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Nānākuli	 	 	 Mā‘ili	 	 	 	 Wai‘anae	 	 	 	 Mākaha
THE MAGAZINE OF THE WAI‘ANAE COAST. FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE.   
www.kingdomimkpublishing.org/na-pua-o-waianae
Issue # 2 | April 2015
Different Paths, Same Journey
Strengthen.   Challenge.   Support.
beach photo by Masina N. Sausi2 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
mahalo to our sponsors
History is rich in Wai’anae.  Let’s start with our names. The place name Wai’anae (wai meaning water, and ‘anae
meaning mullet) was said to have been inspired by the large mullet pond, Pu’ehu, built at the mouth of the stream
that flowed on the west side of what is now Pōka’i Bay. Pōka’i Bay is said to have been named after Pōkai, a Tahitian
chief who planted a coconut grove along the beach. The community surrounding Pōka’i Bay, because of it’s coconut
grove and mullet water pond, became the largest and thriving community along the coast.
The place name Nānākuli has an equally interesting history. Nānā means to look and kuli means deaf.  The first
settlers of the Nānākuli coastline (stretching from Lualualei toward the east) experienced mostly barren and scarce
resources.  Although fishing was plentiful, fresh water and vegetable food was not. The people of Nānākuli were
ashamed to greet visitors who passed through Nānākuli because there was not enough resources to share. The
culture of the people was to be hospitable and share their resources, however, because of the people’s shame that
they couldn’t, they ignored the ‘passer bys.’
These and more interesting facts and stories can be found in the following book, Historic Wai’anae.  Read
Historic Wai’anae in its entirety or keep it as a conversation piece.
What’s in a Name? History!
Resource
Historic Wai’anae by Edward J. McGrath Jr., Kenneth M. Brewer
and Bob Krauss and published by Island Heritage (1973)
Na Pua o Wai’anae is abundantly grateful for our generous sponsors. Over the
next few issues, we will share with you all about what they do and why they give.
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 3
letter from the publisher
Aloha Kāua e Wai’anae!Happy 2015! We made it—our second issue. The
road was bumpy, ladened with ditches (not
just potholes), and sharp, narrow, sketchy, turns,
but the journey and arrival at our destination
made the risks well worth  it.  
A
s we approached the new year, most people
were thinking about resolutions. A resolution is
nothing more than an acknowledgment that we
have made a choice to let go of the past, and make way
for a new brighter future. Many of us made resolutions
to better ourselves in some way--lose a few pounds,
eat healthier, better handle stress, spend more time
with loved ones, make a plan to get out of debt, drink
less, dream big, spend more quiet time with our higher
power, help those less fortunate.
We’ve been in
our new year for a
while now. How’s
that working for
you?  Statistically
speaking, some of
us have already
given up on our new
year’s resolutions.  
Some of us don’t
even remember the
declarations we’ve
made. If you’ve
already given up,
don’t feel bad, at
all.  Statistics say
that only 8% of us
who make resolu-
tions are actually successful. Does that make 92% of us
failures? In my opinion, something is wrong with the
process, not the people who make the resolutions.
I recently read a Forbes article by Dan Diamond.
He reminded me of some great strategies: Set small,
measurable goals; Keep track of your progress; Believe
that you can; and tell as many people your goals to help
keep you accountable. These strategies sound great, and
we should all use them, but, there’s more to it than that.
	 In this issue, Na Pua o Wai’anae will focus on
what we feel is the missing element to making, keeping
and realizing our goals—seek inspiration--examples of
others who keep going even when their road is bumpy,
full of potholes and sketchy sharp turns. On the
cover, we showcased four Wai’anae men who are doing
just that—improving their lives, and accomplishing their
goals. They refuse to let life take them for a ride—rather
they’re taking life for a ride. Johanne Mitchell, Max
    Holloway, Kamu Kapoi and Uncle George Kalilikane
are men on a mission. Their paths are different, but their
journeys are the same. Na Pua o Wai’anae hopes that in
sharing their journeys, it will help you along yours.
Na Pua o Wai’anae promises to remain steadfast
toward our goal of becoming a voice of strength in our
community as we share information that motivates,
inspires and provokes thought and action. At the heart
of our mission is to be culturally sensitive and global in
perspective as we empower, encourage and educate our
readers.  I pray you feel we do that.
Keep the magazine on your kitchen table as a
resource or share it with your neighbors.  But, whatever
you do, please do not keep us a secret. If you’d like to
share your thoughts, give us a ring at 808-888-9434 or
send us an email to stories@npow.org.  
Currently, Na Pua O Wai’anae is a quarterly
publication. Please be on the look out for each issue.  
We will also be uploading every issue on our website
at the following page: www.kingdominkpublishing.org/
na-pua-o-waianae. We would appreciate it if you could
share about us on facebook, linkedin, and Instagram.
Please allow me a personal moment.  I was born
and raised in Waimanalo, exactly on the opposite
side of Wai’anae. And although I wasn’t able to spend
much time in Wai’anae, my wife was born and raised in
Wai’anae and through that connection I will do my best
as publisher to do the best job I can to carry forth the
mission and to be accepted by the community as a voice
of the people, about the people and for the people.
Me ka ha’aha’a a me ke aloha,
Publisher
photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
Tad K. Makaila
Morning Rainbow at Nanakuli “Flats”
photo by Jash Defreitas
4 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
PUBLISHER:
Tad K Makaila
808-352-1560
tad@napuaowaianae.org
WRITER:
Momi Robins-Makaila
808-888-9434
momi@napuaowaianae.org
ADVERTISING MANAGER:
Sharon Fountain
808-306-3054
sharon@napuaowaianae.org
ACCOUNT MANAGER:
Tehani Robins
808-218-1753
tehani@napuaowaianae.org
MAGAZINE/
ADVERTISING DESIGN:
Masina N. Sausi
808-620-0127
sausigfx@gmail.com          
06
cover story
Read about the four inspiring
journeys  of this issue’s
Men on Missions.
13
education
Are you a homeschooling parent
looking for support? Connect with
other homeschooling families.
14
people & community
66 years ago,  The Okimoto family founded the Wai’anae store—a family
owned and operated business. Read about their beginnings and why they
do what they do.
25
healthy food tips
Tips to improve our diet
16
issues
Fear: It’s a real issue, even for our
young people. How can we overcome
this debilitating, universal feeling?
28
faith & spirituality
An encounter with God: A Personal
Testimony
30
health & beauty
Hawaiian Hair can be hard to handle,
but with these inexpensive remedies,
help is here.
	 Nānākuli	 	 	 Mā‘ili	 	 	 	 Wai‘anae	 	 	 	 Mākaha
THE	MAGAZINE	OF	THE	WAI‘ANAE	COAST.	FOR	THE	PEOPLE,	BY	THE	PEOPLE.			
www.kingdomimkpublishing.org/na-pua-o-waianae
Issue	#	2	|	March	2015
Different Paths, Same Journey
	Strengthen.			Challenge.			Support.
COVER:
Featured (L-R)
J. Mitchell, M. Holloway, K. Kapoi, Uncle
George K. photo by  Miulan Nihipali
The Picture Lady.
Cover design by: Masina N. Sausi
If you visit any of our
businesses or sponsors,
or make contact
with anyone we’ve s
hared with you,
please tell them
Na Pua `O Wai`anae
sent you. Mahalo for
your support!
22
WIS Coach Tyler Fabrao:
Wai’anae athletes could
achieve more! But why
aren’t they?
in this issue
sausigfx@gmail.com
facebook.com/SausiGfx
MASINA N. SAUSI
Creative Designs for...
• identity, branding, logo
• print collateral
• advertisements
• or personal events
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 5
6 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 7
Cover Story
Johanne Mitchell, Max Holloway, Kamu Kapoi, and
Uncle George Kalilikane are four Wai’anae ‘Men
on Missions’. Read about their incredible journeys.
Let them serve as inspiration to be purposeful and
impactful—to live as a man on a mission
Johanne Mitchell
J
ohanne, his wife Lynn and his children Alexis and Sky, have brought
the ancient art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu to Mākaha. Through 808 Gracie
Fighter, Johanne shares with adults and children the ancient art of
Jiu Jitsu made famous by Royce Gracie, the winner of the very first UFC
tournament. Royce and the Gracie family are famous for sharing the
innovative and creative art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.
Johanne hails from Kahalu`u but for 2 years has called Mākaha his
home. He, and his family decided on Mākaha because it is where the
warrior spirit is strong. Johanne says, “There is so much to learn from this
ancient art that can be easily applied to all areas of life. When you’re in
training, caught in a submission, ready to ‘tap’ you are really allowing
yourself to submit to that person, declaring that he or she has your life
in their hands.” Johanne adds, “That truly does amazing things for your
ego.” “There are other times when you’re in the middle of a match, tired
and ready to quit that the fundamental principles of this art teaches
you to dig down deep inside yourself and find that place of calm. One
can learn to apply that to other areas of life.”
Johanne’s goal for 808 Gracie Fighter in Mākaha is to offer a
generation of students the opportunity to ground themselves in some-
thing honorable. Johanne says, “We are often defined by the activities
in which we participate. Jiu Jitsu is an art of discipline, confidence, and
purpose. It allows us to detach from the ego, and instead, seek comradery,
collaboration and commitment to each other.” He hopes others find out for themselves how valuable Jiu Jitsu
can be in every area of life. Johanne and his entire family make Jiu Jitsu a part of every aspect of their own lives.
When asked about his mission, Johanne says, “I hope to be a beacon of light and I will continue to do
what I can to create a better community.” Johanne says that he hopes to be a role model to his family and his
community and that to be a man requires him to make decisions for his family and community. Johanne feels it’s
important to leave a legacy. For him, he wants 808 Gracie Fighter from Mākaha known to produce Jiu-Jitsu world
champions. Johanne Mitchell knows what it takes to be a man on a mission. He says, “We need to show our love
for our children by making them better. That takes doing what’s right, not just what’s right for the moment.”
If you’d like to join Johanne and his family, give them a call at 408-843-7566, or visit their website
at www.808GracieFighter.com.
photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
8 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
42-year-old, Johanne Mitchell, is a man on a mission.
brings jiu jitsu to mākaha
Max “Blessed” Holloway
-year-old, 2009 Wai’anae High School graduate Jerome
“Max” Holloway is a man on a mission. He’s a husband,
father and son.  He’s doing his best to provide for his
family and be a positive role model as a MMA UFC fighter. Max
“Blessed” Holloway has wowed fans in Hawaii, the nation and
the world. If you watch any of his youtube videos, you’ll see
that he is intense, aggressive, and blessed. Max is a warrior in
the cage, and wears his UFC belt with pride, but what’s more
rewarding to Max is winning young souls for Christ. “Jesus Christ,
my grandma Cynthia Kapoi, mom Missy Kapoi and wife Kaimana
Holloway have molded me into the man you know,” says Max.
Max didn’t grow up dreaming about becoming an MMA
fighter.  “I started training because one of my best friends - Josh
Keanu - told me I should train with him. I slept over his house one
night and his trainer was there too. Colin Mackenzie watched me
hit the speed bag and said I should come to training. So I did and
the rest is history,” says Max. Now that Max is a contracted UFC
fighter making a name for himself, he realizes that it comes with
responsibility. Being from Wai’anae, a town that is often looked
down upon,  he especially feels a responsibility to share with
young men what he feels is an important message. “Max says
“a real man is one who does whatever he has to, to take care of
his family, not what he can, but what he has too.” Here’s some
advice from Max, a humble young man, “the world doesn’t owe
us anything.  It isn’t about what the world will give to us, it’s
about what we can give to the world. If we understand that, we
can make positive changes in our world.”
Max is proud to be from Wai’anae. Max explains, “The greatest
thing about Wai’anae has to be the strength of our community. People outside of Wai’anae think it’s a bad place,
but if any one of them got to know the people, they would find out that we care deeply for each other, even
strangers. I think that’s one of the things that has helped me to get where I am today. It’s not always expected
that we’ll do great things, but when we push through adversity, there’s nothing sweeter than showing people
we can. The one thing about Wai’anae that I pray changes, is the rampant drug abuse.  I have seen many families
destroyed by drug abuse.”
Max is living a dream: earning an honest living; taking care of his family; doing what he loves. Max shares,
“the road was not always easy in fact it was difficult. But, that’s what life is--a bunch of ups and downs. Whatever
you do, when you hit rock bottom, you can’t give up. We define ourselves when we hit our lowest point and
bounce back up.”
Max Holloway has been a professional since 2010.  He’s fought all over the world in places like Las Vegas,
Stockholm, Sweden, Singapore, Baltimore, Maryland and Tulsa, Oklahoma.  He’s fought opponents of every caliber.  
When asked if he ever gets scared, Max shared this, “Of course!  But, the way I look at it, it comes with the job
and will happen sooner or later.  Why walk around with an umbrella waiting for the rain? When the time comes,
I’ll deal with it. All I can do is train right, fight smart and pray for the best. I’d rather remember the highlights,”
says Max, “like when I got my first professional submission. I tapped my opponent out with a move that his gym
was known for. And, all fight week, I was as sick as a dog. I overcame adversity in that fight!” “The day I’ll never
forget is the day I got my professional contract.  I received it at 12, and my son, Rush, took his first breath of life
at 3. I am a blessed man.”
Max Holloway is definitely a man on a mission. You can expect much more from Max Holloway.  You can find
Max’s stats at http://www.ufc.com/fighter/Max-Holloway. You can also find his career highlights in videos on
youtube--made by Max’s fans.
23
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 9
Congratulations Max Holloway on your
recent win against Cole Miller!
photo by James Law
mma fighter:
Kamu Kapoi
K
amu is a man on a mission.  He describes himself as
‘straight up.’  “I never settle for less. I’m persistent, and
I have a burning passion to be the change I seek. I’m
an optimistic Moke! When I really want something, I go get
it.” That attitude explains his long list of accomplishments-
-impressive for anyone, no matter what age.  
Kamu graduated from Wai’anae High School then earned a
Bachelors of Science Degree in Digital Filmmaking and Video
Production from the Art Institute of California, Los Angeles.
Since graduating Kamu has been a ‘serial entrepreneur.’ He
says, “If it makes sense to me, I go for it. That’s because I’m
a man on a mission.  I have a purpose--an ‘ohana to provide
for, my wahine and two keikikāne.”
When Kamu co-founded his first production company in
2006, they landed a $1.8 million contract that spanned over 3
years. “Not to bad for a bunch of Wai’anae boys,” laughs Kamu.
Currently, Kamu runs an independent production house.
He directs, shoots, and edits--commercials, music videos,
documentaries, short & feature length films, and Reality TV.
“I’m primarily a camera operator, but I do anything.” Kamu
is working with ‘Ōiwi TV and the Polynesian Voyaging Society
documenting the Hōkūle‘a & Hikianalia as they sail around the
world to share the mission of Mālama Honua: To Care for Island
Earth. Kamu is also a camera operator on CMT’s popular hit
show Dog & Beth: On The Hunt. Kamu is also involved with Ola
Kino Maika’i, a program aimed at helping people improve their
health.  Also, as part of his commitment to Mālama Honua,
he’s helping ‘ohana and businesses by providing free solar
systems. Kamu laughs as he shares, “I’ve got other things in
the works too, but I can’t show all my trump cards!” Kamu’s
mission is to share stories about challenges that mainstream media overlook.  “In those stories come triumph over
obstacles, and it’s important to tell those stories.” Kamu also adds, “I believe that giving back is a key element in
my success. Wai’anae has a traditional replica voyaging canoe named, “E Ala”. My good friend, Kaina Nakanealoha
and I are the current captains who volunteer to mālama E Ala. If you’re Interested, bring your good mana to our
new Hālau Wa‘a at the Wai‘anae Boat Harbor.”
When I asked Kamu, “Who do you thank for guiding you along the way?” Kamu answers, “I aloha and mahalo my
grandparents Jerome and Cynthia Kapoi, their children, my mom, Yvonne-Marie “Missy” Kapoi, all my brothers and
sisters. my dad and stepmom, Doug and Joann Westbrook--all were instrumental in giving me a solid foundation.”
Kamu also thanks “Ke Akua, Nā Akua, Nā Aumakua, Nā Kūpuna, Nā `Ōpio.” Kamu adds, “There’s so many people
who have mentored me over the past 28 years of my life. I could write a novel. If you my mentors are reading this,
I mahalo you for that piece of mana’o. It made me who I am today. I have and always will look up to the people
who kept pushing, through all the bullshit, to make positive changes in their lives and in others--the people
who rise above the stereotypes and naysayers. Much respect to them. Keep it up, because someone is always
watching.” When asked his advice for young men watching him, he says, “Find a purpose and live like no other.”
