north-
south axis of the site, orienting the exposed facades towards the east and west.
The second challenge was the neighborhood context which resembled scenes
from the HBO series The Wire. In a neighborhood dealing with crime and drugs we
were concerned with the safety and well-being of the residents. We addressed se-
curity issues by wrapping the site with a masonry wall and providing delicate white
steel bars at the ground floor of the units. At the same time we opened the units to
daylight and to the neighborhood through the use of ample glass, shared outdoor
courtyards and walkways that promote visibility and interaction.
This series of duplexes is a new interpretation of the Washington, DC row house in
a historic district. Constructed in a long-neglected section of the Shaw neighbor-
hood, the dwellings transformed the area and serve as a prototype for new urban
living, both spatially and in terms of construction methods and materials.
In a departure from typical residential wood construction, these row houses are
built with materials commonly used in commercial and institutional buildings. The
shell is built of pre-fabricated concrete panels and hollow-core concrete planks.
The facades are predominantly aluminum store fronts with the added rhythm of
brick on the historic designated street facade. To keep the project financially fea-
sible, all building elements are standard, off-the-shelf items. The concrete structure
offers durability, non-combustibility, sound absorption, termite protection and
cost-efficiency, making it ideally suited for high-density urban living.
The unique sectional configuration of interlocking units creates both lofty, double–
height spaces and double-exposure; a rare combination in urban living. Each unit
has ample outdoor space as well. The lower unit features a rear, private terrace
that expands livable space. A roof-top terrace belonging to the upper unit provides
breath-taking views of the Capitol dome and downtown Washington, D.C.
N STREET lofTS
424-434 N St NW, Washington DC
— 79
48 — SEE-THROUGH TOWNHOUSE
LEFT Living area facing court
RIghT Interior stairs facing court
LEFT North facade with private entrances to each unit from parking
bELOW Section
RIghT Upper unit master bedroom
92 — ridge street row
26 — ASHLAND AVENUE
AbOvE View of roof deck from interior
RIghT Roof deck with photographer Bob Lautman
LEFT Courtyard
RIghT Duplex view of courtyard
124 — bailey park
50 — SEE-THROUGH TOWNHOUSE
LEFT Corner-wrapping windows open to the neighborhood
RIghT North façade
“At first glance (and second, and third) the corner
of 5th & O seems like an odd place for a big glass
house with a Japanese-inspired rock garden, and
picture windows that make the structure nearly
see-through. Maybe it’s the row of ornate rowhouses
that make it seem so out of place. Or maybe it’s
the police roadblock that checks IDs at 6th & O on
Friday nights. Or else the surveillance camera sits
atop a former school at 4th & 0. Then again, maybe
it’s the 5 N’O gang graffiti on several walls in walking
distance. Whatever the reason, it’s hard to envision
feeling entirely comfortable being so open in such an
environment. Nevertheless, its placement is striking,
and in the right combinations of light and shadow,
beautiful in a minimalist sort of way”.
Book Captions.doc”. Easter, Eric (May 13, 2009). House of Prayer/
House of Style, Ebony Magazine.
Cities are about people, but what people crave most in cities is comfort, greenery,
nature and space, amenities not often associated with urban living. In recent years,
oversaturation of small apartments with high turnover in the DC housing market,
(mainly efficiencies and one-bedrooms), forced families to seek housing in the sub-
urbs. The goal at Bailey Park was to design housing that provides relief from the
stress of city life.
Located steps from the Shaw Metro, a 16-unit apartment building replaced four
small dilapidated townhomes. The four-story building provides spacious units, ex-
posure to light, air, and the outdoors. Large operable windows and deep balconies
provide cross-ventilation and plentiful daylight. Every unit enjoys a private balcony
or terrace in addition to the three communal outdoor areas for tenants—a green
roof deck, an interior court and a planted tree garden along the alley façade.
We saw the dark and neglected alley along the west façade as an opportunity. Re-
cessing the west face of the building and allocating space between the building and
alley for a garden transformed the alley to a friendly, safe walkway. The long bright
colorful façade and the abundance of nature surrounding the building resulted in
an unmistakable identity frequently mentioned by passersby.
Bringing nature to tenants in these communal areas created opportunities to inter-
act and socialize, while also embracing a sense of calm and serenity. Providing the
essentials for healthy living enhances urban life and encourages people to stay in
the city long-term.
bAIlEY PARk
625 Rhode Island Avenue NW, Washington DC
— 121
53
Book Size: 10 x 8 in / 254 x 203 mm
Format: Landscape
Pages: 136
Publication Date: May 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 150
Ilustrations: 50
Rights: World Rights Available
Editions:
.	Softcover with 3/4 flaps
	Price: US$ 25. Weight: 0.6 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12249-3-4
.	Softcover with 3/4 flaps in slipcase
	Price: US$ 35. Weight: 0.8 kg. ISBN: 978-988-13975-4-6
Orop catalogue
Edition: Hardcover with 3/4 flaps in slipcase
Book Size: 7.25 x 9.25 in / 184 x 235 mm
Format: Portrait
Pages: 368
Publication Date: May 2015
Language: English
Photographs: 275
Ilustrations: 285
Weight: 1.6 kg
Rights: World Rights Available
Price: US$ 49
ISBN: 978-988-16194-0-2
Close to 75% of primary energy in New York City is used in or for buildings. Amid the many different initiatives being implemented today to
increase energy efficiency, it is clear that it is our built urban environment that needs the most improvement. Besides the fact that existing
buildings have to be upgraded, the forgotten, interstitial spaces, where improvement can become architecturally tangible, should also be
addressed. The project described in this book developed from the observation that “our most abundant energy resource is the sun and our
most underutilized urban space is our rooftops,” and a successful entry into the Department of Energy’s 2011 Solar Decathlon whose goal
was to design and build a “Net-Zero-Energy” house to be exhibited on the National Mall in Washington, DC. • What if we could make use
of infrastructure developed over generations by developing the underutilized space of apartment building rooftops to generate some of the
power for the “host-buildings” underneath, and thus immediately renew the way we power our buildings and, beyond that, our urban way of
life? This visionary concept, documented here in comprehensive architectural detail, became reality when a team of students from The City
College of New York took on the challenge of presenting their vision of a built “Roofpod” prototype that could be promoted in New York City.
A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
56-56waSte/GarBaGe7URbANENvIRONmENT
landfills are vast open spaces, this is not easily
achieved.
another option for handling waste are incinerator
plants or ‘waste-to-energy’ (wte) plants, which
some countries in europe or and South-east asia
have already transitioned to. Since the late 90’s
common waste policies (Landfill Directive 1999)
have changed over concern for shortages of landfill
capacity. often the preference is incineration be-
cause of its potential as an energy source for pow-
er and heating. Modern technology behind waste
incineration, releases, if accurately filtered, far
less emissions and is therefore less harmful to our
environment than the uncontrolled exhaust that is
typical of landfills. in short, burning trash is cleaner
than storing it in our environment for hundreds of
years. Developed countries like Japan, Sweden or
Denmark, have relied heavily on local incinerator
plants that, in turn, provide a substantial amount
of heat and power for their buildings. Suddenly,
waste becomes a resource for energy produc-
tion. the principle being (see Fig 1.43) that after
the recyclable waste is sorted, the unrecyclable
materials are burned in a furnace at 800 - 1000˚F.
the garbage is then converted into ash, flue gases
and heat. after passing through several controlled
steps, the flue gasses produce steam via a boiler
that powers a turbine and generates electricity.
the ‘waste heat’ from this process can also be
recovered and used for district heating schemes.
the ash, a waste product of this process, can be
used for building material supplements, if it is not
too toxic (for example, as an ingredient in concrete
to replace lime). if it is too toxic, it must be land-
filled. But any disposed ash still only takes up a
tenth of the space as the unprocessed material.
in addition, waste used as a fuel source ultimately
replaces the very fossil fuels that constitute a high
percentage of imported goods.
what makes these plants feasible, is their filter
technology that remove toxins with chemical and
electrical reactions integrated into their emissions
control. at present, the cleanest incinerator plant,
which is in rahway, nJ, emits only a fifth of the
maximum emissions allowed by state legislation.
to put this into greater perspective, backyard burn-
ing of just ten pounds of trash can produce more
dioxins, furans, and PCBs than 100,000 pounds
of trash in an incinerator plant. However, all this
cleanliness comes at a price. Strict pollution con-
trols, and of course manufacturing and maintaining
the equipment itself, cost millions of dollars, while
moving trash hundreds of miles to a landfill is most
often cheaper. as of yet, the factor of ‘cleanliness’
has not found the right price tag. the effects on
our environment are mainly of ethical considera-
tion, while decisions are most often based on fi-
nancial constraints. Laws that restrict the export
of waste materials across state lines can take a
step toward being environmentally conscious, and
would make incinerator plants more economically
competitive with landfills. also, this step would
provide the volume of waste, which is necessary
to run these plants more economically. Currently,
only a fraction of trash collected in Manhattan, only
approximately 3% of the city’s total waste stream,
goes to incinerator plants in new Jersey30. the
rest is transported out of state, involving much
longer distances in transportation. therefore, the
City has proposed a ‘Solid waste Management
Plan’ (SwMP) to enable more efficient long-dis-
tance waste disposal in the future. Unfortunately,
it intends to maintain its current strategy of long-
distance hauling. But, it is planning to transfer the
waste by barge or rail to container stations, where
the waste will be transported to out-of-state land-
fills. this modest but beneficial change is an effort
to reduce the amount of truck traffic in new York
City neighborhoods and interstate highways.
exporting garbage by rail and barge will ultimately
be more economical than by truck, and it is in-
tended to distribute garbage ¬to less expensive
landfills than previously possible. However, rail
and barge destinations are more limited than truck
accessible destinations, with the risk of economic
dependencies. even though the fuel used for trans-
portation of garbage will be reduced, not much has
changed conceptually. instead of investing in more
technically advanced and locally applied solutions,
which new York often favored at the height of its
development, it continues to endorse the far away
landfills and embedded high transportation fuel
and emissions involved.
1.44
Dry Cell Batteries 0%
rubber 0%
Fines 2%
Diapers 4%
Miscellaneous
inorganics 2%
Miscellaneous HHw 0%
Pesticides 0%
non-Pesticide Poisons 0%
office Computer 1%
non-corrugated Cardboard 3%
Books/Phone Books 1%
Mixed Paper 12%
Corrugated/kraft 5%
newsprint 10%
Magazines/Glossy paper 3%
Clear HDPe Containers 1%
Colored HDPe Containers 1%
Clear Pet Containers 1%
Grass/Leaves 1%
Clear Glass Containers 4%
Green Glass Containers 1%
Brown Glass Containers 1%
Food Containers / Foil 1%
Beverage Cans 0%
Food Containers 2%
Bi-Metal Cans 0%
other Ferrous metal 2%
Films and Bags 5%
Polystyrene 1%
Miscellaneous Plastics 2%
Food waste 17%
Car Batteries 0%
Paint/Solvent/Fuel 0%
non-Bulk Ceramics 0%
textiles 6%
Lumber 3%
Miscellaneous
organics 7%
1.44 nYC: Composition
of ‘Municipal Solid waste’
(MSw), Study of the
Department of Sanitation
(1990)(compiled by Marjorie
J. Clarke, www.geo.hunter.
cuny.edu/~mclarke/apr29-
2002sancommtestimony.htm)
40-40UrBanVeGetation4URbANENvIRONmENT
1.25 Santiago De Chile,
(Chile), trellised office
building w/ integrated
planters
1.26 trellis support
system, mounting
alternatives
1.24
1.25
4. ‘Plants protect our water.’ in rural environments,
the root system of plants prevent soil erosion
caused by rain. in urban environments, however,
vegetation is of much higher significance in its
capacity to influence stormwater management by
absorbing water in ‘soft scape’ areas. For example,
trees retain a high amount of rainwater on their
surface during light rainfall. Better yet, the soil
they grow in is able to absorb the water and slowly
release it over time via evaporation, or by any sup-
porting drainage system.
new York is mostly ‘hard scaped surfaces’, made
up of concrete sidewalks and drained rooftops,
all ‘sealed areas’. in certain Manhattan neighbor-
hoods, such as Midtown, the ‘sealed area’ per-
centage is close to 100%17
. when it rains, all of the
water collected on these surfaces is immediately
drained into the public sewer system, which was
designed more than a century ago. this system
combines both sewage and urban runoff, and was
sized to carry three to five times the average dry
weather flows during downpours. the system has
since been significantly improved, but if these
loads cannot be handled, water is either released
into a stormwater overflow system, or if necessary
even into the rivers. (Fig.1.23). anecdotal evidence
of this occurrence is that the ‘Hudson river swim-
mers’ call off their swimming sessions immedi-
ately following a significant downpour. of course,
solving this dilemma by increasing the capacity
of the sewer system is an expensive undertaking.
though, instead of enlarging the infrastructure,
one could simply delay these loads, and lower the
peak of accruing rainwater loads. (Fig. 1.24) this is
where vegetation cover, like green roofs, kicks in
as a feasible solution: for every 5% of vegetation
cover added, stormwater runoff is reduced by ap-
proximately 2%18
.
