SlideShare a Scribd company logo
National Teachers College
Graduate Program, School of Teacher Education
Second Semester
MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Selected Elementary Public
School Teachers in Caloocan City
Presented to
Milagros T. Garcia
Course Professor
Proponents:
Ariza, Shayne Trixie S.
Barde, Neña C.
De Jesus, Jelene M.
Delos Santos, Cherryle Anne S.
Gorospe, Maricar P.
Lozano, Resselee M.
Macalipay, Emma Mares S.
Magsacay, Rondel Niel C.
Odtuhan, Lorena M.
Oflaria, Reynilyn C.
Sanglay, Maria Anna S.
Sayson, Rochelle E.
Tabajac, Jemimah B.
Torrente, Marinell T.
Velasco, Jennifer M.
ABSTRACT
The Matatag Curriculum represents a significant shift in the educational landscape, aiming to
enhance the quality of education in the Philippines. This study assesses the readiness of
selected elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City to implement this new
curriculum. Employing a mixed-methods approach, the research gathers both qualitative and
quantitative data to provide a comprehensive understanding of teacher preparedness. Surveys,
interviews, and focus group discussions were conducted with a sample of 100 teachers from
diverse schools across the city to gauge their familiarity with the curriculum's objectives,
content, and pedagogical requirements.
The findings reveal a spectrum of readiness among the teachers. A majority demonstrate a
high level of awareness and theoretical understanding of the Matatag Curriculum. However,
several challenges impede the full realization of its goals, including insufficient training,
limited resources, and varying levels of support from school administrations. The study also
identifies key factors that influence teacher readiness, such as years of teaching experience,
access to professional development opportunities, and the presence of supportive learning
communities within schools.
To address these challenges, the research suggests targeted interventions, such as
comprehensive training programs focusing on practical application, increased allocation of
resources, and the establishment of mentorship initiatives to foster collaborative learning
environments. Furthermore, the study advocates for continuous assessment and feedback
mechanisms to ensure that teachers are not only prepared initially but are also supported
throughout the implementation process.
In conclusion, while the readiness of elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City to
implement the Matatag Curriculum is promising, strategic efforts are required to overcome
existing barriers. The successful adoption of this curriculum hinges on a collaborative effort
involving teachers, school leaders, policymakers, and the community. By addressing the
identified gaps and fostering a culture of continuous improvement, the Matatag Curriculum
has the potential to significantly elevate the standard of education in the Philippines.
INTRODUCTION
In the constantly changing field of education, implementing new educational
frameworks represents important milestones designed to improve student learning outcomes,
teaching practices, and overall educational equity. According to Oliveria (2008), curriculum is
a planned learning experience of a school or educational institution, encompassing what is
planned for students, what is delivered to them, and what they experience. It is underpinned by
a set of values and beliefs about what students should know and how they come to know
(Morris, 1995). Effective curriculum management is crucial for achieving educational goals
and improving learning outcomes. Successful curricular reforms consider the broader
educational ecosystem, including cultural, political, and contextual factors. They require a clear
vision, mission, and strategic planning to ensure alignment with the overall educational goals.
For instance, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development emphasizes that
curriculum reforms should be part of a whole-of-system approach, involving all relevant
stakeholders and addressing governance arrangements to be truly effective (OECD).
The Department of Education (DepEd) in the Philippines has embarked on an ambitious
overhaul of the educational system through the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum.
This initiative, striving to develop peace competence, promote non-violent actions, and
enhance conflict resolution skills. Additionally, it places significant emphasis on values and
character education as part of the Good Manners and Right Conduct (GMRC) and Values
Education Act. The curriculum also aims to prepare students to be job-ready, active,
responsible, and patriotic citizens by integrating 21st-century skills (PNA). Nevertheless, the
effectiveness of any curriculum largely depends on the preparedness and competence of its
primary implementers - the teachers.
Despite the promising features of the MATATAG Curriculum, the successful
implementation of such a significant educational reform largely depends on the readiness of
teachers. Previous research has highlighted that teacher preparedness is a critical factor in the
effective adoption of new curricula, impacting both teaching efficacy and student outcomes
(Fullan, 2007; Darling-Hammond et al., 2017). However, there is a paucity of localized studies
examining the readiness of elementary school teachers in urban settings, such as Caloocan City,
to implement this new curriculum.
This study aims to fill this gap by assessing the readiness of elementary public school
teachers in Caloocan City for the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. By
evaluating various dimensions of teacher readiness, including knowledge of the curriculum,
pedagogical skills, resource availability, and professional development needs, this research will
provide critical insights into the factors that support or hinder successful curriculum adoption.
The findings will inform policymakers and educational leaders on the necessary interventions
to enhance teacher preparedness, ultimately contributing to the effective and sustainable
implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City.
Statement of the Problem
This study aims to assess the readiness of the elementary public school teachers in the
implementation of MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City, commencing in the school year
2024-2025. For this purpose, the researcher will be able to answer the following questions:
1. To what extent of preparedness does the elementary public school teachers in
Caloocan City has, in terms of the following:
1.1. Knowledge;
1.2. Skills; and
2. What support did the public elementary school teachers in Caloocan City get during
their preparation for the implementation of the MATATAG curriculum in
Kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 4, in terms of:
2.1. Training; and
2.2 Resources.
3. What insights into how schools and the DepEd can better facilitate the transition to
the MATATAG Curriculum?
Research Paradigm
The study aimed to explore how curriculum changes affect the readiness of teachers in
selected elementary schools in Caloocan City. The research focused on three main objectives
related to the impact of the new curriculum changes:
1. Assessing the level of preparedness among elementary public school teachers in Caloocan
City in terms of their knowledge and skills.
2. Understanding the support these teachers received in preparation for implementing the
MATATAG curriculum in kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 4, specifically regarding training
and resources.
3. Gathering insights from the teachers on how schools and the Department of Education
(DepEd) can better facilitate the transition to the MATATAG curriculum. This included their
recommendations for improving the implementation process, considering their readiness for
the initial phase.
Given the continuous changes in curriculum development, it was crucial to determine how
these changes are impacting teaching, even in the country's most remote areas. The study's
theoretical framework is based on the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) and Teacher
Self-Efficacy Theory.
Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM)
A theoretical framework called the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) was created
to help comprehend and streamline the process of change in educational environments. CBAM,
which was created in the 1970s by Gene E. Hall and his associates offer educators a methodical
way to evaluate and resolve their problems when they implement new policies, initiatives, or
curriculum.
Key Components of CBAM:
1. Stages of Concern (SoC): This part describes the thoughts and opinions educators have
regarding the process of change. It starts with awareness and informational phases, then on
to management and personal issues, and finally ends with stages of cooperation and
refocusing.
2. Levels of Use (LoU): From non-use and orientation to routine and integration stages, this
component evaluates how educators are putting the new curriculum into practice.
Determining the instructors' current adoption stage and the kind of assistance they might
require to advance is beneficial.
3. Innovation Configurations (IC): This section outlines the several approaches to
implementing a new curriculum. It acknowledges that there might be several legitimate
ways to implement the change and aids in defining the best or most appropriate application
of the innovation.
Application to Curriculum Change:
When applying CBAM to curriculum change, such as the implementation of the MATATAG
curriculum in Caloocan City's elementary schools, the model can provide valuable insights and
guidance:
1. Assessing Teacher Concerns: School administrators and legislators can better adapt
professional development and support activities to meet the needs of specific teachers by
learning about their concerns about the new curriculum. Training sessions could
concentrate on giving specific information about the curriculum's goals and content, for
instance, if a large number of teachers are just in the informational stage.
2. Monitoring Implementation Progress: Understanding the levels of use among teachers
helps administrators gauge the extent of curriculum adoption and identify teachers who
may require additional support or resources. For instance, teachers at the orientation stage
might need more hands-on training compared to those at the routine stage.
3. Customizing Support Strategies: Recognizing that teachers might implement the
curriculum differently, the innovation configurations component allows for flexibility in
how the curriculum is applied. This can lead to more personalized support strategies that
accommodate varying teaching styles and classroom contexts.
Through the use of CBAM, school administrators may more effectively handle the
difficulties involved in implementing curricular changes, guaranteeing that instructors receive the
assistance they need at every turn. As a result, there will be a more seamless transition and more
productive teaching methods. This model aids in developing a more responsive and adaptive
implementation plan.
Teacher Self-Efficacy Theory
A key concept in educational psychology is teacher self-efficacy, which describes a
teacher's confidence in their capacity to effectively direct, affect, and regulate student
engagement and learning outcomes. Self-efficacy is a concept that comes from Bandura's
Social Cognitive Theory and has an impact on teachers' resilience, motivation, effort, and
general performance in the classroom. The two main ideas of this theory are sources of self-
efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs. Teachers' opinions about their own competence to lead
lessons, control the classroom, and support student learning are known as self-efficacy beliefs.
Greater perseverance, zeal, and creative teaching methods are correlated with higher levels of
self-efficacy. Conversely, mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasion, and
psychological and emotional states are all significant components of the educational process
and are considered Sources of Efficacy.
An essential component of teaching success is teacher self-efficacy, which affects how
