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CHICAGO
WRIGHTWOOD
17 ARTISTS EXPLORE THE PROMISE & DANGER OF OUR
DIGITAL WORLD IN THIS AWARD-WINNING EXHIBITION
TECHNOLOGY
BRINGS US TOGETHER...
WHY DO WE FEEL
SO ALONE?
OCT/13 -
DEC/16
GET TICKETS:
wrightwood659.org
THIS EXHIBITION IS PRESENTED BY
ALPHAWOOD EXHIBITIONS AT WRIGHTWOOD 659.
DIFFERENCE MACHINES: TECHNOLOGY AND
IDENTITY IN CONTEMPORARY ART IS ORGANIZED
BY THE BUFFALO AKG ART MUSEUM.
Managing Editor
Ankit Khadgi
SAIC/News Editor
Khytul Qazi
Arts Editor
Gordon Fung
Entertainment Editor
Sidne K. Gard
Comics Editor
Teddie Bernard
Multimedia Editor
Nitya Mehrotra
NEWS
FIGHTING PATRIARCHY: A YEAR OF
COURAGE AND REVOLUTION IN IRAN
by Ankit Khadgi
On the first anniversary of the tragic death of Mahsa
Amini, an Iranian student at SAIC ,and his friends
reflect on what they experienced one year ago.
ARTS
To be Pakistani, to be a woman, or to
be an artist?
by Khytul Qazi
An interview with Sayera Anwar.
Finding Space for Black Memory
by Casey Cameron Wheeler
COBRA showcasing “The Black Domestic”
LIT
MY BODY, MY VOICE
by Jamisen
Keep flipping if you’re not interested in reading an
essay by a female-identified person discussing her
bodily functions.
ENTERTAINTMENT
TikTok For Her
by Fah
What Does It Mean To Be A ‘Girl?’
TAYLOR SWIFT YEAR
RETROSPECTIVE
by Kit
Whether you love her or hate her, Taylor
Swift is the name on everybody’s lips.
Loving the Monster: Looking
for Some Monstrous Romantic
Leads?
by Sid
Here are five frightfully romantic flicks to
sink your teeth into this Halloween.
SAIC
THE GATEKEEPERS OF THE
HERITAGE
by Da Zhuang
How SAIC students feel when they see their artifacts
at the Art Institute of Chicago.
So You Wanna Collaborate?
by Schatauna
Students at SAIC share insights on collaboration.
WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE SOUTH
ASIAN
by Ankit Khadgi
Five South Asian students share their thoughts on
their shared identity, and commonalities.
04
10 17
06
12
18
08
14
20
16
21
COMICS
FEATURING WORKS BY
by Teddie Bernard, Cam Collins, Eric J.
Garcia, Kristen Lee, Mae Lyne, Magdalene
Ma, Kit Montgomery, and Julianne Teres
TABLE OF
CONTENTS
CREDITS
Editorial Advisor
Sophie Goalson
Design Advisor
Rochell Sleets
Distributors
Kristen Lee
Kit Montgomery
Staff writers
Kit Montgomery
Da Zhuang
Schetauna Powell
Art Director
Bei Lin
Design Team
Bei Lin
Teddie Bernard
Allen Ye
Shina King
Hailey Kim
Aditi Singh
Copy Editor
Sidne K. Gard
Web Editor/Copy Editor
Maya Emma Odim
Webmaster
Nick Michael Turgeon
Front cover design by Shina Kang
TOC design by Shina Kang
TABLE OF
CONTENTS
Managing Editor
Ankit Khadgi
Art Director
Bei Lin
Arts Editor
Gordon Fung
Entertainment
Editor
Sidne K. Gard
Comics Editor
Teddie Bernard
Multimedia Editor
Nitya Mehrota
Staff Writers
Kit Montgomery
Da Zhuang
Schetauna Powell
Alex Lee
Designers
Bei Lin
Teddie Bernard
Allen Ye
Shina Kang
Hailey Kim
Aditi Singh
Web/Copy Editor
Maya Emma Odim
Webmaster
Nick Michael
Turgeon
Editorial Adviser
Sophie Goalson
Design Adviser
Rochell Sleets
Distributors
Kit Montgomery
Kristen Lee
04
17
S
SAIC
AIC
Resident Advisors United
by Ankit Khadgi
How 32 student-workers came together to
improve their working conditions.
Scream, Shout. Let it out!
by Alex Lee
Places to go to be alone as an SAIC student
CO
COMICS
MICS
Featuring Works by
by Teddie Bernard, Cam Collins, Ellie Gerken,
Chana Goldbloom, Alex Lee, Mae Lyne,
Cameron Neuwell, Zoe Regnier, Veronica
Timble, Vanya Vellore, and Ava Walkow
09
10
11
18
06
20
21
ARTS
ARTS
Shining Overseas
by Gordon Fung
SAIC ATS graduates at the Ars Electronica
Festival
Turning the Table
by Tyler Calderin
SAIC alumn DJ NVM showcased in charity
concert
N
NEWS
EWS
More Than Noodles and Dumplings
by Da Zhuang
5 Best Chinese Restaurants in Chicago
Protestors Rally in Support of Gaza
by Marium Asif (text), FNewsmagazine
LI
LIT
T
A Heartbreak in Fragments
by Sisel Gelman
Recovering from a bad breakup in a new city
Decolonize your Bookshelf
by Katie Mae Maclauchlan
Spend Thanksgiving with 3 reads by indigenous
authors
E
ENTERTAINMENT
NTERTAINMENT
Has Cancel Culture Failed?
by Kit Montgomery
Accountability – from burned at the stake to
topping the charts
The Wisdom of Julia Child
by John McDonald
Life lessons everyone needs this holiday season.
Net Neutrality Graphic Journalism
Explainer
by Sidne Katherine Gard
12
14
16
CREDITS
CREDITS
Want
more?
Take a look
at our website!
Front cover & TOC design by
Shina Kang
32 student-workers came together
to start a reform group
REPORT by Ankit Khadgi
RESIDENT ADVISORS
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM
4 SAIC SAIC 5
NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE
W
hen Yaelin Kim was hired as Resident
Advisor at the School of the Art Institute of
Chicago, she was passionate about her job.
As an RA, her responsibilities entailed frequent
interactions with students living in the school’s
housing, along with organizing programs for them.
Kim was excited about the pivotal role she would play
in fostering a sense of community within the school.
However, once she started the job, she found
herself in a situation she didn’t anticipate.
“The job exceeded the labor that I expected, or,
at least, asked more of me emotionally than
logistically,” Kim said.
Besides Kim, her fellow RAs at the three on-
campus residences (162 Building, Jones Hall, and
The Buckingham) share similar views. From getting
inadequate compensation to pouring emotional labor
on an overwhelming job, RAs said that their working
conditions have been challenging.
“Our job is very intense and interpersonal. Similarly,
there’s not a lot of separation between work and life.
The working conditions aren’t either ideal,” Mads
Reardon, an RA in the Buckingham Building said.
Unlike several other universities including
University of Pennsylvania, ColuWmbia University,
and Boston University, where student workers have
unionized or are in the process of gaining union
status, SAIC lacks such representation. As a result, 32
SAIC RAs formed a reform group last fall and have
been actively negotiating with Residence Life — SAIC’s
administration body — to improve their working
conditions.
“We all were united because we worked under the
same conditions. Hence, it was really important to
have a united front and bring in a collective energy
so we can improve our work conditions and be
compensated for the work we do,” Reardon said.
Since their formation, the reform group has
already sparked many changes that they believe have
improved their working conditions. The Residence
Life increased the RAs yearly stipend from $2,000 to
$3,600 and ARTICash funds from $1,150 to $1,200.
Another significant change was the reduction of
working hours. RAs said they were overworking in
comparison to the compensation they received from
the school.
So what motivated the group to come together and
demand these changes?
According to the members of the reform group,
former RAs inspired this new group to start a
united front.
In 2021 when most of the members of the reform
group started their role, an announcement was made
that instead of only ARTICash funds, the RAs would
also be paid in cash, a change made possible because
of the former RAs’ demands.
Continuing the momentum, RAs reached a
consensus to unite to improve their conditions more,
according to Reardon, a member of the group.
“We started collectively crunching numbers and
started discussing how we felt. We also address
the changes we think need to occur in our working
conditions during those meetings,” Reardon said.
To get a better sense of unionizing and negotiation,
some of the group members also met with senior
organizers from Art Institute of Chicago Workers
United, SAIC’s union for non-tenure-track faculty.
Once the spring semester of 2023 commenced, the
reform group met the representatives from Residence
Life and put their demands forward.
“We had sit-down meetings with Abigail Holcombs,
Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Residence
Life; and Debbie Martin, Acting Vice President and
Dean of Student Affairs. The bargaining happened in
good faith mostly,” Pratima Pinnepalli, an RA, said.
Pinnepali is a frequent contributor to
F Newsmagazine.
Answering their demands, the administration
did make some quick changes to improve working
conditions which included a $20 posters printing
allowance for RAs’ programmed events that was
previously self funded. The administration also
shortened bi-weekly meetings with hall directors,
from an hour to 30 minutes.
For the group members, these changes were big.
And they strongly believe that it happened because
they all came together.
“It’s really important to stress that since we started
talking, change has happened. Our grievances in
the past have been taken into consideration because
we all spoke and we will continue doing so,” said
Pinnepalli.
The Struggles of Being an RA
To understand why RAs formed their united front, it is
important to know what their job entails.
Typically RAs are student workers hired by
Residence Life to help care for students while living
alongside them in campus housing. Currently, SAIC
employs around three dozen RAs who look after more
than 100 residents living in the three residence halls,
and work for a minimum of 20 hours a week.
Despite their roles as caretakers of the residents
who help students through hardships, there’s more to
the job than meets the eye, Liberty Harris, a senior
RA, said.
“This job is advertised as you gonna take care of
residents. But once you slowly start working, you
realize you have to be somebody who has to work 24/7,”
she said. Harris continues: “You’re somebody who,
whether on or not on-call, has to be responsible for
residents. You are responsible for students on campus.
You just kind of fall into all of these responsibilities,
and it gets so overwhelming so quickly, and then you
don’t feel like you’re properly getting compensated as
well.”
Harris’ sentiments were echoed by Reardon, who
said they can’t describe a typical day in their role as
RA because not every day is the same; they are buried
with different responsibilities all of the time.
“But when we barely have time to kind of take care
of ourselves, it’s hard to take care of other people,”
Reardon said.
Resident Life lists four areas where RAs actively
work during their tenure on one of its websites:
Community Development, On Call and Crisis
Management, Staff Member, and Administrative
Works.
But for RAs — who are students themselves and are
dealing with school work — Harris said handling all
these responsibilities can be challenging.
“We’re dealing with things like COVID. We’re
dealing with things like homesickness. We need to
create posters. We need to host parties. At the age of
20, we sometimes have to be mandated reporters as
well. Okay, technically, I signed up for this job, and
this was all written out for me before I signed up for it,
and went through the training. But it’s just like, I don’t
think there’s any amount of training that can prepare
you 100 percent,” Harris continued.
Pinnepali said that most RAs can keep up with
everything because of housing, which is a part of
their remuneration.
“It’s very hard to turn down the role because people
get housing when they are employed. A lot of people
don’t have other options, at least not ones that are
good for them when it comes to housing. So people
are willing to put up with a lot more than they can,”
Pinnepali said.
According to Holcomb, on average the housing
RAs get is valued at $15,750 or $19,100, depending on
the building.
Besides the housing, RAs get a $4,800 stipend
which includes a cash payment and ARTICash. This
includes compensation for a 29 day training (22 days
before the fall semester and seven days before the
spring semester), when RAs must be available for all
days and evenings, and cannot do other jobs during
the training period.
Despite the increased stipend members of the
reform group still feel they could be compensated
more based on their laborious works.
“It’s hard to quantify the compensation. But the
school needs to recognize how much labor we are
putting into it. We deserve to get fairly compensated,
and we will probably keep on demanding for that,”
Kim said.
Future Plans for the Reform Group
Reform members feel cautiously optimistic that more
changes will take place in their working conditions.
“We were able to implement some big changes. All
of the RAs overcame differences to reach a common
goal, to demand better working conditions and get
ourselves heard. This momentum will be continuing,”
Reardon said.
The school administration said that they would
also work closely with RAs to collaborate around
improvements in their working conditions in the
future.
In an email interview with F Newsmagazine,
Holcomb wrote, “Working collaboratively [with the
reform group], we were able to make several positive
changes to the RA position. In response to their
feedback, we restructured RA committees, removed
many responsibilities related to room preparation,
incorporated their feedback into training, adjusted
the number of resident check-ins, and reduced the
number of community walks.”
“We look forward to continuing these discussions
this year,” she added.
Some of the areas the reform group members
think the administration can work on in the upcoming
days are updating the COVID policies, organizing
shorter trainings, creating severance processes, and
structuring committees better.
In addition, the members demand transparency
about Residence Life’s budget allocations.
However, RAs understand their demands will take
time to be implemented. This semester all four of the
RAs interviewed will be graduating, but this won’t
deter them from continuing to ask for fair treatment.
They said they want to leave a legacy for the
upcoming RAs.
“When changes are made for the most part, we
know that we’re not going to see them getting
implemented. Still, we will work so that somebody
somewhere will not have to go through what we had to
deal with,” Reardon said.
“We just want good things for our current selves
and whoever could be in our same shoes in the future.
We just want to see each other, get better working
conditions and work for people in the future so
that they don’t feel as overwhelmed, overworked or
undervalued,” they added.
ILLUSTRATION BY HAILEY KIM(MFAVCD 2024). She
cannot work without iced coffee and sweets.
“There’s a lot of emotional
labor that I think we would all
love to pour into helping our
residents, to get connected
with the things that would
benefit them.”
Ankit Khadgi (MAVCS 20240 is the Managing Editor of
F Newsmagazine. He just wants to sleep.
UNITED
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE
SCREAM
LET IT ALL OUT
overwhelmed, so she took a break beginning in
2019. She delayed coming back during the COVID-19
pandemic, and spent some time in Denmark studying
geology and climate science to get a different
perspective on the world. Jiapan tried out five jobs
in four years while in China, trying everything
professionally related to art.
Now she’s back at SAIC with new perspectives and a
better understanding of the world. Most importantly,
she said she knows how she fits into it.
“Now I feel like I know what I’m doing and what
I will do in the future. It’s a long journey of being a
Y
ou’re having a panic attack. The cause doesn’t
matter. What matters is your skin is crawling,
your hands are shaking, your thoughts are
racing. If you don’t move, you might explode.
What you really want to do is scream. Loudly.
But you can’t. There’s no place to scream. You live in
Chicago with two roommates. You can’t go home; one
of your roommates will be there, or your neighbors
will hear you through the walls. You can’t go to the
park; the park is a public space, someone will think
you’re “crazy”. Everywhere you go, there is someone.
There is nowhere to be truly, loudly alone.
Addie Stiles is a self-proclaimed loud person. She’s
a newcomer to Chicago as a freshman undergraduate.
