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Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
26 Things: A Photography Scavenger Hunt Using the iPod/iPhone and Flickr
The point of this exercise is to familiarize yourselves with taking pictures with the iPod
Touch or iPhone (or your own smartphone) using the ProCamera app, editing those photos
using Photoshop Express, and posting them to Flickr.
Working in pairs, find and photograph several items on the list. You are free to interpret
these words however you want. Engage the quirky, offbeat part of your brain.
This is not a race. The goal is to make photos, not take photos. Let’s push these cameras to
their fullest capability, and push ourselves to make photos that are of high quality, both
compositionally and technically.
Composition: carefully frame your shot; get close; avoid distracting backgrounds; watch
your lighting; get eye level; lock the focus on the subject (not the center of the frame);
choose a main point of interest for every photo; place your subject off-center; try different
angles.
Also focus on good technical quality: turn off flash, minimize camera shake, shoot at the
highest resolution, frame the shot while the shutter button is depressed, etc.
Experiment with your camera’s scene settings (landscape, night, portrait, etc.) and with
tapping the screen to set exposure and focus. The point is to get off your camera’s auto
settings.
If you have an iPhone 4 or newer, experiment with the HDR feature.
Using ProCamera on the iPods Touch, experiment with anti-shake, exposure, level, rule-
of-thirds grid, self-timer, rapid-fire mode, zoom.
Using Photoshop Express, edit your photos as you go: crop, straighten, adjust
brightness/contrast.
As you take and edit your pictures, post them to the EyesOnIowa Flickr.
Launch your Flickr app > Upload > Take/Upload Photo > Choose Photo. Add title and
description. In the description, write the name of the item and your name(s). Example:
“Glow” by Megan Bannister and Kristen Smith. Also note any special settings (“shot in
rapid-fire mode using the ProCamera app,” for example). Add it to the “26 Things
Scavenger Hunt” set. Include location. Set privacy level to public.
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
The list:
1. couple
2. slope
3. plate
4. going places
5. in the water
6. button
7. heritage
8. glow
9. clock
10.closed
11.smile
12.back
13.plastic
14.handle
15.sound
16.wheels
17.silence
18.new
19.old
20.mess
21.half
22.strings
23.graffiti
24.corner
25.opposite
26.round
This exercise is adapted from sh1ft.org’s “26 Things” photographic scavenger hunt. In that event,
photographers are given 28 days to find the 26 items and upload them to a blog, Flickr, Photobucket or
other photosharing site. There are no winners or losers; the fun is in the hunt and in seeing how other
photographers interpreted the list. For more info:
http://sh1ft.org/projects/index.php/category/26things/
	
  
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
10 Tips for Taking Better Pictures with Your iPod/iPhone
1. Always have phone with you. “The best camera to have is the one that’s with you
all the time.”
2. Know and accept the camera’s limits.
3. Clean the lens.
4. Get your finger out of the way.
5. Stabilize.
6. Watch your light, exposure.
7. Turn off flash.
8. Zoom with your feet.
9. Get close to your subject; get your subjects close to each other
10.Focus the camera.
Taking Better Photos with the ProCamera App
• Exposure
• White balance
• Rapid-fire mode
• Zoom
• Date Stamp
• Anti-shake
• White balance
• Level
• Rule of thirds
• Sharing
• Info
• Pro Lab
• Pro Cut: crop, rotate
Editing Photos with PS Express
• Crop, straighten, rotate, flip
• Exposure, contrast, saturation
• Reduce noise
Photo Sharing
• Instagram, Flickr, etc.
• geotagging
• title
• description/captions
• tags
• location
• privacy level
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
Mobile	
  Audio	
  Assignment	
  	
  
	
  
Part	
  1.	
  	
  
A	
  bio/intro.	
  
Using	
  AudioBoo,	
  record	
  a	
  boo	
  about	
  yourself	
  to	
  serve	
  as	
  a	
  brief	
  bio	
  on	
  our	
  website.	
  
Introduce	
  yourself	
  to	
  readers.	
  You	
  could	
  say	
  where	
  you’re	
  from,	
  what	
  you’re	
  studying,	
  
where	
  you’ve	
  traveled,	
  where	
  you’ve	
  interned,	
  what	
  you	
  hope	
  to	
  do	
  professionally,	
  hobbies,	
  
etc.	
  	
  
	
  
Take	
  a	
  picture	
  of	
  yourself	
  (or	
  have	
  a	
  classmate	
  help	
  you).	
  Title	
  your	
  boo	
  with	
  your	
  name.	
  
Publish	
  your	
  AudioBoo.	
  Check	
  it	
  on	
  Tumblr	
  and	
  Twitter.	
  Then	
  copy	
  the	
  embed	
  code	
  and	
  
post	
  it	
  to	
  our	
  EyesOnIowa	
  WordPress	
  site,	
  on	
  the	
  “Staff”	
  page.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Part	
  2.	
  	
  
Man-­‐on-­‐the-­‐street	
  interviews.	
  	
  
Interview	
  at	
  least	
  three	
  people,	
  using	
  Audioboo.	
  Make	
  sure	
  you	
  state	
  clearly	
  who	
  you	
  are	
  
interviewing,	
  or	
  have	
  the	
  interviewees	
  state	
  their	
  names.	
  	
  
Interview	
  each	
  person	
  on	
  the	
  same	
  topic.	
  Topics	
  could	
  be:	
  	
  
§ Would	
  you	
  pay	
  for	
  the	
  New	
  York	
  Times	
  online	
  or	
  mobile?	
  (The	
  pay	
  wall	
  goes	
  into	
  
effect	
  this	
  week.)	
  
§ The	
  Final	
  Four.	
  Is	
  your	
  bracket	
  busted?	
  	
  Predictions,	
  favorite	
  players,	
  Final-­‐wha?	
  
§ Should	
  the	
  U.S.	
  military	
  be	
  in	
  Libya?	
  	
  
§ What	
  Republican	
  is	
  most	
  likely	
  to	
  unseat	
  Obama?	
  
	
  
Take	
  the	
  interviewee’s	
  picture.	
  	
  
Give	
  the	
  boo	
  a	
  good	
  title	
  and	
  description.	
  	
  
Post	
  the	
  boo	
  as	
  soon	
  as	
  you’re	
  done	
  with	
  the	
  interview.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
Part	
  3.	
  	
  
Research	
  audio	
  editing	
  apps.	
  