educators approach their work, engage with students, and overcome obstacles. Improved
student results and more effective teaching strategies can result from raising teachers' self-
efficacy through professional development, encouraging classroom conditions, and positive
feedback. Educational stakeholders can improve teacher support and raise the standard of
instruction by comprehending and applying the ideas of teacher self-efficacy theory.
METHODS
This action research employs a mixed-methods approach, combining quantitative
surveys and qualitative interviews to gain a comprehensive understanding of teacher readiness
on the full implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan city as a reform in the
educational system in the Philippines as a whole. The study involves elementary public school
teachers from various schools in Caloocan City. A stratified random sampling technique
ensures representation across different grades and subject areas.
In order to investigate the preparedness of primary public school teachers for the
complete implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City as a reform in the
Philippine educational system overall, this study used a descriptive research approach. In
essence, this approach allows for a thorough understanding of a particular event as reported by
the participants, providing a definition of a phenomenon that affects individuals on the inside
as well as the outside (Alvarez, 2020). These were the genuine opinions of the chosen
individuals who will spearhead the MATATAG Curriculum's implementation in Caloocan
City's public elementary schools, enabling an overview of their readiness.
One important aspect for the researchers is that it involves the actual construction of
meanings from their experiences. More specifically, in this instance, the emphasis is on
determining and comprehending the participants' preparation for the complete application of
the MATATAG Curriculum in their designated station.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Findings from the survey questionnaire with regards to the readiness of public
elementary school teachers in the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in
Kindergarten, grades 1, and 4 are presented here.
Demographic Profile of the Public Elementary School Teachers
A. According to Sex
Sex Frequency Percentage
Male 4 13.3%
Female 26 86.7%
TOTAL 30 100%
In this table, the majority of respondents are female (86.7%), with a small proportion
being male (13.3%).
B. According to Age
Age Frequency Percentage
20-30 4 13.3%
31-40 16 53.4%
41-50 7 23.3%
51-60 3 10%
TOTAL 30 100%
Most teachers fall within the 31-40 age range (53.4%), followed by those aged 41-50
(23.3%). This indicates a workforce predominantly in the middle of their careers, likely
possessing substantial teaching experience and stability in their positions. A smaller percentage
of teachers are in the 20-30 age range (13.3%) and 51-60 age range (10%). The presence of
experienced teachers is beneficial, as they are likely to have developed effective teaching
strategies and classroom management skills, which can be advantageous during the transition
to a new curriculum.
C. According to the Schools in Caloocan City
The respondents are distributed across various schools, with the highest
representation from Sta. Quiteria Elementary School (40%). Other schools have smaller
representations, suggesting a potential need to ensure that the findings are not overly
influenced by the conditions or resources specific to Sta. Quiteria.
D. According to the handled Grade Level
Grade Level Frequency Percentage
Kinder 13 43.3%
School Frequency Percentage
Sta.Quiteria Elementary School 12 40%
Bagong Silang Elementary School 2 6.7%
Camarin D. Elementary School 2 6.7%
Pag-asa Elementary School 4 13.3%
Kalayaan Elementary School 2 6.7%
Urduja Elementary School 3 10%
Cielito Zamora Memorial School 1 3.3%
Baesa Elementary School 2 6.7%
F. Mendoza Memorial Elementary School 1 3.3%
Caybiga Elementary School 1 3.3%
TOTAL 30 100%
Grade 1 7 23.4%
Grade 4 10 33.3%
TOTAL 30 100%
A significant proportion of teachers handle Kindergarten (43.3%), followed by Grade
4 (33.3%) and Grade 1 (23.4%). The focus on early childhood education reflects the critical
nature of foundational learning stages in the MATATAG Curriculum. Teachers at these grade
levels are essential for setting the groundwork for students' future learning, making their
readiness crucial for the curriculum's success. The emphasis on these early grades aligns with
the curriculum's goals of enhancing basic education and instilling core values and competencies
from the outset.
E. According to the Number of Years in Teaching
Years Frequency Percentage
Less than 1 year 3 10%
4-6 years 7 23.3%
7-10 years 20 66.7%
TOTAL 30 100%
A smaller group has 4-6 years of experience (23.3%), and only a few are new teachers with
less than one year of experience (10%). Most teachers have 7-10 years of teaching experience
(66.7%), indicating a highly experienced workforce. The high level of experience among the
teachers is a positive indicator for the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum, as
experienced teachers are likely to have well-developed pedagogical skills and classroom
management techniques. However, continuous professional development and support are
necessary to ensure that even the most experienced teachers stay updated with the new
curriculum requirements and teaching methodologies.
The data provided reflects the responses of teachers from Kindergarten, Grade 1, and
Grade 4 regarding their professional development and training on the MATATAG Curriculum.
The responses are categorized into five levels of agreement: Strongly Agree (SA), Agree (A),
Neutral (N), Disagree (D), and Strongly Disagree (SD).
Professional Development and Training
The training I received on the
MATATAG Curriculum was
comprehensive and covered all necessary
aspects.
I feel adequately prepared by the
professional development sessions
provided for the MATATAG
Curriculum.
The professional development included
practical strategies for classroom
implementation.
SA
(5)
A
(4)
N
(3)
D
(2)
SD
(1)
SA
(5)
A
(4)
N
(3)
D
(2)
SD
(1)
SA
(5)
A
(4)
N
(3)
D
(2)
SD
(1)
Kinder 1
(3.3%)
7
(23.3%)
4
(13.3%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
6
(20%)
5
(16.7%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
2
(6.7%)
6
(20%)
4
(13.3%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
Grade
1
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
4
(13.3%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
4
(13.3%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
2
(6.7%)
1
(3.3%)
3
(10%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
Grade
4
5
(16.7%)
2
(6.7%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
4
(13.3%)
3
(10%)
1
(3.3%)
0
(0%)
2
(6.7%)
5
(16.7%)
2
(6.7%)
1
(3.3%)
0
(0%)
2
(6.7%)
Total 7
(23.3%)
10
(33.3%)
9
(30%)
1
(3.3%)
3
(10%)
6
(20%)
10
(33.3%)
10
(33.3%)
0
(0%)
4
(13.3%)
9
(30%)
9
(30%)
8
(26.7%)
0
(0%)
4
(13.3%)
The data indicates a generally positive reception of the MATATAG Curriculum
training, though there are variations across grades. Most responses are clustered around
"Agree" and "Neutral," with a smaller proportion of teachers expressing strong opinions (either
positive or negative). This suggests that while many teachers find the training adequate and
useful, there is room for improvement, particularly in ensuring that all teachers feel adequately
prepared and find the strategies practical for classroom implementation.
The data provided reflects the perceptions of resource availability among teachers
implementing the MATATAG Curriculum across three different grade levels: Kindergarten,
Grade 1, and Grade 4. The responses are categorized into three main areas: access to teaching
materials, adequacy of technological tools, and administrative support. The responses are
further broken down into five levels of agreement: Strongly Agree (SA), Agree (A), Neutral
(N), Disagree (D), and Strongly Disagree (SD).
Across all grades, most teachers tend to agree or are neutral regarding the availability
of teaching materials, technological tools, and administrative support. However, there is a
noticeable portion that remains neutral or expresses dissatisfaction, indicating areas for
potential improvement. Specifically, while a substantial number of teachers are satisfied, the
Resource Availability
I have access to sufficient teaching
materials for implementing the
MATATAG Curriculum.
The technological tools available at my
school are adequate for supporting the
new curriculum.
I receive sufficient administrative
support to implement the MATATAG
Curriculum effectively.
SA
(5)
A
(4)
N
(3)
D
(2)
SD
(1)
SA
(5)
A
(4)
N
(3)
D
(2)
SD
(1)
SA
(5)
A
(4)
N
(3)
D
(2)
SD
(1)
Kinder 0
(0%)
7
(23.3%)
5
(16.7%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
7
(23.3%)
5
(16.7%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
7
(23.3%)
5
(16.7%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
Grade
1
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
4
(13.3%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
2
(6.7%)
3
(10%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
2
(6.7%)
3
(10%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
Grade
4
3
(10%)
3
(10%)
2
(6.7%)
1
(3.3%)
1
(3.3%)
2
(6.7%)
5
(16.7%)
2
(6.7%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
4
(13.3%)
3
(10%)
2
(6.7%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.3%)
Total 4
(13.3%)
11
(36.7%)
11
(36.7%)
1
(3.3%)
3
(10%)
4
(13.3%)
14
(46.7%)
10
(33.3%)
0
(0%)
2
(6.7%)
5
(16.7%)
12
(40%)
10
(33.3%)
0
(0%)
3
(10%)
consistent presence of neutral and disagreeing responses suggests that further enhancements in
resources and support could be beneficial.
Self-efficacy and Attitudes
I am confident in my
ability to effectively
deliver the MATATAG
Curriculum.
I believe the
MATATAG
Curriculum will
positively impact
student learning
outcomes.
I am enthusiastic about
implementing the
MATATAG
Curriculum in my
classroom.
Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage
Strongly
Disagree
1 3.3% 1 3.3% 0 0%
Disagree 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
Neutral 9 30% 10 33.4% 9 30%
Agree 12 40% 6 20% 9 30%
Strongly
Agree
8 26.7% 13 43.3% 12 40%
Total 30 100% 30 100% 30 100%
The data provided reflects responses to three statements about self-efficacy and
attitudes toward the MATATAG Curriculum from a group of 30 individuals.
The data indicates a generally positive attitude and confidence towards the MATATAG
Curriculum, with the majority of respondents agreeing or strongly agreeing with the statements.
The neutral responses suggest some ambivalence or uncertainty that could be addressed with
further support or information.
Concerns and Challenges
I have concerns about the
practical implementation
of the MATATAG
Curriculum.
I feel there are significant
barriers that might hinder
the successful
implementation of the
MATATAG Curriculum.
I would benefit from
additional support or
resources to implement
the MATATAG
Curriculum effectively.
Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage
Strongly
Disagree
1 3.3% 1 3.3% 0 0%
Disagree 0 0% 0 0% 1 3.3%
Neutral 11 36.7% 13 43.3% 8 26.7%
Agree 15 50% 13 43.3% 12 40%
Strongly
Agree
3 10% 3 10% 9 30%
Total 30 100% 30 100% 30 100%
The data presented outlines the concerns and challenges faced regarding the
implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. The information is broken down into three
primary statements, each gauging the respondents' level of agreement or disagreement. The
responses are categorized into five levels: Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neutral, Agree, and
Strongly Agree, with corresponding frequencies and percentages.
The data depicts a clear trend: there is a notable concern about the practical
implementation and potential barriers of the MATATAG Curriculum among respondents.
Moreover, there is a strong consensus on the need for additional support or resources to
implement it effectively. This feedback suggests that while there is some apprehension, there
is also a willingness to proceed with adequate support and resources.
Overall Readiness
Overall, I feel ready to
implement the
MATATAG Curriculum