Kamu quotes his mentor Jim Rohn: “The same wind blows on us all. The wind of disaster, sorrow, bad times, good
times, success, money, etc… So it’s not the direction of the blowing of the wind that determines our destination,
it is the set of our sails.” And Kamu adds, to the young Kanaka Maoli, “Rely on the ones who have come before.”
As Papa Mau says so eloquently, “If I have courage, it is because I have faith in the knowledge of my ancestors.”
Sam “Kamu” Kapoi is definitely a man on a mission, and we thank him for sharing his mana’o with us. If you’d
like to check out his work, you can find him on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.  You can also find out about the
solar systems he’s providing for families at www.samkapoi.com.
10 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
When it comes to knowing what he wants and going for it, 28-year-old
Samuel Keli’inui “Kamu” Kapoi is all guts.
photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
Uncle George Kalilikane
J
ust 5 short years ago, George (49 years old at the time)
weighed over 300 pounds, was border line diabetic and scored
a whopping 150+ on the blood pressure scale.  He’d been
inactive for most of his adult life, having put away the surfboard
of his youth to devote his life to raising his children. Shortly after
losing his father-in-law to diabetes, and most of his adult children
leaving home, George made his health his number one priority.  
His answer came when a fellow Nanaikapono Protestant church
member, Frank Taua brought a couple of paddle boards to the
beach. George wanted to get on, but his size prevented him from
trying.  He watched until he could watch no longer.  Once he
got on, he was hooked. The clarity and peace he experienced
while on the ocean was so overwhelming he needed to share that
experience with others.
George spent 4 months paddleboarding when he decided
he was ready to share. Equipped with just 2 paddleboards, he
pitched a tent at Poka’i bay and waited for people to come. The
first few weeks George spent days at the bay with not one inquiry.
George chuckles as he explains, “If someone so much as looked
at my boards funny, I’d talk them into a lesson.” George laughs as
he asserts, “I did a few things wrong; I didn’t tell anyone what I
was doing; people couldn’t find the bay anyway; and if they could,
they were told to stay out of Wai’anae.”
George didn’t let those lonely days at the bay stop him. He
asked God to send people to him. He knew he needed to bless others with the gift he’d been given.  George told
God that if he’d send people to George, he’d pray for each and every one. God did just that.  To date, George has
taught more than 6,700 people how to paddleboard. George says, “What amazes me is that when people come
out of the water they have this desire to share their life story.”
George realized people needed more. They needed prayers. On
every drive home, George prayed for every person to whom he
gave a paddleboard lesson. George also started a prayer group
on facebook for just that—people who need prayers. Today there
are 157 members from around the world praying for one another.  
George says that he focused on helping others, but when his
mother was in a coma due to lung failure, given only 2 days to live,  
those 157 members prayed for her.  His mom walked out of the
hospital after her doctors prepared George’s family for her death.
George says, “Because I decided to give some random person a
paddleboard lesson on a beach at Poka’i bay in a little town called
Wai’anae, my mom is here today. George says, “I might not be
equipped with a Bible, but with my paddleboards, I share God’s
Word. I am blessed abundantly.”
Today George tows a large trailer, filled with 35 paddle-
boards—blessings from others who believe in his mission. George
says, “find your passion, allow yourself to be led, and you’ll be
exactly where you need to be.” You’ll find him many mornings
at Poka’i bay where he calls the Bay of Dreams. That’s also the
name of his facebook page. By the way, diabetes is not in George’s
future.  His blood pressure is normal and he’s as healthy as a horse.
George Kalilikane is an inspiration, a role model, and definitely a
man on a mission.
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 11
Proud and humble Nānākuli resident and Wai’anae High School graduate,
George Kalilikane says his life’s mission is to be a blessing to others. He
does that one paddleboard lesson at a time.
photos by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
12 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
Wai`anae
Homeschoolers Unite
by Michelle Okimoto
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 13
N
estled along the end of Farrington Highway,
Waianae is of ten considered an isolated
community with a reputation for unbearable
traffic. Yet, it is a very special place, with much to
offer its homeschooling families. There are unique
small businesses, farms, parks, hiking trails and
beaches available for homeschoolers to utilize, to
take learning outside the four walls of their home.
“We love exploring all that Waianae has to offer,”
says Sunshine Lopez, a mother of five, just beginning
her homeschool journey. “I want my children to
know their community well. I want them to respect
it and nurture it, and work for positive changes.
Always. I am really looking forward to growing our
Waianae homeschool ohana so we can do some
amazing community service projects right here
in our coast.”
One thing many new homeschool families, like
the Lopez family, learn quickly is that schooling
at home can be isolating, especially in Waianae.
Too often homeschoolers on our coast must travel
30 minu tes to an h our (on a good day!) jus t
to find activities, sports, clubs and co-ops for their
students. “We have to drive to Mililani to meet
with other homeschoolers who use our Classical
Conversations curriculum,” says Katelin Manansala,
Waianae resident and homeschooling mother of
three. “It’s only once a week, but the drive is long,
and really feels like it wastes some of our learning
time. I’m hoping to make some connections with
more leeward families this year.”
Now, utilizing social media, Manansala, Lopez,
and other Waianae homeschoolers have a way to
connect. Waianae and Ko’Olina homeschooling
families can reach out to each other via Facebook
in the group, Waianae Homeschool Ohana (WHO).
T he g roup of fer s w ide appeal to homeschool
families, because it is driven by its members.
Ma ny a re ha p py to have a fo r um to dis cuss
curriculum options, while others are working on
setting up group events for the kids, and nights
out for the moms. WHO members are planning
community service projects, field trips, socialization
activities and co-ops. Students are enjoying learning
alongside their peers, and parents are enjoying the
fr iendship, encouragement , and suppor t from
like-minded families.
With this new lifeline, the possibilities are
endless for our coast’s homeschooling families.
This social media connection is just the beginning.
Manansala is already working on bringing more
oppor tunities to our Waianae homeschoolers.
After meeting other families in WHO, Manansala
has begun the process of opening a Classical
Co nve r s a t i o n s c a m p us h e r e i n t h e f a l l . “ I ’m
grateful for the opportunity to network closer to
home,” says Manansala. “Waianae Homeschool
Ohana makes homeschooling less isolating and
has helped me meet other families with similar
homeschooling goals.”
Nationally, homeschool rates have seen a
steady increase in recent years, and Waianae is
no exception. It seems everyone knows at least
on e family wh o has t aken t h eir children ou t
of public and private school s to educate them
at home. Families cite various reasons for their
choice to homeschool, such as religious beliefs,
special needs, social problems, safety, or academic
needs. Regardless of the reasons, more and more
leeward families are choosing to take the leap into
the world of homeschool. WHO is a diverse group
and welcomes all homeschoolers from both the
Waianae and Ko’Olina areas.
If you are a homeschooling family or know
one on our coast, WHO wants you! Search for
“Waianae Homeschool Ohana” on Facebook and
send a request to join. After you’ve sent a join
request, check your “other” messages folder often,
and you will hear from an Admin soon. Together,
we can help the Waianae Homeschool Ohana grow,
and bring support to more families right here in
Waianae.
education
I
n 1949, 66 years ago, Maui born, David Okimoto and his wife Betty (Fujihara) Okimoto built The
Wai’anae Store. After building their store, David, who was originally a contractor, made a bold
move--he left contracting for the grocery business. Being a grocer meant he’d have much more
interaction with people. That’s what David wanted--to build relationships with his customers.   As a
contractor, David’s interaction with his clients ended once he built their home. As a grocer, interaction
with his customers was limitless. David and Betty envisioned that their store would become a landmark
of the Wai’anae community. David has always believed that customers come first. He was one of the
first grocers to allow families to open what he called, “store charges”. This allowed families to pay their
grocery bill on pay day.  
66 years later, The Wai’anae Store remains a family business whose mission is to serve the people of
Wai’anae. Food Giant is also a part of the Okimoto Corp, serving the Nānākuli community. Even in today’s
difficult economic times The Okimoto family have managed to keep their prices among the lowest in our
state. They have also been avid supporters of our Wai’anae schools. Although they can’t give to everyone,
they do what they can. That’s just who they are.
In February, David Okimoto was recognized for his contributions to our community--being named  
as one of Wai’anae Mall’s ‘Wai’anae Coast Hall of Fame first 40 inductions’.
the okimoto corporation
The Wai`anae Store
people & community
The Okimoto Corporation is a family-owned-and-operated business whose roots in
Wai’anae go way back.
14 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
David and Betty (Fujihara) Okimoto
WAIANAE STORE
Wai’anae Store, a family-run company is devoted to
servingthe grocery needs of the residents on the Wai’anae
coast. Established in 1949 by David and Betty Okimoto,
Wai’anae Store is celebrating 66 years--3 generations. The
Okimoto family have built strong relationships with their
customers and the community by offering competitive
prices and product selection not offered by traditional
spermarkets and by supporting the community.
66 years and still going strong!
Nānākuli Super, also part of Okimoto Corp.
celebrates 42 years in business this year.
The Okimoto family would like to humbly
thank all of their customers, employees,
vendors, business partners, and the
community for their continued support!
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 15
working for our families
Local 368 Union
T
he Laborers’ Union Local 368 faced one of its most challenging situations. Construction projects
slowed drastically.  The livelihood of the unions 3100+ active members and their families were at
risk. Members working in such fields as construction, landscaping, hazardous material removal and
golf course maintenance were out of work for significant amounts of time.  Under the direction of Union
Leader Peter Ganaban, Local 368 worked tirelessly in the political arena to obtain funding for various federal
and local government projects. They worked with private developers and private owners to get approvals
for their projects in an effort to stimulate Hawai’i’s economy and improve the livelihood of its members.
Since the union was chartered on December 1, 1954, that’s been their mission: work for the betterment of
working people and their families.  Local 368 seeks improved working conditions for members by protecting
their safety, and by negotiating fair wages and benefits.  Local 368 leaders advocate for laws that protect
on-the-job workers and consumers from contractors who do not operate as they should.
Over 500 Local 368 members call the Wai’anae
coast their home.  Many members and their families
have been direct beneficiaries of the Laborers’ Union’s
work.  Peter Ganaban, Business Manager and long
time Wai’anae resident, shares, “My Executive Board
are truly representative of the members we service.
All of them came from ‘the field.’ They understand
the struggles of our members and work for them.  
Our members’ lives are the reasons we take our jobs
so seriously, and work tirelessly to improve their
conditions and protect their rights.”  The Laborers’
Union Local 368 is located at 1617 Palama St. in
Kalihi.  They also have offices on Maui and in Hilo.  
Visit them at www.local368.org.
In the thick of Hawaii’s recession, a few years ago, many Local 368 members were out of work.
16 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
another young man on a mission
Leighton Panui
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 17
I
t was evident in the 8th grade that Leighton
Panui Jr. had a promising future. The afternoon
I had an encounter with Leighton, while he was
an 8th grader at WIS, impacted me enough that I
sought him out 8 years later. I was dragging my rolling
cart through the hall when Leighton and his 2 friends
turned the corner from the direction I was headed.  
Although I intended to step aside, Leighton held both
arms out to his side, and said to his friends, “Hey,
let the lady pass.” I said thank you, and he said, “Of
course,” like what he did was no big deal. He probably
doesn’t remember that. But, I was so impressed that
afternoon that I’ve never forgotten it.
Today, Leighton is a student and football player
for Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Oregon.  
He’s a fullback for the WOU Wolves. He was blessed
to have played from his Freshman year. As a Wai’anae
High Searider, he played as a running back, fullback
and special teams.  He also served as team captain.
When I caught up with Leighton I asked him about college life.  He had lots to share and some good
advice for our Wai’anae kids. Leighton shared that he dreamed of attending college on the mainland since
he was in the 6th grade.  College was the answer for a better future for himself and his family. “College was
also my ticket to explore the mainland,” asserts Leighton.  “I always knew I’d reach my goal, and it came
very real in my junior year of high school when I started receiving letters from multiple schools showing
interest in me.” “I’ve been in college for three years now and it isn’t easy,” says Leighton.
As a high school student, I worked hard in the classroom and on the football field. I took advanced
placement classes, joined the National Honor Society, did community service, and I let each college know
that I wanted to be a part of their school.  Even though I worked as hard as I could, I don’t feel I was ready
for college. I believe the Hawaii school system needs a revamping.  They didn’t prepare me well enough
when compared to other students on the mainland, but I didn’t let that stop me. I work hard everyday.  It’s a
natural instinct in me, instilled by my parents. My family and girlfriend, Britt are instrumental when it comes
to me achieving my goals. They have been with me since the beginning of my journey and have continued
to support me every step of the way. Without their love and support I would not have the determination
and drive to accomplish any of my goals.” Leighton believes, “Nothing is handed to you. God might have
given you the talent, but it’s up to you to make the most of it. My parents taught me and my siblings (Leahi,
Leina and Leihali’a) that lesson, and it is God who guides me the rest of the way.”
“Unfor tunately people from Wai’anae are
stereot yped, says Leighton.“ It ’s impor tant to
do our best to come out of that stereotype. One
day while I was in high school, the National Honor
Society was having a meeting. When I walked in, an
advisor stopped me and told me that the classroom
was being used for a National Honor Society meeting.
I told him to check his list because my name was on
it. At first I was angry that they labeled me a football
jock and couldn’t believe I was a scholar too. I never
let stereotypes hold me back,” remarks Leighton.
Leighton Panui Jr. is a man on a mission and a role
model for young men in Wai’anae, and everywhere.
Leighton shares this with any young person. “Going
to college is not impossible. But, be prepared to work
hard for it. You’re going to face adversity but push
through because you will see doors and dreams open
for you. Don’t be afraid to leave Wai’anae because
Wai’anae will be there when you get back.” Leighton’s
last words? “Aloha to all, from Monmouth Oregon.”
D
id you grow up believing any of these thoughts about money? Whatever your presuppositions about money,
it effects your current situation. It has either helped you reach your goals or prevented you from reaching
your goals. Whatever your situation, money in-and-of-itself is not responsible.  Money is simply a tool, an
instrument, and a medium of exchange.  Period.  The personification of money as power, wealth and greed doesn’t
come from money itself, it comes from qualities we’ve attached to money based on the history of money from the
beginning of time.  
Money continues to perplex me today.  I grew up with the perception that a good deed is only a good deed when the
good deed doer expects nothing in return.  The deed immediately loses its appeal when the doer expects to somehow
receive compensation for what he or she has done. That compensation usually involves money.
I believed that money would turn my good intentions bad. Although I looked for opportunities to earn money,
when I earned it, I felt as though I should apologize for having earned it.  When I published my first book, the hardest
thing to do was sell them.  I wanted to give them away. It
didn’t feel right to expect compensation for doing what I
thought was a good deed. If I asked for compensation for
my work, then my intentions could be questioned. Uncon-
scious of that presupposition until recently, I know now that
being unaware of your ideals regarding money can
keep you stuck.  
So where did we get those perceptions in the first
place?  Here’s what I came to believe about my own views
on money.  In Matthew 6:24 Jesus said, “no servant can be
slave to two masters: for either he would hate the first and
love the second, or he will be devoted to the first and think
nothing of the second. You cannot serve God and money.”  
A superficial reading of this Scripture may be interpreted
to say that money and God are in opposition.  Growing up I
read it the way I think many people read it—that money is evil and that if you love God, you cannot love money. Today I
believe that this Scripture is not declaring the opposition of God and money, but asserting that we must make a choice.  
Do we want to serve God? Or, do we want to serve money?
Over the centuries money has been personified as a master of wealth. Money has evolved from a symbol of grand
power to become power itself. From the 6th century B.C. when the Athenians used their money to defeat the Persians,
to Al-Qaeda using money to spread terrorism across the world—we see money as a way to spread evil. The problem
with money is that money can be used to control others.  Money can cause us to forget the values we hold dear.  Money
can turn people into oppressors.  
We can absolutely assign new characteristics to money.  We can make money a servant, an instrument and a tool
to spread goodness in the world.  We can use money as a resource to advance human welfare and spur social reform.
We can choose to make money a master or a servant.  We can choose to serve money or make money serve us.    
The following journal article was used as a reference:  
Burkholder, J. (2011). Money: master or servant?. Vision (Winnipeg, Man.), 12(1), 26-33.
18 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
does money serve you, OR
Do You Serve Money?
•All people with money are to some degree evil or selfish.
•Money can buy you happiness.
•Money is the root of all evil.
•Money can turn a good person bad.
•Money doesn’t grow on trees.
•A rich man cannot enter heaven.
•You are powerful if you are rich.
Money
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94-801 Farrington Hwy.
Waipahu Professional Ctr.