Vegetation also acts as a natural filter for pollution.
it removes polluted particulate matter from the
flow as it reaches the storm sewers. reducing the
flow of stormwater reduces the amount of pollution
that is washed into a drainage area. trees use nu-
trients like nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium,
all byproducts of urban living, that would otherwise
pollute and over-fertilize the rivers.
16—16PowerGeneration1URbANENvIRONmENT
cities?; why is power produced far away?; under
what circumstances is it produced?; and how does
it affect us?
1. First of all, there are substantial transmission
losses in any kind of energy distribution: the far-
ther away the source, the more energy gets lost
in transmission. it is estimated that approximately
20% of all energy produced in the United States is
lost in transportation5
. the artist richard Box (Fig.
1.4) brought attention to this issue when installing
a ‘field’ of more than a thousand fluorescent light
bulbs underneath a low-overhead power pylon. the
installation was entirely powered by this ‘waste en-
ergy’.
Hypothetically speaking, if we all had a smart ‘mi-
ni-generator’ in our apartment windows, and these
devices would only produce power as necessary,
the savings would be huge. Furthermore, we would
have an immediate relationship to our consumption
of fossil fuels.
in conclusion, one fact is clear: the current, cen-
trally planned and controlled, distribution system
doesn’t work as efficiently as intended; it produces
a lot of wasteful ‘left-overs’.
2. Secondly, the means with which we produce en-
ergy is environmentally unconscious and not very
sophisticated. in the US, most of the energy used
to produce electricity is made of non-renewable ma-
terials: it is effectively fuel we burn using the result-
ing heat to generate electricity. these natural re-
sources –mankind has consumed more fossil fuels
in the past 50 years than in its entire prior history–
are gone for good after they are consumed, when
they could be used more productively for chemical
or pharmaceutical applications, for instance. it is
worth noting that mankind has consumed more fos-
sil fuels in the past 50 years than in its entire prior
history, and it is estimated that we will run out of oil
in ca. 40 years, out of natural gas in ca. 60 years,
and out of coal in ca. 200 years .
about ¾ of the US’s energy supply is based on a
mix of fossil fuel ‘products’: Currently, a bit less
than 50% of this mix is coal. natural gas is the new
favorite, approaching a 25% margin, and becoming
increasingly more popular. this is due to the fact
that gas plants operate more efficiently, have an
easier permitting process and contribute to less
Co2
emissions than coal plants6
.
about 90% of power plants constructed in the last
ten years are either gas plants or ‘dual-fuel’ plants,
1.4
1.4
1.4 richarBox:‘Field’,
Skenfrith/wales 2004
nYS: Sustainable materials management strategy for
waste (Dept. of environmental Conservation
nYS: Sustainable materials management strategy for
waste (Dept. of environmental Conservation
76-76ViSUaLDoSSierSOLARDECATHLON
Prototyping
Architecture:
The Solar
Roofpod
An Educational Design-
Build Research Project
Text by Christian Volkmann
Preface by Barry Bergdoll
Christian Volkmann is an associate professor at the Spitzer School of
Architecture, City College of New York (CCNY). He immigrated to the United
States in 1997, after having worked and studied in Berlin, Zurich, and Lugano,
among others at the offices of J. P. Kleihues and Mario Campi. He holds an
MArch. from the ETH Zurich, and is a Registered Architect in New York. In the
US, he has been teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design and at City
College of New York. At City College, he currently coordinates the 3rd Year
Undergraduate Design Studio, the Construction Technology sequence and
several electives focusing on the integration of technical and environmental
topics into the design process. He is part of the joint faculty for CCNY’s
interdisciplinary Masters program “Sustainability in the Urban Environment,”
combining science, engineering, and architecture.
Barry Bergdoll, architectural historian, is Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art
History at Columbia University and curator in the Department of Architecture
and Design at the Museum of Modern Art.
57
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  • 1. Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers Distribution Catalogue | 2015 OSCAR RIERA OJEDA PUBLISHERS
  • 3. Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers Distribution Catalogue | 2015
  • 8. we have one clear mission: we are determined to make a substantial cultural contribution with each one of our books. We are an international team of designers, writers, editors, and industry professionals with an extensive record of ac- complishment, who are committed to the advancement of knowled- ge in various fields of design and the production of quality books as creative artifacts. We believe that architecture and design are critically important dis- ciplines that affect every aspect of our lives, from the monumen- tal to the personal. We equally believe that the ideas enshrined in these disciplines must be communicated to as wide an audience as possible, in the most articulate and coherent manner possible. Architects and designers are only as good as their ideas and, given that they shape homes, neighborhoods, cities, and entire countries, changing and improving lives even as they provoke and cause con- troversy, they should be given an appropriate medium for them to be heard, considered, and discussed. We want to provide this medium. Although we have our own vision and direction, our role as publis- hers is to give equal exposure to a wide variety of ideologies and philosophies that consistently and intelligently aim to respond to the realities and issues that affect the world we live in. At Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers
  • 9. Contents Displaced. Llonch + Vidalle Architecture Beyond Petropolis. Designing a Practical Utopia in Nueva Loja City Works 6. Student Work 2011-2012. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture The Landscape Architecture of Paul Sangha. Campo Baeza. Complete Works In Situ. George Ranalli, Works & Projects Beyond Context. The Work of Atelier Arcau Architects Sand to Spectacle. The Dubai Mall. DP Architects Contemporanea. Giovanni Presutti Sagrada Família. Gaudí’s Unfinished Masterpiece Geometry, Construction and Site WOW. Experiential Design for a Changing World designwajskol. The Legacy Project. New Housing New York Best Practices in Affordable, Sustainable, Replicable Housing Design Reconnaissance. Nic Lehoux Object Lessons. Monuments in the Age of Anti-Monumentality Dialogues in Space. Wendell Burnette Architects The Built Idea. Alberto Campo Baeza City Works 8. Student Work 2013-2014. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Clear Light. The Architecture of Lauretta Vinciarelli Figures. Essays on Contemporary Architecture City for City. City College Architectural Center 1995-2015 Surfaced. The Formation of Twisted Structures The Work of SYSTEMarchitects A Clear View. How Glass Buildings in the Inner City Transformed a Neighborhood Prototyping Architecture: The Solar Roofpod An Educational Design — Build Research Project City Works 7. Student Work 2012-2013. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture eastwest. Nabil Gholam Architects The Bali Villas. Bedmar & Shi Kerry Hill. Crafting Modernism 5 in Five – Second Revised Edition. Reinventing Tradition in Contemporary Living. Bedmar & Shi Make Alive. Prototypes for Responsive Architectures City Sink. Carbon Cycle Infrastructure for our Built Environments Ralph Johnson of Perkins + Will. Recent Works Architecture with and without Le Corbusier. José Oubrerie Architecte Unexpect. The Works of Michael Ryan Architects City Works 5. Student Work 2010-2011. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Ineffable. Architecture, Computation and the Inexpressible Concrete Ideas. Material to Shape a City City Works 4. Student Work 2009-2010. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Generic Specific Continuum. Julio Salcedo / Scalar Architecture New Architecture in the Emerging World. Projects by Andrew Bromberg, Aedas 5 in Five. Reinventing Tradition in Contemporary Living. Bedmar & Shi States of Architecture in the Twenty-First Century. New Directions from the Shanghai World Expo City Works 3. Student Work 2008-2009. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Heirlooms to Live In. Homes In a New Regional Vernacular Hutker Architects Research & Design. Faculty Work. The City College of New York – Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture 65 69 73 77 81 85 89 93 97 101 105 109 113 17 21 25 29 33 37 41 45 49 53 57 61 117 121 125 129 133 137 141 145 149 153 157 161 167 171 175 179 183 187 191 195 New Titles Back List
  • 11. Reconnaissance Nic Lehoux Nic Lehoux is a Canadian architectural photographer who works with archi- tects that push the boundaries of design of the built environment. Nic is regu- larly commissioned to document significant buildings around the world with his unique eye, lighting, and sense of composition. His images are frequently published in the international architectural press. His professional work puts a particular emphasis on incorporating people within tightly-composed architec- tural photographs. Nic is influenced by the concept of the “decisive moment” – popularized by Henry Cartier-Bresson – which he adapts to the rigors of architectural photography. His images therefore serve as a reflection on the interaction of people with the built environment. James Russell is the architecture critic for Bloomberg News. His commen- taries also appear on the Bloomberg Muse website. He has been a regular guest on Bloomberg radio and TV. For eighteen years, Russell was an editor at Architectural Record magazine, the premier American journal for practicing architects, which he helped to earn a National Magazine Award for General Excellence (2003). His book, The Agile City: Building Well-being and Wealth in an Era of Climate Change was published by Island Press in 2011. Russell ear- ned a Masters of Architecture degree from Columbia University and a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design degree from the University of Washington. He also attended Evergreen State College. Renzo Piano, the 1998 Pritzker Prize winner, is perhaps best known for his controversial design of the Centre Georges Pompidou, located in the heart of Paris and completed in 1978. Conceived in collaboration with English archi- tect Richard Rogers, and described by Piano as “a joyful urban machine ... a creature that might have come from a Jules Verne book,” Beaubourg, as it is called, has become a cultural icon, expressive of Piano’s love of technology. Born in Genoa in 1937, Piano comes from a family of builders. Following his graduation from Milan Polytechnic Architecture School in 1964, he worked in his father’s construction company and later was associated with the offices of Louis Kahn in Philadelphia and Z. S. Mackowsky in London. He formed Renzo Piano Building Workshop in 1980, which now has offices in Paris, Genoa, and Berlin. Vladimir Belogolovsky is the founder of New York-based Intercontinental Curatorial Project, which focuses on organizing, curating, and designing ar- chitectural exhibitions worldwide. Trained as an architect at Cooper Union in New York, he has published over 150 articles in American, European, and Russian publications, as well as several books including Felix Novikov for the Masters of Soviet Architecture series, GreenHouse on leading sustainable pro- jects, and Soviet Modernism: 1955-1985, which was coauthored with archi- tect Felix Novikov.  Photography by Nic Lehoux Foreword by Renzo Piano Introduction by James Russell Interview by Vladimir Belogolovsky Edited by Oscar Riera Ojeda Reconnaissance presents a cross-section of the work of Canadian-born architecture photographer Nic Lehoux. The photographs featured were taken throughout the past decade, presenting a selection of both personal and professional work. An overarching feature of this co- llection is also one of Lehoux’s trademarks: a rare ability to capture people within the built environment at the decisive moment. • The book includes several thematic essays, many of them exploring marginal environments in urban landscapes to depict a rapidly changing world. This global outlook includes studies of Shanghai, where older sections of the city are disappearing at a frightening rate, and several different lo- cations in the USA and Europe, where industrial urban areas are decaying at a similar pace. In another photo-essay, Lehoux uses his dis- tinctive “selective focus” style to capture the essence of the ancient city of Matera in Italy. A further exhaustive photo-essay, on the 2010 Shanghai World Expo, includes both personal and professional elements. The work Lehoux has done for some of the world’s most influen- tial and progressive architects is also featured within themes that dictate the essential strengths of his work: “Form” contains images of ar- chitectural abstraction and compositional purity; “Light” is an exaltation of architecture’s most noble tool; “Texture” documents the varie- ty and poetry of surfaces, while “Object” and “Space” depict the beauty of tangible and elusive shapes. • This book features over 200 original images and is produced as part of a joint project between Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers and the Architectural Photography Foundation. It accompanies an exhibition of the photography featured, which, in 2012, toured through the Chinese cities of Beijing, Shanghai, and Shenzen. Book Size: 11 x 9.5 in / 279 x 241 mm Box Size: 11.25 x 9.75 in / 286 x 248 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 294 Publication Date: October 2015 Language: English Photographs: 400 Rights: World Rights Available Editions: . Hardcover in box Price: US$ 75. Weight: 2.5 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12250-5-4 . Hardcover, premium edition limited to forty sets in clamshell box with five signed prints Price: US$ 4500. Weight: 3.4 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12252-9-0 17