Stiles likes making noises as she exists, whether they
be by vocal stim or by hazard of doing tasks. Yet, now
that she’s in Chicago, she feels like she can’t do that
anymore.
If she drops her keys on the counter, she wakes her
roommate. If she plays music, she has to be careful of
who’s listening through the walls.
“I am like a mouse in my dorm room,” Stiles said.
Solomon Duncan, also a freshman undergraduate,
said he has similar feelings. “I don’t think I could find
a place [where] I could scream and not care about
reactions.”
Duncan comes from a small suburb outside
Nashville, Illinois. For him, the transition to Chicago
— a big city — was exciting and full of possibilities,
and it still is. But he’s also learned that the city can
induce anxiety.
To cope, Duncan often seeks a quieter place where
he can be alone, but this has become difficult with a
roommate. As opposed to playing records to unwind,
he said he spends time on his bed trying to not to
irritate anyone.
Neither Stiles nor Duncan feels hopeless. As their
old ways of coping have become inaccessible, they’ve
found new ones. Duncan makes time to ride the Blue
Line and hang out in the suburbs of Chicago on the
weekends. Stiles re-joined Roller Derby, one of her
favorite activities back home. Despite their newness to
Chicago, both of them are starting to adjust.
On the other hand, senior TJ Jiapan said she’s spent
the last four years feeling frequently overwhelmed.
When she started school at School of the Art Institute
of Chicago in 2016, she wasn’t super focused on
anything.
“It’s like a buffet. I’m so starving, but after I enter
the buffet, I’m like, ‘I should try a bite of this, a bite
of that.’ But after all, I don’t know which one is my
favorite. Or, which one is the one I should pursue for
the rest of my life.”
Jiapan left SAIC during her junior year. She felt
ILLUSTRATION BY BEI LIN (BFA 2023). He is trying his
hardest not to be replaced by AI.
Places to go to be
alone as an SAIC
student.
REPORT by Alex Lee
SHOUT
6 SAIC
student at SAIC,” she said.
Jiapan was sure to stress that there are valuable
resources at SAIC. The Title IX office, the Wellness
Center, and her professors have all been beneficial.
According to her, everyone she talks with wants to
help, and they all want her to succeed. Jaipan said:“I
already paid the money for them. They have to give
me something back. So I will never think that too
much, or like I am bothering them.”
Graduate Student Mira Simonton-Chao is a first
year grad in the art education program (MAAE). She
also struggles with finding places to be alone. She said
Wellness Center
Lakeview Building
116 S. Michigan Ave., 13th floor
Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Health Services
312.499.4288
healthservices@saic.edu
Counseling Services
312.499.4271
counselingservices@saic.edu
Disability and Learning Resource Center
312.499.4278
dlrc@saic.edu
Every SAIC Student may receive up to 16
free short-term counseling and psychother-
apy sessions with the Counseling Services
Department. One could always scream at a
counselor.
Loyola
Beach
The Far North Side of
Loyola Beach has big
empty patches. Few
people would hear if
one wanted to scream.
2023 SAIC 7
Alex Lee (BFA 2027) is probably human. They’re just
happy to be here.
“I hate going to MacLean because it’s really hard to
find a space to be alone there. There’s always people
going to class or something.”
Simonton-Chao recommends going to the Film
Video New Media & Animation Screening Room (only
available to students enrolled in specific FVNMA
classes), or the 280 Sculpture Garden.
Mike Pietrus, Director of Counseling Services at
SAIC, said he is not aware of any spaces on campus
that are dedicated for students to be alone and
scream or be loud. He did, however, give alternative
recommendations.
Pietrus mentioned such places like the Movement
room on the 13th floor of MacLean, or looking into
reserving rooms through the Instructional Resources
& Facilities Management department. He also said
that often students are able to find empty classrooms
to solitarily chill in.
Pietrus also encourages students to be creative
when coming up with places to be alone.
“But it’s also like if you’re looking for something
a little more you know, specific, it might be helpful
to find places, there might be a community in the
Chicago that sort of does this kind of stuff and, and
engages in that kind of support,” He said.
SAIC counseling services also provides access to
several online services such as ThrivingCampus, an
online directory to help find mental health care off-
campus; Togetherall, an anonymous social media site
to talk about your struggles and help others; and Telus
Health Student Support (THSS), a free and confidential
mental health and wellbeing support service that is
open 24/7.
Above are some resources if you are feeling alone
or overwhelmed. Don’t be afraid to shoot an email or
show up in someone’s office.
Title IX Office
Lakeview Building
116 S. Michigan Ave., 12th floor
Robert Babcock, Ed.D.
312.499.4165
title9@saic.edu
Title IX Deputy Director
Verron Fisher
312.499.3904
title9@saic.edu
Rage
Rooms
For $35 one can
throw axes for
an hour at Kanya
Lounge. They also
offer two-person
rage rooms.
Make it Art
SAIC is, in fact, an art school.
Turn your anxiety and feelings
into a performance piece! Get
your class together and just
scream at them. Real loud.
Then you can talk about your
feelings in critique.
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE ARTS 9
8 ARTS
Gordon Fung (MFA FVNMA 2024) is a
transdisciplinary artist working with experimental
video art, multi-/ new media, installation, sound
art, audiovisual performance, conceptual arts, and
curatorial practice. He directs the experimental arts
collective //sense.
ILLUSTRATION BY ALLEN YE (BFA 2023). He likes bin
bin bam bam.
SAIC Grads Gain International Exposure
at ARS Electronica
REPORT by Gordon Fung
Nimrod Astarhan — artist of “KhazarArcheological
Confabulations” (2023)
By chance or not, museums in Linz have some of the most novel
approaches to collecting and exhibiting digital art. These include the
Francisco Carolinium, headed by curator Alfred Weiniger. Situated in
a beautiful 1895 building designed by Berlin architect Bruno Schmitz,
the museum has one of the world’s first digital platforms for exhibiting
digital art and a robust collection of digital-born works.
Experiencing the museum’s shows balanced the progressive thrust
of new work presented ina the festival with research about cultural
relevance, provenance, and preservation of digital work. The museum’s
shows had fresh takes on contemporary issues, such as in Meta.
space: Visions of Space, exhibiting contemporary social VR and 3D
simulation works alongside maps and globes from the 15th century.
This environment provided the physical and conceptual space for
exploring the cultural relevance of celebrated new technologies in a
slower, more profound way, without losing touch with contemporary
work with them.
It inspired me to think about my digital work’s physical renderings,
embedding conceptual thinking about materiality in methods of
depiction and representation.
“Khazar Archeological Confabulations” (2023).
Photo by artist.
“Happy Travels” (2023). Photo by artist. “Camera Shy Hoodie” (2023). Photo by artist.
“The Lovers” (2023). Photo by artist.
“<overload.love>” (2023). Photo by artist.
SHINING
OVERSEAS
Juan Flores — artist of “Happy Travels” (2023)
My time at the Ars Electronica Festival was half spent answering
questions about my work, while the other half was spent asking
questions about other peoples’ work. I wanted to take advantage of
the fact that this festival brings an audience from all over the world
to get different perspectives. It was important to me to see people’s
reactions to my piece, and overhear their conversations, though most
of what I heard were gasps and whispers when they noticed a zipper
on a backpack moving autonomously, which was also affirming that at
least something was happening.
My favorite piece in the festival was a VR experience that
connected you to the physical control of a chair that was behind
a curtain nearby. I am in love with that absurdity and playfulness
when it comes to technologies that are becoming more advanced and
accessible to us. I talked to the team that made it and they were happy
to share their code. That to me shows the love of making and curiosity
that got me interested in the field in the first place.
Eul Lee — artist of “The Lovers” (2023)
What is art? The answer is: this varies from person to person. As
an artist, I believe it is the act of communicating with the audience
through a core human sense of “aesthetic perception.” This sense
transcends both language and borders.
As a native Korean speaker, English is not my mother tongue.
Interacting with many Austrians who speak German, another language
that I am unfamiliar with, makes me feel like I’m dealing with some
kind of alien. However, the language barriers are transcended when
viewers see my work. These beautiful and gentle smiles — like flowers
— give me the greatest satisfaction an artist could possibly experience.
We don’t communicate as Austrians and Koreans, but as fellow beings
drawn to the same visions, engaging in deep and meaningful dialogue.
Certainly, exhibiting in European countries far from my home
studio presents numerous challenges. I have encountered unexpected
variables during the installation process, which were the most difficult
of my exhibition experiences so far. Nevertheless, overcoming these
obstacles is the artist I’d envisioned becoming. With newfound
confidence, I continue to tirelessly work (through the night) in my
studio preparing to connect with even more audiences.
Yiyi Liu — artist of “<overload.love>” (2023)
Ars Electronica is absolutely amazing. It’s a massive gathering for
new media artists, combined with a carnival vibe. Whether you’re a
student practicing art or a professional artist, everyone has an equal
opportunity to showcase their work.
<overload.love> is an interactive game installation. The game causes
computer devices to overload, triggered by data from the audience’s
heartbeat. This data significantly lags the system and frame rate that
eventually results in a glitch. Ars provides a unique opportunity for
audiences from different countries, genders, ages, and professions
to experience and test my work. Sometimes, the audience hasn’t
interacted with the installation in the way I planned, so I keep refining
the interaction to make it as natural as the “iOS system.”
Participating in a public exhibition for the first time as an artist,
and in Europe no less, I faced numerous practical challenges: visa
issues, losing a suitcase containing my installation at the airport
(and eventually retrieving it), and uncertainties about the space and
equipment. These challenges, beyond the creating the installation
itself, are things artists have to face alone. I want to thank our curator
Angelia Mahaney for negotiating with Ars. Thanks to the Department
of ATS for providing such a valuable opportunity.
Mac Pierce — artist of “Camera Shy Hoodie” (2023)
Ars Electronica Festival is something I’d only ever experienced through
buzz and bursts of documentation, having only vicariously experienced
it up until this year. Leading up to it I barely knew what to expect, and
after diving in head-first I can describe it as an art and technology
carnival. The sheer magnitude of events was staggering, with over 1,500
artists and over 88,000 attendees making their way through the main
venue — Post City — over the five days, the festival was in full swing.
Within the brutalist former mail-sorting facility, the full basement (a
nuclear bunker) was solely dedicated to various installations. Included,
was a narrative AR telepresence work where you could pilot a motorized
folding chair around a room (“Unconventional Self” by Werner van der
Zwan (NL) and Charl Linssen (NL)). The top floor exhibited 56 university
campus exhibits that represented students from around the world, with
the work of students from SAIC included.
It was a huge event that required a ton of effort to organize. Special
thanks to our curator Angelia Mahaney and ATS facilities manager
Anna Yu for all their work in making it happen. It was a truly special
opportunity and I’m grateful for it.
T
he Ars Electronica Festival is an annual international new media arts festival
organized by the Austria-based organization Ars Electronica Linz GmbH,
which was founded in 1979. This year, The School of the Art Institute of
Chicago will be represented at the festival by eight graduates from the Department
of Art and Technology Studies, where they’ll show work on this year’s theme: “Who
Owns the Truth?” The SAIC faction’s work is titled “Funnel & Switch,” curated by
Angelia Mahaney, under the “Ars Electronica Campus Exhibition.” It will run from
Sept. 6 to 10.
Ars Electronica has been the major international outlet for media artists to
showcase their most up-to-date contemporaneous artistic response through
technologies. To gain more insight about the festival, F Newsmagazine spoke to five
artists, who shared their experiences.
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE
2023 NEWS 11
ILLUSTRATION BY ADITI SINGH (BFA 2026) a graphic
designer and digital illustrator. Originally from India,
raised in Dubai, and recently moved to Chicago.
dishes, the fried soft-shell crab with salted egg yolk is the most remarkable,
delivering a harmony of crispy exteriors and soft interiors, rated as the finest in
Chicago. Equally delightful is the oxtail stew.”
Address: 225 W 26th St, Chicago, IL 60616
Price Range: $11-30
Shoo Loong Kan Hotpot
Shoo Loong Kan Hotpot stands out as one of the top destinations in Chicago for
those seeking a comforting and authentic Chinese hot pot. Whether you are looking
for a spot to hang out with friends or a place for a hearty family dinner, it will fit
the bill. Yixuan Liu (BFA 2024), said, “Shoo Loong Kan holds a special place in my
heart as the ultimate Sichuan cuisine. Each bite offers a fiery kick. For those who
love bold and spicy flavors, this is the place to be.” The design of Shoo Loong Kan is
just as enchanting as its food. Stepping inside is akin to stepping back in time, with
its ancient-style decor that takes diners on a visual journey through history. Dining
here is an immersive experience in Chinese culture.
Address: 2201 S Wentworth Ave 1st Fl, Chicago, IL 60616
Website: hotpotchicago.com
Price Range: $31 - $60
C
hinese food is the mosyt Googled cuisine in the United States, with over 3.35
million average monthly searches on Google in 2022. Chicago’s Chinese
population rapidly increases , the city is home to several Chinese restaurants
— and Chinese SAIC students have opinions about which ones are best.
Da Mao Jia
Da Mao Jia tempts discerning palates with its captivating textures. In this
unassuming store, pans beneath the glass case proudly show an array of tasty
street-style delicacies, Chengdu Famous Hotpot Mix, handmade bell dumplings
nesting in a flavorful broth, special spicy noodle soup enriched with braised beef,
and many more dishes. Among the options, Fiona Qiao (BFA 2025), recommends
the soft, spicy bean curd, a luxurious indulgence that transports diners with each
velvety bite. Clouds of tofu glide down the throat, while crunchy soybeans introduce
a delightful contrast, and cabbage and onion provide another layer of complexity,
harkening to the bustling lanes of Sichuan.
Address: 2621 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60608
Website: damaojiausa.com
Price Range: $11 - $30
TSAôCAA
The story of this little cafe begins with their philosophy of “a pure cup of good
tea.” Qixin Chen (BFA 2024) said, “The must-try, undoubtedly, is the Grape Green
Tea Slush with Milk Foam. It’s a star of the show, a perfect blend of juicy fruit
and the rich fragrance of milk foam. With every sip, your tongue is coated in a
sweet aftertaste, motivating you to return for another encounter.” TSAôCAA takes
youback to your high school days with their emphasis on bubble tea flavors, and
their delightful after-school desserts, like the matcha tofu and egg waffle that, will
make your heart sing. You can almost feel the weight of your backpack as you hear
the joyful laughter of your friends.
Address: 2026 S Clark St unit g, Chicago, IL 60616
Website: tsaocaail.com
Price Range: $11 - $30
Ken Kee Restaurant
Recommended by Boning Yan (BFA 2025), Ken Kee Restaurant is renowned for
its delectable offerings, including Cart Noodle, traditional Cantonese cuisine, and
milk tea. Located in the heart of Chicago’s Chinatown, it is Chicago’s first restaurant
dedicated to Cart Noodle, which is a beloved dish with over twenty toppings and
an array of noodle varieties that originated with street vendors in the 1950s, and
later became a classic cultural icon. This eatery has also garnered a devoted online
following, thanks to its distinctive neon-style decor, which evokes the charm of old
Canton. With its warm and inviting atmosphere, Ken Kee offers more than just a
dining experience but a journey through time and culture that captures the essence
of Cantonese traditions.