Waipahu, HI 96797
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WAIMANALO
41-849 Kalanianaole Hwy.,
Waimanalo, HI 96795
(Inside Payday Loans next to 7-Eleven)
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 19
20 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
Ono Kettle Korn
M
ikala Pieper alongside her fiancé Sua Stevens, can fill small or large orders.  No matter the flavor, no matter
the size, all orders are hand popped and made fresh daily. Mikala offers her products for fundraising
activities--project graduation or family reunions.  Hire her for parties of any kind. As the “one-stop-sweet-
shop” for cotton candy, shave ice and of course, ‘Ono Kettle Korn, you can’t go wrong!  
Mikala, Wai’anae High School graduate, Wai’anae Coast teacher, single parent/proud mother
of a pre-medical school, college student sought an opportunity to supplement her income.  In 2008, she
purchased this business- -it was just the right fit. Mikala loves providing her customers with
homemade, craving-quenching snacks. She loves meeting people and networking at events and fairs and
welcome any kind of conversation. “Meeting people is one of the favorite parts of being an entrepreneur.
I love it!”
Call Mikala for your next birthday party, fundraising event or if you’re ‘ono for ‘Ono Kettle Korn.
Sweet, salty, crunchy, chewy--if you’re craving it ‘Ono Kettle Korn can quench it.
Roy Robins Jr., Hawaii native and founder of Koko’s
Roasted Salsa, is the uncle of 11 nieces and nephews.
Every one of them calls him Koko. It started when Ricky
boy, the eldest, as a toddler, struggled to say Uncle.
Every time Ricky called for his Uncle’s attention, he
called out, Koko. Koko was such an endearing name
that it stuck. Roy has never been called Uncle by his
nieces and nephews. That’s because he isn’t
uncle—he’s Koko!
For every occasion or for no occasion at all, Koko Roy
has wowed his nieces and nephews with mouthwater-
ing, flavorful dishes. Roy’s creations are fresh, home-
made, original, and most of all made with love. Roy
brings to you his latest creation—roasted pepper and
garlic salsa with corn and beans.
From Koko Roy and his `ohana to yours, we hope you
enjoy our salsa as much as we have enjoyed preparing it
for you.
808-306-3054808-306-3054
No order too big or too small
Call for pricing!
Free Delivery!
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 21
sports
22 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
WIS coach tyler fabrao:
Wai’anae athletes could achieve
more! But why aren’t they?
T
yler Fabrao, newly appointed Head Coach of Wai’anae
Intermediate Schools’ football team, sat down with me
to share his mana’o about their recent championship
win. He’s ecstatic about their victory--in the first year of
the 808 Football Youth League, WIS won the championship,
and WHS’ JV team won their championship. They won in
2011 and 2012 as well.  These boys are the group of boys
Tyler coached at WIS. The wins make a statement, no
doubt. In the history of OIA, Wai’anae High School has
taken more than 18 championship titles. Tyler declares,
“By far, our coast athletes have more natural talent: speed;
technique; and athleticism than athletes anywhere in the
island and that’s been evident in the games they’ve played
throughout the 3 years he’s coached. Tyler says, “Yup,
we’ve won multiple championships, but where has that
gotten us? Nowhere.  Kurt Gouveia played for Wai’anae
High School, went on to BYU, won a national championship,
then on to the Washington Redskins where he earned 3
Superbowl rings, but why are there not more of us accom-
plishing to that level? Our kids start off wanting that. Our
athletes are that kind of caliber.”  He continues, “In Pop
Warner, Intermediate and JV level football, we win, but
once athletes get to 11th and 12th grade, that isn’t the
case.  We need to look at why that is.”
Tyler definitely had lots to say on the matter. “I’ve
been working with athletes for upwards of 10 years now.  
I have mentoring relationships with many of our athletes.  
Before 4 years ago, I focused on winning championships.  
All I cared about was bringing back the Wai’anae record
and reputation.  But, I realized I was doing my students
an injustice.  It isn’t championships that’s important, it’s
sticking to the plan.”
According to Tyler, athletes from outside of Wai’anae
who clearly are not as talented, surpass our kids level of
athleticism around the 11th grade because our kids stop
working.  Others go to clinics and camps, elevate their
gameandstudyhard.Ourkidsstop.”  Toomanyofourathletes
choose the wrong path. They choose to drink, party, cruise
and smoke. “They lose the hunger they once had,” remarks
Tyler. “Many of our students give up on school, sports and
their goals.” Tyler says, “The mentoring I do now looks a lot
different than it did 10 years ago.  Today, he preaches on
how to set goals, give back to yourself, and stay on course.
“Success isn’t measured by the amount of money you
have in your checkbook.  It’s measured by whether you
have the life you wanted.  You can be a janitor all your life.  
You don’t get glory and you don’t make a lot of money, but
if you are truly happy, and are doing what you wanted to,
then you are a success.” Tyler tells his athletes, “envision
your goal and work toward it. Don’t be afraid of hard work.
It’s the only way you’ll make it big.”  #stick2theplan is
their motto. You’ll see it all over our athletes Facebook and
Instagram pages. Tyler says, “it’s catching on, and the tide
is changing, and the kids are buying in. It’s exciting,” says
We are proud of our schools
and our students. If you have
inspirational stories of how
ourstudentsareovercoming
obstacles, making a difference
or achieving their dreams,
please write to us at
info@napuaowaianae.org.
If you visit any of our
businesses or sponsors, or
make contact with anyone
we’ve shared with you,
please tell them
Na Pua `O Wai`anae sent you.
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 23
Tyler, “but we need everyone in the community in on it,
to make a big impact.”  
Here’s the advice he shares, and he asks the com-
munity to rally behind him, and the other coaches and
community members:
1 Decide on a goal for you.  Start small and
practice working toward small goals. Then build up.
2 Find counselors, mentors, and people to help
achieve that goal.
3 Tell people about your goals.
4 Be kind to yourself. Devote time by working
toward your goal.
5 Every decision you make, or action you take,
ask yourself, “Does this help me get to my goal? if
not, don’t do it.
6 #STICK2THEPLAN!
If you’d like to help Tyler, and the other coaches,
he invites you to email him at
tylerfabrao@yahoo.com
#STICK2THEPLAN
24 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
C
helsie Hose, one of the organization’s founders, sat
down with me to share with our Wai’anae community
the goals of the Westside Girls Softball Club, and some
of the highlights of 2014.  Chelsie shares, “You just have to
watch them play!  From the very first game of the 2014 ASA
Paradise Invitational Tournament (August 11th through the
17th) they showed off their dedication and commitment to
this club. We are so proud of the girls.”
Chelsieshares,“Themission for our club is to share with
each and every player the fundamentals of the game, the
significance of working together, and the importance of
having fun in a win or a loss. We were able to achieve our
mission, but we did even better.  The girls won 2nd place
in the 2014 ASA Fall Classic Tournament.  Our girls dedication,
determination and hard work, with awesome parental
support made it happen.
The girls are now like sisters--encouraging each other
to try harder and never give up. They are striving for bigger
and better things--more tournaments, in Hawaii and in the
U.S. mainland. It will take hard work, dedication and tons of
fundraising, but we’re up for it.” Chelsie invites anyone who
is interested in finding out more about the club to contact
her via email at chels_96792@yahoo.com.
  ChelsiewantedtoextendaheartfeltmahalotoBubbies
Ice Cream Company for allowing Westside Girls Softball
Club to fundraise their ‘ono mochi ice cream.  Chelsie
says, “It is a definate must have--the bomb!” Also, a huge
shout out to OICA/FIAH CLIQUE/LTD ADDICTION HI T-Shirt
company who printed booster shirts for the parents, family
members and friends.
Be on the look out for this up and coming club! Na Pua
`O Wai’anae sends a big congratulations to Westside Girls
Softball Club for striving for excellence and representing
our community well.  Awesome job girls!
wai`anae girl’s
Softball Club
“WestsideGirlsSoftballClubisaneworganizationforthegirlsofWai’anae,ages7-13.In2014,WestsideGirlsSoftball
Club began and ended their first and unbelievable season. They don’t yet have history, however, if their success is
any indication of their future potential, then their future is bright!”
photos courtesy of Chelsie Hose
Coaches right to left: Eldon Bolahao, Napua Makaneole, Ross Hose Jr., Head Coach: Jonathan
Ilae. Standing players right to left: Alohilani Napalapalai, Emma Tauala, Cherish Hose,
Emeryl Juan, Relyssa Kauhane, Maudestie Alvarado Players kneeling right to left: Victoria
Alaivanu-Lene, Kawehi Cariaga, Dakota Ilae, Jordyn-Rece Palacio, Melody Makaneola-
Baligad, Torie McKinney
embracing fear:
Children Who Fear Become
Adults Who Fear
T
welve and thirteen year olds walk into my classroom
everyday.  My plan is to teach them something I
know.  One of two things will happen: they will learn
what I have to teach, or they won’t.  Some of my students
understand new concepts right away, while others take
longer.  The ones who take longer get frustrated.  They are
often afraid to admit what they don’t know.  They fear that
if they admit, they’ll be judged or ridiculed. It becomes
more important to hide than it does to learn. Rather than
work through their fears, they allow the fear of judge-
ment or ridicule to stop them in their tracks. Fear causes
them to act out or shut down, and no matter how much
they do want to learn, their fear won’t allow it. “Heaven
forbid someone else know that I didn’t get it.” That’s what
they think. I’ve experienced every type of student—the
student who pretends not to care; the student who
pretends to have a headache; and the student who
pretends not to have heard. If they allow it, which they
do, fear robs them of opportunities to learn and grow to
their full potential.  
Fast forward 20 years. You’re at a restaurant
with friends of your significant other.  Far from being
comfortable, you stay only to be supportive.  Your dinner
guests are well-versed in things about which you have no
clue. One of them refers to the foies gras.  You can’t even
pronounce the dish, let alone have a conversation about
it.  What do you do?  You pretend you know what they’re
talking about and pray that’s the end of that.  Here’s what
happens: you stop listening, stop connecting, and stop
sharing. Your temperature might rise a few degrees.  
Why?  You’re afraid.  You’re afraid to look stupid and show
them how much you don’t know. You don’t think about
all the things you could share with them. You think only
about the things they’ll know you don’t know.  
So what do we do?  Try something new. Admit the
fear. Face it, and embrace it. Be honest about what you
fear, and why. Be honest about what you don’t know.
When we let go of the fear, we can take risks, broaden
our horizons, and grow into better versions of ourselves.
In John 21:20, John refers to himself on multiple
occasions as the one whom Jesus loved.  When I first
read that, I thought, “Wow, John is full of himself.” John
wasn’t bragging. He was not being haughty. He found
something that gave him strength any time he needed
to be strong—Jesus’ love for him.  When John was afraid,
he reminded himself of how much Jesus loved him, then
made a choice not to be afraid.  If we work to become like
John, we rest in being loved for just who we are.  When
we embrace being loved for who we are, what we know
and what we don’t, matters little. We begin to share our
true selves, and because of it, learn and grow.
Children who don’t learn to face their fears become
adults who have difficulty facing fears. Children do not
learn to face their fears by adults telling them to do so.  
Children learn to face their fears by witnessing others
face theirs.  Let’s build a nation where there is no need
for fear—a place where everyone is accepted for exactly
who they are.
How do you face your fears? If you have stories
to share about how you faced and overcame your
fears, email us at stories@npow.org. We’d love to hear
from you!
Social Issues
“When we let go of fear...
We become better
versions of ourselves.”
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 25
photo by Ryan McGuire
perfect & peculiar
Peanut Butter
Powder
coconut flour recipe
BananaOatcake
Spoonfuls
(photo left)
Banana oatcake spoonfuls & ingredients
healthy food tips
26 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
Combine all the ingredients above.  Either mix
by hand or blender until it has the consistency of
oatmeal cookies.  Drop spoonfuls onto a greased
cookie sheet.  Bake on 350 degrees for 15 minutes.
This recipe will yield approximately 2 dozen spoonfuls.
Some of the ingredients can be substituted, but of
course the recipe won’t be as healthy. Almond Flour
is expensive. At Down to Earth in Kapolei you can buy
it for approximately $11 per pound. If that doesn’t
work, use a whole wheat or whole grain flour. The
Agave, Coconut Flour and Coconut Palm Sugar can be
purchased from Sam’s Club at surprisingly, reasonable
prices.  In fact Sam’s club has lately been doing an
awesome job bringing in organic products for prices
cheaper than anywhere else.
Remember, you’re not baking grandma’s home-
made desserts that are to die for, but you’ll get a
delicious healthy snack that you won’t have to feel
guilty about, at all! It will satisfy the sweet tooth.  
It’s unfortunate that the tastes we’re accustomed
too, isn’t what we should be consuming at all, so a
definite shift in our taste buds are in order. That’s
a difficult one.
At least that’s what I thought, until I tasted it. A
product of BetterBody Foods, PB2 is made by extracting
90% of the oil in peanut butter to produce a low
fat powder saving the consumer over 100 calories
and 10 grams of fat per serving!  When my husband
brought it home from  Sam’s Club, I couldn’t believe
it.  It really is the next best thing next to slice bread,
well almost! A regular serving of peanut butter has an
average 190 calories per serving, 16 grams of fat,
125 mg of salt, and 3 grams of sugar. PB2 has 55 calories
per serving, 1.5 grams of fat, 70 mg of salt, and 2
grams of sugar. It’s an all around great buy--for your
body and your pocket book. You can find PB2 at
Sam’s Club for an extremely reasonable $10.28 per
30 ounce jar. Did I mention it is gluten free, GMO free
and all natural?
Mothers across the world can feel great about
packing a peanut butter and jelly sandwich when
they use PB2. I’ll bet most children won’t even be
able to tell. PB2 isn’t as creamy as regular peanut
butter, but the difference in taste isn’t that significant
especially when you look at the benefits. If you decide
not to compare it to the peanut butter we’ve eaten as
children, you won’t mind.  The peanut butter we grew
up eating, isn’t that great for your health anyway-
-with all that fat, sugar and salt.
Add approximately two tablespoons of water to
two tablespoons of PB2, stir, and serve.  It’s great in
smoothies and of course the old fashion way--as
a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. It’s yummy,
easy and inexpensive.
Peanut Butter Powder? That sounds peculiar.
Ingredients (substitutions)
1 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup fat-free yogurt
1/2 tablespoon almond butter (unsalted butter)
1/2 cup coconut flour
1/2 cup almond flour (whole wheat flour)
1/4 cup raisins
1/4 cup coconut sugar (brown sugar)
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
Two overripe bananas
2 tablespoons peanut butter powder
1 tablespoon cinnamon
Agave to taste, then to drizzle on top after baked
(honey)
02/14/15-05/31/15
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 27
momi’s minute
My Encounter with God
faith & spirituality
28 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
E
veryone I knew who experienced their personal
encounter with God was filled with excitement for me.  
My daughter had her encounter and she emerged
from her experience a new person too. What exactly
happened to her during those 3 days?  God was working
in her. That was clear. If she could come out a new person,
so could I right? But I worried. “What if I’m the only one
who comes out the same?”  “What if God doesn’t come
to see me?”  Although I’ve had my own experiences with
God, I worried that He might not come. No matter what my
worries were, I knew it was my time.  Then God opened
the doors for my husband to be blessed as well.  So it was
done--we were scheduled to encounter God together.
The traffic wasn’t so bad the first night (on my drive
from Kapolei to Queen Street), but still, I had 40 minutes
to contemplate my weekend to come. I prayed God
would come especially for me. I was anxious and excited
knowing I was ready for the special appointment I made-
-on my own time, and my own terms. That same fervor
that filled my body before my first date with my husband,
inhabited my mind, heart and soul. I was giddy and
‘good-anxious’.
At Word of Life Christian Center in Honolulu,
shepherded by Pastor Art and Kuna Sepulveda, my
husband and I were welcomed with smiling faces, warm
hugs and cheerful words of encouragement. Still nervous,
I worried about being placed into groups or feeling
threatened to share things I wasn’t yet willing. The entire
weekend I never once needed to get into a group or share
things I wasn’t willing to share.  It was just about God and
me. The women leaders who shared their mana’o were
open and transparent about their struggles and how their
lives were transformed by the renewal of their minds by
the Holy Spirit (Romans 12:2). Their paths were different,
but their journeys were the same.  The common thread
in all of their stories was this: When they asked God to
come in, He did. They no longer needed to live broken,
shameful, guilty and condemned because all of their
pains, worries, fears, insecurities, and past sins--they
nailed to the cross, exactly where it belonged.  
Jesus’ death and resurrection bought their freedom
that day at Calvary. When Jesus died, He became
the connection between us and God--the connection
that had been broken by Adam’s sin.  When Jesus was
resurrected, He beat death, which means (for us) that we
beat death too.  So, when we believe in Him, we are gifted
with eternal life--Salvation. There’s nothing we need to
do but accept Him as our Lord and Savior, and allow Him
to transform us from the inside.  When we do, everything
else just comes. Slowly, consistently and with surety, we
become more and more like Him--which was His plan all
along.  The last day of the “Encounter” I thanked God for
pursuing me relentlessly--over and over again even when
I ran from Him. He continues to save me.  He always will.