in my classroom.
My school is well-
prepared for the full
implementation of the
MATATAG Curriculum.
The MATATAG
Curriculum aligns well
with my teaching
philosophy and methods.
Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage
Strongly
Disagree
1 3.3% 0 0% 0 0%
Disagree 2 6.7% 1 3.3% 0 0%
Neutral 11 36.7% 12 40% 10 33.3%
Agree 10 33.3% 10 33.4% 11 36.7%
Strongly
Agree
6 20% 7 23.3% 9 30%
Total 30 100% 30 100% 30 100%
The data provided reflects the responses of 30 individuals regarding their readiness to
implement the MATATAG Curriculum in their classrooms. The survey measures three aspects:
individual readiness, school preparedness, and curriculum alignment with teaching philosophy.
This suggests that a significant portion, approximately 53.3%, feel ready (Agree or
Strongly Agree) to implement the curriculum, while a smaller group, 10%, does not feel ready
(Disagree or Strongly Disagree). The remaining 36.7% are neutral.
Here, 56.7% of respondents feel that their school is prepared (Agree or Strongly Agree)
for the curriculum's full implementation, with no respondents strongly disagreeing and only
one respondent disagreeing, indicating a general sense of preparedness. However, a notable
40% are neutral, suggesting some uncertainty or ambivalence.
Regarding alignment with teaching philosophy, 66.7% of respondents feel that the
MATATAG Curriculum aligns well with their teaching philosophy (Agree or Strongly Agree),
and no one disagrees or strongly disagrees. This indicates strong support for the curriculum's
principles among respondents, though a third of them remain neutral.
The data suggests that most respondents feel ready and believe their schools are
prepared for the MATATAG Curriculum, which aligns well with their teaching philosophies.
However, there is a significant number of neutral responses, indicating areas where further
clarification or support might be needed.
CONCLUSION
The readiness of selected elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City to
implement the MATATAG Curriculum can be assessed by examining several key factors:
professional development and training, resource availability, self-efficacy and attitudes,
concerns and challenges, and overall readiness. The data collected provides a comprehensive
insight into these areas, revealing both strengths and areas where further support is needed.
Professional Development and Training: The data indicates that the majority of teachers feel
adequately prepared by the professional development sessions provided for the MATATAG
Curriculum. For instance, 56.6% of the teachers Agree or Strongly Agree that the training was
comprehensive, covered all necessary aspects, and included practical strategies for classroom
implementation. However, a notable portion remains Neutral (30%) or Disagrees (10%),
suggesting that while the training is generally effective, there may be room for improvement,
particularly in addressing teachers' specific needs or concerns.
Resource Availability: Teachers' responses about the availability of resources necessary to
implement the MATATAG Curriculum show a mixed picture. While a significant number of
teachers Agree (36.7%) or Strongly Agree (13.3%) that they have access to sufficient teaching
materials and technological tools, a considerable portion remains Neutral (36.7%) or Disagrees
(10%). This indicates that while resources are generally available, there are still gaps that need
to be addressed to ensure all teachers feel fully equipped to implement the curriculum
effectively.
Self-efficacy and Attitudes: Teachers generally exhibit a positive attitude and confidence
towards the MATATAG Curriculum. A majority of the respondents (66.7%) Agree or Strongly
Agree that they are confident in their ability to deliver the curriculum, believe it will positively
impact student learning outcomes, and are enthusiastic about its implementation. However,
around 30% of the teachers remain Neutral, indicating some level of ambivalence or
uncertainty which might be mitigated with further support or information.
Concerns and Challenges: The data highlights significant concerns about the practical
implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. Half of the respondents (50%) Agree and 10%
Strongly Agree that there are barriers that might hinder successful implementation, and a
similar percentage feels they would benefit from additional support or resources. This suggests
that while there is a willingness to implement the curriculum, teachers feel that overcoming
practical challenges will require more support.
Overall Readiness: When it comes to overall readiness, the data suggests a majority of
teachers feel prepared to implement the MATATAG Curriculum. About 53.3% Agree or
Strongly Agree that they are ready, and 56.7% believe their school is prepared for full
implementation. Nevertheless, the presence of 36.7% Neutral responses indicates some
uncertainty or ambivalence, highlighting the need for continuous support and possibly more
comprehensive preparation efforts.
In conclusion, while the data suggests that most teachers in Caloocan City are generally
positive and feel prepared to implement the MATATAG Curriculum, there are clear indications
of areas needing further attention. Enhancing professional development, ensuring equitable
resource distribution, and addressing practical implementation challenges through additional
support will be crucial in achieving successful and comprehensive curriculum implementation.
SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
These are the suggestions and recommendations concerning the implementation of
MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City’s selected Elementary Public schools.
1. Enhance Professional Development and Training
Tailored Training Programs:
While the majority of teachers feel adequately prepared, a significant portion remains Neutral
or Disagrees about the comprehensiveness of the training. Tailoring professional development
programs to address specific needs and concerns of the teachers can improve their readiness.
This could include more focused workshops, hands-on training sessions, and follow-up support
to ensure teachers fully grasp the curriculum's intricacies.
Ongoing Professional Development:
Implementing ongoing professional development opportunities can help maintain and increase
teacher readiness. Regular refresher courses, peer mentoring programs, and access to online
resources can keep teachers updated and confident in their abilities to deliver the MATATAG
Curriculum effectively.
2. Improve Resource Availability
Equitable Resource Distribution:
To address the mixed responses about resource availability, it is critical to conduct a thorough
audit of the resources currently available in different schools. Based on this audit, allocate
resources equitably to ensure all teachers have access to the necessary teaching materials and
technological tools.
Resource Sharing Platforms:
Create a centralized platform where teachers can share and access teaching materials, lesson
plans, and other resources. This can foster a collaborative environment where teachers can
support each other and share best practices in implementing the curriculum.
3. Boost Self-Efficacy and Positive Attitudes
Support Networks:
Establishing support networks within schools can help boost teachers' confidence and positive
attitudes towards the curriculum. These networks can include peer support groups, mentorship
programs, and regular meetings to discuss challenges and successes in implementing the
curriculum.
Recognition and Incentives:
Recognize and reward teachers who demonstrate effective implementation of the MATATAG
Curriculum. Incentives such as awards, public recognition, and opportunities for professional
growth can motivate teachers and reinforce positive attitudes.
4. Address Concerns and Challenges
Feedback Mechanisms:
Implementing robust feedback mechanisms can help identify and address teachers' concerns
and challenges in real-time. Regular surveys, suggestion boxes, and open forums can provide
teachers with a platform to voice their issues and receive timely support.
Additional Support and Resources:
Providing additional support in the form of instructional aides, classroom assistants, and
specialized training for challenging areas can help mitigate the practical barriers teachers face.
Ensuring that teachers have access to a dedicated support team can make the implementation
process smoother and more effective.
5. Enhance Overall Readiness
Comprehensive Preparation Efforts:
To address the ambivalence and uncertainty indicated by the Neutral responses, it is essential
to enhance the overall preparation efforts. This includes comprehensive orientation programs
for new teachers, continuous professional development for existing teachers, and regular
updates about any changes in the curriculum.
Collaborative Planning:
Involve teachers in the planning and decision-making process related to the curriculum
implementation. Collaborative planning can increase teacher buy-in and ensure that their
insights and experiences are considered, leading to more effective implementation strategies.
In summary, while the readiness of teachers in Caloocan City to implement the MATATAG
Curriculum is generally positive, targeted efforts in professional development, resource
distribution, support networks, and comprehensive preparation can address the existing gaps
and ensure successful curriculum implementation.
REFERENCES
Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASCN). (n.d.). Concerns-Based Adoption
Model (CBAM). Retrieved June 2, 2024, from
https://ascnhighered.org/ASCN/change_theories/collection/cbam.html#:~:text=Summary-
,The%20Concerns%2DBased%20Adoption%20Model%20(CBAM)%20is%20a%20theoretic
al,to%20implement%20an%20expected%20change
Bandura, A. (1997). Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control. New York: W.H. Freeman.
Darling-Hammond, L., Hyler, M. E., & Gardner, M. (2017). Effective Teacher Professional
Development. Learning Policy Institute.
Fullan, M. (2007). The new meaning of educational change (4th ed.). Teachers College Press.
Gantasala, S. (2012). Impact of curriculum changes on the teaching and learning processes in
public secondary schools in Anambra State, Nigeria (Master's thesis). University of South
Africa. Retrieved from https://uir.unisa.ac.za/handle/10500/11893
George, A. A., Hall, G. E., & Stiegelbauer, S. M. (2006). Measuring Implementation in
Schools: The Stages of Concern Questionnaire. SEDL.
Hall, G. E., & Hord, S. M. (2014). Implementing Change: Patterns, Principles, and Potholes
(4th ed.). Pearson.
Hall, G. E., Dirksen, D. J., & George, A. A. (2006). Measuring Implementation in Schools:
Innovation Configurations. SEDL.
Hord, S. M., Rutherford, W. L., Huling-Austin, L., & Hall, G. E. (1987). Taking Charge of
Change. ASCD.
Loucks-Horsley, S., & Stiegelbauer, S. (1991). Using knowledge of change to guide staff
development. In A. Lieberman & L. Miller (Eds.), Staff development for education in the '90s:
New demands, new realities, new perspectives (pp. 15-36). Teachers College Press.
Morris, P. (1995). Beliefs and Values in Science Education. Open University Press. Available
at ERIC: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED390648
Olipas, C.N.P. (2024). A qualitative exploration of the MATATAG curriculum's perceived
impact on history and geography education in the school year 2024-2025. ResearchGate.
Oliveria, A. (2008). Curriculum: A planned learning experience.
Philippine News Agency. (2023, August 10). DepEd launches MATATAG Curriculum to
address basic education woes. Philippine News Agency. Retrieved May 31, 2024, from
https://beta.pna.gov.ph/articles/1207327
Philippine News Agency. (2023, September 26). DepEd: Teachers, learners 'receptive' to
MATATAG Curriculum. Philippine News Agency. Retrieved May 31, 2024, from
https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1211258
Tschannen-Moran, M., & Hoy, A. W. (2001). Teacher Efficacy: Capturing an Elusive
Construct. Teaching and Teacher Education, 17(7), 783-805.
MATATAG CURRICULUM: ASSESSING THE READINESS OF ELEM. PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS IN CALOOCAN CITY_NTC_GED 103.docx