Address: 2129 S China Pl, Chicago, IL 60616
Website: kenkee.com
Price Range: $11 - $30
Grand Palace
Located a bit farther south, this hidden gem may be unassuming, but it has
an ever-present warmth. Despite the quality of the dishes, the prices remain
modest, ensuring that a family dinner doesn’t break the bank. There is always
the option to reserve a large round table, perfect for hosting or gatherings. The
gracious lady extends her warmth to patrons, offering sweet oranges to cool off on
sweltering summer days, and comforting bowls of warm chicken soup to ward off
winter’s chill. Nanyu Jiang (BFA 2024) said, “The dining experience here strikes a
harmonious balance in taste — neither overly salty nor bland. Among the standout
5 Best Chinese Restaurants in Chicago.
REVIEWS by Da Zhuang
Da Zhuang (MFAW 2025) is a staff writer at F
newsmagazine. She loves dogs, the sea, and soft boiled
eggs, but hates spiders, cinnamon, cold rain.
MORE NOODLES
DUMPLINGS
AND
THAN
10 ARTS
Tyler Calderon (BFA 2027) is a writer who loves ice
cream!
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY BEI LIN (BFA 2023). He is
trying his hardest not to be replaced by AI.
Photo by Karla Ponce.
Photo by Karla Ponce.
This down-to-earth excitement is exactly what Nam’s sets evoke from his
listeners: shouting, dancing, moshing, and overall freneticism.
Nam and the other artists raised over $700 in ticket sale proceeds donated to
Apna Ghar, a Chicago-based nonprofit that aims to end gender violence.
Commenting on the trajectory of his career — from DJing his own house parties
to performing sets at bustling venues — Nam said, “I don’t really mind, as long as
I’m having fun.”
His practice dedicates itself to the conflation of artmaking and partying,
something that has consistently risen in quality and popularity over the last
several years. “Nam doesn’t like drinking really, [although] he doesn’t mind being
surrounded by drunk people because he’s dedicated to creating a good time,” said
Momo Ishibashi, who is one of his closest peers.
After he graduates in 2024, at the rate he’s progressing, Nam’s potential in the
Chicago DJ scene is limitless. His endgame, however, is to one day own a mixed-
purpose establishment that serves as a clothing store on weekdays, a nightclub on
Fridays and Saturdays, and a restaurant on Sundays. Regardless, one thing’s for
certain: Wherever he goes, fun is sure to follow.
For more information on the “Audio Awareness” charity concert series and
Nam’s upcoming events, check out their Instagram pages: @audio.awareness and
@follow_nam.
S
chool of the Art Institute of Chicago sound student Namjoo Kim (BFA 2024),
aka DJ NVM, has a spirit so loud even his silence is melodic. Born in South
Korea in 1999, his love for music began early on.
“I was listening to Tupac since I was like 12,” Kim said.
From a young age, he built up a vast reservoir of different inspirations,
establishing the foundation of his practice of DJing and beatmaking.
From Afrobeat, to bossa nova, to hip-hop, to Brazilian dance music Nam’s
range of musical tastes inform his developing musical style. But jazz had a
particularly strong influence on him.
“[the] build-ups and improv[isational]” scenes in jazz music evoke the same
rollercoaster of suspense that he imbues in his dance music,” he said.”
When Nam first moved to the U.S. in 2017, English didn’t come easily to
him and he frequently holed up in his room, struggling to make friends. In his
isolation, he started to learn DJ techniques by watching YouTube.
Four years later, Nam’s apartment was regularly flooded with people excited to
lose themselves in one of his iconic weekend “rager parties.” With party themes
like “The Matrix” and “Someone Broke Our Neighbor’s Door,” Nam’s apartment
(aka 1127) became a weekend staple for SAIC students and general Chicago party
goers alike.
From these modest beginnings, DJ NVM has grown into an artist capable of
drawing huge crowds. He was one of three performers on Oct. 5 at Book Club
Chicago — an underground music venue in Wrigleyville — for a charity concert
series called “Audio Awareness.” The primary goal of “Audio Awareness” is to raise
awareness about and funds for small charities, while spotlighting local artists.
“We really want to have an underground approach towards nonprofit
fundraising. When you think about fundraisers, you might think of pretentious
galas or grade school barbecues, [but] for our shows we want people to be
surprised that it is even a fundraiser,” said Graeme Phillips, — the founder of the
art nonprofit Agora Chicago, which organized “Audio Awareness.”
SAIC alum DJ NVM showcased
in charity concert
PROFILE by Tyler Calderon
THE
TABLE
TURNING
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE NEWS 13
12 NEWS
Marium Asif (MFA 2025) is a first year graduate
student from Karachi. She explores dystopian
elements/events, mythology, folklore and magical
realism themes both in her creative fiction, and non-
fiction personal essays.
PHOTOS BY FNewsmagazine
PHOTO ESSAY by F Newsmagazine Staff
TEXT by Marium Asif
PROTESTERS
RALLY IN SUPPORT
OF GAZA
L
ess than a week after the escalation in Gaza began on October
7, three protests by supporters of the Palestinian movement
took place outside The School of the Art Institute of Chicago,
and into the greater Loop area. The protests were organized by
the Chicago Coalition for Justice in Palestine, along with the
representatives from the Dissenters, Jewish Voices for Peace Action
and Black Lives Matter (Chicago).
The venue for the first protest was 500 West Madison Street,
which is near the Israeli embassy; the second was held in Ida B
Wells Street; and the third witnessed a group of 15,000 people who
met at Ida B. Wells walked all the way to Michigan Avenue. An even
larger protest took place on October 21.
A woman with a painted heart on her face looks out over the crowd. The organizers
and protesters chanted slogans like, “Netanyahu you can’t hide. We charge you with
genocide.” Along with: “Gaza, Gaza don’t you cry, Palestine will never die.”
A protester waves the Palestinian flag during an Oct. 14 demonstration in Chicago.
Participants chanted phrases in support of Palestinians, which were followed
by speeches that shared the history of Gaza’s occupation, the need for mass
movement by the public, and an appeal for immediate de-escalation.
A sea of protesters march forward down the street on October 14, carrying printed
signs. “I believe in the rights of people to determine their own future and not to
be under occupation. Israelis need to put down their arms, for a settled peace, for
a sharing of land. [The end of the war] It’s horrible. It’s going to be terrible,” said
one of the protesters, Sean Obidah. The current war began when Hamas attacked
Israel on October 7.
A protester’s sign stating solidarity with Palestinian people. Illinois Gov. J.B.
Pritzker pledged support to Israel during an Israeli solidarity event in Glencoe
that drew a few hundred people. Recent rallies in Chicago have shown support of
Palestinians.
A protester wears a mask and holds a sign in support of Palestinians at an Oct. 14 rally. Many of
the rallies have passed by The Art Institute and other SAIC buildings.
In Chicago, Four major protests have taken place in support of Palestinians. Axios
Chicago reports that the city is home to 85,000 Palestinians, forming 60 percent of
the the city’s Arab population.
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE LIT 15
14 LIT
27
27.
I have to remind myself that it took me two years to fall in love with
the friends I had senior year in college.
It takes time to fall in love with someone and somewhere, but I do
not have time.
I have two years until my master’s is over and I have to move on
again.
28
28.
I send my lover’s mother a postcard every
month. We are still close despite the breakup.
I can never remember her zip code in
New England, so I search online for her
street—hoping her full address will
auto-populate on my screen like it
always does. For the first time ever,
the search engine takes me to an
address in Illinois.
29
29.
During my last semester at
Emerson College, I published an
article titled Sunset Moments.
In it, I argue that a sunset forces
you to stop, stare, and reflect as
the day comes to a close—just as
life’s transitional moments force
you to do so too.
Now I wonder if the inverse is
also true: Sunrise Moments. Periods
in your life where you’re forced to stop
and stare at the start of something new
while still caught in the sleepy, immovable
limbo of it all.
30
30.
Charles Dickens wrote, “One always begins to forgive a
place as soon as it's left behind.” This applies both to Boston and my
lover.
31
31.
I used to cry on the phone every night to his friends—our friends.
Where I was once met with empathy, I am now met with “you need to
learn to move on.”
32
32.
I also wrote about this breakup in Sunset Moments. To those
concerned, I’m almost ready to stop writing about the topic.
19
19.
I can’t look at the men I match with when we meet at museums.
I am repulsed by their physical qualities. It’s not that they’re ugly.
They’re just not him.
20
20.
I only started going to pole dance classes because my lover enjoyed
doing inverse spins on his friend’s pole at parties.
I thought about quitting classes after the breakup, but I
kept having these vivid dreams about twirling on the pole.
21
21.
I dream about him every night.
It’s hard waking up alone when I get to touch
him in dreams.
22
22.
It’s harder falling asleep in an empty bed.
23
23.
I haven’t gotten a dating app match in
two weeks.
“You’re gorgeous,” a friend says when I
mention this. “Is it you that’s picky?” I nod.
They’re just not him.
24
24.
I make a friend at pole dance class. We
walk to the Blue Line together.
“I didn’t know the Blue Line ran through this
neighborhood,” she says.
It doesn’t.
The Blue Line I so love is actually the Green Line.
It’s just that the station’s floor is painted blue.
25
25.
I search online for “The Esplanade” to catch a glimpse of my old
Boston sights—even if just in pictures.
Results for Chicago’s “River Esplanade Park” pop up instead.
26
26.
I never thought I’d miss Boston this much when I first moved there. Now
I wonder, will I miss Chicago this much when I leave?
I fear either response.
If I do, I’ll be plagued by sadness all over again.
If I don’t, it means I never fell in love with this city and its people—that
my years here were a waste of time.
I’m afraid of feeling this sad for two years.
Sisel Gelman (MFAW 2025) was raised in Mexico
City. Her work has been published over 37 times.
#siselgelman has 3.0 million views on TikTok.
Recovering from a bad breakup in a new city
ESSAY by Sisel Gelman
1
1.
Three months before my boyfriend broke up with
me, we held each other tightly in my bed crying. It was
the eve of our last Valentine’s Day together, and we
knew the relationship had an expiration date.
The end of college was less than a hundred days
away, and to keep my student visa, I would be moving
to Chicago in the Fall to start a master’s program. He
would be staying in Boston.
My lover turned his face away from me. He was
tall, strong, and blue-eyed. His deep voice cracked
between sobs.
“You have to go become a great writer,” he said,
resigned to letting me go. A month ago, I moved to
Chicago to become that great writer. These words
echoed in my mind.
2
2.
The most common advice for a breakup is:
1) Spend time with friends and family.
2) Go to your favorite places and do things that
you love.
Starting fresh in a new city, you have neither.
3
3.
I’ve been told that his letting go is a sign of his
true love for me: a selfless willingness to let me walk
unburdened into this life of writing that has always
called for me.
But why was he an impediment to my journey? Why
was he unable to walk with me?
4
4.
I was bedridden for three weeks after we broke up.
5
5.
My doctor said a few years ago that I had to go on
hour-long walks every day. This was easy with my
lover in Boston. We used to walk alongside the Charles
River Esplanade, all the way to the Smoot Bridge, and
then loop back onto cobblestoned Commonwealth
Avenue, through the Boston Common, to the urban
campus of Emerson College in the Downtown Theater
District.
Every season brought new colors to our walk:
reds and oranges in the Fall, green and blues in the
Summer, pearly white snow in the Winter, and pink
cherry blossoms in the Spring. He was good at walking
long distances—he was a runner. It was always me
with my bad knee and my bad hip that had to often
stop and rest on a park bench at the edge of the
Esplanade.
6
6.
I’m looking for someone in Chicago to go on long
walks with.
If I could, I would stick a brightly colored ad onto
every street lamp in the city: “Help Wanted: Friend or
Lover Who Likes to Walk.”
7
7.
I’ve begun to go on dating apps. This was a
suggestion from another ex of mine—an ex who I am
now best friends with.
It took us a year of not talking to process our
breakup.
I wonder how long it’ll take my lover and I to mend
the tear in our hearts. I haven’t heard from him in
weeks.
8
8.
I don’t know where my new friend and I would walk
around Chicago. I don’t know the city well enough to
map out my ideal walk. I’ve taken strolls by the lake’s
trails and by the Riverwalk, but I quickly become
upset. Both feel like a personal “Fake Esplanade.” The
city of Chicago feels like “Fake Boston.”
9
9.
I record these moments of “Fake Boston” on my
social media with the sole intention that my lover will
see them. I photograph Chicago extensively so that it
seems like I am already in love with the city. It is all a
lie. I am alienated from my environment despite its
objective beauty.
10
10.
Everyone I have met so far in Chicago loves
Chicago. They go out of their way to tell me it is a
fantastic city to live in—to create art in—but I have not
yet found this love within myself. Part of me thinks if I
was not abandoned, I would be excited to explore this
city too.
11
11.
It’s been four months since our breakup and I still
cry every night.
When you’re bitter and bruised, even the smallest
of triggers make you blue.
12
12.
I am in a poisonous era of my life.
I meet strangers on the internet and take them to
my apartment to fill up that empty space. It’s risky
behavior, but my heart races at the rewarding prospect
of not being alone.
13
13.
I envy everyone I know in a long term
relationship—especially when they post about it on
the internet. Moments like those make me wonder if
things would be different if I had asked once, “Would
you come to Chicago with me? Could we try to make it
work?”
14
14.
Everything is a trigger.
Kraft Mac and Cheese. The Parquet Courts. Las
Vegas.
15
15.
A common sign of a manic episode is risky sexual
behavior.
I don’t sleep with these men. I just like the idea of
their company.
I am not manic—I have been manic before and
can recognize the feeling—I am energetic in my
depression.
16
16.
I have the belief that everything I am looking
for is also looking for me. This comfort, this
companionship, this happiness. It is all searching for
me too. I go out to parties on most nights so that love
can find me.
17
17.
Chicago’s “L” Blue Line looks similar to Boston’s “T”
Blue Line.
I take this train every Thursday on my way back
from pole dance class and I pretend I am home.
18
18.
I become physically ill, grappled by sadness, every
time I think about my old life.
A HE
HEA
ARTBRE
RTBREA
AK
K
FRAGMENTS
IN
IN
ILLUSTRATION BY ALLEN YE (BFA 2023). He likes bin
bin bam bam.
2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE ENTERTAINMENT 17
Kit Montgomery (BFA 2025) is earning their degree
in side quests. Currently, they’re spinning spiderwebs
into yarn and crocheting yarn into spiderwebs.
ILLUSTRATION BY BEI LIN (BFA 2023). He is trying his
hardest not to be replaced by AI.