For that I am abundantly blessed.  I am the daughter of
the most High God.  I am royalty.  I reign. Like Pastor Art
says, “I dare you to reign!”
For any person curious about the Christian faith,
every question is answered at the Encounter. Being a
Christian has nothing to do with religion but everything
to do with Jesus, having a relationship with Him and
knowing in your heart, mind and soul that everything
He did, he did for YOU. Claim and receive every blessing
He wants for you--restoration, healing, prosperity,
covering, and most of all unconditional love. Even if you
don’t believe in God, I think most of us can believe that
there is something out there bigger than us--molding,
shaping and directing our lives.  What risk is there in
believing that-that something is Jesus?  Go find out for
yourself what He has to offer. If you need help, call Word
Of Life Christian Center, and make an appointment with
God for your own ENCOUNTER. In faith, I know He will
show up! God is good all the time.  All the time God is good.
“You’re gonna be so blessed,” they said. “You’re
gonna let go of so many things.” “You’re gonna come
away from this weekend transformed, renewed and
rejuvenated--a new person.”
Pastor Art and Kuna Sepulveda
808-528-4044
Fax 808-545-5566
wolhawaii.com
wolcc@wolhawaii.com
Word of Life Christian Center
550 Queen Street
Honolulu, HI
96813
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 29
Hawaiian Hair Hullabaloo?
T
hick, wavy, long Hawaiian hair
is beautiful. Some days. But,
on those humid, bad hair days,
it is anything but beautiful. The
funky, frizzy, fly-aways are just
not in style.  Salon solutions can
be expensive and many times
don’t work like they promise.  They
leave you frustrated--with empty
pockets. I’ve heard complaints
from many women and because
I share the same frustration, (I
have thick, frizzy, Hawaiian hair)
began to look for inexpensive,
home remedies to frail the frizz.
I’ve found 3 remedies that work.  
These remedies aren’t miracles.
You won’t rinse and find a new
head of ‘exactly-what-you-want-
hair’ because let’s face it, we all
want what we don’t have, but you
will find yourself saying, “Ooh
this feels good.” Your hair will be
a little more smooth, a little more
shiny, and a lot less frizzy. It is
my God-given duty to share this
information with you.
First solution: Yes, the obvi-
ous, coconut oil.  But, how exactly
do you apply and for how long?  
Easy. You can use any kind of
coconut oil . The l arge tub at
Sam’s Club for around $20 is a
good buy, and it’s not just for
cooking anymore. The fractionated
coconut oil from Down to Earth is
approximately $15 for the largest
bottle. Either one works fine.  The
fractionated coconut oil is a little
less messy, and the consistency
isn’t affected by the weather-
unlike the coconut oil for cooking.
You’ll need approximately a
cup of oil or so to soak your entire
head. Pour a little coconut oil in
the middle of your palm and apply
to the tips of your head near your
scalp and work your way down
until your entire head of hair is
coated.  Pay special attention to
your scalp and your ends. Put your
hair up in a ‘bun’ and cover with a
shower cap for at least 20 minutes.  
Then, remove the shower cap and
continue to leave the coconut oil
in your hair for at least 4 hours.
Keep away from the sun.  I like to
leave it in when I’m working at my
computer or cleaning the house.  
You have the option to leave it in
your hair overnight, just ensure
you have it wrapped in a shower
cap. The oil will leave stubborn
stains on your pillow case. Wash,
shampoo, condition, and style
your hair as normal. You’ll need
to repeat periodically to maintain
and increase results. Once a week
is a good rule of thumb.
The second remedy is Guinness
Beer.  I know, beer? Yes. Guinness
beer works well. All you do is pour
approximately 2 bottles of beer
over your head until your head
is soaked. Take the beer out of
t h e f r i d g e a p p r ox i m a t e ly a n
hour before you use it, so you’re
not pouring an ice cold beer on
your head. This remedy is a little
messy.  I’d advise you to apply it
with your head over the tub or
a large sink.  It would work well
if you were planning to soak in
a tub because you’ll drip brown
water all over your floor if you
don’t. Leave the Guinness in for as
long as you can.  Wash, shampoo,
condition, and style your hair as
normal. And, just like the coconut
oil, you’ll need to repeat periodically.  
Once a week works well.
The third home remedy is the
messiest of them all--over ripened
bananas and yogurt. Blend 2 overripe
bananas and an 8 ounce cup of
yogurt until it becomes pasty.  
Apply the mixture to your hair
from the scalp down. Leave in your
hair for as long as you can (any-
where from 2 - 6 hours). Wash your
hair as usual. This is the most
difficult because the banana can
get stuck in your hair.   It looks
and feels like very small pieces of
dried up boogers. And when you
style your hair, the pieces will
slowly and almost altogether fall
out.  Wash, shampoo, condition,
and style your hair as normal. And,
just like the coconut oil, you’ll need
to repeat periodically. Once a week
works well.
Over a few months, I’ve used
each remedy repeatedly. My hair
is considerably less frizzy than it
was. I attribute the change a little
to age, a little to the Kyani I’ve been
taking for a few months, and of
course, to these inexpensive home
r e m e d i e s t h a t a l m o s t anyone
already has in their cupboards.
If you try any of these remedies
or have others that work, let me
know at momi@napuaowaianae.org.
HEALTH & BEAUTY
30 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
help is here!
“Over a few
months, I’ve
used each remedy
repeatedly. My
hair is considerably
less frizzy than
it was.”
20%
OFF!Until May 31, 2015
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 31
Embrace Your Hardships &
Its Transformative Power
Call to book Momi for your next event.
Special Event Pricing Available!
www.momirobins-makaila.org
808-888-9434
“A must read for
anyone wanting to
become a better
version of yourself.”
One woman’s testimony of
transformation by grace
and mercy.
32 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
Important Numbers & ResourcesImportant Numbers & Resources
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 33
Important City Numbers
(808) 768-3202 Bulky Item collection
(808) 733-4300 Civil Defense
(808) 768-5001 Councilwoman Kym Pine
(808) 955-8300 Crime Stoppers
(808) 455-1725 Dead Animal Pick up and 	 	 	
	 	   Drains, Ditches Cleaning
(808) 768-3100 Driver License - Kapolei
(808) 723-7139 Fire Department Station #26         	 	
	 	   Wai‘anae
(808  723-7139 Fire Department Station #28   	   	
	                 Nānākuli
(808) 832-5105 Governor’s Office
(808) 768-5007 Honolulu City Councilmember                	
	                 Kym Pine District 1
(808) 696-4257 Library Wai‘anae
(808) 532-7700 License Registration
(808) 786-4141 Mayor’s Office Kirk Caldwell
(808) 973-5286 National Weather Service - Oahu
(808) 768-3003 Park Recreation Programs
(808) 723-7162 Permits
                             (Camping, Picnics, and Fire)
(800) 222-1222 Poison Control
(808) 723-8600 Police Department – Wai‘anae
(808) 768-7777 Pot Hole Hotline
(808) 768-3980 Property Tax
(808) 586-8465 Representative Karen Awana
                          	  House District 43
(808) 586-8460 Representative Jo Jordan
                          	  House District 44
(808) 455-9644 Refuse Collection
(808) 768-3798 Satellite City Hall
(808) 586-7793 Senator Maile Shimabukuro
(808) 768-3330 Sewer Charges/Billing
(808) 772-1213 Social Security Office - Kapolei
(808) 696-0161 US Postal Office - Wai’anae
(808) 786-3800 Voter Information
Local Utilities
(808) 748-5000 Board of Water Supply
(808) 748-5872 After Hours Water Emergency
(808) 548-7311 Hawaiian Electric
(808) 548-7961 Hawaiian Electric Company
	 	   Service Calls
(808) 643-3456 Hawaiian Tel Com
(808) 768-2100 Oceanic-Time Warner Cable
(808) 768-3200 Refuse and Recycling Services
Public Schools
(808) 697-7100  Leihoku Elementary
	 	    Principal Randall Miura
(808) 697-7150  Mā’ili Elementary
	 	    Principal Suzie Lee
(808) 695-7900  Mākaha Elementary
	 	    Principal Nelson Shigeta
(808) 668-5800  Nānāikapono Elementary
	 	    Principal Debra Knight
(808) 668-5813  Nānākuli Elementary
	 	    Principal Lisa Ann Higa
(808) 668-5823  Nānākuli High
	 	    Principal Darin Pilialoha
(808) 697-7121  Wai‘anae Elementary
	 	    Principal Wendy Takahashi
(808) 697-9400  Wai’anae High
	 	    Principal Disa Hauge
(808) 697-7121  Wai‘anae Intermediate
	 	    Principal Raechelle Fabrao
Charter Schools
(808) 697-7110 Kamaile Academy
	 	   Principal Emma Weiss   
(808) 620-9030 Kawaihona
	 	   Principal Alvin Parker
Post High
(808) 696-6378 Leeward Community College - 	 	
	      Wai‘anae Dean of Students Laurie Lawrence
911 All Emergencies
Resources of Organizations
34 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
   Children’s Services	 	                         696-9498
   Ho‘okaulike	 	                                       696-4212
   Hi‘iola (Hawaii Health Connector)                 294-1820
   Ka Wahi Kaiaulu-Wai‘anae Neighborhood Place 	 	
	 	 	 	 	           696-4598
♥ Hawaii Family Services, Inc.     	           696-3482
♥ Hawaii Job Corps 	 	 	           536-0695
♥ Hoa ‘Āina O Mākaha	 	                         695-8978
♥ Ho‘omau Ke Ola	 	 	           696-4266
♥ Honolulu Community Action Program         696-4261
   Head Start	 	 	                         847-2400
   Kumuhonua Transitional Shelter	           682-5494
   Hā Initiative-STEM After-School Program   	 	 	
	 	 	 	          	           521-4531
♥ INPEACE-Ka Lama Education Academy	          	 	
	 	 	 	 	           696-8312
   Keiki Steps	 	 	      	           620-9043
   P-3 Waianae	 	 	          	           620-9041
   Kupu Ola	 	 	 	           620-9041
   Hō‘ala 	 	 	 	           696-9300
♥ Ka‘ala Cultural Learning Center	           696-4954
♥ Kaiser Permanente-Continuing Care (Kaiser Only)  	 	
	 	 	 	          	           432-7100
♥ Kamehameha Schools- Preschools	           668-1196
   Community Learning Center at Nānākuli     668-1517
   Hi‘ilani Program	      	 	           534-8261  
   Ka Pua Initiative	 	 	           541-5333
♥ Kathy’s Parenting Solutions	         	           352-3303
♥ Ke Ola Mamo  	 	   	           668-1110
♥ Keiki O Ka ‘Aina-H.I.P.P.Y./Aim High/PAT/PPP   		 	
	 	 	         	                         843-2502
♥ Kokua Villa 	 	 	 	           696-7000
♥ Learning Disabilities Association of Hawaii    	 	
	 	 	 	 	           536-9684
   School Readiness Project	 	           696-5361
   Parent Training & Information Center          536-9684
♥ Legal Aid Society of Hawaii	          	           536-4302
♥ Leeward Community College-Wai‘anae      696-6378
♥ Maili Bible	     	 	 	           696-3038
♥ Maluhia Lutheran Church	     	           696-3497
♥ Mala ‘Ai ‘Opio (MA‘O) Organic Farm  	           696-5569
♥ Nanakuli Housing Corporation	           842-0770
♥ O‘ahu WorkLinks	                                       768-5801
♥ ‘Olelo Community Media Center Wai‘anae       	 	
	 	 	 	 	           696-1003
♥ Onemalu Shelter	 	 	           682-3869
♥ Paradise Chapel-Social Services                   668-1588
♥ P.A.R.E.N.T.S., Inc.         	 	           235-0255
   Confident Parenting	 	        	           235-0487
♥ Parents for Righteousness, Inc                      697-8384
This list was provided by B. Burgess at Hale Na’au Pono
♥ 211- Aloha United Way-Dial “2-1-1”
	 (on your telephone)
♥ ACTIVE HI	 	 	 	            457-6385
♥ Adventist Malama School	 	            696-3988
♥ Alternative Structures International (ASI)    696-2655
   Kahumana	 	 	                         696-2655          
   ‘Ohana Ola O Kahumana Transitional Shelter		 	
          	 	 	                       	            696-4095
   Ulu Ke Kukui Transitional Shelter                  620-9011
♥ ALU LIKE, Inc.-Pūlama I Nā Keiki                    668-0553
   Ke Ala Ho‘olokahi Project	                         668-0555
   Project SPIRIT 	 	                         956-4453
♥ Ark of Safety-Preschool	 	            696-8928
♥ Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Honolulu 	 	 	
	 	 	 	 	            521-3811
♥ Boys and Girls Club-Wai‘anae Clubhouse 	 	 	
	 	 	 	 	            696-2794
   NFL YET Hawaii Nanakuli Clubhouse            668-9399
♥ Catholic Charities-Mā‘ili Land Transitional
	 Shelter   	 	 	           696-4885
♥ Child and Family Service	     	           681-3500
    Comprehensive Cnslng & Support Services
	 	 	 	 	           681-3500
   Domestic Abuse Hotline	 	           841-0822
   Gerontology	 	                       	           681-1411
   Enhanced Healthy Start	 	           681-1555
   Healthy Start   	 	                         681-1555
   Pathways to Work	 	 	           681-1430
   ParentLine/HomeReach	 	           526-1222
♥ City of Joy	     	 	 	           668-8826
♥ Community Case Management Corp.           486-8030
♥ Department of Health-Access Line               823-3100
   Public Health Nursing-Waianae	           697-7839
   Hansen’s Disease Community Program       675-0077
♥ Department of Human Services Child Protective 	 	
	 Services	 	     	           832-5300
   Financial Assistance & SNAP	                         697-7147
   First To Work		 	                         692-7760
   Employment First	 	 	           692-8310
   QUEST/Medicaid	 	 	           692-7364
♥ Domestic Violence Action Center-HelpLine	    	 	
	 	 	 	          	            531-3771
   Consortium for Health, Safety & Support    447-3508
♥ EPIC, Inc-`Ohana Conferencing	            838-7752
♥ Family Hui	 	 	 	            230-7110
♥ Family Programs Hawaii	 	            521-9531
   Ho‘omalu O Na Kamalii	 	            620-9444
   Leeward Voluntary Case Management         540-2536
   Resource Families Support Services             521-9531
   Warm Line	 	 	   	            545-1130
♥ Habitat for Humanity-Leeward O‘ahu           696-7882
♥ Hawaii Families As Allies       	                        692-8232
♥ Hale Na‘au Pono	 	                         696-4211
   Adult Services 	 	 	           696-4212
Energy – Natural and Healthy
The path to success is often littered with setbacks, obstacles, and fear of failure. Pushing through to
reach your goals is challenging. A Japanese proverb sums up this journey: “Beginning is easy;
continuing is hard.” So as we face challenges, we need both our minds and our bodies to be at the
ready if we want to persevere.
Unicity has tapped into a remedy that Zen monks have used for
centuries to sharpen their focus and enhance meditation. This
elixir is UNICITYMATCHA—a finely powdered green tea that can
give you the fortitude and support you need to combat the odds.
Navigate with Matcha
This Chi-Oka blend, rich in antioxidants and other vital nutrients,
provides a natural source of energy and improved mental clarity.
Whenever you need it, enjoy a drink of Matcha to help:
 Increase alertness and focus
 Add vitality and harmony to your mind and body
 Relieve stress and improve concentration
 Contribute to normal, energy-yielding metabolism
 Contribute to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage
How It Works
What makes Matcha exceptional is that it is not steeped like most teas; the entire tea leaf is consumed in
powder form. You therefore take advantage of 100% of its nutrients—including chlorophyll, protein, and dietary
fiber. Matcha has both healing and preventative properties to:
Cleanse and Restore: The abundance of chlorophyll in Matcha makes it an ideal rejuvenator. It carries oxygen
to your cells, regenerating them and building your blood. As a purifier, it neutralizes free radicals, eradicates
toxins, and improves radiation damage.
Boost metabolism: Bursting with antioxidants called catechins (a class of polyphenols), Matcha eliminates free
radicals, slows the signs of aging, and optimizes your metabolism.
Reduce fatigue: The naturally occurring caffeine and theophylline in Matcha work to stimulate
wakefulness and provide mental clarity, making it a healthier alternative to classic energy drinks or
coffees. Additionally, its absorption into your blood is as discreet as its dissipation, preventing the
infamous crash that comes with most caffeinated beverages.