  • 13. Object Lessons Monuments in the Age of Anti-Monumentality Authored by Rodolphe el-Khoury and Robert Levit Essays by Paulette Singley, Andrew Payne, Nader Tehrani, Preston Scott Cohen, and Zeynep Çelik Alexander Rodolphe el-Khoury and Robert Levit’s work take up the vexing problem of monuments and collective form. What is the form of the contemporary collective? Within and through the monuments and environments of collective life, can we be free together and how can be make real the forms of collective life? The work recognizes the pleasure in the binding form of the total figure and sees in this figure the impress of institutional life. But, the press of individuals, the unruly thriving of difference, also unsettles the forms of the work: counter forms inhabit and disrupt the monumental shape of their public buildings and spaces. • Responsive media register the input and actions of individuals and produce sensuous events within and upon the body of their buildings. Conventions are recast through new parametric capacities in the production of architectural form, while current developments in interactive media refashion perceptions of the fixity of the built environment. The work documented in this book reflects, at a variety of scales, the tense relationship between community and individual. It inscribes this tension, between the one and the many, into the body of architecture and the city. In addition to el-Khoury and Levit’s own theoretical treatment of their work, contributions by Nader Tehrani and Scott Cohen, along with a number of other authors will assess the work in the context of contemporary and historical concerns of architecture. Rodolphe el-Khoury and Robert Levit are partners in the design firm Khou- ry Levit Fong. This book is a document of their architecture and urban design work in this firm, and an account of the theoretical concerns that drive it. Rodolphe el-Khoury is Dean of the Miami University School of Architecture. He was Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto, Head of Architecture at California College of the Arts, and associate professor at Harvard Graduate School of Design. El-Khoury was trained as a historian and an architect; he conti- nues to divide his time between scholarship and practice with Khoury Levit Fong. His books on eighteenth-century European architecture include The Little House, an Architectural Seduction, and See Through Ledoux; Architecture, Theatre and the Pursuit of Transparency. Books on contemporary architecture and urbanism include Monolithic Architecture, Architecture in Fashion, and States of Architec- ture in the Twenty-first Century: New Directions from the Shanghai Expo. Robert Levit is director of the Master of Architecture program and associate professor of architecture at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Lands- cape, and Design, University of Toronto. He was also the director of the Master of Urban Design program at the University of Toronto, assistant professor at the University of Michigan, and has been a visiting professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. His design work has been recognized through numerous awards and competitions. His articles on architecture including “Or- nament: The Return of the Symbolic Repressed,” and “Design’s New Cate- chism,” have become staples of the current debates on architecture. Nader Tehrani is professor of architecture at MIT, where he served as the head of the department from 2010-2014. He is also Principal of NADAAA, a practice dedicated to the advancement of design innovation, interdisciplinary collabora- tion, and an intensive dialogue with the construction industry. Tehrani received a BFA and a BArch from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1985 and 1986 respectively. He continued his studies at the Architectural Association, where he attended the post-graduate program in History and Theory. Upon his return to the United States, Tehrani received a MAUD from the Harvard Graduate School of Design in 1991. Preston Scott Cohen is the former Chair of the Department of Architecture and the Gerald M. McCue Professor of Architecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design and is principal of Preston Scott Cohen, Inc. of Cambridge, MA. Projects recently completed include the Tel Aviv Museum of Art Amir Buil- ding, the Goldman Sachs Arcade in New York, the Datong City Library, and the Taiyuan Museum of Art. Presently, the firm is completing an addition to the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Mi- chigan. Cohen has received numerous awards and honors including induction as an academician at the National Academy of Art, an Annual Design Review Award, the Travel and Leisure Best Museum Award, five Progressive Architectu- re Awards, first prizes for seven international architectural competitions and an Academy Award in Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Zeynep Çelik Alexander is an architectural historian. Her work focuses on the history of modern architecture since the Enlightenment with an emphasis on German modernism. After being trained as an architect at Istanbul Technical Uni- versity and Harvard Graduate School of Design, she received her PhD from the History, Theory, and Criticism Program at MIT She has received research grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), a postdoctoral fellowship from Columbia University, and pre-doctoral fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art, Social Science Research Council (SSRC), Dedalus Foundation, DAAD, and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. 46 47184 185 296 297 82 83 SIBBESBORG ARChIPELAGO Sibbesborg, Finland City C Sibbisorg: Urban archipelago. This is an urban design for Sibbisborg, a community one hour by car to the east of helsinki. The mandate of the de- sign is to plan for Sibbisborg’s growth from a community of 3,000 to a city of 100,000 people. Our proposition, the Sibbesborg archipelago, is a network of neighborhoods, island-like in form, but bound together in a larger urban ensemble by shared networks of social and physical infrastructure. Set within the forested landscape, amidst agricul- tural fields, wetlands, and coastline, these urban islands are linked but distinct neighbourhoods that leave intact existing landscapes and permit, in the space between them, the constitution of a new ecological and recreational network that is as vital to the metropolitan form as the islands of the archipelago themselves. The islands are connected by roads, bike paths, parks, and the shared social and economic institutions of schools, commerce and shopping, and linked to the larger territory by regional transportation and new concentrations of employment and retail services. Between these islands continuous ecological networks of habitat, hydrology, and farmland are preserved, shaped, and stitched into a larger territorial ecology. New and re-purposed networks of biking, walking, and hiking paths turn the natural amenities of the Sibbesborg region into an attractive destination for recreation and tourism. Urban Islands, Landscape, and Ecological Sustainability: The urban islands of the Sibbisborg archipelago, positioned on high ground and nestled between working agricultural landscapes, and between sites of historical or natural interest, in their leapfrogging pattern permit large and continuous ecological corridors to be shaped. The movement of water through the region, the territory’s hydrology, is preserved. Continuity of habitat is preserved for animal life. Wetlands and designated sites of historical or natural interest, and working farmland are all left intact. The landscape component of this proposal focuses on the open systems of the site, and proposes a series of ecological and water management strategies and guidelines, starting from the large scale level of the whole site, and moving into the smaller scale of streetscapes. The approach is to balance the need for development, and the on-going socio- economic practices such as agricul- ture on the site, with the need for preserving the ecological integrity of the site. Bounded density and natural amenity: The archipelago of neighbourhoods in the new Sibbes- borg is made possible by concentrating the new buildings in moderately dense islands of de- velopment. Each island is comprised of a mixture of six story apartments that bound lower rise town houses and/or walk-up duplexes and sometimes give way to single-family groupings. Employment centres: While individual islands will provide smaller scale services, two town cen- tre developments will include provisions for larger scale buildings with commercial uses. This 154 15594 95 NATURA 2000 SITE NATURA 2000 SIPOO RIVER, DELTA, BAY & ESTU- ARIES BAY OF FINLAND NATURA 2000 SITE Primary Corridors Tertiary Corridors Primary Connections Secondary Connections developed over time Secondary Corridors develped over time after the primary corridors To Possible National Park Contributing Zones Collection Zones Conveyance Zones Ground Water Areas Watershed Boundaries Hydrological Zones Drainage Arrows 172 173178 179 Museum M The Museum of Underwater antiquities is to be housed within a building that is itself an artifact of great cultural significance: The Cereals Stock house Building. The underlying structure, the silos themselves provide the warp and the woof that orga- nizes the collection of underwater antiq- uities–bringing these antique artifacts into intimate contact with the archaeology of a more recent history—the now iconic re- mains of port of piraeus’s 20th century in- dustrial past in the form of the silos of The Cereals Stock house building. Excavation of Silos how to convert the small cellular nature of the grain silos into spaces adequate to the museum? taking a cue from the artistic inventions of Gordon Matta-Clark we have cut conic voids across the tightly packed chambers of the silos. These voids provide a rich means of dramatic movement through the museum. In each of the voids that have been cut escalators have been placed that pro- vide for a pattern of movement choreographing through the whole building the six specified exhi- bition themes, each of which occupies its own floor or, in the case of theme 5 and 6, share a floor. The excavation of the silos provides a number of advantages. Like the boulevards that cut through the diverse neighbourhoods of city binding them to the larger scale of the city as a whole, these excavated passages in the building permit the visitor to the museum to recognize the unity of an institution to be housed in what began as the non-communicating chambers of silos. Under the original conditions each silo remained utterly segregated each from the next. The excavation is a cross-cut, more violent than the methods of contemporary archaeological excavation, but related to the act of uncovering, digging in, as it were, into the literally stratified material of the historical record. here, the beauty of the internal organization of the silos is made visible to the museum vis- itor, both from within the museum and from without through the act of cutting or, to put it more thematically, through excavation. The cross-cut voids opening up the silos slicegreatglazedopeningsintotheouter wall of The Cereals Stock Building. They create fantastic views of the port from within the museum and, from without, reveal the complex internal spectacle of people. They expose to view the silo forms themselves and offer an X-ray of sorts into the building of the new Muse- um of Underwater antiquities. WARP ANd WOOF: ThE MUSEUM OF UNdERWATER ANTIQUITIES (2012) piraeus, Greece 21 Book Size: 9 x 11 in / 228 x 279 mm Box Size: 9.5 x 11.5 x 2 in / 241 x 292 x 50 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 304 Publication Date: October 2015 Language: English Photographs: 250 Rights: World Rights Available Editions: . Hardcover Price: US$ 55. Weight: 1.7 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12252-6-9 . Hardcover, limited edition in clamshell box Price: US$ 70. Weight: 2.3 kg. ISBN: 978-988-13975-9-1
  • 15. Foreword by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien Essay by Robert McCarter Introduction by Juhani Pallasmaa Epilogue by Brian MacKay-Lyons Edited by Oscar Riera Ojeda Dialogues in Space: Process and Ideas in the Work of Wendell Burnette Architects is the first multi-project monograph on this American architect’s selective body of work. The title alludes to the architect’s view that architecture is a constructed conversation between people, things, and time. Six singular projects from the architect’s oeuvre are presented in-depth through the architect’s own words, drawings, and photography. Also included is a comprehensive essay by the celebrated architectural writer/critic Robert McCarter entitled “Crafting Space: Composition and Cons- truction in the Architecture of Wendell Burnette” that examines the “thinking and making” process behind the built and un-built work across fifteen years of practice. The different typologies of the work explores authentic human experience through provocative spatial constructions – public and private in diverse locales – that attempt to promote an expansive dialogue with our places, our environment, our communities, ourselves, and our time. Through extensive research into the “art of building” – the specificity of place and locally appropriate construction systems, materials, craft, and their infinite capacity to transcend mere construction – the work strives toward an architecture that is at once functional and poetic. Wendell Burnette is a self-taught architect and principal of Wendell Burnette Architects, established in 1996 after a three-year period at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture and an eleven-year association with William Bruder. He has been an assistant professor at the School of Architecture and Landscape Ar- chitecture at Arizona State University since 2000. Wendell Burnette’s design phi- losophy is grounded in distilling the essence of a project to create highly specific architecture that is at once functional and poetic. Burnette has traveled widely in Asia, Europe, Africa, Central and North America where he has assimilated a personal perspective on the “art of place making.” The work of Wendell Burnette Architects has been presented in over 100 publications worldwide including The Burnette Studio/Residence, a single building monograph published by Rockport Press and the Phaidon Atlas of World Architecture in 2004 and 2008. Tod Williams and Billie Tsien have worked together for over thirty years. In 1986, they founded Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects on Central Park South in New York City. The firm is known for institutional work that pays careful attention to context, detail, and the subtleties of materials. Award winning projects include the Neurosciences Institute, the American Folk Art Museum, Cranbrook Natato- rium, the Phoenix Art Museum, Skirkanich Hall at the University of Pennsylvania, and the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. Current work in construction includes a new museum for