Accountability — from burned at the stake
to topping the charts
OPINION by Kit Montgomery
Martinez situation as opposed to the Cavetown
situation. Both are “canceled,” but in a lot of online
spaces, they might be treated exactly the same.
Through online platforms, people are able to speak
openly about their alleged harmful experiences with
artists and public figures. There’s even a public Google
sheet that tracks canceled musicians. People can
access information about situations that got artists
canceled without victims needing to talk to the press
or the police.
But this “lack of proof” comes with its own
set of problems. It’s led to a myriad of people not
believing victims’ claims and even accusing them
of making false claims. An example would be Tory
Lanez continued online support despite having
been convicted of shooting Megan Thee Stallion.
The onslaught of people claiming “false accusation”
causes victims to fear sharing their stories and in turn
protects a number of abusers.
The line between hate and criticism in social
media callouts becomes blurred when problematic
behavior is excused and open bullying or harassing
of people who have made claims happens without
repercussions. Allowing alleged offender to say
they’ve been bullied by allegations is a way of them
avoiding any real repercussions for their actions.
I
n June 2020 I stumbled across a series of social
media posts about one of my favorite bands that
detailed their problematic behavior. This
post included a story about one of the adult
drummers dating a minor. I started reading
anything I could find out about the
situation, and the story became more
and more clear with each post.
Immediately, I started trying to
rationalize what I was reading. I
thought, “Maybe it’s not nearly as
bad as what people are saying
online.” But I realized it didn’t
matter if it “wasn’t as bad” as it
looked, I didn’t feel OK about
continuing to support the band.
This experience isn’t
uncommon. Many people who
have looked up to a celebrity,
artist, or public figure have found
out they said or did something they
couldn’t support. This phenomenon
branches out into the idea of
“canceling” a person because of
their misdeeds.
But does canceling work? When we call
out these problematic people and explain
why we can’t support their behavior, does their
behavior change?
Typically, not.
In the music world for example, artists often deny
accusations or give a weak, half apology that doesn’t
acknowledge the depth of the hurt experienced by
their victims and their fans.
When pop-punk band All Time Low was called out
for allegedly having a long history of being sexually
inappropriate with minors, they immediately denied
the allegations and then filed a lawsuit against three
people who used social media to make these claims.
So what exactly isn’t working?
“In general, social media is not set up well for
distributing information accurately and thoroughly.
In order to truly be able to hold people accountable
we have to establish better communities and systems
of communication that are not based on superficiality
and consumerism,” said SAIC student Milo Brown
(BFA 2025).
The young people who have grown up in an era
where so-called “cancel culture” is a perennial topic
have strong opinions.
“The label of being ‘canceled’ gets applied to
both major issues and minor mistakes, diluting the
term and making it less useful,” said SAIC student
Lyss Rogers (BFA 2027). One artist might be called
out for sexual assault allegations, and another for
making insensitive comments about a marginalized
community online. For example, the Melanie
But callouts for actions that happened pre-
social media didn’t really stick either. Artists who
did questionable or harmful things prior to the
integration of social media often don’t get
meaningfully canceled.
Notoriously the former frontman of The
Smiths, Morrissey, has been criticized
for decades of racist, xenophobic,
and otherwise problematic behavior.
But he has never faced any real
consequences for his actions and he
still consistently tours and releases
music while having maintained a
huge fanbase.
There are exceptions to
cancelling’s lack of repercussions.
During the shooting of “The
Mandalorian,” Gina Carano was
confronted online about a social
media post that likened being
a Republican to being a Jewish
person during the Holocaust,
and she was effectively fired. This
accountability might have been due to
the pandemic lockdowns giving people
more time to focus on social media which
could have made people more likely to call
someone out online in a way that would stick.
However, post-pandemic, many artists and
creators ignore, deny, or otherwise disengage with
any criticism of their behavior, and nothing happens
to them. An example would be Brendon Urie who had
many different allegations mounted against him but
only addressed his use of transphobic language and
not his sexual misconduct allegations, homophobic
language, or racist language, among other things.
“Especially when it comes to allegations of sexual
misconduct and/or abuse, we, culturally, need to
stop viewing cancellation as primarily serving as
punishment. It’s not about punishment, it’s not about
what a band member does or doesn’t deserve, it’s not
about ‘jumping on bandwagons,’ or trying to hold
people to unrealistic standards — it’s about keeping
people safe,” said content creator Valeriesvoice when
interviewed by me. Valeriesvoice focuses on covering
news surrounding canceled musicians.
She added: “Boiled down to its very simplicity, if
someone is using their fanbase as a predation pool,
they shouldn’t have access to that fanbase to prey on.”
So how do we fix “cancel culture?”
There’s no easy solution that will work for every
case, but victims’ claims should not be treated like
social media controversies, instead, they are real
issues and should be addressed as such.
Canceling shouldn’t be about whether or not you
can still support an artist, it should be about keeping
people safe.
CANCEL
CULTURE
HAS
FAILED?
ILLUSTRATION BY SHINA KANG (BFA 2027). She
wants new shoes.
Katie Mae MacLauchlan (MFAW 2025) is a poet and a
scholar. You can find her with a nose in a book most
days, or pushing up her glasses. (She really needs to
renew her prescription.)
Spend Thanksgiving with 3 reads by Indigenous authors
REVIEWS by Katie Mae MacLauchlan
DECOLONIZE
BOOKSHELF
YOUR
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM
16 LIT NOVEMBER
A
s Thanksgiving draws nearer in the United
States and the larger world is currently examin-
ing the effects of colonialism, it’s important to
revisit our own histories. Here are three reads from
different genres that center indigenous voices to decol-
onize your bookshelf this November.
“A Snake Falls to Earth” by Darcie Little Badger
“A Snake Falls to Earth” by climate scientist and Lipan
Apache author Darcie Little Badger is a subtly-crafted
split narrative YA novel full of shapeshifters and magic.
It draws on Apache storytelling and emphasizes the
importance of orality. I loved it. I appreciated how
Little Badger echoed too familiar genocidal histories,
but placed those histories in an uplifting fable filled
with imagination, adventure, and friendship. Despite
its unmistakably modern context, it’s all the same
tricks. Confusing contracts and colonizer bullies are
pitted against our young narrator, a Lipan girl named
Nina. But in this story, we get a happy ending–and just
barely, just in the nick of time.
Nina is obsessed with solving the mystery of a story
relayed to her by her Great Great Grandmother Rosita.
Rosita says she saw a girl who could transform into a
fish in the deep well that lies on the family’s property.
Nina has long believed in the oral legends about
people who can transform into animals and who are
intrinsically linked to their animal counterparts
on Earth.
The second voice in this split narrative is Oli, a
cottonmouth snake person who lives in the Reflecting
World, the world where animal people roam free. He
embarks on a desperate quest to save his friend Ami,
a toad person whose species is going extinct on Earth.
If the toads disappear on Earth, Ami will too. Oli and
Nina’s worlds collide when Oli journeys to Earth with
his pack of lovable animal friends to enlist Nina’s help.
This is a story about families. It’s a story about the
disappearances of peoples and species, and about
the trials that still face indigenous peoples today,
who endure and are still among us. It’s a story about
language and translation, about what is lost and
how we might still preserve it. It’s sure to charm and
enchant readers of all ages.
“There There” by Tommy Orange
“There There” by Cheyenne and Arapaho author
Tommy Orange shines for its empathy and plurality
of voice. There are several Native narrative voices
involved in its craft. Each voice is engaging and
showcases a different version of urban Native life. The
resulting novel is a triumph and a wonderful example
of a story that looks to Native futures with a nod to the
unforgettable past.
Orange writes themes of belonging, community,
addiction, and migration in this powerful woven
narrative about identity. There is a diverse cast
of characters from Oakland, California — most of
them just scraping by— who are brought together as
they travel to the Big Oakland Powwow. Each seeks
something different from the gathering whether it’s
money, information, or communion. Each has a past
marked by a complicated relationship with their
identity. Orange examines the cognitive dissonance
that can exist between identity and lived
experiences, writing characters that exist across an
identity spectrum.
“There There” is a bravely honest work by a
masterful storyteller. Orange extends an impressive
and nuanced empathy to his carefully-rendered
characters, with all their various strengths and flaws.
There are no villains, only people dealing with the
circumstances they are dealt.
This is a quick read, and the action chugs along.
There is a brief interlude that includes essays which
give context to the action in the novel written in the
same engaging voice Orange employs for narrative.
Despite the multiple character arcs, the story never
lags, propelling readers through its action-packed and
perhaps inevitable conclusion at the powwow. “There
There” was selected as the One Book, One Chicago
book of the year for 2023. This initiative encourages
Chicagoans to read the book together over the course
of the year, and there are likely copies on display in
your local Chicago libraries. “There There” is not a
story to miss.
“Postcolonial Love Poem” by Natalie Diaz
“Postcolonial Love Poem” is like one long love poem to
indigenous women and girls by Mojave author Natalie
Diaz. This poetry collection is an intersectional work
that examines how the double forces of colonization
and patriarchy have affected indigenous women
and peoples. On its last few pages, Diaz dedicates
this anthology to the many missing and murdered
Native and indigenous women and girls
and genderqueer and nonbinary
indigenous people living in
occupied lands.
Cathartic poems examining historical gendered
and racial violences are included beside infinitely
more tender pieces that meditate on touch, intimacy,
and sexuality. In this way, Diaz calls for a gentler
future for indigenous women and girls.
Diaz places her poems on and off the rez,
locating some pieces in major urban spaces. This
recontextualizes preconceived notions of indigenous
lives in America, and reminds the reader of the
lasting legacies of displacement. Throughout this
collection, Diaz comments on themes of class,
addiction, violence, disappearance, preservation,
sex, and intimacy.
Diaz draws on both indigenous imagery and
iconographic American imagery. There’s even one
reference to Beyoncé. This situates the anthology
in its moment in history and breaks the mold of
outdated stereotypes of indigenous people. Diaz has a
complicated identity with nuanced markers. She is not
only Mojave. She is also American. She is also queer.
This anthology belongs on anyone’s bookshelf who
has questioned who they are, and how they got there.
It’s certainly a favorite on mine.
A
s we approach the cool and tumultuous weather of fall, many of us are
tempted with thoughts of stews and soups. And not just stretching our
budgets, perhaps too, these thoughts inspire planning some fun potlucks or
dinner parties for the upcoming holiday season.
In any case, the YouTube algorithm has my (and your) back because I have taken
on the task of watching every slightly grainy, still-in-black-and-white episodes
of Julia Child’s “The French Chef” that exist on the platform. Not only do I have
some insight into what will make a recipe tasty, but, surprisingly, I also have a few
insights into life because Julia knew no one is just cooking to eat. A good meal is so
much more.
Julia Child is the perfect chef for a moment filled with imperfections. She’s full
steam ahead on being curious, failing, and succeeding. Maybe this has something
to do with having been a spy for British intelligence, or the love she had for post-
war Paris.
Or maybe this approach started after she released “Mastering the Art of French
Cooking” in America — during a time where nobody was mastering any French
cooking anywhere outside of France — and she parlayed the book’s success into
being one of the first cooking shows on American television in the 1960s. Even
her regular appearances on PBS, a network with millions of viewers, could have
positively impacted the way she looked at life. Julia wanted you to succeed and live
her best life and so do I.
Life Tip No. 1: What complements you can make you stronger.
Did you know when you cook with butter, you should also add some oil so your
butter fares better against the heat and burning?
Julia knew this. She had a huge knowledge of French cooking techniques thanks
to chef courses she took at Le Cordon Bleu. And she was one of the first women to
study here. And you certainly need a good technique like butter and oil together
in a time before cooking spray. However, it’s not enough butter and oil to make a
recipe fatty by any stretch. It’s just enough to make sure things from eggs to steak to
veggies in a saute pan don’t stick to the bottom of the pan.
Applying this way of thinking to life: life is better when you live it with those who
complement you. Think of yourself as a big knob of butter floating in a sizzling hot
pan. Who is your oil and how do they keep you from burning under the pressure of
life’s heat?
Life Tip No. 2: Preparation is key to multitasking (and to everything else).
Julia was a big believer that any home cook can make a professional looking meal as
long as you practice with your tools. Julia wanted home cooks to be faster and more
proficient with their knife skills. After all, if you get through the hard “dog work” (as
she calls it) of the kitchen, you can more easily get on to the fun and satisfying parts
of cooking.
Along with demonstrating different techniques, Julia wanted a cook to have no
fear of a sharp knife so they could quickly peel and segment an orange in their hand
which is a skill necessary to make a dish she was quite enthusiastic about called:
Duck a ‘lOrange (an orange roasted duck).
Julia Child can be remembered for saying: “and if you’ve practiced your knife
skills, this will be easy!” And honestly? She’s not wrong.
One can practice any skill: Maybe you need to get in the practice of visiting
fellow artists or learning how you’re inspired or reading more about a new or
unfamiliar type of art from the Flaxman Library. Practice is what you make of it and
it is about what is most useful to you.
Life Tip No. 3: There are a ton of gadgets (and possibilities)
out in the world!
My favorite television personality and culinary nerd Alton Brown detests one use
items and has complained about them on his show “Good Eats.” But even Alton
might have to admit how cool some of Julia’s European gadgets were, when they
only had one job.
John McDonald (MFAW 2025) is a queer playwright
bent on telling stories that highlight the diverse yet
universal relationships we share. You’ll find them
scarfing donuts, brownies, and compliments wherever
the best ones are.
THE
WISDOM
OF JULIA
CHILD
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM
18 ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT 19
NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE
Julia loved to show off what different kinds of cooking gadgets were capable
of doing. My personal favorite is the pot with a handle that detaches and can be
reattached so it can go in the oven with ease. It’s wild.
Understanding one’s own kitchen is something Julia Child had to do, — given the
fact that her tall height meant her kitchens had to be custom built both in her home
and on her television set — and something I think she might have also promoted to
other home cooks.
The life question (maybe lesson) here is learning how you account for what
makes you unique in your life and your art practice. Are you prepared for whatever
your art practice might throw at you next or a any cool gadgets that could make your
life easier?
Life Tip No. 4: Sorrow and nervousness in adversity doesn’t
make you weak.
One of the most interesting things that sets Julia Child’s work apart from other TV
chefs is the way she fumbles from time to time. She loses her words, her glasses,
and sometimes her cooking pots despite knowing her kitchen so well. She has
forgotten the meat in a dish after showing you how to chop it earlier making her
appear more authentically human as she taught cooking. Julia Child was more than
a perfect personality mimicking a recipe.
Julia’s authenticity is something we can all strive for. She was nervous, she was
imperfect, she was a little sad when things didn’t work out but that never stopped
her. She was a cooking shark, bent on swimming through the waters and I know I
want that kind of strength present in how I approach my own art practice.
Life Tip No. 5: Embrace what you love.
This might sound like a redundant idea if you’re reading this while currently in
art school, but this isn’t just about where you are in life or what new thing you’re
learning about in class.