Calm the mind: Shade-grown plants like Matcha produce L-theanines. These amino acids calm the brain without
making you drowsy. Paired with caffeine and theophylline, L-theanines generate a lucid frame of mind, enabling
you to determine what needs to be accomplished and how.
For more information contact Sharon @ fountainsm@yahoo.com or call 808-306-3054
Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 35
Highlights
• Designed by William F. Bell, who designed the Torrey
Pines South Course which hosted the 2008 U.S. Open.
• A golf experience like no other, an escape from routine
for golfers of all skill levels.
• Variety of doglegs and elevation changes, with one of
Hawaii’s most demanding closing holes.
• Year round, sunshine and trade winds with an
occasional refreshing mountain mist.
Features
Pro Shop • Club Rentals • Driving Range
Restaurant • Golf Clinics • Private/Group Lessons
Kids’ Junior Golf
Events and Services
Golf Clinics – A free monthly event for the whole family.
Typically scheduled in the evening, our golf instructor
provides pointers and tips on how to improve your game
while Junior Golfers enjoy learning golf through the SNAG
Program.
Personal & Group Lessons
Choose from a single lesson or five session package.
Whether you’re a beginner or looking to lower your
handicap our instructor has the tools to help you succeed.
Junior Golf Program
Group lessons for junior golfers 5 – 18 years old. Juniors
will attend a 1 hour class for 6 consecutive weeks typically
scheduled on the weekend. With a maximum of 6 juniors
per class.
Visit the hidden gem of the island
Experience true island beauty on Oahu with
breathtaking views of the mountains and ocean.
Stay up to date on course events and clinics by emailing
golfmakaha@gmail.com
Please call our pro shop for current club pricing and scheduling
(808) 397-5347
Direct Line: (808) 397-5347 • 84-627 Makaha Valley Road Waianae, Hawaii 96792 • Course Contact: Byran Manansala

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Na Pua O Wai'anae April 2015

  • 1. Nānākuli Mā‘ili Wai‘anae Mākaha THE MAGAZINE OF THE WAI‘ANAE COAST. FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE. www.kingdomimkpublishing.org/na-pua-o-waianae Issue # 2 | April 2015 Different Paths, Same Journey Strengthen. Challenge. Support.
  • 2. beach photo by Masina N. Sausi2 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 mahalo to our sponsors History is rich in Wai’anae. Let’s start with our names. The place name Wai’anae (wai meaning water, and ‘anae meaning mullet) was said to have been inspired by the large mullet pond, Pu’ehu, built at the mouth of the stream that flowed on the west side of what is now Pōka’i Bay. Pōka’i Bay is said to have been named after Pōkai, a Tahitian chief who planted a coconut grove along the beach. The community surrounding Pōka’i Bay, because of it’s coconut grove and mullet water pond, became the largest and thriving community along the coast. The place name Nānākuli has an equally interesting history. Nānā means to look and kuli means deaf. The first settlers of the Nānākuli coastline (stretching from Lualualei toward the east) experienced mostly barren and scarce resources. Although fishing was plentiful, fresh water and vegetable food was not. The people of Nānākuli were ashamed to greet visitors who passed through Nānākuli because there was not enough resources to share. The culture of the people was to be hospitable and share their resources, however, because of the people’s shame that they couldn’t, they ignored the ‘passer bys.’ These and more interesting facts and stories can be found in the following book, Historic Wai’anae. Read Historic Wai’anae in its entirety or keep it as a conversation piece. What’s in a Name? History! Resource Historic Wai’anae by Edward J. McGrath Jr., Kenneth M. Brewer and Bob Krauss and published by Island Heritage (1973) Na Pua o Wai’anae is abundantly grateful for our generous sponsors. Over the next few issues, we will share with you all about what they do and why they give.
  • 3. Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 3 letter from the publisher Aloha Kāua e Wai’anae!Happy 2015! We made it—our second issue. The road was bumpy, ladened with ditches (not just potholes), and sharp, narrow, sketchy, turns, but the journey and arrival at our destination made the risks well worth it. A s we approached the new year, most people were thinking about resolutions. A resolution is nothing more than an acknowledgment that we have made a choice to let go of the past, and make way for a new brighter future. Many of us made resolutions to better ourselves in some way--lose a few pounds, eat healthier, better handle stress, spend more time with loved ones, make a plan to get out of debt, drink less, dream big, spend more quiet time with our higher power, help those less fortunate. We’ve been in our new year for a while now. How’s that working for you? Statistically speaking, some of us have already given up on our new year’s resolutions. Some of us don’t even remember the declarations we’ve made. If you’ve already given up, don’t feel bad, at all. Statistics say that only 8% of us who make resolu- tions are actually successful. Does that make 92% of us failures? In my opinion, something is wrong with the process, not the people who make the resolutions. I recently read a Forbes article by Dan Diamond. He reminded me of some great strategies: Set small, measurable goals; Keep track of your progress; Believe that you can; and tell as many people your goals to help keep you accountable. These strategies sound great, and we should all use them, but, there’s more to it than that. In this issue, Na Pua o Wai’anae will focus on what we feel is the missing element to making, keeping and realizing our goals—seek inspiration--examples of others who keep going even when their road is bumpy, full of potholes and sketchy sharp turns. On the cover, we showcased four Wai’anae men who are doing just that—improving their lives, and accomplishing their goals. They refuse to let life take them for a ride—rather they’re taking life for a ride. Johanne Mitchell, Max Holloway, Kamu Kapoi and Uncle George Kalilikane are men on a mission. Their paths are different, but their journeys are the same. Na Pua o Wai’anae hopes that in sharing their journeys, it will help you along yours. Na Pua o Wai’anae promises to remain steadfast toward our goal of becoming a voice of strength in our community as we share information that motivates, inspires and provokes thought and action. At the heart of our mission is to be culturally sensitive and global in perspective as we empower, encourage and educate our readers. I pray you feel we do that. Keep the magazine on your kitchen table as a resource or share it with your neighbors. But, whatever you do, please do not keep us a secret. If you’d like to share your thoughts, give us a ring at 808-888-9434 or send us an email to stories@npow.org. Currently, Na Pua O Wai’anae is a quarterly publication. Please be on the look out for each issue. We will also be uploading every issue on our website at the following page: www.kingdominkpublishing.org/ na-pua-o-waianae. We would appreciate it if you could share about us on facebook, linkedin, and Instagram. Please allow me a personal moment. I was born and raised in Waimanalo, exactly on the opposite side of Wai’anae. And although I wasn’t able to spend much time in Wai’anae, my wife was born and raised in Wai’anae and through that connection I will do my best as publisher to do the best job I can to carry forth the mission and to be accepted by the community as a voice of the people, about the people and for the people. Me ka ha’aha’a a me ke aloha, Publisher photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady Tad K. Makaila
  • 4. Morning Rainbow at Nanakuli “Flats” photo by Jash Defreitas 4 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 PUBLISHER: Tad K Makaila 808-352-1560 tad@napuaowaianae.org WRITER: Momi Robins-Makaila 808-888-9434 momi@napuaowaianae.org ADVERTISING MANAGER: Sharon Fountain 808-306-3054 sharon@napuaowaianae.org ACCOUNT MANAGER: Tehani Robins 808-218-1753 tehani@napuaowaianae.org MAGAZINE/ ADVERTISING DESIGN: Masina N. Sausi 808-620-0127 sausigfx@gmail.com 06 cover story Read about the four inspiring journeys of this issue’s Men on Missions. 13 education Are you a homeschooling parent looking for support? Connect with other homeschooling families. 14 people & community 66 years ago, The Okimoto family founded the Wai’anae store—a family owned and operated business. Read about their beginnings and why they do what they do. 25 healthy food tips Tips to improve our diet 16 issues Fear: It’s a real issue, even for our young people. How can we overcome this debilitating, universal feeling? 28 faith & spirituality An encounter with God: A Personal Testimony 30 health & beauty Hawaiian Hair can be hard to handle, but with these inexpensive remedies, help is here. Nānākuli Mā‘ili Wai‘anae Mākaha THE MAGAZINE OF THE WAI‘ANAE COAST. FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE. www.kingdomimkpublishing.org/na-pua-o-waianae Issue # 2 | March 2015 Different Paths, Same Journey Strengthen. Challenge. Support. COVER: Featured (L-R) J. Mitchell, M. Holloway, K. Kapoi, Uncle George K. photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady. Cover design by: Masina N. Sausi If you visit any of our businesses or sponsors, or make contact with anyone we’ve s hared with you, please tell them Na Pua `O Wai`anae sent you. Mahalo for your support! 22 WIS Coach Tyler Fabrao: Wai’anae athletes could achieve more! But why aren’t they? in this issue
  • 5. sausigfx@gmail.com facebook.com/SausiGfx MASINA N. SAUSI Creative Designs for... • identity, branding, logo • print collateral • advertisements • or personal events Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 5
  • 6. 6 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
  • 7. Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 7 Cover Story Johanne Mitchell, Max Holloway, Kamu Kapoi, and Uncle George Kalilikane are four Wai’anae ‘Men on Missions’. Read about their incredible journeys. Let them serve as inspiration to be purposeful and impactful—to live as a man on a mission
  • 8. Johanne Mitchell J ohanne, his wife Lynn and his children Alexis and Sky, have brought the ancient art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu to Mākaha. Through 808 Gracie Fighter, Johanne shares with adults and children the ancient art of Jiu Jitsu made famous by Royce Gracie, the winner of the very first UFC tournament. Royce and the Gracie family are famous for sharing the innovative and creative art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Johanne hails from Kahalu`u but for 2 years has called Mākaha his home. He, and his family decided on Mākaha because it is where the warrior spirit is strong. Johanne says, “There is so much to learn from this ancient art that can be easily applied to all areas of life. When you’re in training, caught in a submission, ready to ‘tap’ you are really allowing yourself to submit to that person, declaring that he or she has your life in their hands.” Johanne adds, “That truly does amazing things for your ego.” “There are other times when you’re in the middle of a match, tired and ready to quit that the fundamental principles of this art teaches you to dig down deep inside yourself and find that place of calm. One can learn to apply that to other areas of life.” Johanne’s goal for 808 Gracie Fighter in Mākaha is to offer a generation of students the opportunity to ground themselves in some- thing honorable. Johanne says, “We are often defined by the activities in which we participate. Jiu Jitsu is an art of discipline, confidence, and purpose. It allows us to detach from the ego, and instead, seek comradery, collaboration and commitment to each other.” He hopes others find out for themselves how valuable Jiu Jitsu can be in every area of life. Johanne and his entire family make Jiu Jitsu a part of every aspect of their own lives. When asked about his mission, Johanne says, “I hope to be a beacon of light and I will continue to do what I can to create a better community.” Johanne says that he hopes to be a role model to his family and his community and that to be a man requires him to make decisions for his family and community. Johanne feels it’s important to leave a legacy. For him, he wants 808 Gracie Fighter from Mākaha known to produce Jiu-Jitsu world champions. Johanne Mitchell knows what it takes to be a man on a mission. He says, “We need to show our love for our children by making them better. That takes doing what’s right, not just what’s right for the moment.” If you’d like to join Johanne and his family, give them a call at 408-843-7566, or visit their website at www.808GracieFighter.com. photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady 8 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 42-year-old, Johanne Mitchell, is a man on a mission. brings jiu jitsu to mākaha
  • 9. Max “Blessed” Holloway -year-old, 2009 Wai’anae High School graduate Jerome “Max” Holloway is a man on a mission. He’s a husband, father and son. He’s doing his best to provide for his family and be a positive role model as a MMA UFC fighter. Max “Blessed” Holloway has wowed fans in Hawaii, the nation and the world. If you watch any of his youtube videos, you’ll see that he is intense, aggressive, and blessed. Max is a warrior in the cage, and wears his UFC belt with pride, but what’s more rewarding to Max is winning young souls for Christ. “Jesus Christ, my grandma Cynthia Kapoi, mom Missy Kapoi and wife Kaimana Holloway have molded me into the man you know,” says Max. Max didn’t grow up dreaming about becoming an MMA fighter. “I started training because one of my best friends - Josh Keanu - told me I should train with him. I slept over his house one night and his trainer was there too. Colin Mackenzie watched me hit the speed bag and said I should come to training. So I did and the rest is history,” says Max. Now that Max is a contracted UFC fighter making a name for himself, he realizes that it comes with responsibility. Being from Wai’anae, a town that is often looked down upon, he especially feels a responsibility to share with young men what he feels is an important message. “Max says “a real man is one who does whatever he has to, to take care of his family, not what he can, but what he has too.” Here’s some advice from Max, a humble young man, “the world doesn’t owe us anything. It isn’t about what the world will give to us, it’s about what we can give to the world. If we understand that, we can make positive changes in our world.” Max is proud to be from Wai’anae. Max explains, “The greatest thing about Wai’anae has to be the strength of our community. People outside of Wai’anae think it’s a bad place, but if any one of them got to know the people, they would find out that we care deeply for each other, even strangers. I think that’s one of the things that has helped me to get where I am today. It’s not always expected that we’ll do great things, but when we push through adversity, there’s nothing sweeter than showing people we can. The one thing about Wai’anae that I pray changes, is the rampant drug abuse. I have seen many families destroyed by drug abuse.” Max is living a dream: earning an honest living; taking care of his family; doing what he loves. Max shares, “the road was not always easy in fact it was difficult. But, that’s what life is--a bunch of ups and downs. Whatever you do, when you hit rock bottom, you can’t give up. We define ourselves when we hit our lowest point and bounce back up.” Max Holloway has been a professional since 2010. He’s fought all over the world in places like Las Vegas, Stockholm, Sweden, Singapore, Baltimore, Maryland and Tulsa, Oklahoma. He’s fought opponents of every caliber. When asked if he ever gets scared, Max shared this, “Of course! But, the way I look at it, it comes with the job and will happen sooner or later. Why walk around with an umbrella waiting for the rain? When the time comes, I’ll deal with it. All I can do is train right, fight smart and pray for the best. I’d rather remember the highlights,” says Max, “like when I got my first professional submission. I tapped my opponent out with a move that his gym was known for. And, all fight week, I was as sick as a dog. I overcame adversity in that fight!” “The day I’ll never forget is the day I got my professional contract. I received it at 12, and my son, Rush, took his first breath of life at 3. I am a blessed man.” Max Holloway is definitely a man on a mission. You can expect much more from Max Holloway. You can find Max’s stats at http://www.ufc.com/fighter/Max-Holloway. You can also find his career highlights in videos on youtube--made by Max’s fans. 23 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 9 Congratulations Max Holloway on your recent win against Cole Miller! photo by James Law mma fighter:
  • 10. Kamu Kapoi K amu is a man on a mission. He describes himself as ‘straight up.’ “I never settle for less. I’m persistent, and I have a burning passion to be the change I seek. I’m an optimistic Moke! When I really want something, I go get it.” That attitude explains his long list of accomplishments- -impressive for anyone, no matter what age. Kamu graduated from Wai’anae High School then earned a Bachelors of Science Degree in Digital Filmmaking and Video Production from the Art Institute of California, Los Angeles. Since graduating Kamu has been a ‘serial entrepreneur.’ He says, “If it makes sense to me, I go for it. That’s because I’m a man on a mission. I have a purpose--an ‘ohana to provide for, my wahine and two keikikāne.” When Kamu co-founded his first production company in 2006, they landed a $1.8 million contract that spanned over 3 years. “Not to bad for a bunch of Wai’anae boys,” laughs Kamu. Currently, Kamu runs an independent production house. He directs, shoots, and edits--commercials, music videos, documentaries, short & feature length films, and Reality TV. “I’m primarily a camera operator, but I do anything.” Kamu is working with ‘Ōiwi TV and the Polynesian Voyaging Society documenting the Hōkūle‘a & Hikianalia as they sail around the world to share the mission of Mālama Honua: To Care for Island Earth. Kamu is also a camera operator on CMT’s popular hit show Dog & Beth: On The Hunt. Kamu is also involved with Ola Kino Maika’i, a program aimed at helping people improve their health. Also, as part of his commitment to Mālama Honua, he’s helping ‘ohana and businesses by providing free solar systems. Kamu laughs as he shares, “I’ve got other things in the works too, but I can’t show all my trump cards!” Kamu’s mission is to share stories about challenges that mainstream media overlook. “In those stories come triumph over obstacles, and it’s important to tell those stories.” Kamu also adds, “I believe that giving back is a key element in my success. Wai’anae has a traditional replica voyaging canoe named, “E Ala”. My good friend, Kaina Nakanealoha and I are the current captains who volunteer to mālama E Ala. If you’re Interested, bring your good mana to our new Hālau Wa‘a at the Wai‘anae Boat Harbor.” When I asked Kamu, “Who do you thank for guiding you along the way?” Kamu answers, “I aloha and mahalo my grandparents Jerome and Cynthia Kapoi, their children, my mom, Yvonne-Marie “Missy” Kapoi, all my brothers and sisters. my dad and stepmom, Doug and Joann Westbrook--all were instrumental in giving me a solid foundation.” Kamu also thanks “Ke Akua, Nā Akua, Nā Aumakua, Nā Kūpuna, Nā `Ōpio.” Kamu adds, “There’s so many people who have mentored me over the past 28 years of my life. I could write a novel. If you my mentors are reading this, I mahalo you for that piece of mana’o. It made me who I am today. I have and always will look up to the people who kept pushing, through all the bullshit, to make positive changes in their lives and in others--the people who rise above the stereotypes and naysayers. Much respect to them. Keep it up, because someone is always watching.” When asked his advice for young men watching him, he says, “Find a purpose and live like no other.” Kamu quotes his mentor Jim Rohn: “The same wind blows on us all. The wind of disaster, sorrow, bad times, good times, success, money, etc… So it’s not the direction of the blowing of the wind that determines our destination, it is the set of our sails.” And Kamu adds, to the young Kanaka Maoli, “Rely on the ones who have come before.” As Papa Mau says so eloquently, “If I have courage, it is because I have faith in the knowledge of my ancestors.” Sam “Kamu” Kapoi is definitely a man on a mission, and we thank him for sharing his mana’o with us. If you’d like to check out his work, you can find him on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. You can also find out about the solar systems he’s providing for families at www.samkapoi.com. 10 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 When it comes to knowing what he wants and going for it, 28-year-old Samuel Keli’inui “Kamu” Kapoi is all guts. photo by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