What	
  kinds	
  of	
  features	
  would	
  you	
  look	
  for	
  in	
  a	
  mobile	
  audio-­‐recording	
  app?	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Find	
  two	
  or	
  three	
  audio	
  editing	
  apps	
  (not	
  just	
  recording	
  apps)	
  available	
  for	
  the	
  iPod	
  Touch.	
  
Find	
  out	
  what’s	
  available,	
  their	
  features,	
  cost,	
  consumer	
  reviews.	
  Bring	
  back	
  a	
  brief	
  
summary	
  and	
  recommendation	
  of	
  what	
  we	
  should	
  purchase.	
  
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
Note: This was an exercise in experimenting with three different audio recorders,
comparing their ease of use and quality of audio recording.
Audio Interviewing Exercise
Work in pairs (and one trio).
Interview each other in two settings, using both recorders at both sites. Make sure
everybody in your group gets a chance to operate both recorders.
Set the date and time for all three recorders.
Olympus WS-331
experiment with
rec mode: ST XQ (highest quality) to HQ (lowest)
distance b/t mic and subject’s voice
internal vs. external mic
Tascam
First, adjust these settings:
menu > input setting > input > mic
mic > type: mono
power > on (must be “on” for external mic to work)
rec settings > format > WAV 16 or 24
rec settings > sample > 44.1
rec settings > pre rec > off
rec settings > delay > off
Then, experiment with:
internal mic. vs. external mic
internal mic with and without windscreen
distance b/t mic and subject
recording level 1-10 (dial on right side)
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
Zoom
First, adjust these settings:
Input > Mic
WAV format, 16 or 24 bit, 44.1 kHz
Then, experiment with:
automatic recording level vs. user-set recording level
Menu > Input > Level Auto > Off/On
recording level 1-100 (button on right side)
internal mic. vs. external mic
distance b/t mic and subject
Get at least 30 seconds of audio with each of the various settings/experiments. Use the
chart to keep track of which files are what so we can compare sound quality later.
Groups and Locations:
Meredith south lobby | Cowles Library quiet study room
Olmsted coffee shop | Mer. 101 or 106; or other large lecture hall
At a busy intersection | Inside a car
Residence hall lobby | Outside where it’s quiet
Cowles coffee shop | Van Wyke’s office
Olmsted fitness room | Quiet room in Olmsted (Mezzanine)
r How hard is it for you to shut up when the subject is talking?
r Are you minimizing “handling noise”?
r What’s the best distance between the mic and the subject’s mouth?
r You’re wearing headphones, right?
r Are you asking questions in a way to encourage complete answers and complete sentences?
r Did you try the “questions after” or “delayed record” strategy?
r Can you minimize any background noise? (buzzing lights, fans, printers)
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
Grading Criteria: Audio stories
Reporting
Newsworthiness
Targets identified audience
Appropriate sourcing
Thoroughness
A mix of officials and “real people.”
Advances story
Good quotes from sources, resulting from open-ended questions.
Field Technique
Recorded closely enough; minimal background noise.
Interviews conducted in quiet room whenever possible.
Reporter isn’t trampling all over the audio.
No “handling” noise.
Gathered natural and interview sound
Gathered an underlying track (“bed”) of ambient sound to smooth edits.
Natural sound is gathered from as close to the sound source as possible
Absence of mic-handling noise
Actuality/sound bite is clear
Actuality/sound bite is brief, to the point
Sound levels are even
Absence of voice "pops"
Editing
Voicer (narration) presence
Voicer levels
Actuality/sound bite presence
Actuality/sound bite levels
Appropriately creative audio
Interview and natural sound are pieced together smoothly
An underlying track (“bed”) of ambient sound smooths edits.
Audio saved as MP3
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
Writing
Written for the ear
Script formatted properly
Overall
Places the listener at scene of story
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
CREATING AN AUDIO SLIDESHOW
“Don’t tell me. Show me.”
Introduction
If you are a good writer, you already have what it takes to tell stories in other media: a sense for
news and story; a sharp mind; a compassionate heart; persistence and passion; keen
observational and analytical skills; and a sense of drama and “the moment.”
“Still images elicit a visceral response. They can be enhanced by text captions that
are great for the basic who, what and where of an image. The addition of audio,
then, takes the picture and text caption to another level, where image, text and
audio work together to create an experience that neither could produce on its
own.”
– Brian Storm, MediaStorm
Audio
– Audio is intimate. It conveys what text and images can’t: emotion, humor. Sound can
transport you.
– Audio gives your subject a voice.
– Paint a picture with sounds as well as words.
– “Create a virtual reality for your listener. Make them feel like they’re wherever you are,
not reading the postcard you sent.” – J. Carl Gantner
Gathering Audio
– Equipment
o The recorder
o Headphones
o Batteries
o Get your gear in order, know how to operate it. You only get one shot at
getting audio.
o DTC checkout policies
– General Tips
o Your brain is an amazing noise filter. Your recorder isn’t. Close your eyes and
listen. Watch out for camera clicks.
o Cover your bases. Record a lot of ambient/natural sound. Do multiple takes.
Record 20 times more than the length of your show.
o Make sure your gear’s in order. Extra batteries.
_ Natural and Ambient Sound
o Background noise (ambient sound) and sound effects (natural sound)
o Use to show action.
o You’ll only need a few seconds of natural sound, but record at least 15 seconds
of it.
o Record at least a minute, preferably more, of ambient sound in each location,
including where you interview.
o Get close to it with recorder. But also record medium distance and far.
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
o Gather 5 seconds of “junk” audio before and after each recording. These
buffers are called “handles” and will come in handy when you’re editing.
o Your sound must be authentic. Ethics.
_ Interview Sound
o Different from just recording for transcription.
o Before you start taping, write down basic facts: name, spelling, pronunciation,
location, date.
o On tape, start by having subject state name, title what they do.
o Get close with recorder, 4” or so.
o Shut up. Don’t trample over the audio with your own voice. Make eye contact
and nod instead.
o Don’t let the subject hold the mic.
o Watch out for “handling” noise.
o Find a quiet, “soft” room.
o Listen more, talk less. Don’t fear silence.
o Be confident with gear. If you are constantly checking equipment, your
source’s confidence will erode.
o Wear headphones!
o Ask subject to repeat what s/he said if a noisy disturbance.
o Reassure subject that s/he can start over if s/he gets tongue-tied.
o Avoid yes or no questions. Ask open-ended questions.
• Tell me the story of …
• Explain what you are doing now.
• Talk about your best/worst/…”
• Describe for me
• Give me a sense of…
• Could you tell me why?
• Why?
• What happened?
• Then what happened?
• Then what happened?
• What did you see?
• What went thru your mind?
• What would you say to someone who…
• What did that tell you?
• Why did you care about that?
• How did/would you respond (to something)?
• What makes you care about that?
• Why was that important?
• What picture remains most vivid?
• Imagine you’re back at scene; how did you feel?
• What did you see?
• Describe the scene.
• What stands out the most?
• What did it smell like?
• What are the consequences?
• What’s the best/worst possible scenario?
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
• What do you fear?
• How did/does that affect you?
• How did you deal with that?
• How do you know?
• What went thru your mind?
• What did he/she/they say?
• What were the options?
• How would you describe that?
Editing Audio
_ Make copies of your audio files. Never edit original files.
_ Keep your audio files organized. Find a consistent naming/filing system.
_ Place all sound files for one project in one folder, slugged with the interviewee’s name
and the date of interview.
_ Audio formats. Ours will come in as .WMA (Windows Media). Newer Macs will
convert them automatically to an editable AIFF file. We’ll edit in Audacity (GarageBand