the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, a performing and visual arts center at the University of Chicago, the Asia Society headquarters in Hong Kong, and two new skating rinks in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park. Robert McCarter is a practicing architect, author, and professor. He is the Ruth and Norman Moore Professor of Architecture at Washington Universi- ty in St. Louis (since 2007), and he has previously taught at the University of Florida and Columbia University, among others. His books include Frank Lloyd Wright, (1997), William Morgan (2002), Louis I. Kahn (2005), On and By Frank Lloyd Wright: A Primer of Architectural Principles (2005), and Frank Lloyd Wright: Critical Lives (2006), among a number of others. Books currently at press include Alvar Aalto (2012), Architecture as Experience (2012, with Juhani Pallasmaa), Wiel Arets at Work (2012), Atlas of 20th Century Architecture (2012, with Adrian Forty and Jean-Louis Cohen), Carlo Scarpa (2013), and Aldo van Eyck (2013). Brian MacKay-Lyons is a Canadian architect best known for his designs for houses on the coast of his native Nova Scotia and his use of Atlantic Canadian vernacular materials and construction techniques. Mackay-Lyons was born of part-Acadian heritage in Acadia, on the French Shore of southwest Nova Sco- tia, and was strongly influenced by the region’s maritime landscape, architectu- re, and functionalist design. He studied architecture at the Technical University of Nova Scotia (graduated in 1978) and received his Master’s in Architecture and Urban Design from the University of California, Los Angeles. He also stu- died and worked in China, Japan, and Siena, Italy. In 1983, MacKay-Lyons returned to Nova Scotia to work on vernacular designs and teach at Dalhousie University, where he holds a full professorship in architecture. Juhani Uolevi Pallasmaa (born September 14, 1936, Hämeenlinna, Finland) is a Finnish architect and former professor of architecture and dean at the Helsinki University of Technology. Among the many academic and civic positions he has held are those of director of the Museum of Finnish Architecture 1978-1983, and head of the Institute of Industrial Arts, Helsinki. He established his own architect’s office – Arkkitehtitoimisto Juhani Pallasmaa KY – in 1983 in Helsinki. From 2001 to 2003, he was Raymond E. Maritz Visiting Professor of Architecture at Wash- ington University in St. Louis, and in 2013 he received an honorary doctorate from that university. In 2010-2011, Pallasmaa served as Plym Distinguished Pro- fessor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and in 2012-2013 he was scholar in residence at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin. Pallasmaa has also lectured widely in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Dialogues in Space Wendell Burnette Architects 25 Book Size: 9 x 9 in / 228 x 228 mm Box Size: 9.5 x 9.5 x 2.5 in / 241 x 241 x 63 mm Format: Square Pages: 512 Publication Date: August 2015 Language: English Photographs: 325 Ilustrations: 50 Rights: World Rights Available Editions: . Hardcover Price: US$ 65. Weight: 2.2 kg. ISBN: 978-988-16194-3-3 . Hardcover in box Price: US$ 85. Weight: 4.9 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12250-2-3
  • 17. Authored by Alberto Campo Baeza Alberto Campo Baeza is an architect (Escuela de Arquitectura de Madrid). He wrote his doctoral thesis with Javier Carvajal and was a professor at the ETSAM for more than twenty years. He has taught at the ETH in Zurich, EPFL in Lau- sanne; the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia; the BAUHAUS in Weimar; Kansas State University and other institutions in Dublin, Naples, Virginia, and Co- penhagen. He spent a year as a research fellow at Columbia University in New York (2001). He has published two collections of writing: La idea construída and Pensar con las manos. He has also received many awards including the Torroja for his Caja Granada building, and The Buenos Aires Biennial 2009 for his Nursery for Benetton in Venice and his MA Museum in Granada. Recently, the American Academy of Arts and Letters nominated Alberto Campo Baeza for the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize of 2010. His work has been exhibited at the Crown Hall by Mies at Chicago’s IIT, the Palladio Basilica in Vicenza, the Urban Center in New York, the Saint Irene Church in Istanbul, and the MA Gallery of Toto in Tokyo. In 2010 his work was exhibited at the MAXXI Museum and in San Pietro in Montorio, both in Rome. He believes in Architecture as a BUILT IDEA, and that the principle components of Architecture are GRAVITY, which builds SPACE, and LIGHT, which builds TIME. The Built Idea Alberto Campo Baeza “Architects reveal the keys to Architecture in their drawings, their floor plans, sections and also in their writings. It is important to appreciate the concise texts of Mies Van der Rohe or the more passionate expressions of Le Corbusier. And that is how I would like these texts, published here today, to be understood.” Alberto Campo Baeza (born Valladolid, Spain, 1946) is one of the most important architects of the modern period. The Built Idea presents a series of seminal texts in which he conveys his most deeply- held architectural ideas and convictions, exploring and explaining his foundational influences and subjects such as the importance of light, the work of his contemporaries, and the future of architecture, as well as accounts of his own work and personal anecdotes from a rich and successful life in architecture. “To use words that express one’s intentions clearly is not just a convenience for architects. One wants to let people know the meaning behind the things that are being made. My aim in publishing these texts is precisely that.” This book also includes a photographic documentation of Campo Baeza’s greatest works along with architectural sketches, plans, and mo- dels to provide a privileged insight into one of the greatest architectural minds working today. “And the reasoning on which one bases one’s work in their attempt at Architecture is what is going to be reflected here in these texts, some of it consciously, some unconsciously. Realizing the ideas expressed in these words in built works is of course the best proof that the ideas are valid and the words true.” 29 Book Size: 6.5 x 8.5 in / 165 x 215 mm Box Size: 6.75 x 8.75 x 1.3 in / 171 x 222 x 33 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 104 Publication Date: July 2015 Photographs: 16 Ilustrations: 5 Rights: World Rights Available Editions: . English Language, softcover with 3/4 flaps Price: US$ 15. Weight: 0.3 kg. ISBN: 978-988-15125-3-6 . Chinese Language, softcover with 3/4 flaps Price: US$ 15. Weight: 0.3 kg. ISBN: 978-988-13975-2-2 . English Language, hardcover in clamshell box Price: US$ 25. Weight: 1.0 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12251-2-2
  • 19. City Works 8 Student Work 2013-2014 The City College of New York Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Foreword by George Ranalli Edited by Nandini Bagchee Design/Production Coordinators: Salvatore Cosenza and Sarah Holtzer City Works 8 is the eighth book in an annual series that documents the work produced by the students of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York. This collection of projects in the interrelated disciplines of architecture, urban design, and landscape architecture brings together the prescient questions of environmental and social sustainability. The unique position of being a publically funded school in a diverse and didactic city provides fertile ground for exploration of the past and the future. Collaborating with educators and professionals locally and internationally allows for a perspective that is creative but grounded in solving everyday problems with precision and ingenuity. The generous studio and gallery spaces within the Spitzer School of Architecture are conducive of many large- scale installations and engaging exhibits. Student-run journals, rooftop screenings and discussions complement the lecture series spon- sored by the school. This book brings together the models, drawings, research, and spirited actions of a group of designers and thinkers positioned to make significant contributions to the built environment. A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers Nandini Bagchee, founded this practice in 2005. She is licensed to practice architecture in New York State. Prior to starting her own firm, Nandini worked with architectural firms in New York and with the international practice of Herzog and De Meuron on the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis. Her architectural work has been exhibited in galleries such as the Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York. In 2009, she received grants from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council to coordinate an architectural competition for the project, “Peace Pen- tagon: A Call to Action.” This project, intended to garner community support was presented to a public audience in the form of an exhibition in four different venues in April 2010. Nandini Bagchee is a full-time assistant professor at the Spitzer School of Architecture in New York. She coordinates and teaches un- dergraduate design studios and seminars on urbanism in the Middle East and Asia. She has presented her work and lectured at the Bauhaus University in Weimar and the BNCC Architecture College in Pune. Nandini Bagchee holds a Bachelors degree from the Cooper Union and a Masters degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. George Ranalli has been Dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Ar- chitecture at City College since 1999. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the Pratt Institute (1972) and Master of Architecture from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University (1974). He was Professor of Architecture at Yale University (1976-1999), and the William Henry Bishop Chaired Professor in Architectural Design (1988-1989). He recently completed his fourth monogra- ph, Saratoga, devoted to his Saratoga Avenue Community Center for the New York City Housing Authority. His architectural and design work has been exhibi- ted in the US and Europe and published internationally in numerous journals. 33 Edition: Softcover with 3/4 flaps Book Size: 8 x 10 in / 203 x 255 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 248 Publication Date: June 2015 Language: English Photographs: 265 Ilustrations: 515 Weight: 1.1 kg Rights: World Rights Available Price: US$ 30 ISBN: 978-988-13975-8-4
  • 21. Clear Light The Architecture of Lauretta Vinciarelli “Although much of my work is architectural in character, I do not represent real spaces. Rather, my work has its origins in the spaces I have abandoned – the mood of Rome and the landscape of Texas – and the paintings are of spaces I know that look nothing like what I paint … They are essentially meditations on essences of architecture like enclosure, surface and light.” • Born in Italy in 1943, Lauretta Vinciarelli passed away in New York in 2011. Trained as an architect in Rome but a watercolorist by vocation, her works reside in numerous private col- lections and among the holdings of prominent institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery in Wash- ington DC, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Noted for their luminous qualities of color and light, her depictions of imagined spaces open up a world of enclosed rooms, sweeping landscapes, watery materiality, and atmospheric ephemerality. Describing her work, a noted theorist and critic once said, “They are not architecture exactly, but evidence that it exists.” This book brings together paintings from 1981 onwards in the most complete collection of Vinciarelli’s work to date. It also includes texts from knowledgeable commentators and for the first time presents sketch materials that provide insight into Vinciarelli’s working methodology. Vinciarelli’s technique often operated at the very limits of her medium; sometimes even to the point of failure. In these paintings, color is used as a device for shaping space, with watercolor the chosen medium for its rich portrayal of light and the conceptual simplicity of the act of mixing paste with water. A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers Lauretta Vinciarelli was an architect and artist who has artwork and drawings in the permanent collections of the National Gallery in Washington, DC; the Mu- seum of Modern Art in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Archive of the Biennale of Venice, and the Italian Archive of Drawings, as well as in private collections. She exhibited in the 2002 Whitney Biennial and was represented by Henry Urbach Architecture in New York. Until 2000 she also taught at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. Peter Rowe is Raymond Garbe Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at the Graduate School of Design and a Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor. He served as Dean of the Faculty of Design from 1992 to 2004. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 1985 he was Director of the School of Architecture at Rice University in Houston, Texas also serving as Vice President of Rice Center and Environmental Program Director of the Southwest Center for Urban Research. The author of many articles on ar- chitecture, urban design, and planning, Rowe is also the author, co-author, or editor of numerous books, most recently including: Building Barcelona: A Second Renaixenca, 2006, Emerging Architectural Territories in East Asian Cities, and Urban Intensities: Contemporary Housing Types and Territories, 2014. He was Lauretta Vinciarelli’s husband from 1993. George Ranalli has been Dean of the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Ar- chitecture at City College since 1999. He received his Bachelor of Architecture from the Pratt Institute (1972) and Master of Architecture from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University (1974). He was Professor of Architecture at Yale University (1976-1999), and the William Henry Bishop Chaired Professor in Architectural Design (1988-1989). He recently completed his fourth monogra- ph, Saratoga, devoted to his Saratoga Avenue Community Center for the New York City Housing Authority. His architectural and design work has been exhibi- ted in the US and Europe and published internationally in numerous journals. Michael Sorkin received his architectural training at Harvard and MIT and holds degrees from the University of Chicago and Columbia. He is the princi- pal of the Michael Sorkin Studio in New York City. He is founding president of Terreform, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and urban interven- tion. He is president of the Institute for Urban Design; Distinguished Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Graduate Urban Design Program at The City College of New York (where he has taught since 2000), Professor of Urbanism and Director of the Institute of Urbanism at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna (1993 to 2000), and he has been a professor at numerous schools of architecture. He lectures around the world, is the author of several hundred articles, and is currently a contributing editor at Architectural Record. 213212 1996 Spatial reverb 1996 Neon light 233232 6968 red room (3 of 3) 1990 Windsor and Newton watercolor on paper Paper size: 30 x 22 1/2 in Image size: 27 x 14 1/2 in Private Collection red room (2 of 3) 1990 Windsor and Newton watercolor on paper Paper size: 30 x 22 1/2 in Image size: 27 x 14 1/2 in Private Collection 8988 Per ilaria V 1993 Windsor and Newton watercolor on paper 22 x 30 in Private Collectio 54 76 Introduction by George Ranalli Essays by Peter Rowe, Camille Farey, Michael Sorkin, and Ida Panicell 37 Edition: Hardcover in clamshell box Book Size: 8.46 x 11 in / 215 x 280 mm Box Size: 8.85 x 11.4 x 1.37 in / 225 x 290 x 35 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 296 Publication Date: May 2015 Language: English Photographs: 6 Ilustrations: 260 Weight: 2.6 kg Rights: World Rights Available Price: US$ 65 ISBN: 978-988-16195-9-4