Julia’s passion for cooking and eating French food moved mountains and not just
for the audience. It wasn’t just that she introduced a whole bunch of people to boeuf
bourguignon (fancy French meat stew) or that she got them to advocate for fresher
options in their markets. She also lived her life passionately for food. “The French
Chef” show debuted near the middle of her life’s legacy, even though it was just her
start in most of America’s homes.
By seeking and embracing something that brought her joy, she changed the lives
of so many. Along with her own.
So, take a moment to think about your art practice. It’s not just about the hard
work of making art it’s also about asking ourselves: What do you have special
expertise in or a passion for? What joy that you want to show off to all? What is your
“cooking?” French food to your Julia Child?
Life Tip No. 6: Any dessert can be improved with dark rum.
“And it has to be dark rum because otherwise you might as well not put it in at all.”
- Julia Child, “The French Chef,” Season 5
Tasty life lessons everyone needs
this holiday season.
ESSAY by John McDonald
ILLUSTRATION BY HAILEY KIM(MFAVCD 2024). She
cannot work without iced coffee and sweets.
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE COMICS 21
20 ENTERTAINMENT
Staying Warm by Ava Walkow
Copper Odyssey - Broken Glass
by Cam Collins
Graphic Journalism by Sidne K. Gard
Sidne K. Gard (BFA 2025) is a queer writer and artist from New Orleans.
They hope to one day understand how to make their own monsters.
FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE
22 COMICS COMICS 23
Dead Bugs by Veronica Timble
Thrift Culture by Vanya Vellore
by Mae Lyne
Even more comics online at:
fnewsmagazine.com
Find web-exclusive
comics as well as a
massive backlog of
cartoons, new and old!
Check your answers online at fnewsmagazine.com!
NOV 18, 2023–FEB 25, 2024
Faith Ringgold, Early Works #25: Self-Portrait, 1965. Oil on canvas;
50 × 40 in. (127 × 101.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Elizabeth
A. Sackler, 2013.96. © 2023 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights
Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York.

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November Issue 2023 - Fnewsmagazine SAIC

  • 1.
  • 2. CHICAGO WRIGHTWOOD 17 ARTISTS EXPLORE THE PROMISE & DANGER OF OUR DIGITAL WORLD IN THIS AWARD-WINNING EXHIBITION TECHNOLOGY BRINGS US TOGETHER... WHY DO WE FEEL SO ALONE? OCT/13 - DEC/16 GET TICKETS: wrightwood659.org THIS EXHIBITION IS PRESENTED BY ALPHAWOOD EXHIBITIONS AT WRIGHTWOOD 659. DIFFERENCE MACHINES: TECHNOLOGY AND IDENTITY IN CONTEMPORARY ART IS ORGANIZED BY THE BUFFALO AKG ART MUSEUM. Managing Editor Ankit Khadgi SAIC/News Editor Khytul Qazi Arts Editor Gordon Fung Entertainment Editor Sidne K. Gard Comics Editor Teddie Bernard Multimedia Editor Nitya Mehrotra NEWS FIGHTING PATRIARCHY: A YEAR OF COURAGE AND REVOLUTION IN IRAN by Ankit Khadgi On the first anniversary of the tragic death of Mahsa Amini, an Iranian student at SAIC ,and his friends reflect on what they experienced one year ago. ARTS To be Pakistani, to be a woman, or to be an artist? by Khytul Qazi An interview with Sayera Anwar. Finding Space for Black Memory by Casey Cameron Wheeler COBRA showcasing “The Black Domestic” LIT MY BODY, MY VOICE by Jamisen Keep flipping if you’re not interested in reading an essay by a female-identified person discussing her bodily functions. ENTERTAINTMENT TikTok For Her by Fah What Does It Mean To Be A ‘Girl?’ TAYLOR SWIFT YEAR RETROSPECTIVE by Kit Whether you love her or hate her, Taylor Swift is the name on everybody’s lips. Loving the Monster: Looking for Some Monstrous Romantic Leads? by Sid Here are five frightfully romantic flicks to sink your teeth into this Halloween. SAIC THE GATEKEEPERS OF THE HERITAGE by Da Zhuang How SAIC students feel when they see their artifacts at the Art Institute of Chicago. So You Wanna Collaborate? by Schatauna Students at SAIC share insights on collaboration. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE SOUTH ASIAN by Ankit Khadgi Five South Asian students share their thoughts on their shared identity, and commonalities. 04 10 17 06 12 18 08 14 20 16 21 COMICS FEATURING WORKS BY by Teddie Bernard, Cam Collins, Eric J. Garcia, Kristen Lee, Mae Lyne, Magdalene Ma, Kit Montgomery, and Julianne Teres TABLE OF CONTENTS CREDITS Editorial Advisor Sophie Goalson Design Advisor Rochell Sleets Distributors Kristen Lee Kit Montgomery Staff writers Kit Montgomery Da Zhuang Schetauna Powell Art Director Bei Lin Design Team Bei Lin Teddie Bernard Allen Ye Shina King Hailey Kim Aditi Singh Copy Editor Sidne K. Gard Web Editor/Copy Editor Maya Emma Odim Webmaster Nick Michael Turgeon Front cover design by Shina Kang TOC design by Shina Kang TABLE OF CONTENTS Managing Editor Ankit Khadgi Art Director Bei Lin Arts Editor Gordon Fung Entertainment Editor Sidne K. Gard Comics Editor Teddie Bernard Multimedia Editor Nitya Mehrota Staff Writers Kit Montgomery Da Zhuang Schetauna Powell Alex Lee Designers Bei Lin Teddie Bernard Allen Ye Shina Kang Hailey Kim Aditi Singh Web/Copy Editor Maya Emma Odim Webmaster Nick Michael Turgeon Editorial Adviser Sophie Goalson Design Adviser Rochell Sleets Distributors Kit Montgomery Kristen Lee 04 17 S SAIC AIC Resident Advisors United by Ankit Khadgi How 32 student-workers came together to improve their working conditions. Scream, Shout. Let it out! by Alex Lee Places to go to be alone as an SAIC student CO COMICS MICS Featuring Works by by Teddie Bernard, Cam Collins, Ellie Gerken, Chana Goldbloom, Alex Lee, Mae Lyne, Cameron Neuwell, Zoe Regnier, Veronica Timble, Vanya Vellore, and Ava Walkow 09 10 11 18 06 20 21 ARTS ARTS Shining Overseas by Gordon Fung SAIC ATS graduates at the Ars Electronica Festival Turning the Table by Tyler Calderin SAIC alumn DJ NVM showcased in charity concert N NEWS EWS More Than Noodles and Dumplings by Da Zhuang 5 Best Chinese Restaurants in Chicago Protestors Rally in Support of Gaza by Marium Asif (text), FNewsmagazine LI LIT T A Heartbreak in Fragments by Sisel Gelman Recovering from a bad breakup in a new city Decolonize your Bookshelf by Katie Mae Maclauchlan Spend Thanksgiving with 3 reads by indigenous authors E ENTERTAINMENT NTERTAINMENT Has Cancel Culture Failed? by Kit Montgomery Accountability – from burned at the stake to topping the charts The Wisdom of Julia Child by John McDonald Life lessons everyone needs this holiday season. Net Neutrality Graphic Journalism Explainer by Sidne Katherine Gard 12 14 16 CREDITS CREDITS Want more? Take a look at our website! Front cover & TOC design by Shina Kang
  • 3. 32 student-workers came together to start a reform group REPORT by Ankit Khadgi RESIDENT ADVISORS FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM 4 SAIC SAIC 5 NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE W hen Yaelin Kim was hired as Resident Advisor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, she was passionate about her job. As an RA, her responsibilities entailed frequent interactions with students living in the school’s housing, along with organizing programs for them. Kim was excited about the pivotal role she would play in fostering a sense of community within the school. However, once she started the job, she found herself in a situation she didn’t anticipate. “The job exceeded the labor that I expected, or, at least, asked more of me emotionally than logistically,” Kim said. Besides Kim, her fellow RAs at the three on- campus residences (162 Building, Jones Hall, and The Buckingham) share similar views. From getting inadequate compensation to pouring emotional labor on an overwhelming job, RAs said that their working conditions have been challenging. “Our job is very intense and interpersonal. Similarly, there’s not a lot of separation between work and life. The working conditions aren’t either ideal,” Mads Reardon, an RA in the Buckingham Building said. Unlike several other universities including University of Pennsylvania, ColuWmbia University, and Boston University, where student workers have unionized or are in the process of gaining union status, SAIC lacks such representation. As a result, 32 SAIC RAs formed a reform group last fall and have been actively negotiating with Residence Life — SAIC’s administration body — to improve their working conditions. “We all were united because we worked under the same conditions. Hence, it was really important to have a united front and bring in a collective energy so we can improve our work conditions and be compensated for the work we do,” Reardon said. Since their formation, the reform group has already sparked many changes that they believe have improved their working conditions. The Residence Life increased the RAs yearly stipend from $2,000 to $3,600 and ARTICash funds from $1,150 to $1,200. Another significant change was the reduction of working hours. RAs said they were overworking in comparison to the compensation they received from the school. So what motivated the group to come together and demand these changes? According to the members of the reform group, former RAs inspired this new group to start a united front. In 2021 when most of the members of the reform group started their role, an announcement was made that instead of only ARTICash funds, the RAs would also be paid in cash, a change made possible because of the former RAs’ demands. Continuing the momentum, RAs reached a consensus to unite to improve their conditions more, according to Reardon, a member of the group. “We started collectively crunching numbers and started discussing how we felt. We also address the changes we think need to occur in our working conditions during those meetings,” Reardon said. To get a better sense of unionizing and negotiation, some of the group members also met with senior organizers from Art Institute of Chicago Workers United, SAIC’s union for non-tenure-track faculty. Once the spring semester of 2023 commenced, the reform group met the representatives from Residence Life and put their demands forward. “We had sit-down meetings with Abigail Holcombs, Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Residence Life; and Debbie Martin, Acting Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs. The bargaining happened in good faith mostly,” Pratima Pinnepalli, an RA, said. Pinnepali is a frequent contributor to F Newsmagazine. Answering their demands, the administration did make some quick changes to improve working conditions which included a $20 posters printing allowance for RAs’ programmed events that was previously self funded. The administration also shortened bi-weekly meetings with hall directors, from an hour to 30 minutes. For the group members, these changes were big. And they strongly believe that it happened because they all came together. “It’s really important to stress that since we started talking, change has happened. Our grievances in the past have been taken into consideration because we all spoke and we will continue doing so,” said Pinnepalli. The Struggles of Being an RA To understand why RAs formed their united front, it is important to know what their job entails. Typically RAs are student workers hired by Residence Life to help care for students while living alongside them in campus housing. Currently, SAIC employs around three dozen RAs who look after more than 100 residents living in the three residence halls, and work for a minimum of 20 hours a week. Despite their roles as caretakers of the residents who help students through hardships, there’s more to the job than meets the eye, Liberty Harris, a senior RA, said. “This job is advertised as you gonna take care of residents. But once you slowly start working, you realize you have to be somebody who has to work 24/7,” she said. Harris continues: “You’re somebody who, whether on or not on-call, has to be responsible for residents. You are responsible for students on campus. You just kind of fall into all of these responsibilities, and it gets so overwhelming so quickly, and then you don’t feel like you’re properly getting compensated as well.” Harris’ sentiments were echoed by Reardon, who said they can’t describe a typical day in their role as RA because not every day is the same; they are buried with different responsibilities all of the time. “But when we barely have time to kind of take care of ourselves, it’s hard to take care of other people,” Reardon said. Resident Life lists four areas where RAs actively work during their tenure on one of its websites: Community Development, On Call and Crisis Management, Staff Member, and Administrative Works. But for RAs — who are students themselves and are dealing with school work — Harris said handling all these responsibilities can be challenging. “We’re dealing with things like COVID. We’re dealing with things like homesickness. We need to create posters. We need to host parties. At the age of 20, we sometimes have to be mandated reporters as well. Okay, technically, I signed up for this job, and this was all written out for me before I signed up for it, and went through the training. But it’s just like, I don’t think there’s any amount of training that can prepare you 100 percent,” Harris continued. Pinnepali said that most RAs can keep up with everything because of housing, which is a part of their remuneration. “It’s very hard to turn down the role because people get housing when they are employed. A lot of people don’t have other options, at least not ones that are good for them when it comes to housing. So people are willing to put up with a lot more than they can,” Pinnepali said. According to Holcomb, on average the housing RAs get is valued at $15,750 or $19,100, depending on the building. Besides the housing, RAs get a $4,800 stipend which includes a cash payment and ARTICash. This includes compensation for a 29 day training (22 days before the fall semester and seven days before the spring semester), when RAs must be available for all days and evenings, and cannot do other jobs during the training period. Despite the increased stipend members of the reform group still feel they could be compensated more based on their laborious works. “It’s hard to quantify the compensation. But the school needs to recognize how much labor we are putting into it. We deserve to get fairly compensated, and we will probably keep on demanding for that,” Kim said. Future Plans for the Reform Group Reform members feel cautiously optimistic that more changes will take place in their working conditions. “We were able to implement some big changes. All of the RAs overcame differences to reach a common goal, to demand better working conditions and get ourselves heard. This momentum will be continuing,” Reardon said. The school administration said that they would also work closely with RAs to collaborate around improvements in their working conditions in the future. In an email interview with F Newsmagazine, Holcomb wrote, “Working collaboratively [with the reform group], we were able to make several positive changes to the RA position. In response to their feedback, we restructured RA committees, removed many responsibilities related to room preparation, incorporated their feedback into training, adjusted the number of resident check-ins, and reduced the number of community walks.” “We look forward to continuing these discussions this year,” she added. Some of the areas the reform group members think the administration can work on in the upcoming days are updating the COVID policies, organizing shorter trainings, creating severance processes, and structuring committees better. In addition, the members demand transparency about Residence Life’s budget allocations. However, RAs understand their demands will take time to be implemented. This semester all four of the RAs interviewed will be graduating, but this won’t deter them from continuing to ask for fair treatment. They said they want to leave a legacy for the upcoming RAs. “When changes are made for the most part, we know that we’re not going to see them getting implemented. Still, we will work so that somebody somewhere will not have to go through what we had to deal with,” Reardon said. “We just want good things for our current selves and whoever could be in our same shoes in the future. We just want to see each other, get better working conditions and work for people in the future so that they don’t feel as overwhelmed, overworked or undervalued,” they added. ILLUSTRATION BY HAILEY KIM(MFAVCD 2024). She cannot work without iced coffee and sweets. “There’s a lot of emotional labor that I think we would all love to pour into helping our residents, to get connected with the things that would benefit them.” Ankit Khadgi (MAVCS 20240 is the Managing Editor of F Newsmagazine. He just wants to sleep. UNITED