works, too).
_ Bring all your audio clips into Audacity and listen to all of it. Write down specifically
what’s being discussed and note the time stamps of important material. Jot down what
photos might relate to that sequence.
_ When you’re done editing, export the finished file as an MP3.
Photography
Gathering Photos
_ Shooting for a slideshow is like shooting a photo essay, but with more pictures.
_ Is the story linear (chronological)? Then think sequence: beginning, middle, end. If not,
how will you organize your photos in a logical way?
_ Photos must be high quality: sharp, well-focused, well-composed. Get variety, in angle,
lighting, distance from subject, horizontal/vertical.
_ For a 2-3 minute slideshow, you’ll need 20 to 35 great photos.
_ Get a mix of wide-angle shots, medium shots, close-ups and tight detail shots.
_ Shots for beginning of show: set the scene, introduce topic and main character
_ Shots for middle of show: develop the topic and character with details.
_ Shots for end of show: Wrap up the story, what does it all mean, what’s next, what
does this story point to.
_ Think about the “cover” or “title” shot. This will be the teaser thumbnail.
Editing Photos
_ Make copies! Never overwrite your original image.
_ In PhotoShop, crop, adjust red-eye, adjust brightness.
_ Decide on sequence of photos. Rename photos in numerical order (01farm, 02sunrise,
03barn, 04fence, 05cow…). No spaces, no punctuation.
_ Decide if you want to make a title page or section title pages, with text on photo.
_ Prep image for Soundslides:
o Set resolution to 72 dpi. Image Size > Resolution > 72 dpi
o Resample Image > Bicubic Sharper
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
o Constrain Proportions
o Width > 680 px
o File > File Info. Soundslides pulls caption info from here (you can edit later in
Soundslides). Include author (photographer), copyrighted work/notice (“2009 by Jill
Van Wyke”)
o Save As > .jpg, quality setting “High.” (Soundslides will compress.)
o Do not “Save for Web”
_ Save all your images for one slideshow in one folder. Don’t put any other images in
that folder. Soundslides imports folders, not individual images.
_ Remember where you put it. Make a parent folder with two folders in it, one for your
edited images, one your edited audio.
Soundslides
Producing in Soundslides
_ Optimum length of a slideshow is 2-3 minutes.
_ Five to six seconds per photo. 20-35 photos total.
_ The quality of your photos and your audio determine length.
_ Look through your pictures first, then edit your audio. Your photos will give you an
idea of how the sound needs to flow. What audio do you need to leave in or take out,
based on your photos?
_ Your audio must support your photos must support your audio. The audio commentary
should match the picture being shown. It’s confusing for viewer if it doesn’t. Match
sound to pictures.
_ Avoid visual redundancy. Vary images by close-ups, medium, detail, wide shots,
different angles.
_ Use a quick series of stills to indicate motion/action.
_ If you have someone speaking for 15 seconds, try to use three appropriate photos for
that 15 seconds.
Captions
_ Viewers should concentrate on images, not captions.
_ Keep them short. You don’t need time, date, place in every caption (very different from
print captions).
_ You can omit captions entirely where the image, in the context of the story is self-
explanatory.
_ But don’t omit all captions. Briefly identify anyone speaking in audio, and anyone
introduced in show for the first time.
_ Test it: Do you have time to read the entire caption before the show advances to the
next frame?
_ Why bother with captions at all? They are key in an all-digital, metadata-driven search
universe. You can’t search pixels. You search text.
Final Thoughts
_ Try. Fail. Try again. Fail harder.
_ The best way to learn to write is to read. The best way to learn audio is to listen.
_ Practice is the path to perfection.
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
Grading Criteria: Slideshow
PHOTOGRAPHS
Compositional:
r Every photo has a clean, clear center of interest.
r People are shot at eye level.
r The background doesn’t distract.
r Use the rule of thirds. Place your subject off-center.
r Shoot vertically when appropriate.
r Shoot from a variety of angles and distances.
Technical
r Sharp focus.
r Good exposure (lighting).
r The flash is used well; outdoors to fill in shadow on faces; indoors to lighten. Pix
are shot within flash’s range.
r Cropped well.
AUDIO
r Places the listener at scene of story.
r A mix of natural and interview sound.
r Natural sound is gathered from as close to the sound source as possible.
r An underlying track (“bed”) of ambient sound to smooth edits.
r Recorded closely enough; minimal background noise.
r Interviews conducted in quiet room whenever possible.
r Reporter isn’t trampling all over the audio.
r No “handling” noise.
r A mix of officials and “real people.”
r Good quotes from sources, resulting from open-ended questions.
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
THE SLIDESHOW
r Tells a particular, coherent, well-focused story with a central point.
r Opens with natural sound to set the scene.
r Opens with a strong, tight image that sets the scene and also functions as a
thumbnail.
r The audio and photos complement and enhance each other.
r An even level of sound throughout. If multiple tracks are used, they complement
each other rather than compete.
r Audio and photographic fades used appropriately and executed well.
r Special effects (Ken Burns, eg.) are used purposefully and well.
r Where appropriate, uses a quick series of photos to convey motion.
r Incorporates a variety of tight close-ups, medium shots and wide shots.
r Uses a variety of angles, orientation (horizontal or vertical) and distance. Avoids
redundancy.
r Is viewed well in the small size of the viewing window.
r Includes a headline.
r Includes captions and lower-thirds where necessary (with proper grammar and
spelling).
r Captions are brief. They identify anyone speaking in the audio and anyone
introduced for the first time in the show.
r Captions are searchable by search engine like Google. Think keywords!
r Includes credits.
r Runs 2-3 minutes.
r Is paced well; photos are on view long enough to absorb the image, short enough
to keep it interesting (generally 3 to 7 seconds).
r Ends with strong photo and audio. Doesn’t just peter out.
r Image, text and audio create an experience that neither could produce on its own.
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
Video Assignment
Due date:
Your in-depth story will be accompanied by a video of 2-3 minutes’ length. Your video should
supplement your text story by presenting new information; it should not repeat or rehash what
you’ve written in the story.
Focus on the action and emotion of your story that can best be conveyed by video rather than
text.
In general, your video should consist of 25 to 35 shots of an average of 5 seconds each, but let
your creativity and sense of story guide you. The video must include A-roll and B-roll. Do not
turn in a video that is one l – o – n – g shot of a person being interviewed! The choice of whether
to narrate your video or to rely only on natural sound and interview is up to you.
If you use music in your video, you need to convince us that it’s necessary and appropriate to the
story. Of course, any music must respect copyrights.
You will work in pairs to shoot your videos. For your story, you’ll conduct the interviews and
play “director,” making sure you get all the necessary shots. Your partner will operate the
camera and monitor audio. Reverse roles on your partner’s story. Edit together, using iMovie.
iMovie ’09 tutorial available at:
http://www.apple.com/ilife/tutorials/#imovie
iMovie HD 6 tutorial available at:
http://www.apple.com/support/ilife/tutorials/imovie/index.html
Before you shoot your video, you will submit a plan for it: how you conceive it, and how you’ll
execute it. (See reverse.)
Make sure your edited video has an opening title and properly credits all those who worked on it.
It must include lower-thirds of everybody interviewed.
When you’re done with your video, upload it to YouTube, following YouTube’s instructions
regarding file formats, compression, etc.
Grading criteria for this assignment is attached.
That’s it for now, until we’re ready to post your complete multimedia package to our site.
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
	