  • 23. Figures Essays on Contemporary Architecture Authored by Rodolphe el-Khoury Introduction by George Baird The essays consider the contemporary architectural scene from a variety of perspectives in theory and practice. They include seminal pieces that framed important debates in the field, such as the introduction to the exhibition catalogue Monolithic Architecture, as well as observations on buildings and practices from around the world, from Santiago, to Beirut and Beijing. Together, the polemical provocations and interpreti- ve insights construct a critical panorama of a global architectural landscape in rapid transformation since the 1990s. • The book is divided into there parts. “Polemics” addresses broad issues and trends with essays that claim a position in current debates. “Agents” examines the oeuvres of particular architects, with pieces that situate their work in relation to such debates. “Artifacts” takes on single buildings, instances where ideas are sedimented into form to situate current architectural discussions in concrete objects. Rodolphe el-Khoury is Dean of the Miami University School of Architecture. He was Canada Research Chair at the University of Toronto, Head of Architecture at California College of the Arts, and associate professor at Harvard Graduate School of Design. El-Khoury was trained as a historian and an architect; he conti- nues to divide his time between scholarship and practice with Khoury Levit Fong. His books on eighteenth-century European architecture include The Little House, an Architectural Seduction, and See Through Ledoux; Architecture, Theatre and the Pursuit of Transparency. Books on contemporary architecture and urbanism include Monolithic Architecture, Architecture in Fashion, and States of Architec- ture in the Twenty-first Century: New Directions from the Shanghai Expo. George Baird was born and grew up in Toronto. After graduating from the Uni- versity of Toronto in 1962, he worked for two years for Toronto architect Jerome Markson. In 1964, he commenced graduate studies in architecture at University College, in London, England, and went on to teach architectural theory and design at the Royal College of Art, and the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London, returning to Toronto in 1967. In 1968 he founded his architectural practice, and joined the faculty of architecture at the University of Toronto. He has been active in architecture, urban design, and heritage pre- servation in Toronto, across Canada, and abroad since that time. A principal author of the pioneering 1974 urban design study “On building downtown,” he acted also as a key advisor to Toronto’s St. Lawrence Neighbourhood site planning team, strongly recommending both the extension of the street grid of the original city, and the creation of what is now known as Esplanade Park. In 1992, Baird was the winner of the Toronto Arts Foundation’s Architecture and Design Award, and in 1999, he was invited to deliver the annual Kilbourn Lecture for Heritage Toronto. In 2001, he received the order of Da Vinci Medal from the Ontario Association of Architects. He received the RAIC Gold Medal in 2010 and the Topaz Medal for excellence in architectural education in 2012. He is the author/editor of numerous books, including Meaning in Architecture (with Charles Jencks, 1968), Alvar Aalto, (1969), The Space of Appearance, (1995), Queues, Rendezvous, Riots (with Mark Lewis, 1995). In 1993, he joined the faculty of the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University, where he was the G. Ware Travelstead Professor of Architecture, and Director of the MArch I and MArch II Programs. From 2005 to 2009 George was Dean of the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto. 8180 “FOR JOHNSON,ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICATION CONSISTS IN SHAPING INTELLIGIBLE AND MEMORABLE FIGURES FROM THE BUILDING’S FUNCTIONAL AND CONSTRUCTIONAL LOGIC” 2120 BIOMIMICRY What is the “life” in “Better City/ Better Life”? The historian and theorist of scientific culture, Eugene Thacker has described the Western concep- tion of life as developing in three major episodes corresponding to three distinct models: life as soul (Aristotle), life as meat (Descartes), life as pattern (the cybernetic conception of life as organized information). The idea of life arising from the cybernetic homology between living systems and information systems has had a strong hold on the contemporary ar- chitectural imagination for several decades (in no small part owing to the ubiquity of computer aided design). This cybernetic conception of life has powerfully influenced the contem- porary conception of the building as an animate or quasi-animate entity. Since the early nineties, that conception can be said to have advanced in three stages: the first stage (represented by the work of architects like Bernard Cache and Greg Lynn) imagined the building form as the em- pirical trace of a process of virtual morphogenesis. The second stage, represented by architects like MY STUDIO/Howeler+Yoon, Khoury Levit Fong, and Mark Goulthorpe, exploited the potentials of embedded tech- nologies to re-conceive the built work as artificial sensorium. At the third stage, largely enabled by digital parametric modeling, the building is conceived, in conformity with Thacker’s third paradigm (life=pattern), as the aggregate produced by the patterning of micrological elements. These stages are less consecutive than cumulative, since strong residues of the earlier stages can be observed in even the most daring and radical examples of the later ones. In the Shanghai Expo, vestiges of all three are apparent, although it is perhaps the fascination with the patterns produced by the dense but carefully regulated distribution of a micro-el- ement across a surface or field that produces the most novel and ingenu- ous expressions of this vitalism. It is here, also, that these vitalist preoc- cupations begin to encroach on our second theme, surface. The treatment of both the interior and exterior surfaces of the U.K. Pa- vilion are exemplary in this regard. The Seed Cathedral, situated at the centre of a deftly terraced landscape, consists of a steel and timber com- posite structure pierced by 60,000 fibre optic filaments, 20 mm square in section, which are encased in aluminum sleeves. By day, the filaments - STATES OF ARCHITECTURE: SIX PAVILIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI 6766 168 169steelbandprojects Implantés sur parc d’activités tertiaire, les deux bâtiments Steel Band qui en assurent la composition, sont inscrits entre la cité qui s’étend et les terres agricoles. Implantés sur parc d’activités tertiaire, les deux bâtiments Steel Band qui en assurent la composition. Implantés sur parc d’activités tertiaire, les deux bâtiments Steel Band qui en assurent la composition. 1 - RALPH JOHNSON’S PERFORMATIVE ICONS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN RALPH JOHNSON OF PERKINS + WILL; RECENT WORK, OSCAR RIERA OJEDA PUBLISHERS, 2012 7372- RALPH JOHNSON’S PERFORMATIVE ICONS Johnson builds the civic character of the courthouse by figu- ratively capturing and monumentalizing its environmental logic. Herein lies his main contribution to the current dis- cussions around sustainable design: in the capacity to tease outasymbolicresonancefromenvironmentalperformance. Take, as another example, the Al Shark Tower project. The environmental agenda is here stated more explicitly with the literal greening of the building. A strategy for a sustainable rapport with Dubai’s desert climate here fa- vors a permeable building envelope with passive cooling and ventilation capabilities. The design strategy which includes a layer of living plant material as part of a breath- ing skin generates a unique building form with a continu- ous spiraling garden carved into the mass of the high-rise structure. A process designed for efficiently regulating environmental recourses is pushed beyond its performa- tive logic to yield a cultural surplus. Sustainability shapes the building into an intelligible icon. ABOVE. Provide Caption. ABOVE. Provide Caption. RIGHT. Los Angeles United States Courthouse: Diagram of Constituent Parts. NEXT PAGE. Los Angeles United States Courthouse: Diagram of Constituent Parts. 73 9594 modernist phobias about symbolic form, he could always counter that his forms were derived from the more acceptable circumstances of plan form. Today, roof and profile are back, but often enough through the exercise of a willful arbitrariness. The refashioning in consciousness of symbol as logo lends a patina of contemporaneity to formerly censured forms of iconicity. By borrowing from the world of logos and branding architects also accept, even delight in the pleasures, and finally, in the limits of the arbitrary form (Big, Plot, OMA). Authorial expressionism, such as that of Frank Gehry, presents a corollary phenomenon to the arbitrary logo-like profiles of shape architecture. Artistic expression, arbitrary in its own fashion, shares with logo what for modernist ethics is a freedom from conventional symbolic forms and from historical idioms of architecture. The interest that logo architecture and expressionist practices take in the return of the roof profile is something that we share. However, we are also invested in the roof as a habitable realm, a condition that played so central a role in Le Corbusier's "five points." And even more pointedly we are committed to the relationship between roof and climactic setting that withdrew in favor of a disavowed conformity to stylistic orthodoxy. In Liwan Bayrut we have made a building figure in which a very plastic roof form is created. This form possesses the iconicity of the logo, yet it is not arbitrary. It is a theater, a roman bowl, structural in character (a tensile net) and energy efficient in its geometry and orientation. It is an intense social form whose shape is the shape of the roof. Its archaic familiarity and its technical modernity combine with its provision for a real social invention germane to a contemporary institution. Likewise in the Phoenix sun -shading infrastructure and in Beirut's Mar- tyrs' Square we have sought to combine technical innovation with icono- graphic intent. And, we eschew what we consider an erroneous distinc- tion between socially and environmentally performative architectural form and symbolic form, which means that we consider these works to be equally committed to an environmentally responsible shaping of so- cial experience as they are to providing symbolic forms of the social world they hope to make. In aligning these goals our work escapes from the col- lapse of practice into the immaterial discursive forms of the logo and of technique into a self-unaware and thus benighted form of technicality. - SMART FIGURE / SENSIBLE GROUND: ANDREW BROMBERG ABOVE. Provide Caption - SMART FIGURE / SENSIBLE GROUND: ANDREW BROMBERG FOREWORD GEORGE BAID - STATES OF ARCHITECTURE: SIX PAVILIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI WORLD EXPO* EXCERPTED FROM STATES OF ARCHITECTURE IN THE TWENTY- FIRST CENTURY: NEW DIRECTIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI WORLD EXPO, OSCAR RIERA OJEDA PUBLISHERS, 2011. * WRITTEN IN COLLABORATION WITH ANDY PAYNE. 3736 6160 139on the crestprojects138 1—REstAuRAnt 2—KItchEn 3—FOOd dIVIsIOn 4—mEAt WORKROOm 5—PAstRy dIVIsIOn 6—BAKERy dIVIsIOn 139on the crestprojects138 1—REstAuRAnt 2—KItchEn 3—FOOd dIVIsIOn 4—mEAt WORKROOm 5—PAstRy dIVIsIOn 6—BAKERy dIVIsIOn ABOVE. Provide Caption RIGHT. Provide Caption floating, un-rooted above the landscape, they are abstract artifacts that embody a regional mentalité, more so than an architectural tradition. Something about them is unmistakably Breton, but that same je ne sais quoi—shall we say the unsentimental indexicality—is what also binds them, paradoxically, to the universal project of modernity. The regional character of Atelier Arcau is not a cultivated aesthetic: it is neither an affirmation of a cultural heritage, nor a deliberate resistance to its erosion by global currents. Atelier Arcau’s architecture is of a particu- lar place, because buildings such as Steel Band, Architectural Digest , and RailwaySentinel,arebluntandunmediated—anti-aesthetic—expressions of the sites, situations, and material resources that shape them in Vannes, Ploufragan, and Nantes. 5756 “DESIGN IS HERE ENABLING A BOLD CONCEPTUAL AND MATERIAL CLARITY INSTEAD OF PACKAGING A POLISHED PRODUCT” 4342- STATES OF ARCHITECTURE: SIX PAVILIONS FROM THE SHANGHAI BSA is partnered with Knippers Helbig Advanced Engineering Stuttgart for the innovative design and engineering. Together they continue a German traditionoflightweightconstructionthatdevelopedwithFreiOtto’sground- breakingworks.MuchliketheGermanPavilionattheWorldExposition1967 in Montreal and the Munich Olympic stadium—formative precedents that defined the genre—the Expo Axis how advanced computation and material research align to produce structures of increasing elegance and efficiency. CORPORATE PAVILION A dense infrastructural matrix envelops a collection of irregularly shaped spaces, unifying divers programs and volumes into a rectangular block. This is a recurrent compositional strategy at the Expo and a compelling model for urban buildings in general. It is a way to transition form in- creasingly complex programs and interior configurations to a consoli- dated mass and iconic presence on the street. The building pays homage to the groundbreaking Centre George Pompi- douof1976withitsexposedinfrastructureandductwork.Inlieuofmassive structural members and conduits the Corporate Pavilion presents a filigree ofinfrastructure.WhiletheCentreGeorgesPompidouflauntedtechnology in the form of colossal machinery this pavilion appeals to a different tech- nological paradigm: information technology and miniaturization. The building is enveloped in a mist of technology: a cloud-like distribution of miniaturized structure, electronics and digital bits. This steel and sili- con filigree features arrays of sensors and actuators that enable the build- ing envelope to respond to ambient conditions and accordingly enhance its environmental performance. Embedded misters for instance produce an actual cloud of cooling vapor that regulates the ambient temperature. This climate-control device responsively boosts the environmental performance of the building while visually enhancing the foamy character of the façade. Embedded LEDs transform the building into an active digital display con- trolled by computers that alter the appearance of the building in a variety of automated or programmed ways, further underscoring the shit from the iconography of the machine to the atmospherics of the information age. RIGHT. Provide Caption 41 Edition: Hardcover in slipcase Book Size: 6.5 x 8.5 in / 165 x 215 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 400 Publication Date: May 2015 Language: English Photographs: 215 Ilustrations: 115 Weight: 1.6 kg Rights: World Rights Available Price: US$ 35 ISBN: 978-988-12249-5-8