  • 4. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE SCREAM LET IT ALL OUT overwhelmed, so she took a break beginning in 2019. She delayed coming back during the COVID-19 pandemic, and spent some time in Denmark studying geology and climate science to get a different perspective on the world. Jiapan tried out five jobs in four years while in China, trying everything professionally related to art. Now she’s back at SAIC with new perspectives and a better understanding of the world. Most importantly, she said she knows how she fits into it. “Now I feel like I know what I’m doing and what I will do in the future. It’s a long journey of being a Y ou’re having a panic attack. The cause doesn’t matter. What matters is your skin is crawling, your hands are shaking, your thoughts are racing. If you don’t move, you might explode. What you really want to do is scream. Loudly. But you can’t. There’s no place to scream. You live in Chicago with two roommates. You can’t go home; one of your roommates will be there, or your neighbors will hear you through the walls. You can’t go to the park; the park is a public space, someone will think you’re “crazy”. Everywhere you go, there is someone. There is nowhere to be truly, loudly alone. Addie Stiles is a self-proclaimed loud person. She’s a newcomer to Chicago as a freshman undergraduate. Stiles likes making noises as she exists, whether they be by vocal stim or by hazard of doing tasks. Yet, now that she’s in Chicago, she feels like she can’t do that anymore. If she drops her keys on the counter, she wakes her roommate. If she plays music, she has to be careful of who’s listening through the walls. “I am like a mouse in my dorm room,” Stiles said. Solomon Duncan, also a freshman undergraduate, said he has similar feelings. “I don’t think I could find a place [where] I could scream and not care about reactions.” Duncan comes from a small suburb outside Nashville, Illinois. For him, the transition to Chicago — a big city — was exciting and full of possibilities, and it still is. But he’s also learned that the city can induce anxiety. To cope, Duncan often seeks a quieter place where he can be alone, but this has become difficult with a roommate. As opposed to playing records to unwind, he said he spends time on his bed trying to not to irritate anyone. Neither Stiles nor Duncan feels hopeless. As their old ways of coping have become inaccessible, they’ve found new ones. Duncan makes time to ride the Blue Line and hang out in the suburbs of Chicago on the weekends. Stiles re-joined Roller Derby, one of her favorite activities back home. Despite their newness to Chicago, both of them are starting to adjust. On the other hand, senior TJ Jiapan said she’s spent the last four years feeling frequently overwhelmed. When she started school at School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2016, she wasn’t super focused on anything. “It’s like a buffet. I’m so starving, but after I enter the buffet, I’m like, ‘I should try a bite of this, a bite of that.’ But after all, I don’t know which one is my favorite. Or, which one is the one I should pursue for the rest of my life.” Jiapan left SAIC during her junior year. She felt ILLUSTRATION BY BEI LIN (BFA 2023). He is trying his hardest not to be replaced by AI. Places to go to be alone as an SAIC student. REPORT by Alex Lee SHOUT 6 SAIC student at SAIC,” she said. Jiapan was sure to stress that there are valuable resources at SAIC. The Title IX office, the Wellness Center, and her professors have all been beneficial. According to her, everyone she talks with wants to help, and they all want her to succeed. Jaipan said:“I already paid the money for them. They have to give me something back. So I will never think that too much, or like I am bothering them.” Graduate Student Mira Simonton-Chao is a first year grad in the art education program (MAAE). She also struggles with finding places to be alone. She said Wellness Center Lakeview Building 116 S. Michigan Ave., 13th floor Monday–Friday, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Health Services 312.499.4288 healthservices@saic.edu Counseling Services 312.499.4271 counselingservices@saic.edu Disability and Learning Resource Center 312.499.4278 dlrc@saic.edu Every SAIC Student may receive up to 16 free short-term counseling and psychother- apy sessions with the Counseling Services Department. One could always scream at a counselor. Loyola Beach The Far North Side of Loyola Beach has big empty patches. Few people would hear if one wanted to scream. 2023 SAIC 7 Alex Lee (BFA 2027) is probably human. They’re just happy to be here. “I hate going to MacLean because it’s really hard to find a space to be alone there. There’s always people going to class or something.” Simonton-Chao recommends going to the Film Video New Media & Animation Screening Room (only available to students enrolled in specific FVNMA classes), or the 280 Sculpture Garden. Mike Pietrus, Director of Counseling Services at SAIC, said he is not aware of any spaces on campus that are dedicated for students to be alone and scream or be loud. He did, however, give alternative recommendations. Pietrus mentioned such places like the Movement room on the 13th floor of MacLean, or looking into reserving rooms through the Instructional Resources & Facilities Management department. He also said that often students are able to find empty classrooms to solitarily chill in. Pietrus also encourages students to be creative when coming up with places to be alone. “But it’s also like if you’re looking for something a little more you know, specific, it might be helpful to find places, there might be a community in the Chicago that sort of does this kind of stuff and, and engages in that kind of support,” He said. SAIC counseling services also provides access to several online services such as ThrivingCampus, an online directory to help find mental health care off- campus; Togetherall, an anonymous social media site to talk about your struggles and help others; and Telus Health Student Support (THSS), a free and confidential mental health and wellbeing support service that is open 24/7. Above are some resources if you are feeling alone or overwhelmed. Don’t be afraid to shoot an email or show up in someone’s office. Title IX Office Lakeview Building 116 S. Michigan Ave., 12th floor Robert Babcock, Ed.D. 312.499.4165 title9@saic.edu Title IX Deputy Director Verron Fisher 312.499.3904 title9@saic.edu Rage Rooms For $35 one can throw axes for an hour at Kanya Lounge. They also offer two-person rage rooms. Make it Art SAIC is, in fact, an art school. Turn your anxiety and feelings into a performance piece! Get your class together and just scream at them. Real loud. Then you can talk about your feelings in critique.
  • 5. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE ARTS 9 8 ARTS Gordon Fung (MFA FVNMA 2024) is a transdisciplinary artist working with experimental video art, multi-/ new media, installation, sound art, audiovisual performance, conceptual arts, and curatorial practice. He directs the experimental arts collective //sense. ILLUSTRATION BY ALLEN YE (BFA 2023). He likes bin bin bam bam. SAIC Grads Gain International Exposure at ARS Electronica REPORT by Gordon Fung Nimrod Astarhan — artist of “KhazarArcheological Confabulations” (2023) By chance or not, museums in Linz have some of the most novel approaches to collecting and exhibiting digital art. These include the Francisco Carolinium, headed by curator Alfred Weiniger. Situated in a beautiful 1895 building designed by Berlin architect Bruno Schmitz, the museum has one of the world’s first digital platforms for exhibiting digital art and a robust collection of digital-born works. Experiencing the museum’s shows balanced the progressive thrust of new work presented ina the festival with research about cultural relevance, provenance, and preservation of digital work. The museum’s shows had fresh takes on contemporary issues, such as in Meta. space: Visions of Space, exhibiting contemporary social VR and 3D simulation works alongside maps and globes from the 15th century. This environment provided the physical and conceptual space for exploring the cultural relevance of celebrated new technologies in a slower, more profound way, without losing touch with contemporary work with them. It inspired me to think about my digital work’s physical renderings, embedding conceptual thinking about materiality in methods of depiction and representation. “Khazar Archeological Confabulations” (2023). Photo by artist. “Happy Travels” (2023). Photo by artist. “Camera Shy Hoodie” (2023). Photo by artist. “The Lovers” (2023). Photo by artist. “<overload.love>” (2023). Photo by artist. SHINING OVERSEAS Juan Flores — artist of “Happy Travels” (2023) My time at the Ars Electronica Festival was half spent answering questions about my work, while the other half was spent asking questions about other peoples’ work. I wanted to take advantage of the fact that this festival brings an audience from all over the world to get different perspectives. It was important to me to see people’s reactions to my piece, and overhear their conversations, though most of what I heard were gasps and whispers when they noticed a zipper on a backpack moving autonomously, which was also affirming that at least something was happening. My favorite piece in the festival was a VR experience that connected you to the physical control of a chair that was behind a curtain nearby. I am in love with that absurdity and playfulness when it comes to technologies that are becoming more advanced and accessible to us. I talked to the team that made it and they were happy to share their code. That to me shows the love of making and curiosity that got me interested in the field in the first place. Eul Lee — artist of “The Lovers” (2023) What is art? The answer is: this varies from person to person. As an artist, I believe it is the act of communicating with the audience through a core human sense of “aesthetic perception.” This sense transcends both language and borders. As a native Korean speaker, English is not my mother tongue. Interacting with many Austrians who speak German, another language that I am unfamiliar with, makes me feel like I’m dealing with some kind of alien. However, the language barriers are transcended when viewers see my work. These beautiful and gentle smiles — like flowers — give me the greatest satisfaction an artist could possibly experience. We don’t communicate as Austrians and Koreans, but as fellow beings drawn to the same visions, engaging in deep and meaningful dialogue. Certainly, exhibiting in European countries far from my home studio presents numerous challenges. I have encountered unexpected variables during the installation process, which were the most difficult of my exhibition experiences so far. Nevertheless, overcoming these obstacles is the artist I’d envisioned becoming. With newfound confidence, I continue to tirelessly work (through the night) in my studio preparing to connect with even more audiences. Yiyi Liu — artist of “<overload.love>” (2023) Ars Electronica is absolutely amazing. It’s a massive gathering for new media artists, combined with a carnival vibe. Whether you’re a student practicing art or a professional artist, everyone has an equal opportunity to showcase their work. <overload.love> is an interactive game installation. The game causes computer devices to overload, triggered by data from the audience’s heartbeat. This data significantly lags the system and frame rate that eventually results in a glitch. Ars provides a unique opportunity for audiences from different countries, genders, ages, and professions to experience and test my work. Sometimes, the audience hasn’t interacted with the installation in the way I planned, so I keep refining the interaction to make it as natural as the “iOS system.” Participating in a public exhibition for the first time as an artist, and in Europe no less, I faced numerous practical challenges: visa issues, losing a suitcase containing my installation at the airport (and eventually retrieving it), and uncertainties about the space and equipment. These challenges, beyond the creating the installation itself, are things artists have to face alone. I want to thank our curator Angelia Mahaney for negotiating with Ars. Thanks to the Department of ATS for providing such a valuable opportunity. Mac Pierce — artist of “Camera Shy Hoodie” (2023) Ars Electronica Festival is something I’d only ever experienced through buzz and bursts of documentation, having only vicariously experienced it up until this year. Leading up to it I barely knew what to expect, and after diving in head-first I can describe it as an art and technology carnival. The sheer magnitude of events was staggering, with over 1,500 artists and over 88,000 attendees making their way through the main venue — Post City — over the five days, the festival was in full swing. Within the brutalist former mail-sorting facility, the full basement (a nuclear bunker) was solely dedicated to various installations. Included, was a narrative AR telepresence work where you could pilot a motorized folding chair around a room (“Unconventional Self” by Werner van der Zwan (NL) and Charl Linssen (NL)). The top floor exhibited 56 university campus exhibits that represented students from around the world, with the work of students from SAIC included. It was a huge event that required a ton of effort to organize. Special thanks to our curator Angelia Mahaney and ATS facilities manager Anna Yu for all their work in making it happen. It was a truly special opportunity and I’m grateful for it. T he Ars Electronica Festival is an annual international new media arts festival organized by the Austria-based organization Ars Electronica Linz GmbH, which was founded in 1979. This year, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago will be represented at the festival by eight graduates from the Department of Art and Technology Studies, where they’ll show work on this year’s theme: “Who Owns the Truth?” The SAIC faction’s work is titled “Funnel & Switch,” curated by Angelia Mahaney, under the “Ars Electronica Campus Exhibition.” It will run from Sept. 6 to 10. Ars Electronica has been the major international outlet for media artists to showcase their most up-to-date contemporaneous artistic response through technologies. To gain more insight about the festival, F Newsmagazine spoke to five artists, who shared their experiences.