  • 11. Uncle George Kalilikane J ust 5 short years ago, George (49 years old at the time) weighed over 300 pounds, was border line diabetic and scored a whopping 150+ on the blood pressure scale. He’d been inactive for most of his adult life, having put away the surfboard of his youth to devote his life to raising his children. Shortly after losing his father-in-law to diabetes, and most of his adult children leaving home, George made his health his number one priority. His answer came when a fellow Nanaikapono Protestant church member, Frank Taua brought a couple of paddle boards to the beach. George wanted to get on, but his size prevented him from trying. He watched until he could watch no longer. Once he got on, he was hooked. The clarity and peace he experienced while on the ocean was so overwhelming he needed to share that experience with others. George spent 4 months paddleboarding when he decided he was ready to share. Equipped with just 2 paddleboards, he pitched a tent at Poka’i bay and waited for people to come. The first few weeks George spent days at the bay with not one inquiry. George chuckles as he explains, “If someone so much as looked at my boards funny, I’d talk them into a lesson.” George laughs as he asserts, “I did a few things wrong; I didn’t tell anyone what I was doing; people couldn’t find the bay anyway; and if they could, they were told to stay out of Wai’anae.” George didn’t let those lonely days at the bay stop him. He asked God to send people to him. He knew he needed to bless others with the gift he’d been given. George told God that if he’d send people to George, he’d pray for each and every one. God did just that. To date, George has taught more than 6,700 people how to paddleboard. George says, “What amazes me is that when people come out of the water they have this desire to share their life story.” George realized people needed more. They needed prayers. On every drive home, George prayed for every person to whom he gave a paddleboard lesson. George also started a prayer group on facebook for just that—people who need prayers. Today there are 157 members from around the world praying for one another. George says that he focused on helping others, but when his mother was in a coma due to lung failure, given only 2 days to live, those 157 members prayed for her. His mom walked out of the hospital after her doctors prepared George’s family for her death. George says, “Because I decided to give some random person a paddleboard lesson on a beach at Poka’i bay in a little town called Wai’anae, my mom is here today. George says, “I might not be equipped with a Bible, but with my paddleboards, I share God’s Word. I am blessed abundantly.” Today George tows a large trailer, filled with 35 paddle- boards—blessings from others who believe in his mission. George says, “find your passion, allow yourself to be led, and you’ll be exactly where you need to be.” You’ll find him many mornings at Poka’i bay where he calls the Bay of Dreams. That’s also the name of his facebook page. By the way, diabetes is not in George’s future. His blood pressure is normal and he’s as healthy as a horse. George Kalilikane is an inspiration, a role model, and definitely a man on a mission. Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 11 Proud and humble Nānākuli resident and Wai’anae High School graduate, George Kalilikane says his life’s mission is to be a blessing to others. He does that one paddleboard lesson at a time. photos by Miulan Nihipali The Picture Lady
  • 12. 12 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
  • 13. Wai`anae Homeschoolers Unite by Michelle Okimoto Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 13 N estled along the end of Farrington Highway, Waianae is of ten considered an isolated community with a reputation for unbearable traffic. Yet, it is a very special place, with much to offer its homeschooling families. There are unique small businesses, farms, parks, hiking trails and beaches available for homeschoolers to utilize, to take learning outside the four walls of their home. “We love exploring all that Waianae has to offer,” says Sunshine Lopez, a mother of five, just beginning her homeschool journey. “I want my children to know their community well. I want them to respect it and nurture it, and work for positive changes. Always. I am really looking forward to growing our Waianae homeschool ohana so we can do some amazing community service projects right here in our coast.” One thing many new homeschool families, like the Lopez family, learn quickly is that schooling at home can be isolating, especially in Waianae. Too often homeschoolers on our coast must travel 30 minu tes to an h our (on a good day!) jus t to find activities, sports, clubs and co-ops for their students. “We have to drive to Mililani to meet with other homeschoolers who use our Classical Conversations curriculum,” says Katelin Manansala, Waianae resident and homeschooling mother of three. “It’s only once a week, but the drive is long, and really feels like it wastes some of our learning time. I’m hoping to make some connections with more leeward families this year.” Now, utilizing social media, Manansala, Lopez, and other Waianae homeschoolers have a way to connect. Waianae and Ko’Olina homeschooling families can reach out to each other via Facebook in the group, Waianae Homeschool Ohana (WHO). T he g roup of fer s w ide appeal to homeschool families, because it is driven by its members. Ma ny a re ha p py to have a fo r um to dis cuss curriculum options, while others are working on setting up group events for the kids, and nights out for the moms. WHO members are planning community service projects, field trips, socialization activities and co-ops. Students are enjoying learning alongside their peers, and parents are enjoying the fr iendship, encouragement , and suppor t from like-minded families. With this new lifeline, the possibilities are endless for our coast’s homeschooling families. This social media connection is just the beginning. Manansala is already working on bringing more oppor tunities to our Waianae homeschoolers. After meeting other families in WHO, Manansala has begun the process of opening a Classical Co nve r s a t i o n s c a m p us h e r e i n t h e f a l l . “ I ’m grateful for the opportunity to network closer to home,” says Manansala. “Waianae Homeschool Ohana makes homeschooling less isolating and has helped me meet other families with similar homeschooling goals.” Nationally, homeschool rates have seen a steady increase in recent years, and Waianae is no exception. It seems everyone knows at least on e family wh o has t aken t h eir children ou t of public and private school s to educate them at home. Families cite various reasons for their choice to homeschool, such as religious beliefs, special needs, social problems, safety, or academic needs. Regardless of the reasons, more and more leeward families are choosing to take the leap into the world of homeschool. WHO is a diverse group and welcomes all homeschoolers from both the Waianae and Ko’Olina areas. If you are a homeschooling family or know one on our coast, WHO wants you! Search for “Waianae Homeschool Ohana” on Facebook and send a request to join. After you’ve sent a join request, check your “other” messages folder often, and you will hear from an Admin soon. Together, we can help the Waianae Homeschool Ohana grow, and bring support to more families right here in Waianae. education
  • 14. I n 1949, 66 years ago, Maui born, David Okimoto and his wife Betty (Fujihara) Okimoto built The Wai’anae Store. After building their store, David, who was originally a contractor, made a bold move--he left contracting for the grocery business. Being a grocer meant he’d have much more interaction with people. That’s what David wanted--to build relationships with his customers. As a contractor, David’s interaction with his clients ended once he built their home. As a grocer, interaction with his customers was limitless. David and Betty envisioned that their store would become a landmark of the Wai’anae community. David has always believed that customers come first. He was one of the first grocers to allow families to open what he called, “store charges”. This allowed families to pay their grocery bill on pay day. 66 years later, The Wai’anae Store remains a family business whose mission is to serve the people of Wai’anae. Food Giant is also a part of the Okimoto Corp, serving the Nānākuli community. Even in today’s difficult economic times The Okimoto family have managed to keep their prices among the lowest in our state. They have also been avid supporters of our Wai’anae schools. Although they can’t give to everyone, they do what they can. That’s just who they are. In February, David Okimoto was recognized for his contributions to our community--being named as one of Wai’anae Mall’s ‘Wai’anae Coast Hall of Fame first 40 inductions’. the okimoto corporation The Wai`anae Store people & community The Okimoto Corporation is a family-owned-and-operated business whose roots in Wai’anae go way back. 14 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 David and Betty (Fujihara) Okimoto
  • 15. WAIANAE STORE Wai’anae Store, a family-run company is devoted to servingthe grocery needs of the residents on the Wai’anae coast. Established in 1949 by David and Betty Okimoto, Wai’anae Store is celebrating 66 years--3 generations. The Okimoto family have built strong relationships with their customers and the community by offering competitive prices and product selection not offered by traditional spermarkets and by supporting the community. 66 years and still going strong! Nānākuli Super, also part of Okimoto Corp. celebrates 42 years in business this year. The Okimoto family would like to humbly thank all of their customers, employees, vendors, business partners, and the community for their continued support! Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 15
  • 16. working for our families Local 368 Union T he Laborers’ Union Local 368 faced one of its most challenging situations. Construction projects slowed drastically. The livelihood of the unions 3100+ active members and their families were at risk. Members working in such fields as construction, landscaping, hazardous material removal and golf course maintenance were out of work for significant amounts of time. Under the direction of Union Leader Peter Ganaban, Local 368 worked tirelessly in the political arena to obtain funding for various federal and local government projects. They worked with private developers and private owners to get approvals for their projects in an effort to stimulate Hawai’i’s economy and improve the livelihood of its members. Since the union was chartered on December 1, 1954, that’s been their mission: work for the betterment of working people and their families. Local 368 seeks improved working conditions for members by protecting their safety, and by negotiating fair wages and benefits. Local 368 leaders advocate for laws that protect on-the-job workers and consumers from contractors who do not operate as they should. Over 500 Local 368 members call the Wai’anae coast their home. Many members and their families have been direct beneficiaries of the Laborers’ Union’s work. Peter Ganaban, Business Manager and long time Wai’anae resident, shares, “My Executive Board are truly representative of the members we service. All of them came from ‘the field.’ They understand the struggles of our members and work for them. Our members’ lives are the reasons we take our jobs so seriously, and work tirelessly to improve their conditions and protect their rights.” The Laborers’ Union Local 368 is located at 1617 Palama St. in Kalihi. They also have offices on Maui and in Hilo. Visit them at www.local368.org. In the thick of Hawaii’s recession, a few years ago, many Local 368 members were out of work. 16 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
  • 17. another young man on a mission Leighton Panui Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 17 I t was evident in the 8th grade that Leighton Panui Jr. had a promising future. The afternoon I had an encounter with Leighton, while he was an 8th grader at WIS, impacted me enough that I sought him out 8 years later. I was dragging my rolling cart through the hall when Leighton and his 2 friends turned the corner from the direction I was headed. Although I intended to step aside, Leighton held both arms out to his side, and said to his friends, “Hey, let the lady pass.” I said thank you, and he said, “Of course,” like what he did was no big deal. He probably doesn’t remember that. But, I was so impressed that afternoon that I’ve never forgotten it. Today, Leighton is a student and football player for Western Oregon University in Monmouth, Oregon. He’s a fullback for the WOU Wolves. He was blessed to have played from his Freshman year. As a Wai’anae High Searider, he played as a running back, fullback and special teams. He also served as team captain. When I caught up with Leighton I asked him about college life. He had lots to share and some good advice for our Wai’anae kids. Leighton shared that he dreamed of attending college on the mainland since he was in the 6th grade. College was the answer for a better future for himself and his family. “College was also my ticket to explore the mainland,” asserts Leighton. “I always knew I’d reach my goal, and it came very real in my junior year of high school when I started receiving letters from multiple schools showing interest in me.” “I’ve been in college for three years now and it isn’t easy,” says Leighton. As a high school student, I worked hard in the classroom and on the football field. I took advanced placement classes, joined the National Honor Society, did community service, and I let each college know that I wanted to be a part of their school. Even though I worked as hard as I could, I don’t feel I was ready for college. I believe the Hawaii school system needs a revamping. They didn’t prepare me well enough when compared to other students on the mainland, but I didn’t let that stop me. I work hard everyday. It’s a natural instinct in me, instilled by my parents. My family and girlfriend, Britt are instrumental when it comes to me achieving my goals. They have been with me since the beginning of my journey and have continued to support me every step of the way. Without their love and support I would not have the determination and drive to accomplish any of my goals.” Leighton believes, “Nothing is handed to you. God might have given you the talent, but it’s up to you to make the most of it. My parents taught me and my siblings (Leahi, Leina and Leihali’a) that lesson, and it is God who guides me the rest of the way.” “Unfor tunately people from Wai’anae are stereot yped, says Leighton.“ It ’s impor tant to do our best to come out of that stereotype. One day while I was in high school, the National Honor Society was having a meeting. When I walked in, an advisor stopped me and told me that the classroom was being used for a National Honor Society meeting. I told him to check his list because my name was on it. At first I was angry that they labeled me a football jock and couldn’t believe I was a scholar too. I never let stereotypes hold me back,” remarks Leighton. Leighton Panui Jr. is a man on a mission and a role model for young men in Wai’anae, and everywhere. Leighton shares this with any young person. “Going to college is not impossible. But, be prepared to work hard for it. You’re going to face adversity but push through because you will see doors and dreams open for you. Don’t be afraid to leave Wai’anae because Wai’anae will be there when you get back.” Leighton’s last words? “Aloha to all, from Monmouth Oregon.”
  • 18. D id you grow up believing any of these thoughts about money? Whatever your presuppositions about money, it effects your current situation. It has either helped you reach your goals or prevented you from reaching your goals. Whatever your situation, money in-and-of-itself is not responsible. Money is simply a tool, an instrument, and a medium of exchange. Period. The personification of money as power, wealth and greed doesn’t come from money itself, it comes from qualities we’ve attached to money based on the history of money from the beginning of time. Money continues to perplex me today. I grew up with the perception that a good deed is only a good deed when the good deed doer expects nothing in return. The deed immediately loses its appeal when the doer expects to somehow receive compensation for what he or she has done. That compensation usually involves money. I believed that money would turn my good intentions bad. Although I looked for opportunities to earn money, when I earned it, I felt as though I should apologize for having earned it. When I published my first book, the hardest thing to do was sell them. I wanted to give them away. It didn’t feel right to expect compensation for doing what I thought was a good deed. If I asked for compensation for my work, then my intentions could be questioned. Uncon- scious of that presupposition until recently, I know now that being unaware of your ideals regarding money can keep you stuck. So where did we get those perceptions in the first place? Here’s what I came to believe about my own views on money. In Matthew 6:24 Jesus said, “no servant can be slave to two masters: for either he would hate the first and love the second, or he will be devoted to the first and think nothing of the second. You cannot serve God and money.” A superficial reading of this Scripture may be interpreted to say that money and God are in opposition. Growing up I read it the way I think many people read it—that money is evil and that if you love God, you cannot love money. Today I believe that this Scripture is not declaring the opposition of God and money, but asserting that we must make a choice. Do we want to serve God? Or, do we want to serve money? Over the centuries money has been personified as a master of wealth. Money has evolved from a symbol of grand power to become power itself. From the 6th century B.C. when the Athenians used their money to defeat the Persians, to Al-Qaeda using money to spread terrorism across the world—we see money as a way to spread evil. The problem with money is that money can be used to control others. Money can cause us to forget the values we hold dear. Money can turn people into oppressors. We can absolutely assign new characteristics to money. We can make money a servant, an instrument and a tool to spread goodness in the world. We can use money as a resource to advance human welfare and spur social reform. We can choose to make money a master or a servant. We can choose to serve money or make money serve us. The following journal article was used as a reference: Burkholder, J. (2011). Money: master or servant?. Vision (Winnipeg, Man.), 12(1), 26-33. 18 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 does money serve you, OR Do You Serve Money? •All people with money are to some degree evil or selfish. •Money can buy you happiness. •Money is the root of all evil. •Money can turn a good person bad. •Money doesn’t grow on trees. •A rich man cannot enter heaven. •You are powerful if you are rich. Money
  • 19. HASSLE FREE TAXES“We Take the Hassle out of Taxes” • Federal & State Tax Preparation • Electronic Filing WAI‘ANAE 86-120 Farr. Hwy. Wai‘anae, HI 96792 Wai‘anae Mall (Between Gold Plus & Credit Union) WAIPAHU 94-801 Farrington Hwy. Waipahu Professional Ctr. Waipahu, HI 96797 676-8297 (Across from Times inside Payday Loans) NÄNÄKULI 87-1926 Farr. Hwy. & Auyong Hmstd. Rd. Nänäkuli, HI 96792 (Next to 7-Eleven inside PayDay Loans ) NO APPOINTMENT NEEDEDNO APPOINTMENT NEEDED 696-6106 • We prepare taxes for years 2004 - 2014 HASSLE FREE TAXES INSTANT COUPON* $25.00OFF *SEE OFFICE FOR DETAILS Refund Loans Available up to $ 5,000.00! EWA BEACH 91-789 Papipi Rd., Ewa Beach, HI 96706 (Ft. Weaver/Papipi Rd. inside Payday Loans) WAIMANALO 41-849 Kalanianaole Hwy., Waimanalo, HI 96795 (Inside Payday Loans next to 7-Eleven) Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 19
  • 20. 20 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 Ono Kettle Korn M ikala Pieper alongside her fiancé Sua Stevens, can fill small or large orders. No matter the flavor, no matter the size, all orders are hand popped and made fresh daily. Mikala offers her products for fundraising activities--project graduation or family reunions. Hire her for parties of any kind. As the “one-stop-sweet- shop” for cotton candy, shave ice and of course, ‘Ono Kettle Korn, you can’t go wrong! Mikala, Wai’anae High School graduate, Wai’anae Coast teacher, single parent/proud mother of a pre-medical school, college student sought an opportunity to supplement her income. In 2008, she purchased this business- -it was just the right fit. Mikala loves providing her customers with homemade, craving-quenching snacks. She loves meeting people and networking at events and fairs and welcome any kind of conversation. “Meeting people is one of the favorite parts of being an entrepreneur. I love it!” Call Mikala for your next birthday party, fundraising event or if you’re ‘ono for ‘Ono Kettle Korn. Sweet, salty, crunchy, chewy--if you’re craving it ‘Ono Kettle Korn can quench it.