  • 25. City for City City College Architectural Center 1995-2015 Achva Benzinberg Stein, FASLA, is a professor and practicing professional who has taught and worked in the US, Europe, Israel, India, and China. Her projects with neighborhood groups, public agencies, and non-profit organiza- tions concentrate on meeting social needs while seeking to heal the damage of poorly managed urban development. Her landscape designs, which have won numerous awards from the American Society of Landscape Architects include designs for school grounds, large-scale housing projects, parks, pla- ygrounds, hotels, community gardens, and private residences. She has won many awards, including the 1994 Chrysler Award for Innovation in Design, and has twice been the recipient of Fulbright grants. Lance Jay Brown was educated at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and holds two Masters degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He is an ACSA Distinguished Professor at he Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York and a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and the Institute for Urban Design. He was 2005 Chair of the AIA National Regional and Urban Design Committee. From 1979 to 1983 he served as Design Excellence Director of the Design Arts Program of the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington. In 2007 he was awarded the highest honor given for an architectural educator in the United States, the AIA/ ACSA Topaz Medallion. He was the Professional Advisor of the NHNY Ideas Competition and founding member of the New Housing New York Steering Committee. His recently co-authored book, Urban Design For An Urban Cen- tury, was released in 2009. City for City presents examples of the work of The City College Architectural Center over the past fifteen years. The projects selected are grouped under the categories of exhibitions, visioning exercises, planning and urban design studies, and also include a few examples of assignments for implementation. The work was developed at the request of the affected communities and undertaken with their full partici- pation. The projects were financed in various ways, from pro-bono studies to grant-supported efforts. These grants and the special support from state and municipal entities enable the center to develop the projects in greater depth. City for City illustrates the value of cooperative community-based work in which both sides learn and share in the experience. Such interactions offer valuable insights for both students and faculty not normally found in traditional architectural practices. A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers NORTHERN MANHATTAN HERITAGE PLAN DATE OF PROJECT: 2002 - 2004 PARTNERS: Project Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The CCAC conducted a study of strategic planning and urban design opportunities around heritage-based themes in Northern Manhattan, primarily in the neighborhoods of Manhattanville, West Harlem / Hamilton Heights, Washington Heights, and Inwood, with the goal of finding ways to engage the Northern Manhattan community’s history and heritage as a basis for strategizing about its future. The intention of the study was to: - Foster discussion around a range of challenging issues that inevitably emerge from a community defining its history and contemporary identity. - Produce a final report for broad public distribution that would document research and findings and suggestions for coherent themes and area boundaries. - Recommend next steps for design, preservation, and educational programs and for identifying and attracting needed resources. Some particular objectives of the study and overall heritage plan included: - Identifying historical and cultural themes and subjects that link places, events, activities, and people as part of the visible and past fabric of Northern Manhattan’s varied communities. - Identifying public places where design, quality, and amenities can be enhanced and improved. - Suggesting strategies to improve selected public places and areas in order to strengthen the present-day experience of place and heritage. CHAPTER 03 Previous page. Gun Hill Road model This page. Gun Hill Road model P. 197P. 196 URBAN DESIGN STUDIESURBAN DESIGN STUDIES ROCKAWAY BEACH BRANCH GREENWAY DATE OF PROJECT: 2008 - 2009 PARTNERS: Rockaway Beach Branch Greenway Committee. The Rockaway Beach Branch Greenway Committee asked the CCAC to map and document their Rails to Trails project, consisting of a portion of the disused Long Island Railroad line running from Rego Park to Ozone Park in Queens. The CCAC created a preliminary design for the greenway and prepared an informational brochure addressed to the community surrounding the trail to help start the funding campaign for the development phase of the project. The Rockaway Beach Branch railway was built in 1880. It connected New York City residents to the Ocean Beaches of the Rockaway Peninsula, providing urban dwellers with access to the sea and its recreational opportunities. The right-of-way was abandoned by the Long Island Railroad in 1962. The train tracks and the adjacent land have become derelict open space. This vacant, forgotten land can be turned into a linear urban oasis. CHAPTER 01 AMSTERDAM AVENUE MODEL P. 91P. 90 EXHIBIT EXHIBIT Text and Introduction by Achva Benzinberg Stein Preface by Lance Jay Brown 45 Edition: Hardcover with 3/4 flaps in clamshell box Book Size: 8 x 10 in / 203 x 254 mm Box Size: 8.25 x 10.25 x 1.5 in / 209 x 260 x 38 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 240 Publication Date: May 2015 Language: English Photographs: 200 Ilustrations: 140 Weight: 1.7 kg Rights: World Rights Available Price: US$ 35 ISBN: 978-988-16194-1-9
  • 27. Surfaced The Formation of Twisted Structures The Work of SYSTEMarchitects Essays by Chee Pearlman, Carolina Miranda, and Paul Chatterton Contributions by writer, editor, and curator Chee Pearlman, arts journalist Carolina Miranda, architectural critic Vladimir Belogolovsky, and architectural historian Elisabetta Terragni Architectural structures create the environment in which they are situated, while at the same time describing that environment. Complex forms, such as the twist, offer the architect a tool to shape an environment with a visible smoothness that disguises the space’s complexity and precision. But twisted structures present a double-challenge for architects and builders. To create such structures, it is necessary not only to design them, but to design the method of constructing them. For some geometries, it is enough to take a conventional building method, or an already extant tool and modify it slightly. But more often than not, completely new tools and methods need to be figured out. This process of re-engineering, rethinking, and reimagining leads to an increasing and progressively more intimate awareness of material, texture, and detail. • This book charts the journey of SYSTEMarchitects from the folded geometries of the seminal BURST house exhibited at MOMA’s renowned 2008 show to the curves, tucks and twisted spaces that followed. It records five years of experimentation with pre-fabricated and iterative te- chniques, low cost materials, and algorithmic design all in service of projects made for everyday use. It examines the role of parametric design in the domestic sphere, and It explores twisted volumes, from large scale structures to the very surface of the twist itself, offering a whole new animated direction for architecture. A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers 220 221Pied-á-Terrematerial+depth 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software1 2 38 39Burst*003form+use 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology pervasive 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 6 2 11 40 41Burst*003form+use 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology pervasive 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 3 we were using at the time. As the software and our facility with the software progressed 4 so did the experimentation with materials.1 1 4 3 2 perforation+pattern aA SHELTER140 141 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 1 2 cMcF156 157perforation+pattern 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 3 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 4 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 5 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 1 2 3 4 5 10 11 acknowledgements. This book looks particularly at the design activities of SYSTEM over the past six years, none of which would have been possible without the 12 years that came before. We have limited the projects of those years to BURST*003 and 008, Wellfleet, and fulcrumSTAIR in an attempt to contextualize the ideas that influence the current activities. This book would not have been possible without the support and counsel of the dean of architecture of the great City College of New York, George Ranalli, who gave me the idea for the book, the space to write it and the belief that I could pull it off. Making the book took enormous effort for many. It would not have happened without the guidance, wordsmith skills and countless hours of my wife, Belinda Luscombe. Not only did she agree to upend our family schedule but she organized the space we needed to think clearly about the book. I must thank our children Spike and Ginger for their patience while our minds were elsewhere. Jamie Edindjiklian, Alanna Lauter, Florian Gjoka, Nick Napoli and Robert Baker from SYSTEM’s office were invaluable and I’m profoundly grateful to them. I thank the interviewers who engaged with the work during their busy schedules, Vladimir Belogolovsky for the idea, the journalists Chee Pearlman and Carolina Miranda, and the environmental activist Paul Chatterton. The work at SYSTEM is always a labor of love and devotion and the hours people have put in reflect that. Douglas Gauthier and I worked side by side for many hard but fun years. Henry Grosman devoted years of his life to the making of the BURST* projects, and Chris Knapp, Sarkis Areklyavan, Barry Bergdoll, Peter Christensen, Cristobal Correa, Katherine Keltner and John Fuller gave us such important support. I remain deeply indebted to Stacey Greenwald and Martin Cook, true friends who have helped us out at key moments. Robert Baker (again), Charles Kwan and Jesse Lee Wilson have given their time, energy and talent in a way that is humbling and inspiring. My colleague at the Mercer Street studio, Maggie Mahboubian told me early on in the practice to find great makers and design for them. The great makers we have found and continue to design for include Sue Wantz at Paul C. Steck, Armando Saca at Millennium Steel, Corey Akers at Precision Metals, Laserfab, Perry Randazzo, and Art Kozyr, Bill Young, Robert Bridges at eFab Local, and the guys on site with the awe-inspiring hands Tommy Kozlowski and Richard Wilson. Supportive clients are the lifeblood of any architecture practice, most crucially because they engage with the thinking of the projects and improve them. Without the faith and loyalty of clients, all buildings are just dreams. I am honored to have worked with Andrew Katay and Catriona Grant, Douglas and Michelle Monticello, Caroline McFadden, Jeff and Susan Rubenstein, Michel Gainet, Dalton Conley, Milind Sojwal and All Angels Church, Michelle deMilly and Andy Breslau, Ross Whelan and Mark Cooper. They have each taught me so much. Jeremy Edmiston SYSTEMarchitects 238 239 lattice 3N176 177perforation+pattern cMcF154 155perforation+pattern The lobby of a penthouse apartment in a new high-rise residential building in New York City presented an interesting challenge. The space had a utility and it met all the many regula- tions of the building co-operative board, but it needed character. We were only permitted to use paint, so we decided to work with qualities of paint that enhance surface. The pattern we devised envelops the floor, walls and ceiling in a pattern of matte, low sheen, and high gloss finishes. The new surface is immediately transformative but the subtleties of the articulation almost defy documentation. Photographer Albet Velska painstakingly adjusted the lighting to pick up the surface changes and compiled an image of over 20 different images to reveal the interactions between the light and paint. The pattern continued on the terraces as outdoor furniture, where the surface becomes per- forated and articulates the uses of the space. 