  	
  
Using	
  only	
  a	
  smartphone:	
  	
  
	
  
1. Take	
  video	
  of	
  some	
  scenes	
  around	
  campus,	
  both	
  indoors	
  and	
  outdoors.	
  Practice	
  with	
  
setting	
  the	
  exposure.	
  Shoot	
  clips	
  of	
  at	
  least	
  30	
  seconds	
  each.	
  	
  
	
  
2. Interview	
  a	
  classmate	
  outdoors	
  on	
  any	
  topic.	
  Practice:	
  
a. holding	
  the	
  camera	
  steady	
  	
  
b. holding	
  the	
  camera	
  horizontal	
  
c. hold	
  the	
  camera	
  level	
  
d. framing	
  (rule	
  of	
  thirds;	
  don’t	
  cut	
  off	
  heads;	
  interviewee	
  looking	
  into	
  frame;	
  
no	
  distracting	
  background)	
  
e. getting	
  the	
  best	
  audio	
  possible;	
  quiet	
  place;	
  watch	
  out	
  for	
  wind	
  noise	
  	
  
	
  
3. Switch	
  cameras	
  and	
  experiment	
  with	
  shooting	
  video	
  of	
  yourself.	
  	
  
	
  
4. Practice	
  using	
  the	
  built-­‐in	
  editor	
  to	
  trim	
  your	
  scene	
  and	
  interview	
  clips.	
  Remember	
  
to	
  Save	
  a	
  New	
  Clip.	
  	
  
	
  
5. Upload	
  one	
  of	
  your	
  videos	
  via	
  the	
  Tumblr	
  app.	
  	
  
	
  
6. Upload	
  one	
  of	
  your	
  videos	
  to	
  YouTube,	
  using	
  the	
  “share”	
  function.	
  Use	
  your	
  own	
  
YouTube	
  account	
  if	
  you	
  have	
  one,	
  or	
  see	
  me	
  for	
  my	
  account	
  info.	
  	
  
a. After	
  the	
  video	
  is	
  compressed	
  and	
  published,	
  click	
  View	
  on	
  YouTube.	
  Tap	
  the	
  
share,	
  then	
  tap	
  email	
  	
  icon.	
  Scroll	
  down	
  and	
  copy	
  the	
  embed	
  code.	
  Then,	
  
launch	
  the	
  WordPress	
  app,	
  and	
  paste	
  the	
  embed	
  code	
  in	
  a	
  new	
  post.	
  Put	
  it	
  in	
  
the	
  video	
  category.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
7. Launch	
  the	
  uStream	
  app.	
  >	
  Allow	
  current	
  location.	
  >	
  Tape	
  the	
  camera	
  icon	
  in	
  the	
  
upper	
  right,	
  then	
  “Go	
  Live.”	
  	
  
a. Livestream	
  some	
  video.	
  Share	
  it?	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
Download the iMovie app to your smartphone. Read the following chapters in “iMovie
help” in the app, and play with these features:
Gestures: read all
Create a Project:
§ Create a new project
§ Open an existing project
§ Rename a project
§ Play a project
Record Video and Photos
§ Record video into iMovie
§ Take photos in iMovie
Edit Clips
§ Add video to a project
§ Add photos to a project
§ Trim a video clip or photo
§ Edit a photo
§ Split a video clip
§ Rotate a video clip
§ Rearrange video clips
§ Delete a video clip or photo from your project
Adjust audio
§ Record audio into a project
§ Adjust the volume of a video or audio clip
§ Adjust the duration of an audio clip
§ Move a sound effect or audio clip
§ Delete an audio clip
Add Titles and Transitions
§ Add a title to a video clip or photo
§ Edit title text
§ Delete a title
§ Change the style, duration of a transition
§ Delete a transition
§ Add a fade-in, fade-out
Share
§ Share a movie to YouTube
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
	