  • 21. Roy Robins Jr., Hawaii native and founder of Koko’s Roasted Salsa, is the uncle of 11 nieces and nephews. Every one of them calls him Koko. It started when Ricky boy, the eldest, as a toddler, struggled to say Uncle. Every time Ricky called for his Uncle’s attention, he called out, Koko. Koko was such an endearing name that it stuck. Roy has never been called Uncle by his nieces and nephews. That’s because he isn’t uncle—he’s Koko! For every occasion or for no occasion at all, Koko Roy has wowed his nieces and nephews with mouthwater- ing, flavorful dishes. Roy’s creations are fresh, home- made, original, and most of all made with love. Roy brings to you his latest creation—roasted pepper and garlic salsa with corn and beans. From Koko Roy and his `ohana to yours, we hope you enjoy our salsa as much as we have enjoyed preparing it for you. 808-306-3054808-306-3054 No order too big or too small Call for pricing! Free Delivery! Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 21
  • 22. sports 22 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 WIS coach tyler fabrao: Wai’anae athletes could achieve more! But why aren’t they? T yler Fabrao, newly appointed Head Coach of Wai’anae Intermediate Schools’ football team, sat down with me to share his mana’o about their recent championship win. He’s ecstatic about their victory--in the first year of the 808 Football Youth League, WIS won the championship, and WHS’ JV team won their championship. They won in 2011 and 2012 as well. These boys are the group of boys Tyler coached at WIS. The wins make a statement, no doubt. In the history of OIA, Wai’anae High School has taken more than 18 championship titles. Tyler declares, “By far, our coast athletes have more natural talent: speed; technique; and athleticism than athletes anywhere in the island and that’s been evident in the games they’ve played throughout the 3 years he’s coached. Tyler says, “Yup, we’ve won multiple championships, but where has that gotten us? Nowhere. Kurt Gouveia played for Wai’anae High School, went on to BYU, won a national championship, then on to the Washington Redskins where he earned 3 Superbowl rings, but why are there not more of us accom- plishing to that level? Our kids start off wanting that. Our athletes are that kind of caliber.” He continues, “In Pop Warner, Intermediate and JV level football, we win, but once athletes get to 11th and 12th grade, that isn’t the case. We need to look at why that is.” Tyler definitely had lots to say on the matter. “I’ve been working with athletes for upwards of 10 years now. I have mentoring relationships with many of our athletes. Before 4 years ago, I focused on winning championships. All I cared about was bringing back the Wai’anae record and reputation. But, I realized I was doing my students an injustice. It isn’t championships that’s important, it’s sticking to the plan.” According to Tyler, athletes from outside of Wai’anae who clearly are not as talented, surpass our kids level of athleticism around the 11th grade because our kids stop working. Others go to clinics and camps, elevate their gameandstudyhard.Ourkidsstop.” Toomanyofourathletes choose the wrong path. They choose to drink, party, cruise and smoke. “They lose the hunger they once had,” remarks Tyler. “Many of our students give up on school, sports and their goals.” Tyler says, “The mentoring I do now looks a lot different than it did 10 years ago. Today, he preaches on how to set goals, give back to yourself, and stay on course. “Success isn’t measured by the amount of money you have in your checkbook. It’s measured by whether you have the life you wanted. You can be a janitor all your life. You don’t get glory and you don’t make a lot of money, but if you are truly happy, and are doing what you wanted to, then you are a success.” Tyler tells his athletes, “envision your goal and work toward it. Don’t be afraid of hard work. It’s the only way you’ll make it big.” #stick2theplan is their motto. You’ll see it all over our athletes Facebook and Instagram pages. Tyler says, “it’s catching on, and the tide is changing, and the kids are buying in. It’s exciting,” says
  • 23. We are proud of our schools and our students. If you have inspirational stories of how ourstudentsareovercoming obstacles, making a difference or achieving their dreams, please write to us at info@napuaowaianae.org. If you visit any of our businesses or sponsors, or make contact with anyone we’ve shared with you, please tell them Na Pua `O Wai`anae sent you. Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 23 Tyler, “but we need everyone in the community in on it, to make a big impact.” Here’s the advice he shares, and he asks the com- munity to rally behind him, and the other coaches and community members: 1 Decide on a goal for you. Start small and practice working toward small goals. Then build up. 2 Find counselors, mentors, and people to help achieve that goal. 3 Tell people about your goals. 4 Be kind to yourself. Devote time by working toward your goal. 5 Every decision you make, or action you take, ask yourself, “Does this help me get to my goal? if not, don’t do it. 6 #STICK2THEPLAN! If you’d like to help Tyler, and the other coaches, he invites you to email him at tylerfabrao@yahoo.com #STICK2THEPLAN
  • 24. 24 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 C helsie Hose, one of the organization’s founders, sat down with me to share with our Wai’anae community the goals of the Westside Girls Softball Club, and some of the highlights of 2014. Chelsie shares, “You just have to watch them play! From the very first game of the 2014 ASA Paradise Invitational Tournament (August 11th through the 17th) they showed off their dedication and commitment to this club. We are so proud of the girls.” Chelsieshares,“Themission for our club is to share with each and every player the fundamentals of the game, the significance of working together, and the importance of having fun in a win or a loss. We were able to achieve our mission, but we did even better. The girls won 2nd place in the 2014 ASA Fall Classic Tournament. Our girls dedication, determination and hard work, with awesome parental support made it happen. The girls are now like sisters--encouraging each other to try harder and never give up. They are striving for bigger and better things--more tournaments, in Hawaii and in the U.S. mainland. It will take hard work, dedication and tons of fundraising, but we’re up for it.” Chelsie invites anyone who is interested in finding out more about the club to contact her via email at chels_96792@yahoo.com. ChelsiewantedtoextendaheartfeltmahalotoBubbies Ice Cream Company for allowing Westside Girls Softball Club to fundraise their ‘ono mochi ice cream. Chelsie says, “It is a definate must have--the bomb!” Also, a huge shout out to OICA/FIAH CLIQUE/LTD ADDICTION HI T-Shirt company who printed booster shirts for the parents, family members and friends. Be on the look out for this up and coming club! Na Pua `O Wai’anae sends a big congratulations to Westside Girls Softball Club for striving for excellence and representing our community well. Awesome job girls! wai`anae girl’s Softball Club “WestsideGirlsSoftballClubisaneworganizationforthegirlsofWai’anae,ages7-13.In2014,WestsideGirlsSoftball Club began and ended their first and unbelievable season. They don’t yet have history, however, if their success is any indication of their future potential, then their future is bright!” photos courtesy of Chelsie Hose Coaches right to left: Eldon Bolahao, Napua Makaneole, Ross Hose Jr., Head Coach: Jonathan Ilae. Standing players right to left: Alohilani Napalapalai, Emma Tauala, Cherish Hose, Emeryl Juan, Relyssa Kauhane, Maudestie Alvarado Players kneeling right to left: Victoria Alaivanu-Lene, Kawehi Cariaga, Dakota Ilae, Jordyn-Rece Palacio, Melody Makaneola- Baligad, Torie McKinney
  • 25. embracing fear: Children Who Fear Become Adults Who Fear T welve and thirteen year olds walk into my classroom everyday. My plan is to teach them something I know. One of two things will happen: they will learn what I have to teach, or they won’t. Some of my students understand new concepts right away, while others take longer. The ones who take longer get frustrated. They are often afraid to admit what they don’t know. They fear that if they admit, they’ll be judged or ridiculed. It becomes more important to hide than it does to learn. Rather than work through their fears, they allow the fear of judge- ment or ridicule to stop them in their tracks. Fear causes them to act out or shut down, and no matter how much they do want to learn, their fear won’t allow it. “Heaven forbid someone else know that I didn’t get it.” That’s what they think. I’ve experienced every type of student—the student who pretends not to care; the student who pretends to have a headache; and the student who pretends not to have heard. If they allow it, which they do, fear robs them of opportunities to learn and grow to their full potential. Fast forward 20 years. You’re at a restaurant with friends of your significant other. Far from being comfortable, you stay only to be supportive. Your dinner guests are well-versed in things about which you have no clue. One of them refers to the foies gras. You can’t even pronounce the dish, let alone have a conversation about it. What do you do? You pretend you know what they’re talking about and pray that’s the end of that. Here’s what happens: you stop listening, stop connecting, and stop sharing. Your temperature might rise a few degrees. Why? You’re afraid. You’re afraid to look stupid and show them how much you don’t know. You don’t think about all the things you could share with them. You think only about the things they’ll know you don’t know. So what do we do? Try something new. Admit the fear. Face it, and embrace it. Be honest about what you fear, and why. Be honest about what you don’t know. When we let go of the fear, we can take risks, broaden our horizons, and grow into better versions of ourselves. In John 21:20, John refers to himself on multiple occasions as the one whom Jesus loved. When I first read that, I thought, “Wow, John is full of himself.” John wasn’t bragging. He was not being haughty. He found something that gave him strength any time he needed to be strong—Jesus’ love for him. When John was afraid, he reminded himself of how much Jesus loved him, then made a choice not to be afraid. If we work to become like John, we rest in being loved for just who we are. When we embrace being loved for who we are, what we know and what we don’t, matters little. We begin to share our true selves, and because of it, learn and grow. Children who don’t learn to face their fears become adults who have difficulty facing fears. Children do not learn to face their fears by adults telling them to do so. Children learn to face their fears by witnessing others face theirs. Let’s build a nation where there is no need for fear—a place where everyone is accepted for exactly who they are. How do you face your fears? If you have stories to share about how you faced and overcame your fears, email us at stories@npow.org. We’d love to hear from you! Social Issues “When we let go of fear... We become better versions of ourselves.” Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 25 photo by Ryan McGuire
  • 26. perfect & peculiar Peanut Butter Powder coconut flour recipe BananaOatcake Spoonfuls (photo left) Banana oatcake spoonfuls & ingredients healthy food tips 26 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 Combine all the ingredients above. Either mix by hand or blender until it has the consistency of oatmeal cookies. Drop spoonfuls onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake on 350 degrees for 15 minutes. This recipe will yield approximately 2 dozen spoonfuls. Some of the ingredients can be substituted, but of course the recipe won’t be as healthy. Almond Flour is expensive. At Down to Earth in Kapolei you can buy it for approximately $11 per pound. If that doesn’t work, use a whole wheat or whole grain flour. The Agave, Coconut Flour and Coconut Palm Sugar can be purchased from Sam’s Club at surprisingly, reasonable prices. In fact Sam’s club has lately been doing an awesome job bringing in organic products for prices cheaper than anywhere else. Remember, you’re not baking grandma’s home- made desserts that are to die for, but you’ll get a delicious healthy snack that you won’t have to feel guilty about, at all! It will satisfy the sweet tooth. It’s unfortunate that the tastes we’re accustomed too, isn’t what we should be consuming at all, so a definite shift in our taste buds are in order. That’s a difficult one. At least that’s what I thought, until I tasted it. A product of BetterBody Foods, PB2 is made by extracting 90% of the oil in peanut butter to produce a low fat powder saving the consumer over 100 calories and 10 grams of fat per serving! When my husband brought it home from Sam’s Club, I couldn’t believe it. It really is the next best thing next to slice bread, well almost! A regular serving of peanut butter has an average 190 calories per serving, 16 grams of fat, 125 mg of salt, and 3 grams of sugar. PB2 has 55 calories per serving, 1.5 grams of fat, 70 mg of salt, and 2 grams of sugar. It’s an all around great buy--for your body and your pocket book. You can find PB2 at Sam’s Club for an extremely reasonable $10.28 per 30 ounce jar. Did I mention it is gluten free, GMO free and all natural? Mothers across the world can feel great about packing a peanut butter and jelly sandwich when they use PB2. I’ll bet most children won’t even be able to tell. PB2 isn’t as creamy as regular peanut butter, but the difference in taste isn’t that significant especially when you look at the benefits. If you decide not to compare it to the peanut butter we’ve eaten as children, you won’t mind. The peanut butter we grew up eating, isn’t that great for your health anyway- -with all that fat, sugar and salt. Add approximately two tablespoons of water to two tablespoons of PB2, stir, and serve. It’s great in smoothies and of course the old fashion way--as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. It’s yummy, easy and inexpensive. Peanut Butter Powder? That sounds peculiar. Ingredients (substitutions) 1 cup rolled oats 1/2 cup fat-free yogurt 1/2 tablespoon almond butter (unsalted butter) 1/2 cup coconut flour 1/2 cup almond flour (whole wheat flour) 1/4 cup raisins 1/4 cup coconut sugar (brown sugar) 1/4 cup chopped walnuts Two overripe bananas 2 tablespoons peanut butter powder 1 tablespoon cinnamon Agave to taste, then to drizzle on top after baked (honey)
  • 27. 02/14/15-05/31/15 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 27
  • 28. momi’s minute My Encounter with God faith & spirituality 28 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 E veryone I knew who experienced their personal encounter with God was filled with excitement for me. My daughter had her encounter and she emerged from her experience a new person too. What exactly happened to her during those 3 days? God was working in her. That was clear. If she could come out a new person, so could I right? But I worried. “What if I’m the only one who comes out the same?” “What if God doesn’t come to see me?” Although I’ve had my own experiences with God, I worried that He might not come. No matter what my worries were, I knew it was my time. Then God opened the doors for my husband to be blessed as well. So it was done--we were scheduled to encounter God together. The traffic wasn’t so bad the first night (on my drive from Kapolei to Queen Street), but still, I had 40 minutes to contemplate my weekend to come. I prayed God would come especially for me. I was anxious and excited knowing I was ready for the special appointment I made- -on my own time, and my own terms. That same fervor that filled my body before my first date with my husband, inhabited my mind, heart and soul. I was giddy and ‘good-anxious’. At Word of Life Christian Center in Honolulu, shepherded by Pastor Art and Kuna Sepulveda, my husband and I were welcomed with smiling faces, warm hugs and cheerful words of encouragement. Still nervous, I worried about being placed into groups or feeling threatened to share things I wasn’t yet willing. The entire weekend I never once needed to get into a group or share things I wasn’t willing to share. It was just about God and me. The women leaders who shared their mana’o were open and transparent about their struggles and how their lives were transformed by the renewal of their minds by the Holy Spirit (Romans 12:2). Their paths were different, but their journeys were the same. The common thread in all of their stories was this: When they asked God to come in, He did. They no longer needed to live broken, shameful, guilty and condemned because all of their pains, worries, fears, insecurities, and past sins--they nailed to the cross, exactly where it belonged. Jesus’ death and resurrection bought their freedom that day at Calvary. When Jesus died, He became the connection between us and God--the connection that had been broken by Adam’s sin. When Jesus was resurrected, He beat death, which means (for us) that we beat death too. So, when we believe in Him, we are gifted with eternal life--Salvation. There’s nothing we need to do but accept Him as our Lord and Savior, and allow Him to transform us from the inside. When we do, everything else just comes. Slowly, consistently and with surety, we become more and more like Him--which was His plan all along. The last day of the “Encounter” I thanked God for pursuing me relentlessly--over and over again even when I ran from Him. He continues to save me. He always will. For that I am abundantly blessed. I am the daughter of the most High God. I am royalty. I reign. Like Pastor Art says, “I dare you to reign!” For any person curious about the Christian faith, every question is answered at the Encounter. Being a Christian has nothing to do with religion but everything to do with Jesus, having a relationship with Him and knowing in your heart, mind and soul that everything He did, he did for YOU. Claim and receive every blessing He wants for you--restoration, healing, prosperity, covering, and most of all unconditional love. Even if you don’t believe in God, I think most of us can believe that there is something out there bigger than us--molding, shaping and directing our lives. What risk is there in believing that-that something is Jesus? Go find out for yourself what He has to offer. If you need help, call Word Of Life Christian Center, and make an appointment with God for your own ENCOUNTER. In faith, I know He will show up! God is good all the time. All the time God is good. “You’re gonna be so blessed,” they said. “You’re gonna let go of so many things.” “You’re gonna come away from this weekend transformed, renewed and rejuvenated--a new person.” Pastor Art and Kuna Sepulveda