3.2 cMcF 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 1 2 perforation+pattern3 182 183UNhistorictownHOUSEmaterial+depth The Landmark Preservation Commission (LPC) was established in New York to preserve historic buildings after the McKim, Mead and White-designed Penn Station was pulled down. The Commission has jurisdiction over the site of a townhouse that SYSTEM was commissio- ned to renovate and enlarge in 2010. An odd leftover, the lot is only 25-ft. deep and has buil- dings on three sides, but has almost 40 feet of street frontage. The current house does not meet the basic standards of cross ventilation, light and open green space that are required for residential habitation, yet is in a very desirable Manhattan neighborhood. Tribeca was originally built for manufacturing, trade and warehousing when that part of the Hudson River was a thriving shipping port. The 10-story building across the narrow street is now used for offices and movie production. Our site had little or no privacy or sense of domesticity, parti- cularly as the building is only one room deep. The argument we made successfully to the LPC was that our building was to be made from materials characteristic of the historic neighborhood—brick, steel, glass, and cast iron—but used in a revolutionary fashion. The windows are carefully angled to increase the views up and down the street while decrea- sing the view into the house from the commercial building across the way. This has the effect of turning the brick façade into a continuous twisting surface as the angled windows nego- tiate with the street. The bricks become like drapery, corbelling from their cast iron base up to the overhanging cornice. After construction experiments with robotic bricklayers and backup walls made of plywood or honeycombed plastic, we decided to build with brick hand-laid onsite against a permanent foam template that is CNC cut to form every brick course and position every brick. The foam insulates, helps with the waterproofing and prevents damage from condensation between the walls. The interior of the façade is also brick, creating a four wythe wall where one of the interior wythes is foam. This makes the wall highly insulating and eliminates street noise. Balconies extend beyond the façade and provide small outdoor spaces nestled in and jutting out from the brick wall. They’re conceived as a second fabric swelling out from the brick surface, extending the habitable space through the wall, their balustrades screening the interior even further. In the interior, the twisting geometry of the façade imparts an intimate domestic scale to the interior spaces. The curves and kinks create alcoves, cubbies and nooks that can be perso- nalized. One might be a window seat, another a place for a plant, another a spot to talk on the phone or look out the window. Thus an otherwise commercial and impersonal environment can be made more intimate and domestic without the necessity of drawn shades. 4.1 UNhistorictownHOUSE With Robert Baker 1 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 2 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 3 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 4 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 5 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 6 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 7 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 8 in the building industry, and the rudimentary software 9 This was largely a response to the flat sheet technology 1 4 5 8 9 7 32 6 Chee Pearlman, former editor-in-chief of I.D. Magazine, is the director of Chee Company, a New York-based editorial and design consultancy. She is also curator of the Curry Stone Design Prize, an annual $100,000 grant that recog- nizes innovative designers creating social impact solutions. A journalist, confe- rence director, and curator for more than twenty years, she has contributed to The New York Times, Newsweek, Travel + Leisure, Wired, Popular Science, and Architects Newspaper. Chee has been the program director of the Art Center College of Design Conference for six years and has co-edited several books including Spectacle by David Rockwell and Bruce Mau, Made You Look, by Stefan Sagmeister, and Perverse Optimist by Tibor Kalman. She founded and co-chaired the Chrysler Design Award for its ten-year duration, and curated the groundbreaking “Voting Booth Project” exhibition at The New School. She has served on innumerable juries, is an advisor to the TED conference and a board member of the Art Directors Club. Chee is a 2011 Harvard Loeb Fellow and is currently developing a conference in and about Detroit entitled “Urban Craft: Solutions from the Edge.” Carolina A. Miranda is freelance magazine writer and radio reporter who has produced stories on culture and travel for Time, ARTnews, Art in America, Fast Company, NPR’s All Things Considered, and PRI’s Studio 360. She has also served as a contributing art critic and reporter for New York Public Radio, appearing regularly on affiliate stations WNYC and WQXR. Over the course of her career, she has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark de- sign, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums, and the growing intersection between video games and fine art. She blogs about art and culture at C-Monster.net and was named one of nine people to follow on Twitter by The New York Times. Paul Chatterton is the deputy leader of the Forest and Climate division of the World Wildlife Fund and was formerly its Conservation director in Papua New Guinea. He is a lifelong environmental activist. As director for REDD + Landscapes, Paul has designed and initiated WWF’s major activities at scale in the Amazon, Borneo, and Congo, has led strategic planning globally and is responsible for aligned implementation across over twenty countries. Paul has previously managed WWF’s international efforts in Austria, the pacific,and Papua New Guinea, and before this ran his own company consulting on sustai- nable development and stakeholder participation in the Asia Pacific region. 49 Edition: Softcover with 3/4 flaps in slipcase Book Size: 8 x 10 in / 203 x 255 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 240 Publication Date: May 2015 Language: English Photographs: 300 Ilustrations: 120 Weight: 1.7 kg Rights: World Rights Available Price: US$ 45 ISBN: 978-988-12252-3-8
  • 29. A Clear View How Glass Buildings in the Inner City Transformed a Neighborhood Suzane Reatig, FAIA, founded her practice in 1989 and for the last twenty-five years has been altering the Shaw neighborhood lot by lot, house by house, and alley by alley. The cumulative impact on the quality of the urban environment has been staggering. Every project has attracted newcomers to the neighborhood while long-time residents have begun to take renewed interest in their own ho- mes and streets. Through building open, transparent, and inviting buildings in a community historically plagued with crime and blight, Suzane took an active role in improving the neighborhood and presenting a new image to the community and to the city. Today Shaw realizes an increase in property ownership as well as an increase in community involvement by both newcomers and long-time residents. A genuine love of place making and commitment to the needs of her clients has resulted in a long list of awards, publications, and speaking engage- ments, inspiring frequent pilgrimage to her built work. In a 2010 cover story for the Washington Business Journal’s OnSite magazine, Reatig was labeled “the best architect in D.C. you don’t know.” She is an inspiration for her peers and a tireless mentor and role model for younger practitioners. Thomas S. Shiner, FAIA, IDSA, a native of Washington, DC, is an architect devoted to discussing an urban vision for his city. Tom studied in Blacksburg and Copenhagen. He apprenticed in Switzerland and the Netherlands. His largest projects are in Berlin, where he worked with a partner office to com- plete two renovations of historic buildings. Presently, Tom works in both studio and workshop to run an enterprise, MUSEUM & LIBRARY FURNITURE, a company specializing in designing and building furniture for museums and cultural institutions. Introduction by Suzane Reatig Preface by Thomas S. Shiner A Clear View is the first book published by Washington, DC–based architect Suzane Reatig, FAIA. Exploring new interpretations of small- scale urban infill housing, it addresses the changing needs and the real demands of city dwellers. Filling the void in the urban puzzle, in narrow and constrained sites, all of Reatig’s new structures ensure comfortable and safe spaces. • The majority of the work in this book is located in one neighborhood of Washington, DC, Shaw, demonstrating the powerful effect architecture can have on transforming and re- viving a neighborhood. • Through the use of simple materials and innovative clear design, Reatig reveals how community can be achieved among inhabitants without giving up privacy or independence. All projects share the same spirit; they are imaginative, rigorous, and give priority and value to their inhabitants and enhance their quality of life. Each project has its own unmistakable identity. The layout arrangement of the four apartments around a courtyard not only provides ample natural light, cross ventilation, and triple exposure, but also promotes communal outdoor living. — 67 LEFT Second floor living (444 N Street NW) RIghT View of court from stairs (442 N Street NW) 40 — THE METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH LEFT Glass and masonry: heaven and earth RIghT A beacon of light for the neighborhood AbOvE Top unit private roof deck RIghT Alley façade with parking 86 — n street lofts — 21 ASHLAND AVENUE 1505 Ashland Avenue, Baltimore MD Ashland Avenue is the only work in this book not located in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington DC. Since it encompasses many of the urban housing design chal- lenges and solutions common in our work, we chose to include it. The city of Baltimore awarded a vacant lot to our client, a non-profit organization, with the stipulation that the client construct affordable housing. The lot, adjacent to one of the client’s churches and surrounded by dilapidated buildings, vacant lots and crime activities presented two challenges. The first, a long and narrow site that stretches an entire city block of Baltimore, was zoned for townhouse construction. As street exposure was limited, traditional street- facing row houses would have allowed the construction of only three townhouses; two on the north side and one on the south side with no access to a parking area. To maximize the number of townhouse units and to utilize the potential of the un- usually long site, we configured an E-shaped layout with eight attached, two and three story townhouses wrapping around two courtyards. The units span the north- south axis of the site, orienting the exposed facades towards the east and west. The second challenge was the neighborhood context which resembled scenes from the HBO series The Wire. In a neighborhood dealing with crime and drugs we were concerned with the safety and well-being of the residents. We addressed se- curity issues by wrapping the site with a masonry wall and providing delicate white steel bars at the ground floor of the units. At the same time we opened the units to daylight and to the neighborhood through the use of ample glass, shared outdoor courtyards and walkways that promote visibility and interaction. This series of duplexes is a new interpretation of the Washington, DC row house in a historic district. Constructed in a long-neglected section of the Shaw neighbor- hood, the dwellings transformed the area and serve as a prototype for new urban living, both spatially and in terms of construction methods and materials. In a departure from typical residential wood construction, these row houses are built with materials commonly used in commercial and institutional buildings. The shell is built of pre-fabricated concrete panels and hollow-core concrete planks. The facades are predominantly aluminum store fronts with the added rhythm of brick on the historic designated street facade. To keep the project financially fea- sible, all building elements are standard, off-the-shelf items. The concrete structure offers durability, non-combustibility, sound absorption, termite protection and cost-efficiency, making it ideally suited for high-density urban living. The unique sectional configuration of interlocking units creates both lofty, double– height spaces and double-exposure; a rare combination in urban living. Each unit has ample outdoor space as well. The lower unit features a rear, private terrace that expands livable space. A roof-top terrace belonging to the upper unit provides breath-taking views of the Capitol dome and downtown Washington, D.C. N STREET lofTS 424-434 N St NW, Washington DC — 79 48 — SEE-THROUGH TOWNHOUSE LEFT Living area facing court RIghT Interior stairs facing court LEFT North facade with private entrances to each unit from parking bELOW Section RIghT Upper unit master bedroom 92 — ridge street row 26 — ASHLAND AVENUE AbOvE View of roof deck from interior RIghT Roof deck with photographer Bob Lautman LEFT Courtyard RIghT Duplex view of courtyard 124 — bailey park 50 — SEE-THROUGH TOWNHOUSE LEFT Corner-wrapping windows open to the neighborhood RIghT North façade “At first glance (and second, and third) the corner of 5th & O seems like an odd place for a big glass house with a Japanese-inspired rock garden, and picture windows that make the structure nearly see-through. Maybe it’s the row of ornate rowhouses that make it seem so out of place. Or maybe it’s the police roadblock that checks IDs at 6th & O on Friday nights. Or else the surveillance camera sits atop a former school at 4th & 0. Then again, maybe it’s the 5 N’O gang graffiti on several walls in walking distance. Whatever the reason, it’s hard to envision feeling entirely comfortable being so open in such an environment. Nevertheless, its placement is striking, and in the right combinations of light and shadow, beautiful in a minimalist sort of way”. Book Captions.doc”. Easter, Eric (May 13, 2009). House of Prayer/ House of Style, Ebony Magazine. Cities are about people, but what people crave most in cities is comfort, greenery, nature and space, amenities not often associated with urban living. In recent years, oversaturation of small apartments with high turnover in the DC housing market, (mainly efficiencies and one-bedrooms), forced families to seek housing in the sub- urbs. The goal at Bailey Park was to design housing that provides relief from the stress of city life. Located steps from the Shaw Metro, a 16-unit apartment building replaced four small dilapidated townhomes. The four-story building provides spacious units, ex- posure to light, air, and the outdoors. Large operable windows and deep balconies provide cross-ventilation and plentiful daylight. Every unit enjoys a private balcony or terrace in addition to the three communal outdoor areas for tenants—a green roof deck, an interior court and a planted tree garden along the alley façade. We saw the dark and neglected alley along the west façade as an opportunity. Re- cessing the west face of the building and allocating space between the building and alley for a garden transformed the alley to a friendly, safe walkway. The long bright colorful façade and the abundance of nature surrounding the building resulted in an unmistakable identity frequently mentioned by passersby. Bringing nature to tenants in these communal areas created opportunities to inter- act and socialize, while also embracing a sense of calm and serenity. Providing the essentials for healthy living enhances urban life and encourages people to stay in the city long-term. bAIlEY PARk 625 Rhode Island Avenue NW, Washington DC — 121 53 Book Size: 10 x 8 in / 254 x 203 mm Format: Landscape Pages: 136 Publication Date: May 2015 Language: English Photographs: 150 Ilustrations: 50 Rights: World Rights Available Editions: . Softcover with 3/4 flaps Price: US$ 25. Weight: 0.6 kg. ISBN: 978-988-12249-3-4 . Softcover with 3/4 flaps in slipcase Price: US$ 35. Weight: 0.8 kg. ISBN: 978-988-13975-4-6