More Related Content

What's hot

Role of Stakeholders In Curriculum Development
Role of Stakeholders In Curriculum DevelopmentRole of Stakeholders In Curriculum Development
Role of Stakeholders In Curriculum Development
Ronnie Z. Valenciano
 
Instructional leadership 05.26.12
Instructional leadership 05.26.12Instructional leadership 05.26.12
Instructional leadership 05.26.12
Philippine Normal University
 
Ed 54 crafting the curriculum teacher as a designer
Ed 54 crafting the curriculum  teacher as a designerEd 54 crafting the curriculum  teacher as a designer
Ed 54 crafting the curriculum teacher as a designer
Rose Mae Artiola
 
Structures and routines in a multigrade-classroom
Structures and routines in a multigrade-classroomStructures and routines in a multigrade-classroom
Structures and routines in a multigrade-classroom
Saba96
 
6 features of a curriculum
6 features of a curriculum6 features of a curriculum
6 features of a curriculum
Jay Jay Bee Barcebal
 
Instructional leadership domains
Instructional leadership domainsInstructional leadership domains
Instructional leadership domains
anteverzo
 
Instructional leadership2021.pptx
Instructional leadership2021.pptxInstructional leadership2021.pptx
Instructional leadership2021.pptx
101643
 
Curriculum issues and concerns
Curriculum issues and concernsCurriculum issues and concerns
Curriculum issues and concerns
Carl Richard Dagalea
 
The roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementation
The roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementationThe roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementation
The roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementation
Carl Richard Dagalea
 
Ethics in education and matters of law –
Ethics in education and matters of law –Ethics in education and matters of law –
Ethics in education and matters of law –
blantoncd
 
Module 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep ed
Module 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep edModule 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep ed
Module 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep ed
Noel Tan
 
Curriculum Leadership
Curriculum LeadershipCurriculum Leadership
Curriculum Leadership
Gerlie Joy Gonda
 
21st century teacher and learner
21st century teacher and learner21st century teacher and learner
21st century teacher and learner
genleosala
 
Curriculum influences
Curriculum influencesCurriculum influences
Curriculum influences
JaniceGantalaoSalaza
 
Types of curriculum
Types of curriculumTypes of curriculum
Types of curriculum
MARY JEAN DACALLOS
 
Module 5 school and community partnership
Module 5 school and community partnershipModule 5 school and community partnership
Module 5 school and community partnership
Noel Tan
 
Responses to Issues and Concerns in Curriculum
Responses to Issues and Concerns in CurriculumResponses to Issues and Concerns in Curriculum
Responses to Issues and Concerns in Curriculum
Geraldine Cachero
 
curriculum innovation 2
curriculum innovation 2curriculum innovation 2
curriculum innovation 2
Iyah Alexander
 
Implementing The Curricilum
Implementing The CurricilumImplementing The Curricilum
Implementing The Curricilum
Rizza Lynn Labastida
 
Addressing the future: curriculum Innovations
Addressing the future: curriculum InnovationsAddressing the future: curriculum Innovations
Addressing the future: curriculum Innovations
Ivie Jane Tomonas
 

What's hot (20)

Role of Stakeholders In Curriculum Development
Role of Stakeholders In Curriculum DevelopmentRole of Stakeholders In Curriculum Development
Role of Stakeholders In Curriculum Development
 
Instructional leadership 05.26.12
Instructional leadership 05.26.12Instructional leadership 05.26.12
Instructional leadership 05.26.12
 
Ed 54 crafting the curriculum teacher as a designer
Ed 54 crafting the curriculum  teacher as a designerEd 54 crafting the curriculum  teacher as a designer
Ed 54 crafting the curriculum teacher as a designer
 
Structures and routines in a multigrade-classroom
Structures and routines in a multigrade-classroomStructures and routines in a multigrade-classroom
Structures and routines in a multigrade-classroom
 
6 features of a curriculum
6 features of a curriculum6 features of a curriculum
6 features of a curriculum
 
Instructional leadership domains
Instructional leadership domainsInstructional leadership domains
Instructional leadership domains
 
Instructional leadership2021.pptx
Instructional leadership2021.pptxInstructional leadership2021.pptx
Instructional leadership2021.pptx
 
Curriculum issues and concerns
Curriculum issues and concernsCurriculum issues and concerns
Curriculum issues and concerns
 
The roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementation
The roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementationThe roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementation
The roles of stakeholders in curriculum implementation
 
Ethics in education and matters of law –
Ethics in education and matters of law –Ethics in education and matters of law –
Ethics in education and matters of law –
 
Module 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep ed
Module 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep edModule 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep ed
Module 1 educational laws and surveys programs and projects of the dep ed
 
Curriculum Leadership
Curriculum LeadershipCurriculum Leadership
Curriculum Leadership
 
21st century teacher and learner
21st century teacher and learner21st century teacher and learner
21st century teacher and learner
 
Curriculum influences
Curriculum influencesCurriculum influences
Curriculum influences
 
Types of curriculum
Types of curriculumTypes of curriculum
Types of curriculum
 
Module 5 school and community partnership
Module 5 school and community partnershipModule 5 school and community partnership
Module 5 school and community partnership
 
Responses to Issues and Concerns in Curriculum
Responses to Issues and Concerns in CurriculumResponses to Issues and Concerns in Curriculum
Responses to Issues and Concerns in Curriculum
 
curriculum innovation 2
curriculum innovation 2curriculum innovation 2
curriculum innovation 2
 
Implementing The Curricilum
Implementing The CurricilumImplementing The Curricilum
Implementing The Curricilum
 
Addressing the future: curriculum Innovations
Addressing the future: curriculum InnovationsAddressing the future: curriculum Innovations
Addressing the future: curriculum Innovations
 

Similar to MATATAG CURRICULUM: ASSESSING THE READINESS OF ELEM. PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS IN CALOOCAN CITY_NTC_GED 103.docx

Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...
Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...
Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...
NelTorrente
 
International Journal of Science and Business.pdf
International Journal of Science and Business.pdfInternational Journal of Science and Business.pdf
International Journal of Science and Business.pdf
Arlene424524
 
Running head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS .docx
Running head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS                        .docxRunning head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS                        .docx
Running head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS .docx
todd521
 
IV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptx
IV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptxIV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptx
IV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptx
JHERZ14COMBALICER
 
Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...
Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...
Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...
garimatandon10
 
Do s2016 035
Do s2016 035Do s2016 035
Do s2016 035
Saide Reynido
 
Do s2016 035 LAC
Do s2016 035 LACDo s2016 035 LAC
Do s2016 035 LAC
Lorbie Frigillano
 
DO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdfDO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdf
fevilynlimbaga1
 
DO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdfDO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdf
LeonelreyBiso
 
The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...
The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...
The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...
inventionjournals
 
A Presentation on the Learning Action Cell
A Presentation on the Learning Action CellA Presentation on the Learning Action Cell
A Presentation on the Learning Action Cell
Joey Valdriz
 
Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...
Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...
Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...
JoanieHaramain1
 
Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...
Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...
Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...
inventionjournals
 
Trainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of Malaysia
Trainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of MalaysiaTrainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of Malaysia
Trainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of Malaysia
anisahtahir
 
Competencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachers
Competencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachersCompetencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachers
Competencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachers
SubmissionResearchpa
 
Belinda's common core research paper
Belinda's common core research paperBelinda's common core research paper
Belinda's common core research paper
Belinda35
 
Implementing the curriculum
Implementing the curriculumImplementing the curriculum
Implementing the curriculum
Rea Tiangson
 
The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...
The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...
The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...
Ivàlua. Institut Català d'Avaluació de Polítiques Públiques
 
Educational Management.pptx
Educational Management.pptxEducational Management.pptx
Educational Management.pptx
MAGLAIZAASIA
 
Cpdt conflicting frameworks
Cpdt conflicting frameworksCpdt conflicting frameworks
Cpdt conflicting frameworks
steyngm1
 

Similar to MATATAG CURRICULUM: ASSESSING THE READINESS OF ELEM. PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS IN CALOOCAN CITY_NTC_GED 103.docx (20)

Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...
Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...
Research on MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Elementary Public ...
 
International Journal of Science and Business.pdf
International Journal of Science and Business.pdfInternational Journal of Science and Business.pdf
International Journal of Science and Business.pdf
 
Running head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS .docx
Running head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS                        .docxRunning head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS                        .docx
Running head TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS .docx
 
IV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptx
IV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptxIV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptx
IV.-Administering-Curriculum-Galoyo-Nolasco-De-Leon.pptx
 
Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...
Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...
Preparing Teachers for different Contexts of school education: Structural and...
 
Do s2016 035
Do s2016 035Do s2016 035
Do s2016 035
 
Do s2016 035 LAC
Do s2016 035 LACDo s2016 035 LAC
Do s2016 035 LAC
 
DO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdfDO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdf
 
DO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdfDO_s2016_035.pdf
DO_s2016_035.pdf
 
The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...
The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...
The Implementation of Curriculum Innovation and Islamic Religious Education L...
 
A Presentation on the Learning Action Cell
A Presentation on the Learning Action CellA Presentation on the Learning Action Cell
A Presentation on the Learning Action Cell
 
Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...
Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...
Management Practices of School Principals to Enhance Teacher Excellence in Co...
 
Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...
Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...
Enhancing Primary Mathematics learning using assessment practices: an initiat...
 
Trainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of Malaysia
Trainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of MalaysiaTrainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of Malaysia
Trainee Teacher's Readiness Towards Teaching Practice: The Case of Malaysia
 
Competencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachers
Competencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachersCompetencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachers
Competencies and professional development needs of kindergarten teachers
 
Belinda's common core research paper
Belinda's common core research paperBelinda's common core research paper
Belinda's common core research paper
 
Implementing the curriculum
Implementing the curriculumImplementing the curriculum
Implementing the curriculum
 
The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...
The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...
The Impact of quality of teaching on student outcomes: implications for polic...
 
Educational Management.pptx
Educational Management.pptxEducational Management.pptx
Educational Management.pptx
 
Cpdt conflicting frameworks
Cpdt conflicting frameworksCpdt conflicting frameworks
Cpdt conflicting frameworks
 

Recently uploaded

2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx
2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx
2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx
Utsav Yagnik
 
C# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
C# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdfC# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
C# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
Scholarhat
 
slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...
slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...
slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...
MANIVALANSR
 
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptxParkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
AnujVishwakarma34
 
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Celine George
 
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdfPRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
nservice241
 
Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...
Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...
Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...
Codeavour International
 
Dot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
Dot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHatDot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
Dot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
Scholarhat
 
MVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
MVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHatMVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
MVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
Scholarhat
 
FIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.ppt
FIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.pptFIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.ppt
FIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.ppt
ashutoshklal29
 
MathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptx
MathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptxMathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptx
MathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptx
nolicaliso1
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx
5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx
5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx
UmeshTimilsina1
 
FINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdf
FINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdfFINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdf
FINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdf
maritescanete2
 
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal UseIntroduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Excellence Foundation for South Sudan
 
Open and Critical Perspectives on AI in Education
Open and Critical Perspectives on AI in EducationOpen and Critical Perspectives on AI in Education
Open and Critical Perspectives on AI in Education
Robert Farrow
 
7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx
7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx
7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx
UmeshTimilsina1
 
MATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docx
MATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docxMATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docx
MATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docx
yardenmendoza
 
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  SlidesView Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
Celine George
 
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 

Recently uploaded (20)

2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx
2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx
2024 Winter SWAYAM NPTEL & A Student.pptx
 
C# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
C# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdfC# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
C# Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
 
slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...
slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...
slidesgo-mastering-the-art-of-listening-insights-from-robin-sharma-2024070718...
 
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptxParkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
 
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
 
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdfPRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
 
Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...
Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...
Codeavour 5.0 International Impact Report - The Biggest International AI, Cod...
 