  • 29. 808-528-4044 Fax 808-545-5566 wolhawaii.com wolcc@wolhawaii.com Word of Life Christian Center 550 Queen Street Honolulu, HI 96813 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 29
  • 30. Hawaiian Hair Hullabaloo? T hick, wavy, long Hawaiian hair is beautiful. Some days. But, on those humid, bad hair days, it is anything but beautiful. The funky, frizzy, fly-aways are just not in style. Salon solutions can be expensive and many times don’t work like they promise. They leave you frustrated--with empty pockets. I’ve heard complaints from many women and because I share the same frustration, (I have thick, frizzy, Hawaiian hair) began to look for inexpensive, home remedies to frail the frizz. I’ve found 3 remedies that work. These remedies aren’t miracles. You won’t rinse and find a new head of ‘exactly-what-you-want- hair’ because let’s face it, we all want what we don’t have, but you will find yourself saying, “Ooh this feels good.” Your hair will be a little more smooth, a little more shiny, and a lot less frizzy. It is my God-given duty to share this information with you. First solution: Yes, the obvi- ous, coconut oil. But, how exactly do you apply and for how long? Easy. You can use any kind of coconut oil . The l arge tub at Sam’s Club for around $20 is a good buy, and it’s not just for cooking anymore. The fractionated coconut oil from Down to Earth is approximately $15 for the largest bottle. Either one works fine. The fractionated coconut oil is a little less messy, and the consistency isn’t affected by the weather- unlike the coconut oil for cooking. You’ll need approximately a cup of oil or so to soak your entire head. Pour a little coconut oil in the middle of your palm and apply to the tips of your head near your scalp and work your way down until your entire head of hair is coated. Pay special attention to your scalp and your ends. Put your hair up in a ‘bun’ and cover with a shower cap for at least 20 minutes. Then, remove the shower cap and continue to leave the coconut oil in your hair for at least 4 hours. Keep away from the sun. I like to leave it in when I’m working at my computer or cleaning the house. You have the option to leave it in your hair overnight, just ensure you have it wrapped in a shower cap. The oil will leave stubborn stains on your pillow case. Wash, shampoo, condition, and style your hair as normal. You’ll need to repeat periodically to maintain and increase results. Once a week is a good rule of thumb. The second remedy is Guinness Beer. I know, beer? Yes. Guinness beer works well. All you do is pour approximately 2 bottles of beer over your head until your head is soaked. Take the beer out of t h e f r i d g e a p p r ox i m a t e ly a n hour before you use it, so you’re not pouring an ice cold beer on your head. This remedy is a little messy. I’d advise you to apply it with your head over the tub or a large sink. It would work well if you were planning to soak in a tub because you’ll drip brown water all over your floor if you don’t. Leave the Guinness in for as long as you can. Wash, shampoo, condition, and style your hair as normal. And, just like the coconut oil, you’ll need to repeat periodically. Once a week works well. The third home remedy is the messiest of them all--over ripened bananas and yogurt. Blend 2 overripe bananas and an 8 ounce cup of yogurt until it becomes pasty. Apply the mixture to your hair from the scalp down. Leave in your hair for as long as you can (any- where from 2 - 6 hours). Wash your hair as usual. This is the most difficult because the banana can get stuck in your hair. It looks and feels like very small pieces of dried up boogers. And when you style your hair, the pieces will slowly and almost altogether fall out. Wash, shampoo, condition, and style your hair as normal. And, just like the coconut oil, you’ll need to repeat periodically. Once a week works well. Over a few months, I’ve used each remedy repeatedly. My hair is considerably less frizzy than it was. I attribute the change a little to age, a little to the Kyani I’ve been taking for a few months, and of course, to these inexpensive home r e m e d i e s t h a t a l m o s t anyone already has in their cupboards. If you try any of these remedies or have others that work, let me know at momi@napuaowaianae.org. HEALTH & BEAUTY 30 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 help is here! “Over a few months, I’ve used each remedy repeatedly. My hair is considerably less frizzy than it was.”
  • 31. 20% OFF!Until May 31, 2015 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 31
  • 32. Embrace Your Hardships & Its Transformative Power Call to book Momi for your next event. Special Event Pricing Available! www.momirobins-makaila.org 808-888-9434 “A must read for anyone wanting to become a better version of yourself.” One woman’s testimony of transformation by grace and mercy. 32 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015
  • 33. Important Numbers & ResourcesImportant Numbers & Resources Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 33 Important City Numbers (808) 768-3202 Bulky Item collection (808) 733-4300 Civil Defense (808) 768-5001 Councilwoman Kym Pine (808) 955-8300 Crime Stoppers (808) 455-1725 Dead Animal Pick up and Drains, Ditches Cleaning (808) 768-3100 Driver License - Kapolei (808) 723-7139 Fire Department Station #26 Wai‘anae (808 723-7139 Fire Department Station #28 Nānākuli (808) 832-5105 Governor’s Office (808) 768-5007 Honolulu City Councilmember Kym Pine District 1 (808) 696-4257 Library Wai‘anae (808) 532-7700 License Registration (808) 786-4141 Mayor’s Office Kirk Caldwell (808) 973-5286 National Weather Service - Oahu (808) 768-3003 Park Recreation Programs (808) 723-7162 Permits (Camping, Picnics, and Fire) (800) 222-1222 Poison Control (808) 723-8600 Police Department – Wai‘anae (808) 768-7777 Pot Hole Hotline (808) 768-3980 Property Tax (808) 586-8465 Representative Karen Awana House District 43 (808) 586-8460 Representative Jo Jordan House District 44 (808) 455-9644 Refuse Collection (808) 768-3798 Satellite City Hall (808) 586-7793 Senator Maile Shimabukuro (808) 768-3330 Sewer Charges/Billing (808) 772-1213 Social Security Office - Kapolei (808) 696-0161 US Postal Office - Wai’anae (808) 786-3800 Voter Information Local Utilities (808) 748-5000 Board of Water Supply (808) 748-5872 After Hours Water Emergency (808) 548-7311 Hawaiian Electric (808) 548-7961 Hawaiian Electric Company Service Calls (808) 643-3456 Hawaiian Tel Com (808) 768-2100 Oceanic-Time Warner Cable (808) 768-3200 Refuse and Recycling Services Public Schools (808) 697-7100 Leihoku Elementary Principal Randall Miura (808) 697-7150 Mā’ili Elementary Principal Suzie Lee (808) 695-7900 Mākaha Elementary Principal Nelson Shigeta (808) 668-5800 Nānāikapono Elementary Principal Debra Knight (808) 668-5813 Nānākuli Elementary Principal Lisa Ann Higa (808) 668-5823 Nānākuli High Principal Darin Pilialoha (808) 697-7121 Wai‘anae Elementary Principal Wendy Takahashi (808) 697-9400 Wai’anae High Principal Disa Hauge (808) 697-7121 Wai‘anae Intermediate Principal Raechelle Fabrao Charter Schools (808) 697-7110 Kamaile Academy Principal Emma Weiss (808) 620-9030 Kawaihona Principal Alvin Parker Post High (808) 696-6378 Leeward Community College - Wai‘anae Dean of Students Laurie Lawrence 911 All Emergencies
  • 34. Resources of Organizations 34 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 Children’s Services 696-9498 Ho‘okaulike 696-4212 Hi‘iola (Hawaii Health Connector) 294-1820 Ka Wahi Kaiaulu-Wai‘anae Neighborhood Place 696-4598 ♥ Hawaii Family Services, Inc. 696-3482 ♥ Hawaii Job Corps 536-0695 ♥ Hoa ‘Āina O Mākaha 695-8978 ♥ Ho‘omau Ke Ola 696-4266 ♥ Honolulu Community Action Program 696-4261 Head Start 847-2400 Kumuhonua Transitional Shelter 682-5494 Hā Initiative-STEM After-School Program 521-4531 ♥ INPEACE-Ka Lama Education Academy 696-8312 Keiki Steps 620-9043 P-3 Waianae 620-9041 Kupu Ola 620-9041 Hō‘ala 696-9300 ♥ Ka‘ala Cultural Learning Center 696-4954 ♥ Kaiser Permanente-Continuing Care (Kaiser Only) 432-7100 ♥ Kamehameha Schools- Preschools 668-1196 Community Learning Center at Nānākuli 668-1517 Hi‘ilani Program 534-8261 Ka Pua Initiative 541-5333 ♥ Kathy’s Parenting Solutions 352-3303 ♥ Ke Ola Mamo 668-1110 ♥ Keiki O Ka ‘Aina-H.I.P.P.Y./Aim High/PAT/PPP 843-2502 ♥ Kokua Villa 696-7000 ♥ Learning Disabilities Association of Hawaii 536-9684 School Readiness Project 696-5361 Parent Training & Information Center 536-9684 ♥ Legal Aid Society of Hawaii 536-4302 ♥ Leeward Community College-Wai‘anae 696-6378 ♥ Maili Bible 696-3038 ♥ Maluhia Lutheran Church 696-3497 ♥ Mala ‘Ai ‘Opio (MA‘O) Organic Farm 696-5569 ♥ Nanakuli Housing Corporation 842-0770 ♥ O‘ahu WorkLinks 768-5801 ♥ ‘Olelo Community Media Center Wai‘anae 696-1003 ♥ Onemalu Shelter 682-3869 ♥ Paradise Chapel-Social Services 668-1588 ♥ P.A.R.E.N.T.S., Inc. 235-0255 Confident Parenting 235-0487 ♥ Parents for Righteousness, Inc 697-8384 This list was provided by B. Burgess at Hale Na’au Pono ♥ 211- Aloha United Way-Dial “2-1-1” (on your telephone) ♥ ACTIVE HI 457-6385 ♥ Adventist Malama School 696-3988 ♥ Alternative Structures International (ASI) 696-2655 Kahumana 696-2655 ‘Ohana Ola O Kahumana Transitional Shelter 696-4095 Ulu Ke Kukui Transitional Shelter 620-9011 ♥ ALU LIKE, Inc.-Pūlama I Nā Keiki 668-0553 Ke Ala Ho‘olokahi Project 668-0555 Project SPIRIT 956-4453 ♥ Ark of Safety-Preschool 696-8928 ♥ Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Honolulu 521-3811 ♥ Boys and Girls Club-Wai‘anae Clubhouse 696-2794 NFL YET Hawaii Nanakuli Clubhouse 668-9399 ♥ Catholic Charities-Mā‘ili Land Transitional Shelter 696-4885 ♥ Child and Family Service 681-3500 Comprehensive Cnslng & Support Services 681-3500 Domestic Abuse Hotline 841-0822 Gerontology 681-1411 Enhanced Healthy Start 681-1555 Healthy Start 681-1555 Pathways to Work 681-1430 ParentLine/HomeReach 526-1222 ♥ City of Joy 668-8826 ♥ Community Case Management Corp. 486-8030 ♥ Department of Health-Access Line 823-3100 Public Health Nursing-Waianae 697-7839 Hansen’s Disease Community Program 675-0077 ♥ Department of Human Services Child Protective Services 832-5300 Financial Assistance & SNAP 697-7147 First To Work 692-7760 Employment First 692-8310 QUEST/Medicaid 692-7364 ♥ Domestic Violence Action Center-HelpLine 531-3771 Consortium for Health, Safety & Support 447-3508 ♥ EPIC, Inc-`Ohana Conferencing 838-7752 ♥ Family Hui 230-7110 ♥ Family Programs Hawaii 521-9531 Ho‘omalu O Na Kamalii 620-9444 Leeward Voluntary Case Management 540-2536 Resource Families Support Services 521-9531 Warm Line 545-1130 ♥ Habitat for Humanity-Leeward O‘ahu 696-7882 ♥ Hawaii Families As Allies 692-8232 ♥ Hale Na‘au Pono 696-4211 Adult Services 696-4212
  • 35. Energy – Natural and Healthy The path to success is often littered with setbacks, obstacles, and fear of failure. Pushing through to reach your goals is challenging. A Japanese proverb sums up this journey: “Beginning is easy; continuing is hard.” So as we face challenges, we need both our minds and our bodies to be at the ready if we want to persevere. Unicity has tapped into a remedy that Zen monks have used for centuries to sharpen their focus and enhance meditation. This elixir is UNICITYMATCHA—a finely powdered green tea that can give you the fortitude and support you need to combat the odds. Navigate with Matcha This Chi-Oka blend, rich in antioxidants and other vital nutrients, provides a natural source of energy and improved mental clarity. Whenever you need it, enjoy a drink of Matcha to help:  Increase alertness and focus  Add vitality and harmony to your mind and body  Relieve stress and improve concentration  Contribute to normal, energy-yielding metabolism  Contribute to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage How It Works What makes Matcha exceptional is that it is not steeped like most teas; the entire tea leaf is consumed in powder form. You therefore take advantage of 100% of its nutrients—including chlorophyll, protein, and dietary fiber. Matcha has both healing and preventative properties to: Cleanse and Restore: The abundance of chlorophyll in Matcha makes it an ideal rejuvenator. It carries oxygen to your cells, regenerating them and building your blood. As a purifier, it neutralizes free radicals, eradicates toxins, and improves radiation damage. Boost metabolism: Bursting with antioxidants called catechins (a class of polyphenols), Matcha eliminates free radicals, slows the signs of aging, and optimizes your metabolism. Reduce fatigue: The naturally occurring caffeine and theophylline in Matcha work to stimulate wakefulness and provide mental clarity, making it a healthier alternative to classic energy drinks or coffees. Additionally, its absorption into your blood is as discreet as its dissipation, preventing the infamous crash that comes with most caffeinated beverages. Calm the mind: Shade-grown plants like Matcha produce L-theanines. These amino acids calm the brain without making you drowsy. Paired with caffeine and theophylline, L-theanines generate a lucid frame of mind, enabling you to determine what needs to be accomplished and how. For more information contact Sharon @ fountainsm@yahoo.com or call 808-306-3054 Na Pua `O Wai`anae | April 2015 35
  • 36. Highlights • Designed by William F. Bell, who designed the Torrey Pines South Course which hosted the 2008 U.S. Open. • A golf experience like no other, an escape from routine for golfers of all skill levels. • Variety of doglegs and elevation changes, with one of Hawaii’s most demanding closing holes. • Year round, sunshine and trade winds with an occasional refreshing mountain mist. Features Pro Shop • Club Rentals • Driving Range Restaurant • Golf Clinics • Private/Group Lessons Kids’ Junior Golf Events and Services Golf Clinics – A free monthly event for the whole family. Typically scheduled in the evening, our golf instructor provides pointers and tips on how to improve your game while Junior Golfers enjoy learning golf through the SNAG Program. Personal & Group Lessons Choose from a single lesson or five session package. Whether you’re a beginner or looking to lower your handicap our instructor has the tools to help you succeed. Junior Golf Program Group lessons for junior golfers 5 – 18 years old. Juniors will attend a 1 hour class for 6 consecutive weeks typically scheduled on the weekend. With a maximum of 6 juniors per class. Visit the hidden gem of the island Experience true island beauty on Oahu with breathtaking views of the mountains and ocean. Stay up to date on course events and clinics by emailing golfmakaha@gmail.com Please call our pro shop for current club pricing and scheduling (808) 397-5347 Direct Line: (808) 397-5347 • 84-627 Makaha Valley Road Waianae, Hawaii 96792 • Course Contact: Byran Manansala