  • 31. Edition: Hardcover with 3/4 flaps in slipcase Book Size: 7.25 x 9.25 in / 184 x 235 mm Format: Portrait Pages: 368 Publication Date: May 2015 Language: English Photographs: 275 Ilustrations: 285 Weight: 1.6 kg Rights: World Rights Available Price: US$ 49 ISBN: 978-988-16194-0-2 Close to 75% of primary energy in New York City is used in or for buildings. Amid the many different initiatives being implemented today to increase energy efficiency, it is clear that it is our built urban environment that needs the most improvement. Besides the fact that existing buildings have to be upgraded, the forgotten, interstitial spaces, where improvement can become architecturally tangible, should also be addressed. The project described in this book developed from the observation that “our most abundant energy resource is the sun and our most underutilized urban space is our rooftops,” and a successful entry into the Department of Energy’s 2011 Solar Decathlon whose goal was to design and build a “Net-Zero-Energy” house to be exhibited on the National Mall in Washington, DC. • What if we could make use of infrastructure developed over generations by developing the underutilized space of apartment building rooftops to generate some of the power for the “host-buildings” underneath, and thus immediately renew the way we power our buildings and, beyond that, our urban way of life? This visionary concept, documented here in comprehensive architectural detail, became reality when a team of students from The City College of New York took on the challenge of presenting their vision of a built “Roofpod” prototype that could be promoted in New York City. A collaboration between The City College of New York • Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture and Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers 56-56waSte/GarBaGe7URbANENvIRONmENT landfills are vast open spaces, this is not easily achieved. another option for handling waste are incinerator plants or ‘waste-to-energy’ (wte) plants, which some countries in europe or and South-east asia have already transitioned to. Since the late 90’s common waste policies (Landfill Directive 1999) have changed over concern for shortages of landfill capacity. often the preference is incineration be- cause of its potential as an energy source for pow- er and heating. Modern technology behind waste incineration, releases, if accurately filtered, far less emissions and is therefore less harmful to our environment than the uncontrolled exhaust that is typical of landfills. in short, burning trash is cleaner than storing it in our environment for hundreds of years. Developed countries like Japan, Sweden or Denmark, have relied heavily on local incinerator plants that, in turn, provide a substantial amount of heat and power for their buildings. Suddenly, waste becomes a resource for energy produc- tion. the principle being (see Fig 1.43) that after the recyclable waste is sorted, the unrecyclable materials are burned in a furnace at 800 - 1000˚F. the garbage is then converted into ash, flue gases and heat. after passing through several controlled steps, the flue gasses produce steam via a boiler that powers a turbine and generates electricity. the ‘waste heat’ from this process can also be recovered and used for district heating schemes. the ash, a waste product of this process, can be used for building material supplements, if it is not too toxic (for example, as an ingredient in concrete to replace lime). if it is too toxic, it must be land- filled. But any disposed ash still only takes up a tenth of the space as the unprocessed material. in addition, waste used as a fuel source ultimately replaces the very fossil fuels that constitute a high percentage of imported goods. what makes these plants feasible, is their filter technology that remove toxins with chemical and electrical reactions integrated into their emissions control. at present, the cleanest incinerator plant, which is in rahway, nJ, emits only a fifth of the maximum emissions allowed by state legislation. to put this into greater perspective, backyard burn- ing of just ten pounds of trash can produce more dioxins, furans, and PCBs than 100,000 pounds of trash in an incinerator plant. However, all this cleanliness comes at a price. Strict pollution con- trols, and of course manufacturing and maintaining the equipment itself, cost millions of dollars, while moving trash hundreds of miles to a landfill is most often cheaper. as of yet, the factor of ‘cleanliness’ has not found the right price tag. the effects on our environment are mainly of ethical considera- tion, while decisions are most often based on fi- nancial constraints. Laws that restrict the export of waste materials across state lines can take a step toward being environmentally conscious, and would make incinerator plants more economically competitive with landfills. also, this step would provide the volume of waste, which is necessary to run these plants more economically. Currently, only a fraction of trash collected in Manhattan, only approximately 3% of the city’s total waste stream, goes to incinerator plants in new Jersey30. the rest is transported out of state, involving much longer distances in transportation. therefore, the City has proposed a ‘Solid waste Management Plan’ (SwMP) to enable more efficient long-dis- tance waste disposal in the future. Unfortunately, it intends to maintain its current strategy of long- distance hauling. But, it is planning to transfer the waste by barge or rail to container stations, where the waste will be transported to out-of-state land- fills. this modest but beneficial change is an effort to reduce the amount of truck traffic in new York City neighborhoods and interstate highways. exporting garbage by rail and barge will ultimately be more economical than by truck, and it is in- tended to distribute garbage ¬to less expensive landfills than previously possible. However, rail and barge destinations are more limited than truck accessible destinations, with the risk of economic dependencies. even though the fuel used for trans- portation of garbage will be reduced, not much has changed conceptually. instead of investing in more technically advanced and locally applied solutions, which new York often favored at the height of its development, it continues to endorse the far away landfills and embedded high transportation fuel and emissions involved. 1.44 Dry Cell Batteries 0% rubber 0% Fines 2% Diapers 4% Miscellaneous inorganics 2% Miscellaneous HHw 0% Pesticides 0% non-Pesticide Poisons 0% office Computer 1% non-corrugated Cardboard 3% Books/Phone Books 1% Mixed Paper 12% Corrugated/kraft 5% newsprint 10% Magazines/Glossy paper 3% Clear HDPe Containers 1% Colored HDPe Containers 1% Clear Pet Containers 1% Grass/Leaves 1% Clear Glass Containers 4% Green Glass Containers 1% Brown Glass Containers 1% Food Containers / Foil 1% Beverage Cans 0% Food Containers 2% Bi-Metal Cans 0% other Ferrous metal 2% Films and Bags 5% Polystyrene 1% Miscellaneous Plastics 2% Food waste 17% Car Batteries 0% Paint/Solvent/Fuel 0% non-Bulk Ceramics 0% textiles 6% Lumber 3% Miscellaneous organics 7% 1.44 nYC: Composition of ‘Municipal Solid waste’ (MSw), Study of the Department of Sanitation (1990)(compiled by Marjorie J. Clarke, www.geo.hunter. cuny.edu/~mclarke/apr29- 2002sancommtestimony.htm) 40-40UrBanVeGetation4URbANENvIRONmENT 1.25 Santiago De Chile, (Chile), trellised office building w/ integrated planters 1.26 trellis support system, mounting alternatives 1.24 1.25 4. ‘Plants protect our water.’ in rural environments, the root system of plants prevent soil erosion caused by rain. in urban environments, however, vegetation is of much higher significance in its capacity to influence stormwater management by absorbing water in ‘soft scape’ areas. For example, trees retain a high amount of rainwater on their surface during light rainfall. Better yet, the soil they grow in is able to absorb the water and slowly release it over time via evaporation, or by any sup- porting drainage system. new York is mostly ‘hard scaped surfaces’, made up of concrete sidewalks and drained rooftops, all ‘sealed areas’. in certain Manhattan neighbor- hoods, such as Midtown, the ‘sealed area’ per- centage is close to 100%17 . when it rains, all of the water collected on these surfaces is immediately drained into the public sewer system, which was designed more than a century ago. this system combines both sewage and urban runoff, and was sized to carry three to five times the average dry weather flows during downpours. the system has since been significantly improved, but if these loads cannot be handled, water is either released into a stormwater overflow system, or if necessary even into the rivers. (Fig.1.23). anecdotal evidence of this occurrence is that the ‘Hudson river swim- mers’ call off their swimming sessions immedi- ately following a significant downpour. of course, solving this dilemma by increasing the capacity of the sewer system is an expensive undertaking. though, instead of enlarging the infrastructure, one could simply delay these loads, and lower the peak of accruing rainwater loads. (Fig. 1.24) this is where vegetation cover, like green roofs, kicks in as a feasible solution: for every 5% of vegetation cover added, stormwater runoff is reduced by ap- proximately 2%18 . Vegetation also acts as a natural filter for pollution. it removes polluted particulate matter from the flow as it reaches the storm sewers. reducing the flow of stormwater reduces the amount of pollution that is washed into a drainage area. trees use nu- trients like nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, all byproducts of urban living, that would otherwise pollute and over-fertilize the rivers. 16—16PowerGeneration1URbANENvIRONmENT cities?; why is power produced far away?; under what circumstances is it produced?; and how does it affect us? 1. First of all, there are substantial transmission losses in any kind of energy distribution: the far- ther away the source, the more energy gets lost in transmission. it is estimated that approximately 20% of all energy produced in the United States is lost in transportation5 . the artist richard Box (Fig. 1.4) brought attention to this issue when installing a ‘field’ of more than a thousand fluorescent light bulbs underneath a low-overhead power pylon. the installation was entirely powered by this ‘waste en- ergy’. Hypothetically speaking, if we all had a smart ‘mi- ni-generator’ in our apartment windows, and these devices would only produce power as necessary, the savings would be huge. Furthermore, we would have an immediate relationship to our consumption of fossil fuels. in conclusion, one fact is clear: the current, cen- trally planned and controlled, distribution system doesn’t work as efficiently as intended; it produces a lot of wasteful ‘left-overs’. 2. Secondly, the means with which we produce en- ergy is environmentally unconscious and not very sophisticated. in the US, most of the energy used to produce electricity is made of non-renewable ma- terials: it is effectively fuel we burn using the result- ing heat to generate electricity. these natural re- sources –mankind has consumed more fossil fuels in the past 50 years than in its entire prior history– are gone for good after they are consumed, when they could be used more productively for chemical or pharmaceutical applications, for instance. it is worth noting that mankind has consumed more fos- sil fuels in the past 50 years than in its entire prior history, and it is estimated that we will run out of oil in ca. 40 years, out of natural gas in ca. 60 years, and out of coal in ca. 200 years . about ¾ of the US’s energy supply is based on a mix of fossil fuel ‘products’: Currently, a bit less than 50% of this mix is coal. natural gas is the new favorite, approaching a 25% margin, and becoming increasingly more popular. this is due to the fact that gas plants operate more efficiently, have an easier permitting process and contribute to less Co2 emissions than coal plants6 . about 90% of power plants constructed in the last ten years are either gas plants or ‘dual-fuel’ plants, 1.4 1.4 1.4 richarBox:‘Field’, Skenfrith/wales 2004 nYS: Sustainable materials management strategy for waste (Dept. of environmental Conservation nYS: Sustainable materials management strategy for waste (Dept. of environmental Conservation 76-76ViSUaLDoSSierSOLARDECATHLON Prototyping Architecture: The Solar Roofpod An Educational Design- Build Research Project Text by Christian Volkmann Preface by Barry Bergdoll Christian Volkmann is an associate professor at the Spitzer School of Architecture, City College of New York (CCNY). He immigrated to the United States in 1997, after having worked and studied in Berlin, Zurich, and Lugano, among others at the offices of J. P. Kleihues and Mario Campi. He holds an MArch. from the ETH Zurich, and is a Registered Architect in New York. In the US, he has been teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design and at City College of New York. At City College, he currently coordinates the 3rd Year Undergraduate Design Studio, the Construction Technology sequence and several electives focusing on the integration of technical and environmental topics into the design process. He is part of the joint faculty for CCNY’s interdisciplinary Masters program “Sustainability in the Urban Environment,” combining science, engineering, and architecture. Barry Bergdoll, architectural historian, is Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History at Columbia University and curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art. 57