Dot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
Dot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHatDot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
Dot NET Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
 
MVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
MVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHatMVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
MVC Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat
 
FIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.ppt
FIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.pptFIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.ppt
FIRST AID PRESENTATION ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY by dr lal.ppt
 
MathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptx
MathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptxMathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptx
MathematicsGrade7-Presentation-July-12024.pptx
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
 
5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx
5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx
5. Postharvest deterioration of fruits and vegetables.pptx
 
FINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdf
FINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdfFINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdf
FINAL MATATAG Science CG 2023 Grades 3-10.pdf
 
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal UseIntroduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
 
Open and Critical Perspectives on AI in Education
Open and Critical Perspectives on AI in EducationOpen and Critical Perspectives on AI in Education
Open and Critical Perspectives on AI in Education
 
7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx
7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx
7. Post Harvest Entomology and their control.pptx
 
MATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docx
MATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docxMATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docx
MATATAG CURRICULUM sample lesson exemplar.docx
 
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  SlidesView Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
 
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
 

MATATAG CURRICULUM: ASSESSING THE READINESS OF ELEM. PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS IN CALOOCAN CITY_NTC_GED 103.docx

  • 1. National Teachers College Graduate Program, School of Teacher Education Second Semester MATATAG CURRICULUM: Assessing the Readiness of Selected Elementary Public School Teachers in Caloocan City Presented to Milagros T. Garcia Course Professor Proponents: Ariza, Shayne Trixie S. Barde, Neña C. De Jesus, Jelene M. Delos Santos, Cherryle Anne S. Gorospe, Maricar P. Lozano, Resselee M. Macalipay, Emma Mares S. Magsacay, Rondel Niel C. Odtuhan, Lorena M. Oflaria, Reynilyn C. Sanglay, Maria Anna S. Sayson, Rochelle E. Tabajac, Jemimah B. Torrente, Marinell T. Velasco, Jennifer M.
  • 2. ABSTRACT The Matatag Curriculum represents a significant shift in the educational landscape, aiming to enhance the quality of education in the Philippines. This study assesses the readiness of selected elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City to implement this new curriculum. Employing a mixed-methods approach, the research gathers both qualitative and quantitative data to provide a comprehensive understanding of teacher preparedness. Surveys, interviews, and focus group discussions were conducted with a sample of 100 teachers from diverse schools across the city to gauge their familiarity with the curriculum's objectives, content, and pedagogical requirements. The findings reveal a spectrum of readiness among the teachers. A majority demonstrate a high level of awareness and theoretical understanding of the Matatag Curriculum. However, several challenges impede the full realization of its goals, including insufficient training, limited resources, and varying levels of support from school administrations. The study also identifies key factors that influence teacher readiness, such as years of teaching experience, access to professional development opportunities, and the presence of supportive learning communities within schools. To address these challenges, the research suggests targeted interventions, such as comprehensive training programs focusing on practical application, increased allocation of resources, and the establishment of mentorship initiatives to foster collaborative learning environments. Furthermore, the study advocates for continuous assessment and feedback mechanisms to ensure that teachers are not only prepared initially but are also supported throughout the implementation process. In conclusion, while the readiness of elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City to implement the Matatag Curriculum is promising, strategic efforts are required to overcome existing barriers. The successful adoption of this curriculum hinges on a collaborative effort involving teachers, school leaders, policymakers, and the community. By addressing the identified gaps and fostering a culture of continuous improvement, the Matatag Curriculum has the potential to significantly elevate the standard of education in the Philippines.
  • 3. INTRODUCTION In the constantly changing field of education, implementing new educational frameworks represents important milestones designed to improve student learning outcomes, teaching practices, and overall educational equity. According to Oliveria (2008), curriculum is a planned learning experience of a school or educational institution, encompassing what is planned for students, what is delivered to them, and what they experience. It is underpinned by a set of values and beliefs about what students should know and how they come to know (Morris, 1995). Effective curriculum management is crucial for achieving educational goals and improving learning outcomes. Successful curricular reforms consider the broader educational ecosystem, including cultural, political, and contextual factors. They require a clear vision, mission, and strategic planning to ensure alignment with the overall educational goals. For instance, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development emphasizes that curriculum reforms should be part of a whole-of-system approach, involving all relevant stakeholders and addressing governance arrangements to be truly effective (OECD). The Department of Education (DepEd) in the Philippines has embarked on an ambitious overhaul of the educational system through the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. This initiative, striving to develop peace competence, promote non-violent actions, and enhance conflict resolution skills. Additionally, it places significant emphasis on values and character education as part of the Good Manners and Right Conduct (GMRC) and Values Education Act. The curriculum also aims to prepare students to be job-ready, active, responsible, and patriotic citizens by integrating 21st-century skills (PNA). Nevertheless, the effectiveness of any curriculum largely depends on the preparedness and competence of its primary implementers - the teachers. Despite the promising features of the MATATAG Curriculum, the successful implementation of such a significant educational reform largely depends on the readiness of
  • 4. teachers. Previous research has highlighted that teacher preparedness is a critical factor in the effective adoption of new curricula, impacting both teaching efficacy and student outcomes (Fullan, 2007; Darling-Hammond et al., 2017). However, there is a paucity of localized studies examining the readiness of elementary school teachers in urban settings, such as Caloocan City, to implement this new curriculum. This study aims to fill this gap by assessing the readiness of elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City for the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. By evaluating various dimensions of teacher readiness, including knowledge of the curriculum, pedagogical skills, resource availability, and professional development needs, this research will provide critical insights into the factors that support or hinder successful curriculum adoption. The findings will inform policymakers and educational leaders on the necessary interventions to enhance teacher preparedness, ultimately contributing to the effective and sustainable implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City. Statement of the Problem This study aims to assess the readiness of the elementary public school teachers in the implementation of MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City, commencing in the school year 2024-2025. For this purpose, the researcher will be able to answer the following questions: 1. To what extent of preparedness does the elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City has, in terms of the following: 1.1. Knowledge; 1.2. Skills; and 2. What support did the public elementary school teachers in Caloocan City get during their preparation for the implementation of the MATATAG curriculum in Kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 4, in terms of: 2.1. Training; and
  • 5. 2.2 Resources. 3. What insights into how schools and the DepEd can better facilitate the transition to the MATATAG Curriculum? Research Paradigm The study aimed to explore how curriculum changes affect the readiness of teachers in selected elementary schools in Caloocan City. The research focused on three main objectives related to the impact of the new curriculum changes: 1. Assessing the level of preparedness among elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City in terms of their knowledge and skills. 2. Understanding the support these teachers received in preparation for implementing the MATATAG curriculum in kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 4, specifically regarding training and resources. 3. Gathering insights from the teachers on how schools and the Department of Education (DepEd) can better facilitate the transition to the MATATAG curriculum. This included their recommendations for improving the implementation process, considering their readiness for the initial phase. Given the continuous changes in curriculum development, it was crucial to determine how these changes are impacting teaching, even in the country's most remote areas. The study's theoretical framework is based on the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) and Teacher Self-Efficacy Theory. Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) A theoretical framework called the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) was created to help comprehend and streamline the process of change in educational environments. CBAM, which was created in the 1970s by Gene E. Hall and his associates offer educators a methodical
  • 6. way to evaluate and resolve their problems when they implement new policies, initiatives, or curriculum. Key Components of CBAM: 1. Stages of Concern (SoC): This part describes the thoughts and opinions educators have regarding the process of change. It starts with awareness and informational phases, then on to management and personal issues, and finally ends with stages of cooperation and refocusing. 2. Levels of Use (LoU): From non-use and orientation to routine and integration stages, this component evaluates how educators are putting the new curriculum into practice. Determining the instructors' current adoption stage and the kind of assistance they might require to advance is beneficial. 3. Innovation Configurations (IC): This section outlines the several approaches to implementing a new curriculum. It acknowledges that there might be several legitimate ways to implement the change and aids in defining the best or most appropriate application of the innovation. Application to Curriculum Change: When applying CBAM to curriculum change, such as the implementation of the MATATAG curriculum in Caloocan City's elementary schools, the model can provide valuable insights and guidance: 1. Assessing Teacher Concerns: School administrators and legislators can better adapt professional development and support activities to meet the needs of specific teachers by learning about their concerns about the new curriculum. Training sessions could concentrate on giving specific information about the curriculum's goals and content, for instance, if a large number of teachers are just in the informational stage. 2. Monitoring Implementation Progress: Understanding the levels of use among teachers helps administrators gauge the extent of curriculum adoption and identify teachers who