  • 6. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE 2023 NEWS 11 ILLUSTRATION BY ADITI SINGH (BFA 2026) a graphic designer and digital illustrator. Originally from India, raised in Dubai, and recently moved to Chicago. dishes, the fried soft-shell crab with salted egg yolk is the most remarkable, delivering a harmony of crispy exteriors and soft interiors, rated as the finest in Chicago. Equally delightful is the oxtail stew.” Address: 225 W 26th St, Chicago, IL 60616 Price Range: $11-30 Shoo Loong Kan Hotpot Shoo Loong Kan Hotpot stands out as one of the top destinations in Chicago for those seeking a comforting and authentic Chinese hot pot. Whether you are looking for a spot to hang out with friends or a place for a hearty family dinner, it will fit the bill. Yixuan Liu (BFA 2024), said, “Shoo Loong Kan holds a special place in my heart as the ultimate Sichuan cuisine. Each bite offers a fiery kick. For those who love bold and spicy flavors, this is the place to be.” The design of Shoo Loong Kan is just as enchanting as its food. Stepping inside is akin to stepping back in time, with its ancient-style decor that takes diners on a visual journey through history. Dining here is an immersive experience in Chinese culture. Address: 2201 S Wentworth Ave 1st Fl, Chicago, IL 60616 Website: hotpotchicago.com Price Range: $31 - $60 C hinese food is the mosyt Googled cuisine in the United States, with over 3.35 million average monthly searches on Google in 2022. Chicago’s Chinese population rapidly increases , the city is home to several Chinese restaurants — and Chinese SAIC students have opinions about which ones are best. Da Mao Jia Da Mao Jia tempts discerning palates with its captivating textures. In this unassuming store, pans beneath the glass case proudly show an array of tasty street-style delicacies, Chengdu Famous Hotpot Mix, handmade bell dumplings nesting in a flavorful broth, special spicy noodle soup enriched with braised beef, and many more dishes. Among the options, Fiona Qiao (BFA 2025), recommends the soft, spicy bean curd, a luxurious indulgence that transports diners with each velvety bite. Clouds of tofu glide down the throat, while crunchy soybeans introduce a delightful contrast, and cabbage and onion provide another layer of complexity, harkening to the bustling lanes of Sichuan. Address: 2621 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60608 Website: damaojiausa.com Price Range: $11 - $30 TSAôCAA The story of this little cafe begins with their philosophy of “a pure cup of good tea.” Qixin Chen (BFA 2024) said, “The must-try, undoubtedly, is the Grape Green Tea Slush with Milk Foam. It’s a star of the show, a perfect blend of juicy fruit and the rich fragrance of milk foam. With every sip, your tongue is coated in a sweet aftertaste, motivating you to return for another encounter.” TSAôCAA takes youback to your high school days with their emphasis on bubble tea flavors, and their delightful after-school desserts, like the matcha tofu and egg waffle that, will make your heart sing. You can almost feel the weight of your backpack as you hear the joyful laughter of your friends. Address: 2026 S Clark St unit g, Chicago, IL 60616 Website: tsaocaail.com Price Range: $11 - $30 Ken Kee Restaurant Recommended by Boning Yan (BFA 2025), Ken Kee Restaurant is renowned for its delectable offerings, including Cart Noodle, traditional Cantonese cuisine, and milk tea. Located in the heart of Chicago’s Chinatown, it is Chicago’s first restaurant dedicated to Cart Noodle, which is a beloved dish with over twenty toppings and an array of noodle varieties that originated with street vendors in the 1950s, and later became a classic cultural icon. This eatery has also garnered a devoted online following, thanks to its distinctive neon-style decor, which evokes the charm of old Canton. With its warm and inviting atmosphere, Ken Kee offers more than just a dining experience but a journey through time and culture that captures the essence of Cantonese traditions. Address: 2129 S China Pl, Chicago, IL 60616 Website: kenkee.com Price Range: $11 - $30 Grand Palace Located a bit farther south, this hidden gem may be unassuming, but it has an ever-present warmth. Despite the quality of the dishes, the prices remain modest, ensuring that a family dinner doesn’t break the bank. There is always the option to reserve a large round table, perfect for hosting or gatherings. The gracious lady extends her warmth to patrons, offering sweet oranges to cool off on sweltering summer days, and comforting bowls of warm chicken soup to ward off winter’s chill. Nanyu Jiang (BFA 2024) said, “The dining experience here strikes a harmonious balance in taste — neither overly salty nor bland. Among the standout 5 Best Chinese Restaurants in Chicago. REVIEWS by Da Zhuang Da Zhuang (MFAW 2025) is a staff writer at F newsmagazine. She loves dogs, the sea, and soft boiled eggs, but hates spiders, cinnamon, cold rain. MORE NOODLES DUMPLINGS AND THAN 10 ARTS Tyler Calderon (BFA 2027) is a writer who loves ice cream! PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY BEI LIN (BFA 2023). He is trying his hardest not to be replaced by AI. Photo by Karla Ponce. Photo by Karla Ponce. This down-to-earth excitement is exactly what Nam’s sets evoke from his listeners: shouting, dancing, moshing, and overall freneticism. Nam and the other artists raised over $700 in ticket sale proceeds donated to Apna Ghar, a Chicago-based nonprofit that aims to end gender violence. Commenting on the trajectory of his career — from DJing his own house parties to performing sets at bustling venues — Nam said, “I don’t really mind, as long as I’m having fun.” His practice dedicates itself to the conflation of artmaking and partying, something that has consistently risen in quality and popularity over the last several years. “Nam doesn’t like drinking really, [although] he doesn’t mind being surrounded by drunk people because he’s dedicated to creating a good time,” said Momo Ishibashi, who is one of his closest peers. After he graduates in 2024, at the rate he’s progressing, Nam’s potential in the Chicago DJ scene is limitless. His endgame, however, is to one day own a mixed- purpose establishment that serves as a clothing store on weekdays, a nightclub on Fridays and Saturdays, and a restaurant on Sundays. Regardless, one thing’s for certain: Wherever he goes, fun is sure to follow. For more information on the “Audio Awareness” charity concert series and Nam’s upcoming events, check out their Instagram pages: @audio.awareness and @follow_nam. S chool of the Art Institute of Chicago sound student Namjoo Kim (BFA 2024), aka DJ NVM, has a spirit so loud even his silence is melodic. Born in South Korea in 1999, his love for music began early on. “I was listening to Tupac since I was like 12,” Kim said. From a young age, he built up a vast reservoir of different inspirations, establishing the foundation of his practice of DJing and beatmaking. From Afrobeat, to bossa nova, to hip-hop, to Brazilian dance music Nam’s range of musical tastes inform his developing musical style. But jazz had a particularly strong influence on him. “[the] build-ups and improv[isational]” scenes in jazz music evoke the same rollercoaster of suspense that he imbues in his dance music,” he said.” When Nam first moved to the U.S. in 2017, English didn’t come easily to him and he frequently holed up in his room, struggling to make friends. In his isolation, he started to learn DJ techniques by watching YouTube. Four years later, Nam’s apartment was regularly flooded with people excited to lose themselves in one of his iconic weekend “rager parties.” With party themes like “The Matrix” and “Someone Broke Our Neighbor’s Door,” Nam’s apartment (aka 1127) became a weekend staple for SAIC students and general Chicago party goers alike. From these modest beginnings, DJ NVM has grown into an artist capable of drawing huge crowds. He was one of three performers on Oct. 5 at Book Club Chicago — an underground music venue in Wrigleyville — for a charity concert series called “Audio Awareness.” The primary goal of “Audio Awareness” is to raise awareness about and funds for small charities, while spotlighting local artists. “We really want to have an underground approach towards nonprofit fundraising. When you think about fundraisers, you might think of pretentious galas or grade school barbecues, [but] for our shows we want people to be surprised that it is even a fundraiser,” said Graeme Phillips, — the founder of the art nonprofit Agora Chicago, which organized “Audio Awareness.” SAIC alum DJ NVM showcased in charity concert PROFILE by Tyler Calderon THE TABLE TURNING
  • 7. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE NEWS 13 12 NEWS Marium Asif (MFA 2025) is a first year graduate student from Karachi. She explores dystopian elements/events, mythology, folklore and magical realism themes both in her creative fiction, and non- fiction personal essays. PHOTOS BY FNewsmagazine PHOTO ESSAY by F Newsmagazine Staff TEXT by Marium Asif PROTESTERS RALLY IN SUPPORT OF GAZA L ess than a week after the escalation in Gaza began on October 7, three protests by supporters of the Palestinian movement took place outside The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and into the greater Loop area. The protests were organized by the Chicago Coalition for Justice in Palestine, along with the representatives from the Dissenters, Jewish Voices for Peace Action and Black Lives Matter (Chicago). The venue for the first protest was 500 West Madison Street, which is near the Israeli embassy; the second was held in Ida B Wells Street; and the third witnessed a group of 15,000 people who met at Ida B. Wells walked all the way to Michigan Avenue. An even larger protest took place on October 21. A woman with a painted heart on her face looks out over the crowd. The organizers and protesters chanted slogans like, “Netanyahu you can’t hide. We charge you with genocide.” Along with: “Gaza, Gaza don’t you cry, Palestine will never die.” A protester waves the Palestinian flag during an Oct. 14 demonstration in Chicago. Participants chanted phrases in support of Palestinians, which were followed by speeches that shared the history of Gaza’s occupation, the need for mass movement by the public, and an appeal for immediate de-escalation. A sea of protesters march forward down the street on October 14, carrying printed signs. “I believe in the rights of people to determine their own future and not to be under occupation. Israelis need to put down their arms, for a settled peace, for a sharing of land. [The end of the war] It’s horrible. It’s going to be terrible,” said one of the protesters, Sean Obidah. The current war began when Hamas attacked Israel on October 7. A protester’s sign stating solidarity with Palestinian people. Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker pledged support to Israel during an Israeli solidarity event in Glencoe that drew a few hundred people. Recent rallies in Chicago have shown support of Palestinians. A protester wears a mask and holds a sign in support of Palestinians at an Oct. 14 rally. Many of the rallies have passed by The Art Institute and other SAIC buildings. In Chicago, Four major protests have taken place in support of Palestinians. Axios Chicago reports that the city is home to 85,000 Palestinians, forming 60 percent of the the city’s Arab population.
  • 8. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE LIT 15 14 LIT 27 27. I have to remind myself that it took me two years to fall in love with the friends I had senior year in college. It takes time to fall in love with someone and somewhere, but I do not have time. I have two years until my master’s is over and I have to move on again. 28 28. I send my lover’s mother a postcard every month. We are still close despite the breakup. I can never remember her zip code in New England, so I search online for her street—hoping her full address will auto-populate on my screen like it always does. For the first time ever, the search engine takes me to an address in Illinois. 29 29. During my last semester at Emerson College, I published an article titled Sunset Moments. In it, I argue that a sunset forces you to stop, stare, and reflect as the day comes to a close—just as life’s transitional moments force you to do so too. Now I wonder if the inverse is also true: Sunrise Moments. Periods in your life where you’re forced to stop and stare at the start of something new while still caught in the sleepy, immovable limbo of it all. 30 30. Charles Dickens wrote, “One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it's left behind.” This applies both to Boston and my lover. 31 31. I used to cry on the phone every night to his friends—our friends. Where I was once met with empathy, I am now met with “you need to learn to move on.” 32 32. I also wrote about this breakup in Sunset Moments. To those concerned, I’m almost ready to stop writing about the topic. 19 19. I can’t look at the men I match with when we meet at museums. I am repulsed by their physical qualities. It’s not that they’re ugly. They’re just not him. 20 20. I only started going to pole dance classes because my lover enjoyed doing inverse spins on his friend’s pole at parties. I thought about quitting classes after the breakup, but I kept having these vivid dreams about twirling on the pole. 21 21. I dream about him every night. It’s hard waking up alone when I get to touch him in dreams. 22 22. It’s harder falling asleep in an empty bed. 23 23. I haven’t gotten a dating app match in two weeks. “You’re gorgeous,” a friend says when I mention this. “Is it you that’s picky?” I nod. They’re just not him. 24 24. I make a friend at pole dance class. We walk to the Blue Line together. “I didn’t know the Blue Line ran through this neighborhood,” she says. It doesn’t. The Blue Line I so love is actually the Green Line. It’s just that the station’s floor is painted blue. 25 25. I search online for “The Esplanade” to catch a glimpse of my old Boston sights—even if just in pictures. Results for Chicago’s “River Esplanade Park” pop up instead. 26 26. I never thought I’d miss Boston this much when I first moved there. Now I wonder, will I miss Chicago this much when I leave? I fear either response. If I do, I’ll be plagued by sadness all over again. If I don’t, it means I never fell in love with this city and its people—that my years here were a waste of time. I’m afraid of feeling this sad for two years. Sisel Gelman (MFAW 2025) was raised in Mexico City. Her work has been published over 37 times. #siselgelman has 3.0 million views on TikTok. Recovering from a bad breakup in a new city ESSAY by Sisel Gelman 1 1. Three months before my boyfriend broke up with me, we held each other tightly in my bed crying. It was the eve of our last Valentine’s Day together, and we knew the relationship had an expiration date. The end of college was less than a hundred days away, and to keep my student visa, I would be moving to Chicago in the Fall to start a master’s program. He would be staying in Boston. My lover turned his face away from me. He was tall, strong, and blue-eyed. His deep voice cracked between sobs. “You have to go become a great writer,” he said, resigned to letting me go. A month ago, I moved to Chicago to become that great writer. These words echoed in my mind. 2 2. The most common advice for a breakup is: 1) Spend time with friends and family. 2) Go to your favorite places and do things that you love. Starting fresh in a new city, you have neither. 3 3. I’ve been told that his letting go is a sign of his true love for me: a selfless willingness to let me walk unburdened into this life of writing that has always called for me. But why was he an impediment to my journey? Why was he unable to walk with me? 4 4. I was bedridden for three weeks after we broke up. 5 5. My doctor said a few years ago that I had to go on hour-long walks every day. This was easy with my lover in Boston. We used to walk alongside the Charles River Esplanade, all the way to the Smoot Bridge, and then loop back onto cobblestoned Commonwealth Avenue, through the Boston Common, to the urban campus of Emerson College in the Downtown Theater District. Every season brought new colors to our walk: reds and oranges in the Fall, green and blues in the Summer, pearly white snow in the Winter, and pink cherry blossoms in the Spring. He was good at walking long distances—he was a runner. It was always me with my bad knee and my bad hip that had to often stop and rest on a park bench at the edge of the Esplanade. 6 6. I’m looking for someone in Chicago to go on long walks with. If I could, I would stick a brightly colored ad onto every street lamp in the city: “Help Wanted: Friend or Lover Who Likes to Walk.” 7 7. I’ve begun to go on dating apps. This was a suggestion from another ex of mine—an ex who I am now best friends with. It took us a year of not talking to process our breakup. I wonder how long it’ll take my lover and I to mend the tear in our hearts. I haven’t heard from him in weeks. 8 8. I don’t know where my new friend and I would walk around Chicago. I don’t know the city well enough to map out my ideal walk. I’ve taken strolls by the lake’s trails and by the Riverwalk, but I quickly become upset. Both feel like a personal “Fake Esplanade.” The city of Chicago feels like “Fake Boston.” 9 9. I record these moments of “Fake Boston” on my social media with the sole intention that my lover will see them. I photograph Chicago extensively so that it seems like I am already in love with the city. It is all a lie. I am alienated from my environment despite its objective beauty. 10 10. Everyone I have met so far in Chicago loves Chicago. They go out of their way to tell me it is a fantastic city to live in—to create art in—but I have not yet found this love within myself. Part of me thinks if I was not abandoned, I would be excited to explore this city too. 11 11. It’s been four months since our breakup and I still cry every night. When you’re bitter and bruised, even the smallest of triggers make you blue. 12 12. I am in a poisonous era of my life. I meet strangers on the internet and take them to my apartment to fill up that empty space. It’s risky behavior, but my heart races at the rewarding prospect of not being alone. 13 13. I envy everyone I know in a long term relationship—especially when they post about it on the internet. Moments like those make me wonder if things would be different if I had asked once, “Would you come to Chicago with me? Could we try to make it work?” 14 14. Everything is a trigger. Kraft Mac and Cheese. The Parquet Courts. Las Vegas. 15 15. A common sign of a manic episode is risky sexual behavior. I don’t sleep with these men. I just like the idea of their company. I am not manic—I have been manic before and can recognize the feeling—I am energetic in my depression. 16 16. I have the belief that everything I am looking for is also looking for me. This comfort, this companionship, this happiness. It is all searching for me too. I go out to parties on most nights so that love can find me. 17 17. Chicago’s “L” Blue Line looks similar to Boston’s “T” Blue Line. I take this train every Thursday on my way back from pole dance class and I pretend I am home. 18 18. I become physically ill, grappled by sadness, every time I think about my old life. A HE HEA ARTBRE RTBREA AK K FRAGMENTS IN IN ILLUSTRATION BY ALLEN YE (BFA 2023). He likes bin bin bam bam.