  
iMovie app assignment
Create a short movie about something you will already be doing over the weekend. It
should tell a story and meet the criteria for good composition and technical quality.
Specifically, your movie should:
§ have a mix of videos and still photos
§ include A-roll and B-roll
§ have a brief voiceover to introduce it
§ have a title
§ have transitions (fade-ins and -outs)
§ be at least 2 minutes long but no more than 5
§ be uploaded to the Eyes on Iowa YouTube account, named and tagged appropriately
§ posted to our Eyes on Iowa site
I’ll give you time in class Monday to finish editing the movie, upload it to YouTube and
post it to Eyes on Iowa. You may need more time, so it wouldn’t hurt to do a little editing
over the weekend. At a minimum, bring your raw video and photos.
The goal of this assignment is to gain proficiency and confidence in shooting and editing
video with the iPhone. We’ll want that skill and comfort level when we cover our Drake
Relays events live. Be thinking as you work through this exercise how we might use video
to cover the beautiful bulldog contest and the other Relays event you signed up for. What
complications should we anticipate, and how might we address them?
Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor
Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses
AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec
Video Assignment Grading Criteria
Quality of Video Shooting
• Steady shots (you used a tripod)
• Minimal, if any, panning and zooming
• Clear audio, both natural sound and interview
• Well-lit
• Sources are interviewed at eye level
• Interviewees are shot from a slight angle to the left or right
• Interviewees are not looking at camera
• You are silent during interviews (no laughter, “uh-huhs,” etc.)
• Composition
o rule of thirds
o in focus
o level
o no distracting backgrounds or poles emerging from people’s heads
o close to source or action
o varying angles and perspectives
o fill the frame
Quality of Video Editing
• No jumpcuts
• Appropriate shot lengths; good pacing
• Good mix of wide, medium and close-
ups
• Good transitions
• Title
• Credits
• Good audio levels
• Audio matches action
• Every edit has a purpose
• Opens with strong visual
• Continuity of content, movement,
sound
• Compressed properly and uploaded to
YouTube
Quality of Overall Storytelling
• Coherent story arc: beginning, middle end
• Good character(s)
• Captures emotion and/or action
• Tightly focused
• Strong visuals
• Good sequencing

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Using smartphones to teach digital media in writing courses: Handouts