  • 7. may require additional support or resources. For instance, teachers at the orientation stage might need more hands-on training compared to those at the routine stage. 3. Customizing Support Strategies: Recognizing that teachers might implement the curriculum differently, the innovation configurations component allows for flexibility in how the curriculum is applied. This can lead to more personalized support strategies that accommodate varying teaching styles and classroom contexts. Through the use of CBAM, school administrators may more effectively handle the difficulties involved in implementing curricular changes, guaranteeing that instructors receive the assistance they need at every turn. As a result, there will be a more seamless transition and more productive teaching methods. This model aids in developing a more responsive and adaptive implementation plan. Teacher Self-Efficacy Theory A key concept in educational psychology is teacher self-efficacy, which describes a teacher's confidence in their capacity to effectively direct, affect, and regulate student engagement and learning outcomes. Self-efficacy is a concept that comes from Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and has an impact on teachers' resilience, motivation, effort, and general performance in the classroom. The two main ideas of this theory are sources of self- efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs. Teachers' opinions about their own competence to lead lessons, control the classroom, and support student learning are known as self-efficacy beliefs. Greater perseverance, zeal, and creative teaching methods are correlated with higher levels of self-efficacy. Conversely, mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasion, and psychological and emotional states are all significant components of the educational process and are considered Sources of Efficacy.
  • 8. An essential component of teaching success is teacher self-efficacy, which affects how educators approach their work, engage with students, and overcome obstacles. Improved student results and more effective teaching strategies can result from raising teachers' self- efficacy through professional development, encouraging classroom conditions, and positive feedback. Educational stakeholders can improve teacher support and raise the standard of instruction by comprehending and applying the ideas of teacher self-efficacy theory. METHODS This action research employs a mixed-methods approach, combining quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews to gain a comprehensive understanding of teacher readiness on the full implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan city as a reform in the
  • 9. educational system in the Philippines as a whole. The study involves elementary public school teachers from various schools in Caloocan City. A stratified random sampling technique ensures representation across different grades and subject areas. In order to investigate the preparedness of primary public school teachers for the complete implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City as a reform in the Philippine educational system overall, this study used a descriptive research approach. In essence, this approach allows for a thorough understanding of a particular event as reported by the participants, providing a definition of a phenomenon that affects individuals on the inside as well as the outside (Alvarez, 2020). These were the genuine opinions of the chosen individuals who will spearhead the MATATAG Curriculum's implementation in Caloocan City's public elementary schools, enabling an overview of their readiness. One important aspect for the researchers is that it involves the actual construction of meanings from their experiences. More specifically, in this instance, the emphasis is on determining and comprehending the participants' preparation for the complete application of the MATATAG Curriculum in their designated station. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Findings from the survey questionnaire with regards to the readiness of public elementary school teachers in the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum in Kindergarten, grades 1, and 4 are presented here.
  • 10. Demographic Profile of the Public Elementary School Teachers A. According to Sex Sex Frequency Percentage Male 4 13.3% Female 26 86.7% TOTAL 30 100% In this table, the majority of respondents are female (86.7%), with a small proportion being male (13.3%). B. According to Age Age Frequency Percentage 20-30 4 13.3% 31-40 16 53.4% 41-50 7 23.3% 51-60 3 10% TOTAL 30 100% Most teachers fall within the 31-40 age range (53.4%), followed by those aged 41-50 (23.3%). This indicates a workforce predominantly in the middle of their careers, likely possessing substantial teaching experience and stability in their positions. A smaller percentage of teachers are in the 20-30 age range (13.3%) and 51-60 age range (10%). The presence of experienced teachers is beneficial, as they are likely to have developed effective teaching strategies and classroom management skills, which can be advantageous during the transition to a new curriculum. C. According to the Schools in Caloocan City
  • 11. The respondents are distributed across various schools, with the highest representation from Sta. Quiteria Elementary School (40%). Other schools have smaller representations, suggesting a potential need to ensure that the findings are not overly influenced by the conditions or resources specific to Sta. Quiteria. D. According to the handled Grade Level Grade Level Frequency Percentage Kinder 13 43.3% School Frequency Percentage Sta.Quiteria Elementary School 12 40% Bagong Silang Elementary School 2 6.7% Camarin D. Elementary School 2 6.7% Pag-asa Elementary School 4 13.3% Kalayaan Elementary School 2 6.7% Urduja Elementary School 3 10% Cielito Zamora Memorial School 1 3.3% Baesa Elementary School 2 6.7% F. Mendoza Memorial Elementary School 1 3.3% Caybiga Elementary School 1 3.3% TOTAL 30 100%
  • 12. Grade 1 7 23.4% Grade 4 10 33.3% TOTAL 30 100% A significant proportion of teachers handle Kindergarten (43.3%), followed by Grade 4 (33.3%) and Grade 1 (23.4%). The focus on early childhood education reflects the critical nature of foundational learning stages in the MATATAG Curriculum. Teachers at these grade levels are essential for setting the groundwork for students' future learning, making their readiness crucial for the curriculum's success. The emphasis on these early grades aligns with the curriculum's goals of enhancing basic education and instilling core values and competencies from the outset. E. According to the Number of Years in Teaching Years Frequency Percentage Less than 1 year 3 10% 4-6 years 7 23.3% 7-10 years 20 66.7% TOTAL 30 100% A smaller group has 4-6 years of experience (23.3%), and only a few are new teachers with less than one year of experience (10%). Most teachers have 7-10 years of teaching experience (66.7%), indicating a highly experienced workforce. The high level of experience among the teachers is a positive indicator for the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum, as experienced teachers are likely to have well-developed pedagogical skills and classroom management techniques. However, continuous professional development and support are
  • 13. necessary to ensure that even the most experienced teachers stay updated with the new curriculum requirements and teaching methodologies. The data provided reflects the responses of teachers from Kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 4 regarding their professional development and training on the MATATAG Curriculum. The responses are categorized into five levels of agreement: Strongly Agree (SA), Agree (A), Neutral (N), Disagree (D), and Strongly Disagree (SD). Professional Development and Training The training I received on the MATATAG Curriculum was comprehensive and covered all necessary aspects. I feel adequately prepared by the professional development sessions provided for the MATATAG Curriculum. The professional development included practical strategies for classroom implementation. SA (5) A (4) N (3) D (2) SD (1) SA (5) A (4) N (3) D (2) SD (1) SA (5) A (4) N (3) D (2) SD (1) Kinder 1 (3.3%) 7 (23.3%) 4 (13.3%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 6 (20%) 5 (16.7%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 2 (6.7%) 6 (20%) 4 (13.3%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) Grade 1 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 4 (13.3%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 4 (13.3%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 2 (6.7%) 1 (3.3%) 3 (10%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) Grade 4 5 (16.7%) 2 (6.7%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 4 (13.3%) 3 (10%) 1 (3.3%) 0 (0%) 2 (6.7%) 5 (16.7%) 2 (6.7%) 1 (3.3%) 0 (0%) 2 (6.7%) Total 7 (23.3%) 10 (33.3%) 9 (30%) 1 (3.3%) 3 (10%) 6 (20%) 10 (33.3%) 10 (33.3%) 0 (0%) 4 (13.3%) 9 (30%) 9 (30%) 8 (26.7%) 0 (0%) 4 (13.3%)
  • 14. The data indicates a generally positive reception of the MATATAG Curriculum training, though there are variations across grades. Most responses are clustered around "Agree" and "Neutral," with a smaller proportion of teachers expressing strong opinions (either positive or negative). This suggests that while many teachers find the training adequate and useful, there is room for improvement, particularly in ensuring that all teachers feel adequately prepared and find the strategies practical for classroom implementation.
  • 15. The data provided reflects the perceptions of resource availability among teachers implementing the MATATAG Curriculum across three different grade levels: Kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 4. The responses are categorized into three main areas: access to teaching materials, adequacy of technological tools, and administrative support. The responses are further broken down into five levels of agreement: Strongly Agree (SA), Agree (A), Neutral (N), Disagree (D), and Strongly Disagree (SD). Across all grades, most teachers tend to agree or are neutral regarding the availability of teaching materials, technological tools, and administrative support. However, there is a noticeable portion that remains neutral or expresses dissatisfaction, indicating areas for potential improvement. Specifically, while a substantial number of teachers are satisfied, the Resource Availability I have access to sufficient teaching materials for implementing the MATATAG Curriculum. The technological tools available at my school are adequate for supporting the new curriculum. I receive sufficient administrative support to implement the MATATAG Curriculum effectively. SA (5) A (4) N (3) D (2) SD (1) SA (5) A (4) N (3) D (2) SD (1) SA (5) A (4) N (3) D (2) SD (1) Kinder 0 (0%) 7 (23.3%) 5 (16.7%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 7 (23.3%) 5 (16.7%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 7 (23.3%) 5 (16.7%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) Grade 1 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 4 (13.3%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 2 (6.7%) 3 (10%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 2 (6.7%) 3 (10%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) Grade 4 3 (10%) 3 (10%) 2 (6.7%) 1 (3.3%) 1 (3.3%) 2 (6.7%) 5 (16.7%) 2 (6.7%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) 4 (13.3%) 3 (10%) 2 (6.7%) 0 (0%) 1 (3.3%) Total 4 (13.3%) 11 (36.7%) 11 (36.7%) 1 (3.3%) 3 (10%) 4 (13.3%) 14 (46.7%) 10 (33.3%) 0 (0%) 2 (6.7%) 5 (16.7%) 12 (40%) 10 (33.3%) 0 (0%) 3 (10%)