  • 9. 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE ENTERTAINMENT 17 Kit Montgomery (BFA 2025) is earning their degree in side quests. Currently, they’re spinning spiderwebs into yarn and crocheting yarn into spiderwebs. ILLUSTRATION BY BEI LIN (BFA 2023). He is trying his hardest not to be replaced by AI. Accountability — from burned at the stake to topping the charts OPINION by Kit Montgomery Martinez situation as opposed to the Cavetown situation. Both are “canceled,” but in a lot of online spaces, they might be treated exactly the same. Through online platforms, people are able to speak openly about their alleged harmful experiences with artists and public figures. There’s even a public Google sheet that tracks canceled musicians. People can access information about situations that got artists canceled without victims needing to talk to the press or the police. But this “lack of proof” comes with its own set of problems. It’s led to a myriad of people not believing victims’ claims and even accusing them of making false claims. An example would be Tory Lanez continued online support despite having been convicted of shooting Megan Thee Stallion. The onslaught of people claiming “false accusation” causes victims to fear sharing their stories and in turn protects a number of abusers. The line between hate and criticism in social media callouts becomes blurred when problematic behavior is excused and open bullying or harassing of people who have made claims happens without repercussions. Allowing alleged offender to say they’ve been bullied by allegations is a way of them avoiding any real repercussions for their actions. I n June 2020 I stumbled across a series of social media posts about one of my favorite bands that detailed their problematic behavior. This post included a story about one of the adult drummers dating a minor. I started reading anything I could find out about the situation, and the story became more and more clear with each post. Immediately, I started trying to rationalize what I was reading. I thought, “Maybe it’s not nearly as bad as what people are saying online.” But I realized it didn’t matter if it “wasn’t as bad” as it looked, I didn’t feel OK about continuing to support the band. This experience isn’t uncommon. Many people who have looked up to a celebrity, artist, or public figure have found out they said or did something they couldn’t support. This phenomenon branches out into the idea of “canceling” a person because of their misdeeds. But does canceling work? When we call out these problematic people and explain why we can’t support their behavior, does their behavior change? Typically, not. In the music world for example, artists often deny accusations or give a weak, half apology that doesn’t acknowledge the depth of the hurt experienced by their victims and their fans. When pop-punk band All Time Low was called out for allegedly having a long history of being sexually inappropriate with minors, they immediately denied the allegations and then filed a lawsuit against three people who used social media to make these claims. So what exactly isn’t working? “In general, social media is not set up well for distributing information accurately and thoroughly. In order to truly be able to hold people accountable we have to establish better communities and systems of communication that are not based on superficiality and consumerism,” said SAIC student Milo Brown (BFA 2025). The young people who have grown up in an era where so-called “cancel culture” is a perennial topic have strong opinions. “The label of being ‘canceled’ gets applied to both major issues and minor mistakes, diluting the term and making it less useful,” said SAIC student Lyss Rogers (BFA 2027). One artist might be called out for sexual assault allegations, and another for making insensitive comments about a marginalized community online. For example, the Melanie But callouts for actions that happened pre- social media didn’t really stick either. Artists who did questionable or harmful things prior to the integration of social media often don’t get meaningfully canceled. Notoriously the former frontman of The Smiths, Morrissey, has been criticized for decades of racist, xenophobic, and otherwise problematic behavior. But he has never faced any real consequences for his actions and he still consistently tours and releases music while having maintained a huge fanbase. There are exceptions to cancelling’s lack of repercussions. During the shooting of “The Mandalorian,” Gina Carano was confronted online about a social media post that likened being a Republican to being a Jewish person during the Holocaust, and she was effectively fired. This accountability might have been due to the pandemic lockdowns giving people more time to focus on social media which could have made people more likely to call someone out online in a way that would stick. However, post-pandemic, many artists and creators ignore, deny, or otherwise disengage with any criticism of their behavior, and nothing happens to them. An example would be Brendon Urie who had many different allegations mounted against him but only addressed his use of transphobic language and not his sexual misconduct allegations, homophobic language, or racist language, among other things. “Especially when it comes to allegations of sexual misconduct and/or abuse, we, culturally, need to stop viewing cancellation as primarily serving as punishment. It’s not about punishment, it’s not about what a band member does or doesn’t deserve, it’s not about ‘jumping on bandwagons,’ or trying to hold people to unrealistic standards — it’s about keeping people safe,” said content creator Valeriesvoice when interviewed by me. Valeriesvoice focuses on covering news surrounding canceled musicians. She added: “Boiled down to its very simplicity, if someone is using their fanbase as a predation pool, they shouldn’t have access to that fanbase to prey on.” So how do we fix “cancel culture?” There’s no easy solution that will work for every case, but victims’ claims should not be treated like social media controversies, instead, they are real issues and should be addressed as such. Canceling shouldn’t be about whether or not you can still support an artist, it should be about keeping people safe. CANCEL CULTURE HAS FAILED? ILLUSTRATION BY SHINA KANG (BFA 2027). She wants new shoes. Katie Mae MacLauchlan (MFAW 2025) is a poet and a scholar. You can find her with a nose in a book most days, or pushing up her glasses. (She really needs to renew her prescription.) Spend Thanksgiving with 3 reads by Indigenous authors REVIEWS by Katie Mae MacLauchlan DECOLONIZE BOOKSHELF YOUR FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM 16 LIT NOVEMBER A s Thanksgiving draws nearer in the United States and the larger world is currently examin- ing the effects of colonialism, it’s important to revisit our own histories. Here are three reads from different genres that center indigenous voices to decol- onize your bookshelf this November. “A Snake Falls to Earth” by Darcie Little Badger “A Snake Falls to Earth” by climate scientist and Lipan Apache author Darcie Little Badger is a subtly-crafted split narrative YA novel full of shapeshifters and magic. It draws on Apache storytelling and emphasizes the importance of orality. I loved it. I appreciated how Little Badger echoed too familiar genocidal histories, but placed those histories in an uplifting fable filled with imagination, adventure, and friendship. Despite its unmistakably modern context, it’s all the same tricks. Confusing contracts and colonizer bullies are pitted against our young narrator, a Lipan girl named Nina. But in this story, we get a happy ending–and just barely, just in the nick of time. Nina is obsessed with solving the mystery of a story relayed to her by her Great Great Grandmother Rosita. Rosita says she saw a girl who could transform into a fish in the deep well that lies on the family’s property. Nina has long believed in the oral legends about people who can transform into animals and who are intrinsically linked to their animal counterparts on Earth. The second voice in this split narrative is Oli, a cottonmouth snake person who lives in the Reflecting World, the world where animal people roam free. He embarks on a desperate quest to save his friend Ami, a toad person whose species is going extinct on Earth. If the toads disappear on Earth, Ami will too. Oli and Nina’s worlds collide when Oli journeys to Earth with his pack of lovable animal friends to enlist Nina’s help. This is a story about families. It’s a story about the disappearances of peoples and species, and about the trials that still face indigenous peoples today, who endure and are still among us. It’s a story about language and translation, about what is lost and how we might still preserve it. It’s sure to charm and enchant readers of all ages. “There There” by Tommy Orange “There There” by Cheyenne and Arapaho author Tommy Orange shines for its empathy and plurality of voice. There are several Native narrative voices involved in its craft. Each voice is engaging and showcases a different version of urban Native life. The resulting novel is a triumph and a wonderful example of a story that looks to Native futures with a nod to the unforgettable past. Orange writes themes of belonging, community, addiction, and migration in this powerful woven narrative about identity. There is a diverse cast of characters from Oakland, California — most of them just scraping by— who are brought together as they travel to the Big Oakland Powwow. Each seeks something different from the gathering whether it’s money, information, or communion. Each has a past marked by a complicated relationship with their identity. Orange examines the cognitive dissonance that can exist between identity and lived experiences, writing characters that exist across an identity spectrum. “There There” is a bravely honest work by a masterful storyteller. Orange extends an impressive and nuanced empathy to his carefully-rendered characters, with all their various strengths and flaws. There are no villains, only people dealing with the circumstances they are dealt. This is a quick read, and the action chugs along. There is a brief interlude that includes essays which give context to the action in the novel written in the same engaging voice Orange employs for narrative. Despite the multiple character arcs, the story never lags, propelling readers through its action-packed and perhaps inevitable conclusion at the powwow. “There There” was selected as the One Book, One Chicago book of the year for 2023. This initiative encourages Chicagoans to read the book together over the course of the year, and there are likely copies on display in your local Chicago libraries. “There There” is not a story to miss. “Postcolonial Love Poem” by Natalie Diaz “Postcolonial Love Poem” is like one long love poem to indigenous women and girls by Mojave author Natalie Diaz. This poetry collection is an intersectional work that examines how the double forces of colonization and patriarchy have affected indigenous women and peoples. On its last few pages, Diaz dedicates this anthology to the many missing and murdered Native and indigenous women and girls and genderqueer and nonbinary indigenous people living in occupied lands. Cathartic poems examining historical gendered and racial violences are included beside infinitely more tender pieces that meditate on touch, intimacy, and sexuality. In this way, Diaz calls for a gentler future for indigenous women and girls. Diaz places her poems on and off the rez, locating some pieces in major urban spaces. This recontextualizes preconceived notions of indigenous lives in America, and reminds the reader of the lasting legacies of displacement. Throughout this collection, Diaz comments on themes of class, addiction, violence, disappearance, preservation, sex, and intimacy. Diaz draws on both indigenous imagery and iconographic American imagery. There’s even one reference to Beyoncé. This situates the anthology in its moment in history and breaks the mold of outdated stereotypes of indigenous people. Diaz has a complicated identity with nuanced markers. She is not only Mojave. She is also American. She is also queer. This anthology belongs on anyone’s bookshelf who has questioned who they are, and how they got there. It’s certainly a favorite on mine.
  • 10. A s we approach the cool and tumultuous weather of fall, many of us are tempted with thoughts of stews and soups. And not just stretching our budgets, perhaps too, these thoughts inspire planning some fun potlucks or dinner parties for the upcoming holiday season. In any case, the YouTube algorithm has my (and your) back because I have taken on the task of watching every slightly grainy, still-in-black-and-white episodes of Julia Child’s “The French Chef” that exist on the platform. Not only do I have some insight into what will make a recipe tasty, but, surprisingly, I also have a few insights into life because Julia knew no one is just cooking to eat. A good meal is so much more. Julia Child is the perfect chef for a moment filled with imperfections. She’s full steam ahead on being curious, failing, and succeeding. Maybe this has something to do with having been a spy for British intelligence, or the love she had for post- war Paris. Or maybe this approach started after she released “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” in America — during a time where nobody was mastering any French cooking anywhere outside of France — and she parlayed the book’s success into being one of the first cooking shows on American television in the 1960s. Even her regular appearances on PBS, a network with millions of viewers, could have positively impacted the way she looked at life. Julia wanted you to succeed and live her best life and so do I. Life Tip No. 1: What complements you can make you stronger. Did you know when you cook with butter, you should also add some oil so your butter fares better against the heat and burning? Julia knew this. She had a huge knowledge of French cooking techniques thanks to chef courses she took at Le Cordon Bleu. And she was one of the first women to study here. And you certainly need a good technique like butter and oil together in a time before cooking spray. However, it’s not enough butter and oil to make a recipe fatty by any stretch. It’s just enough to make sure things from eggs to steak to veggies in a saute pan don’t stick to the bottom of the pan. Applying this way of thinking to life: life is better when you live it with those who complement you. Think of yourself as a big knob of butter floating in a sizzling hot pan. Who is your oil and how do they keep you from burning under the pressure of life’s heat? Life Tip No. 2: Preparation is key to multitasking (and to everything else). Julia was a big believer that any home cook can make a professional looking meal as long as you practice with your tools. Julia wanted home cooks to be faster and more proficient with their knife skills. After all, if you get through the hard “dog work” (as she calls it) of the kitchen, you can more easily get on to the fun and satisfying parts of cooking. Along with demonstrating different techniques, Julia wanted a cook to have no fear of a sharp knife so they could quickly peel and segment an orange in their hand which is a skill necessary to make a dish she was quite enthusiastic about called: Duck a ‘lOrange (an orange roasted duck). Julia Child can be remembered for saying: “and if you’ve practiced your knife skills, this will be easy!” And honestly? She’s not wrong. One can practice any skill: Maybe you need to get in the practice of visiting fellow artists or learning how you’re inspired or reading more about a new or unfamiliar type of art from the Flaxman Library. Practice is what you make of it and it is about what is most useful to you. Life Tip No. 3: There are a ton of gadgets (and possibilities) out in the world! My favorite television personality and culinary nerd Alton Brown detests one use items and has complained about them on his show “Good Eats.” But even Alton might have to admit how cool some of Julia’s European gadgets were, when they only had one job. John McDonald (MFAW 2025) is a queer playwright bent on telling stories that highlight the diverse yet universal relationships we share. You’ll find them scarfing donuts, brownies, and compliments wherever the best ones are. THE WISDOM OF JULIA CHILD FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM 18 ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT 19 NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE Julia loved to show off what different kinds of cooking gadgets were capable of doing. My personal favorite is the pot with a handle that detaches and can be reattached so it can go in the oven with ease. It’s wild. Understanding one’s own kitchen is something Julia Child had to do, — given the fact that her tall height meant her kitchens had to be custom built both in her home and on her television set — and something I think she might have also promoted to other home cooks. The life question (maybe lesson) here is learning how you account for what makes you unique in your life and your art practice. Are you prepared for whatever your art practice might throw at you next or a any cool gadgets that could make your life easier? Life Tip No. 4: Sorrow and nervousness in adversity doesn’t make you weak. One of the most interesting things that sets Julia Child’s work apart from other TV chefs is the way she fumbles from time to time. She loses her words, her glasses, and sometimes her cooking pots despite knowing her kitchen so well. She has forgotten the meat in a dish after showing you how to chop it earlier making her appear more authentically human as she taught cooking. Julia Child was more than a perfect personality mimicking a recipe. Julia’s authenticity is something we can all strive for. She was nervous, she was imperfect, she was a little sad when things didn’t work out but that never stopped her. She was a cooking shark, bent on swimming through the waters and I know I want that kind of strength present in how I approach my own art practice. Life Tip No. 5: Embrace what you love. This might sound like a redundant idea if you’re reading this while currently in art school, but this isn’t just about where you are in life or what new thing you’re learning about in class. Julia’s passion for cooking and eating French food moved mountains and not just for the audience. It wasn’t just that she introduced a whole bunch of people to boeuf bourguignon (fancy French meat stew) or that she got them to advocate for fresher options in their markets. She also lived her life passionately for food. “The French Chef” show debuted near the middle of her life’s legacy, even though it was just her start in most of America’s homes. By seeking and embracing something that brought her joy, she changed the lives of so many. Along with her own. So, take a moment to think about your art practice. It’s not just about the hard work of making art it’s also about asking ourselves: What do you have special expertise in or a passion for? What joy that you want to show off to all? What is your “cooking?” French food to your Julia Child? Life Tip No. 6: Any dessert can be improved with dark rum. “And it has to be dark rum because otherwise you might as well not put it in at all.” - Julia Child, “The French Chef,” Season 5 Tasty life lessons everyone needs this holiday season. ESSAY by John McDonald ILLUSTRATION BY HAILEY KIM(MFAVCD 2024). She cannot work without iced coffee and sweets.
  • 11. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE COMICS 21 20 ENTERTAINMENT Staying Warm by Ava Walkow Copper Odyssey - Broken Glass by Cam Collins Graphic Journalism by Sidne K. Gard Sidne K. Gard (BFA 2025) is a queer writer and artist from New Orleans. They hope to one day understand how to make their own monsters.
  • 12. FNEWSMAGAZINE.COM NOVEMBER 2023 F NEWSMAGAZINE 22 COMICS COMICS 23 Dead Bugs by Veronica Timble Thrift Culture by Vanya Vellore by Mae Lyne Even more comics online at: fnewsmagazine.com Find web-exclusive comics as well as a massive backlog of cartoons, new and old! Check your answers online at fnewsmagazine.com!
  • 13. NOV 18, 2023–FEB 25, 2024 Faith Ringgold, Early Works #25: Self-Portrait, 1965. Oil on canvas; 50 × 40 in. (127 × 101.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Elizabeth A. Sackler, 2013.96. © 2023 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York.