  • 1. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   26 Things: A Photography Scavenger Hunt Using the iPod/iPhone and Flickr The point of this exercise is to familiarize yourselves with taking pictures with the iPod Touch or iPhone (or your own smartphone) using the ProCamera app, editing those photos using Photoshop Express, and posting them to Flickr. Working in pairs, find and photograph several items on the list. You are free to interpret these words however you want. Engage the quirky, offbeat part of your brain. This is not a race. The goal is to make photos, not take photos. Let’s push these cameras to their fullest capability, and push ourselves to make photos that are of high quality, both compositionally and technically. Composition: carefully frame your shot; get close; avoid distracting backgrounds; watch your lighting; get eye level; lock the focus on the subject (not the center of the frame); choose a main point of interest for every photo; place your subject off-center; try different angles. Also focus on good technical quality: turn off flash, minimize camera shake, shoot at the highest resolution, frame the shot while the shutter button is depressed, etc. Experiment with your camera’s scene settings (landscape, night, portrait, etc.) and with tapping the screen to set exposure and focus. The point is to get off your camera’s auto settings. If you have an iPhone 4 or newer, experiment with the HDR feature. Using ProCamera on the iPods Touch, experiment with anti-shake, exposure, level, rule- of-thirds grid, self-timer, rapid-fire mode, zoom. Using Photoshop Express, edit your photos as you go: crop, straighten, adjust brightness/contrast. As you take and edit your pictures, post them to the EyesOnIowa Flickr. Launch your Flickr app > Upload > Take/Upload Photo > Choose Photo. Add title and description. In the description, write the name of the item and your name(s). Example: “Glow” by Megan Bannister and Kristen Smith. Also note any special settings (“shot in rapid-fire mode using the ProCamera app,” for example). Add it to the “26 Things Scavenger Hunt” set. Include location. Set privacy level to public.
  • 2. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   The list: 1. couple 2. slope 3. plate 4. going places 5. in the water 6. button 7. heritage 8. glow 9. clock 10.closed 11.smile 12.back 13.plastic 14.handle 15.sound 16.wheels 17.silence 18.new 19.old 20.mess 21.half 22.strings 23.graffiti 24.corner 25.opposite 26.round This exercise is adapted from sh1ft.org’s “26 Things” photographic scavenger hunt. In that event, photographers are given 28 days to find the 26 items and upload them to a blog, Flickr, Photobucket or other photosharing site. There are no winners or losers; the fun is in the hunt and in seeing how other photographers interpreted the list. For more info: http://sh1ft.org/projects/index.php/category/26things/  
  • 3. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   10 Tips for Taking Better Pictures with Your iPod/iPhone 1. Always have phone with you. “The best camera to have is the one that’s with you all the time.” 2. Know and accept the camera’s limits. 3. Clean the lens. 4. Get your finger out of the way. 5. Stabilize. 6. Watch your light, exposure. 7. Turn off flash. 8. Zoom with your feet. 9. Get close to your subject; get your subjects close to each other 10.Focus the camera. Taking Better Photos with the ProCamera App • Exposure • White balance • Rapid-fire mode • Zoom • Date Stamp • Anti-shake • White balance • Level • Rule of thirds • Sharing • Info • Pro Lab • Pro Cut: crop, rotate Editing Photos with PS Express • Crop, straighten, rotate, flip • Exposure, contrast, saturation • Reduce noise Photo Sharing • Instagram, Flickr, etc. • geotagging • title • description/captions • tags • location • privacy level
  • 4. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   Mobile  Audio  Assignment       Part  1.     A  bio/intro.   Using  AudioBoo,  record  a  boo  about  yourself  to  serve  as  a  brief  bio  on  our  website.   Introduce  yourself  to  readers.  You  could  say  where  you’re  from,  what  you’re  studying,   where  you’ve  traveled,  where  you’ve  interned,  what  you  hope  to  do  professionally,  hobbies,   etc.       Take  a  picture  of  yourself  (or  have  a  classmate  help  you).  Title  your  boo  with  your  name.   Publish  your  AudioBoo.  Check  it  on  Tumblr  and  Twitter.  Then  copy  the  embed  code  and   post  it  to  our  EyesOnIowa  WordPress  site,  on  the  “Staff”  page.           Part  2.     Man-­‐on-­‐the-­‐street  interviews.     Interview  at  least  three  people,  using  Audioboo.  Make  sure  you  state  clearly  who  you  are   interviewing,  or  have  the  interviewees  state  their  names.     Interview  each  person  on  the  same  topic.  Topics  could  be:     § Would  you  pay  for  the  New  York  Times  online  or  mobile?  (The  pay  wall  goes  into   effect  this  week.)   § The  Final  Four.  Is  your  bracket  busted?    Predictions,  favorite  players,  Final-­‐wha?   § Should  the  U.S.  military  be  in  Libya?     § What  Republican  is  most  likely  to  unseat  Obama?     Take  the  interviewee’s  picture.     Give  the  boo  a  good  title  and  description.     Post  the  boo  as  soon  as  you’re  done  with  the  interview.         Part  3.     Research  audio  editing  apps.   What  kinds  of  features  would  you  look  for  in  a  mobile  audio-­‐recording  app?                   Find  two  or  three  audio  editing  apps  (not  just  recording  apps)  available  for  the  iPod  Touch.   Find  out  what’s  available,  their  features,  cost,  consumer  reviews.  Bring  back  a  brief   summary  and  recommendation  of  what  we  should  purchase.  
  • 5. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   Note: This was an exercise in experimenting with three different audio recorders, comparing their ease of use and quality of audio recording. Audio Interviewing Exercise Work in pairs (and one trio). Interview each other in two settings, using both recorders at both sites. Make sure everybody in your group gets a chance to operate both recorders. Set the date and time for all three recorders. Olympus WS-331 experiment with rec mode: ST XQ (highest quality) to HQ (lowest) distance b/t mic and subject’s voice internal vs. external mic Tascam First, adjust these settings: menu > input setting > input > mic mic > type: mono power > on (must be “on” for external mic to work) rec settings > format > WAV 16 or 24 rec settings > sample > 44.1 rec settings > pre rec > off rec settings > delay > off Then, experiment with: internal mic. vs. external mic internal mic with and without windscreen distance b/t mic and subject recording level 1-10 (dial on right side)
  • 6. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   Zoom First, adjust these settings: Input > Mic WAV format, 16 or 24 bit, 44.1 kHz Then, experiment with: automatic recording level vs. user-set recording level Menu > Input > Level Auto > Off/On recording level 1-100 (button on right side) internal mic. vs. external mic distance b/t mic and subject Get at least 30 seconds of audio with each of the various settings/experiments. Use the chart to keep track of which files are what so we can compare sound quality later. Groups and Locations: Meredith south lobby | Cowles Library quiet study room Olmsted coffee shop | Mer. 101 or 106; or other large lecture hall At a busy intersection | Inside a car Residence hall lobby | Outside where it’s quiet Cowles coffee shop | Van Wyke’s office Olmsted fitness room | Quiet room in Olmsted (Mezzanine) r How hard is it for you to shut up when the subject is talking? r Are you minimizing “handling noise”? r What’s the best distance between the mic and the subject’s mouth? r You’re wearing headphones, right? r Are you asking questions in a way to encourage complete answers and complete sentences? r Did you try the “questions after” or “delayed record” strategy? r Can you minimize any background noise? (buzzing lights, fans, printers)
  • 7. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   Grading Criteria: Audio stories Reporting Newsworthiness Targets identified audience Appropriate sourcing Thoroughness A mix of officials and “real people.” Advances story Good quotes from sources, resulting from open-ended questions. Field Technique Recorded closely enough; minimal background noise. Interviews conducted in quiet room whenever possible. Reporter isn’t trampling all over the audio. No “handling” noise. Gathered natural and interview sound Gathered an underlying track (“bed”) of ambient sound to smooth edits. Natural sound is gathered from as close to the sound source as possible Absence of mic-handling noise Actuality/sound bite is clear Actuality/sound bite is brief, to the point Sound levels are even Absence of voice "pops" Editing Voicer (narration) presence Voicer levels Actuality/sound bite presence Actuality/sound bite levels Appropriately creative audio Interview and natural sound are pieced together smoothly An underlying track (“bed”) of ambient sound smooths edits. Audio saved as MP3
  • 8. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   Writing Written for the ear Script formatted properly Overall Places the listener at scene of story
  • 9. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec CREATING AN AUDIO SLIDESHOW “Don’t tell me. Show me.” Introduction If you are a good writer, you already have what it takes to tell stories in other media: a sense for news and story; a sharp mind; a compassionate heart; persistence and passion; keen observational and analytical skills; and a sense of drama and “the moment.” “Still images elicit a visceral response. They can be enhanced by text captions that are great for the basic who, what and where of an image. The addition of audio, then, takes the picture and text caption to another level, where image, text and audio work together to create an experience that neither could produce on its own.” – Brian Storm, MediaStorm Audio – Audio is intimate. It conveys what text and images can’t: emotion, humor. Sound can transport you. – Audio gives your subject a voice. – Paint a picture with sounds as well as words. – “Create a virtual reality for your listener. Make them feel like they’re wherever you are, not reading the postcard you sent.” – J. Carl Gantner Gathering Audio – Equipment o The recorder o Headphones o Batteries o Get your gear in order, know how to operate it. You only get one shot at getting audio. o DTC checkout policies – General Tips o Your brain is an amazing noise filter. Your recorder isn’t. Close your eyes and listen. Watch out for camera clicks. o Cover your bases. Record a lot of ambient/natural sound. Do multiple takes. Record 20 times more than the length of your show. o Make sure your gear’s in order. Extra batteries. _ Natural and Ambient Sound o Background noise (ambient sound) and sound effects (natural sound) o Use to show action. o You’ll only need a few seconds of natural sound, but record at least 15 seconds of it. o Record at least a minute, preferably more, of ambient sound in each location, including where you interview. o Get close to it with recorder. But also record medium distance and far.
  • 10. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec o Gather 5 seconds of “junk” audio before and after each recording. These buffers are called “handles” and will come in handy when you’re editing. o Your sound must be authentic. Ethics. _ Interview Sound o Different from just recording for transcription. o Before you start taping, write down basic facts: name, spelling, pronunciation, location, date. o On tape, start by having subject state name, title what they do. o Get close with recorder, 4” or so. o Shut up. Don’t trample over the audio with your own voice. Make eye contact and nod instead. o Don’t let the subject hold the mic. o Watch out for “handling” noise. o Find a quiet, “soft” room. o Listen more, talk less. Don’t fear silence. o Be confident with gear. If you are constantly checking equipment, your source’s confidence will erode. o Wear headphones! o Ask subject to repeat what s/he said if a noisy disturbance. o Reassure subject that s/he can start over if s/he gets tongue-tied. o Avoid yes or no questions. Ask open-ended questions. • Tell me the story of … • Explain what you are doing now. • Talk about your best/worst/…” • Describe for me • Give me a sense of… • Could you tell me why? • Why? • What happened? • Then what happened? • Then what happened? • What did you see? • What went thru your mind? • What would you say to someone who… • What did that tell you? • Why did you care about that? • How did/would you respond (to something)? • What makes you care about that? • Why was that important? • What picture remains most vivid? • Imagine you’re back at scene; how did you feel? • What did you see? • Describe the scene. • What stands out the most? • What did it smell like? • What are the consequences? • What’s the best/worst possible scenario?
  • 11. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec • What do you fear? • How did/does that affect you? • How did you deal with that? • How do you know? • What went thru your mind? • What did he/she/they say? • What were the options? • How would you describe that? Editing Audio _ Make copies of your audio files. Never edit original files. _ Keep your audio files organized. Find a consistent naming/filing system. _ Place all sound files for one project in one folder, slugged with the interviewee’s name and the date of interview. _ Audio formats. Ours will come in as .WMA (Windows Media). Newer Macs will convert them automatically to an editable AIFF file. We’ll edit in Audacity (GarageBand works, too). _ Bring all your audio clips into Audacity and listen to all of it. Write down specifically what’s being discussed and note the time stamps of important material. Jot down what photos might relate to that sequence. _ When you’re done editing, export the finished file as an MP3. Photography Gathering Photos _ Shooting for a slideshow is like shooting a photo essay, but with more pictures. _ Is the story linear (chronological)? Then think sequence: beginning, middle, end. If not, how will you organize your photos in a logical way? _ Photos must be high quality: sharp, well-focused, well-composed. Get variety, in angle, lighting, distance from subject, horizontal/vertical. _ For a 2-3 minute slideshow, you’ll need 20 to 35 great photos. _ Get a mix of wide-angle shots, medium shots, close-ups and tight detail shots. _ Shots for beginning of show: set the scene, introduce topic and main character _ Shots for middle of show: develop the topic and character with details. _ Shots for end of show: Wrap up the story, what does it all mean, what’s next, what does this story point to. _ Think about the “cover” or “title” shot. This will be the teaser thumbnail. Editing Photos _ Make copies! Never overwrite your original image. _ In PhotoShop, crop, adjust red-eye, adjust brightness. _ Decide on sequence of photos. Rename photos in numerical order (01farm, 02sunrise, 03barn, 04fence, 05cow…). No spaces, no punctuation. _ Decide if you want to make a title page or section title pages, with text on photo. _ Prep image for Soundslides: o Set resolution to 72 dpi. Image Size > Resolution > 72 dpi o Resample Image > Bicubic Sharper
  • 12. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec o Constrain Proportions o Width > 680 px o File > File Info. Soundslides pulls caption info from here (you can edit later in Soundslides). Include author (photographer), copyrighted work/notice (“2009 by Jill Van Wyke”) o Save As > .jpg, quality setting “High.” (Soundslides will compress.) o Do not “Save for Web” _ Save all your images for one slideshow in one folder. Don’t put any other images in that folder. Soundslides imports folders, not individual images. _ Remember where you put it. Make a parent folder with two folders in it, one for your edited images, one your edited audio. Soundslides Producing in Soundslides _ Optimum length of a slideshow is 2-3 minutes. _ Five to six seconds per photo. 20-35 photos total. _ The quality of your photos and your audio determine length. _ Look through your pictures first, then edit your audio. Your photos will give you an idea of how the sound needs to flow. What audio do you need to leave in or take out, based on your photos? _ Your audio must support your photos must support your audio. The audio commentary should match the picture being shown. It’s confusing for viewer if it doesn’t. Match sound to pictures. _ Avoid visual redundancy. Vary images by close-ups, medium, detail, wide shots, different angles. _ Use a quick series of stills to indicate motion/action. _ If you have someone speaking for 15 seconds, try to use three appropriate photos for that 15 seconds. Captions _ Viewers should concentrate on images, not captions. _ Keep them short. You don’t need time, date, place in every caption (very different from print captions). _ You can omit captions entirely where the image, in the context of the story is self- explanatory. _ But don’t omit all captions. Briefly identify anyone speaking in audio, and anyone introduced in show for the first time. _ Test it: Do you have time to read the entire caption before the show advances to the next frame? _ Why bother with captions at all? They are key in an all-digital, metadata-driven search universe. You can’t search pixels. You search text. Final Thoughts _ Try. Fail. Try again. Fail harder. _ The best way to learn to write is to read. The best way to learn audio is to listen. _ Practice is the path to perfection.
  • 13. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec Grading Criteria: Slideshow PHOTOGRAPHS Compositional: r Every photo has a clean, clear center of interest. r People are shot at eye level. r The background doesn’t distract. r Use the rule of thirds. Place your subject off-center. r Shoot vertically when appropriate. r Shoot from a variety of angles and distances. Technical r Sharp focus. r Good exposure (lighting). r The flash is used well; outdoors to fill in shadow on faces; indoors to lighten. Pix are shot within flash’s range. r Cropped well. AUDIO r Places the listener at scene of story. r A mix of natural and interview sound. r Natural sound is gathered from as close to the sound source as possible. r An underlying track (“bed”) of ambient sound to smooth edits. r Recorded closely enough; minimal background noise. r Interviews conducted in quiet room whenever possible. r Reporter isn’t trampling all over the audio. r No “handling” noise. r A mix of officials and “real people.” r Good quotes from sources, resulting from open-ended questions.
  • 14. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec THE SLIDESHOW r Tells a particular, coherent, well-focused story with a central point. r Opens with natural sound to set the scene. r Opens with a strong, tight image that sets the scene and also functions as a thumbnail. r The audio and photos complement and enhance each other. r An even level of sound throughout. If multiple tracks are used, they complement each other rather than compete. r Audio and photographic fades used appropriately and executed well. r Special effects (Ken Burns, eg.) are used purposefully and well. r Where appropriate, uses a quick series of photos to convey motion. r Incorporates a variety of tight close-ups, medium shots and wide shots. r Uses a variety of angles, orientation (horizontal or vertical) and distance. Avoids redundancy. r Is viewed well in the small size of the viewing window. r Includes a headline. r Includes captions and lower-thirds where necessary (with proper grammar and spelling). r Captions are brief. They identify anyone speaking in the audio and anyone introduced for the first time in the show. r Captions are searchable by search engine like Google. Think keywords! r Includes credits. r Runs 2-3 minutes. r Is paced well; photos are on view long enough to absorb the image, short enough to keep it interesting (generally 3 to 7 seconds). r Ends with strong photo and audio. Doesn’t just peter out. r Image, text and audio create an experience that neither could produce on its own.
  • 15. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec Video Assignment Due date: Your in-depth story will be accompanied by a video of 2-3 minutes’ length. Your video should supplement your text story by presenting new information; it should not repeat or rehash what you’ve written in the story. Focus on the action and emotion of your story that can best be conveyed by video rather than text. In general, your video should consist of 25 to 35 shots of an average of 5 seconds each, but let your creativity and sense of story guide you. The video must include A-roll and B-roll. Do not turn in a video that is one l – o – n – g shot of a person being interviewed! The choice of whether to narrate your video or to rely only on natural sound and interview is up to you. If you use music in your video, you need to convince us that it’s necessary and appropriate to the story. Of course, any music must respect copyrights. You will work in pairs to shoot your videos. For your story, you’ll conduct the interviews and play “director,” making sure you get all the necessary shots. Your partner will operate the camera and monitor audio. Reverse roles on your partner’s story. Edit together, using iMovie. iMovie ’09 tutorial available at: http://www.apple.com/ilife/tutorials/#imovie iMovie HD 6 tutorial available at: http://www.apple.com/support/ilife/tutorials/imovie/index.html Before you shoot your video, you will submit a plan for it: how you conceive it, and how you’ll execute it. (See reverse.) Make sure your edited video has an opening title and properly credits all those who worked on it. It must include lower-thirds of everybody interviewed. When you’re done with your video, upload it to YouTube, following YouTube’s instructions regarding file formats, compression, etc. Grading criteria for this assignment is attached. That’s it for now, until we’re ready to post your complete multimedia package to our site.
  • 16. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec       Using  only  a  smartphone:       1. Take  video  of  some  scenes  around  campus,  both  indoors  and  outdoors.  Practice  with   setting  the  exposure.  Shoot  clips  of  at  least  30  seconds  each.       2. Interview  a  classmate  outdoors  on  any  topic.  Practice:   a. holding  the  camera  steady     b. holding  the  camera  horizontal   c. hold  the  camera  level   d. framing  (rule  of  thirds;  don’t  cut  off  heads;  interviewee  looking  into  frame;   no  distracting  background)   e. getting  the  best  audio  possible;  quiet  place;  watch  out  for  wind  noise       3. Switch  cameras  and  experiment  with  shooting  video  of  yourself.       4. Practice  using  the  built-­‐in  editor  to  trim  your  scene  and  interview  clips.  Remember   to  Save  a  New  Clip.       5. Upload  one  of  your  videos  via  the  Tumblr  app.       6. Upload  one  of  your  videos  to  YouTube,  using  the  “share”  function.  Use  your  own   YouTube  account  if  you  have  one,  or  see  me  for  my  account  info.     a. After  the  video  is  compressed  and  published,  click  View  on  YouTube.  Tap  the   share,  then  tap  email    icon.  Scroll  down  and  copy  the  embed  code.  Then,   launch  the  WordPress  app,  and  paste  the  embed  code  in  a  new  post.  Put  it  in   the  video  category.         7. Launch  the  uStream  app.  >  Allow  current  location.  >  Tape  the  camera  icon  in  the   upper  right,  then  “Go  Live.”     a. Livestream  some  video.  Share  it?        
  • 17. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec Download the iMovie app to your smartphone. Read the following chapters in “iMovie help” in the app, and play with these features: Gestures: read all Create a Project: § Create a new project § Open an existing project § Rename a project § Play a project Record Video and Photos § Record video into iMovie § Take photos in iMovie Edit Clips § Add video to a project § Add photos to a project § Trim a video clip or photo § Edit a photo § Split a video clip § Rotate a video clip § Rearrange video clips § Delete a video clip or photo from your project Adjust audio § Record audio into a project § Adjust the volume of a video or audio clip § Adjust the duration of an audio clip § Move a sound effect or audio clip § Delete an audio clip Add Titles and Transitions § Add a title to a video clip or photo § Edit title text § Delete a title § Change the style, duration of a transition § Delete a transition § Add a fade-in, fade-out Share § Share a movie to YouTube
  • 18. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec   iMovie app assignment Create a short movie about something you will already be doing over the weekend. It should tell a story and meet the criteria for good composition and technical quality. Specifically, your movie should: § have a mix of videos and still photos § include A-roll and B-roll § have a brief voiceover to introduce it § have a title § have transitions (fade-ins and -outs) § be at least 2 minutes long but no more than 5 § be uploaded to the Eyes on Iowa YouTube account, named and tagged appropriately § posted to our Eyes on Iowa site I’ll give you time in class Monday to finish editing the movie, upload it to YouTube and post it to Eyes on Iowa. You may need more time, so it wouldn’t hurt to do a little editing over the weekend. At a minimum, bring your raw video and photos. The goal of this assignment is to gain proficiency and confidence in shooting and editing video with the iPhone. We’ll want that skill and comfort level when we cover our Drake Relays events live. Be thinking as you work through this exercise how we might use video to cover the beautiful bulldog contest and the other Relays event you signed up for. What complications should we anticipate, and how might we address them?
  • 19. Jill Van Wyke, assistant professor Drake University School of Journalism and Mass Communication Rewiring the Ivory Tower: How To Incorporate Multimedia into Writing Courses AEJMC | Aug. 6 | Montreal, Quebec Video Assignment Grading Criteria Quality of Video Shooting • Steady shots (you used a tripod) • Minimal, if any, panning and zooming • Clear audio, both natural sound and interview • Well-lit • Sources are interviewed at eye level • Interviewees are shot from a slight angle to the left or right • Interviewees are not looking at camera • You are silent during interviews (no laughter, “uh-huhs,” etc.) • Composition o rule of thirds o in focus o level o no distracting backgrounds or poles emerging from people’s heads o close to source or action o varying angles and perspectives o fill the frame Quality of Video Editing • No jumpcuts • Appropriate shot lengths; good pacing • Good mix of wide, medium and close- ups • Good transitions • Title • Credits • Good audio levels • Audio matches action • Every edit has a purpose • Opens with strong visual • Continuity of content, movement, sound • Compressed properly and uploaded to YouTube Quality of Overall Storytelling • Coherent story arc: beginning, middle end • Good character(s) • Captures emotion and/or action • Tightly focused • Strong visuals • Good sequencing