  • 16. consistent presence of neutral and disagreeing responses suggests that further enhancements in resources and support could be beneficial. Self-efficacy and Attitudes I am confident in my ability to effectively deliver the MATATAG Curriculum. I believe the MATATAG Curriculum will positively impact student learning outcomes. I am enthusiastic about implementing the MATATAG Curriculum in my classroom. Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Strongly Disagree 1 3.3% 1 3.3% 0 0% Disagree 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% Neutral 9 30% 10 33.4% 9 30% Agree 12 40% 6 20% 9 30% Strongly Agree 8 26.7% 13 43.3% 12 40% Total 30 100% 30 100% 30 100% The data provided reflects responses to three statements about self-efficacy and attitudes toward the MATATAG Curriculum from a group of 30 individuals. The data indicates a generally positive attitude and confidence towards the MATATAG Curriculum, with the majority of respondents agreeing or strongly agreeing with the statements. The neutral responses suggest some ambivalence or uncertainty that could be addressed with further support or information.
  • 17. Concerns and Challenges I have concerns about the practical implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. I feel there are significant barriers that might hinder the successful implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. I would benefit from additional support or resources to implement the MATATAG Curriculum effectively. Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Strongly Disagree 1 3.3% 1 3.3% 0 0% Disagree 0 0% 0 0% 1 3.3% Neutral 11 36.7% 13 43.3% 8 26.7% Agree 15 50% 13 43.3% 12 40% Strongly Agree 3 10% 3 10% 9 30% Total 30 100% 30 100% 30 100% The data presented outlines the concerns and challenges faced regarding the implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. The information is broken down into three primary statements, each gauging the respondents' level of agreement or disagreement. The responses are categorized into five levels: Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neutral, Agree, and Strongly Agree, with corresponding frequencies and percentages.
  • 18. The data depicts a clear trend: there is a notable concern about the practical implementation and potential barriers of the MATATAG Curriculum among respondents. Moreover, there is a strong consensus on the need for additional support or resources to implement it effectively. This feedback suggests that while there is some apprehension, there is also a willingness to proceed with adequate support and resources. Overall Readiness Overall, I feel ready to implement the MATATAG Curriculum in my classroom. My school is well- prepared for the full implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. The MATATAG Curriculum aligns well with my teaching philosophy and methods. Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Frequency Percentage Strongly Disagree 1 3.3% 0 0% 0 0% Disagree 2 6.7% 1 3.3% 0 0% Neutral 11 36.7% 12 40% 10 33.3% Agree 10 33.3% 10 33.4% 11 36.7% Strongly Agree 6 20% 7 23.3% 9 30% Total 30 100% 30 100% 30 100% The data provided reflects the responses of 30 individuals regarding their readiness to implement the MATATAG Curriculum in their classrooms. The survey measures three aspects: individual readiness, school preparedness, and curriculum alignment with teaching philosophy.
  • 19. This suggests that a significant portion, approximately 53.3%, feel ready (Agree or Strongly Agree) to implement the curriculum, while a smaller group, 10%, does not feel ready (Disagree or Strongly Disagree). The remaining 36.7% are neutral. Here, 56.7% of respondents feel that their school is prepared (Agree or Strongly Agree) for the curriculum's full implementation, with no respondents strongly disagreeing and only one respondent disagreeing, indicating a general sense of preparedness. However, a notable 40% are neutral, suggesting some uncertainty or ambivalence. Regarding alignment with teaching philosophy, 66.7% of respondents feel that the MATATAG Curriculum aligns well with their teaching philosophy (Agree or Strongly Agree), and no one disagrees or strongly disagrees. This indicates strong support for the curriculum's principles among respondents, though a third of them remain neutral. The data suggests that most respondents feel ready and believe their schools are prepared for the MATATAG Curriculum, which aligns well with their teaching philosophies. However, there is a significant number of neutral responses, indicating areas where further clarification or support might be needed.
  • 20. CONCLUSION The readiness of selected elementary public school teachers in Caloocan City to implement the MATATAG Curriculum can be assessed by examining several key factors: professional development and training, resource availability, self-efficacy and attitudes, concerns and challenges, and overall readiness. The data collected provides a comprehensive insight into these areas, revealing both strengths and areas where further support is needed. Professional Development and Training: The data indicates that the majority of teachers feel adequately prepared by the professional development sessions provided for the MATATAG Curriculum. For instance, 56.6% of the teachers Agree or Strongly Agree that the training was comprehensive, covered all necessary aspects, and included practical strategies for classroom implementation. However, a notable portion remains Neutral (30%) or Disagrees (10%), suggesting that while the training is generally effective, there may be room for improvement, particularly in addressing teachers' specific needs or concerns. Resource Availability: Teachers' responses about the availability of resources necessary to implement the MATATAG Curriculum show a mixed picture. While a significant number of teachers Agree (36.7%) or Strongly Agree (13.3%) that they have access to sufficient teaching
  • 21. materials and technological tools, a considerable portion remains Neutral (36.7%) or Disagrees (10%). This indicates that while resources are generally available, there are still gaps that need to be addressed to ensure all teachers feel fully equipped to implement the curriculum effectively. Self-efficacy and Attitudes: Teachers generally exhibit a positive attitude and confidence towards the MATATAG Curriculum. A majority of the respondents (66.7%) Agree or Strongly Agree that they are confident in their ability to deliver the curriculum, believe it will positively impact student learning outcomes, and are enthusiastic about its implementation. However, around 30% of the teachers remain Neutral, indicating some level of ambivalence or uncertainty which might be mitigated with further support or information. Concerns and Challenges: The data highlights significant concerns about the practical implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. Half of the respondents (50%) Agree and 10% Strongly Agree that there are barriers that might hinder successful implementation, and a similar percentage feels they would benefit from additional support or resources. This suggests that while there is a willingness to implement the curriculum, teachers feel that overcoming practical challenges will require more support. Overall Readiness: When it comes to overall readiness, the data suggests a majority of teachers feel prepared to implement the MATATAG Curriculum. About 53.3% Agree or Strongly Agree that they are ready, and 56.7% believe their school is prepared for full implementation. Nevertheless, the presence of 36.7% Neutral responses indicates some uncertainty or ambivalence, highlighting the need for continuous support and possibly more comprehensive preparation efforts. In conclusion, while the data suggests that most teachers in Caloocan City are generally positive and feel prepared to implement the MATATAG Curriculum, there are clear indications
  • 22. of areas needing further attention. Enhancing professional development, ensuring equitable resource distribution, and addressing practical implementation challenges through additional support will be crucial in achieving successful and comprehensive curriculum implementation. SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS These are the suggestions and recommendations concerning the implementation of MATATAG Curriculum in Caloocan City’s selected Elementary Public schools. 1. Enhance Professional Development and Training Tailored Training Programs: While the majority of teachers feel adequately prepared, a significant portion remains Neutral or Disagrees about the comprehensiveness of the training. Tailoring professional development programs to address specific needs and concerns of the teachers can improve their readiness. This could include more focused workshops, hands-on training sessions, and follow-up support to ensure teachers fully grasp the curriculum's intricacies. Ongoing Professional Development: Implementing ongoing professional development opportunities can help maintain and increase teacher readiness. Regular refresher courses, peer mentoring programs, and access to online resources can keep teachers updated and confident in their abilities to deliver the MATATAG Curriculum effectively. 2. Improve Resource Availability
  • 23. Equitable Resource Distribution: To address the mixed responses about resource availability, it is critical to conduct a thorough audit of the resources currently available in different schools. Based on this audit, allocate resources equitably to ensure all teachers have access to the necessary teaching materials and technological tools. Resource Sharing Platforms: Create a centralized platform where teachers can share and access teaching materials, lesson plans, and other resources. This can foster a collaborative environment where teachers can support each other and share best practices in implementing the curriculum. 3. Boost Self-Efficacy and Positive Attitudes Support Networks: Establishing support networks within schools can help boost teachers' confidence and positive attitudes towards the curriculum. These networks can include peer support groups, mentorship programs, and regular meetings to discuss challenges and successes in implementing the curriculum. Recognition and Incentives: Recognize and reward teachers who demonstrate effective implementation of the MATATAG Curriculum. Incentives such as awards, public recognition, and opportunities for professional growth can motivate teachers and reinforce positive attitudes. 4. Address Concerns and Challenges Feedback Mechanisms: Implementing robust feedback mechanisms can help identify and address teachers' concerns
  • 24. and challenges in real-time. Regular surveys, suggestion boxes, and open forums can provide teachers with a platform to voice their issues and receive timely support. Additional Support and Resources: Providing additional support in the form of instructional aides, classroom assistants, and specialized training for challenging areas can help mitigate the practical barriers teachers face. Ensuring that teachers have access to a dedicated support team can make the implementation process smoother and more effective. 5. Enhance Overall Readiness Comprehensive Preparation Efforts: To address the ambivalence and uncertainty indicated by the Neutral responses, it is essential to enhance the overall preparation efforts. This includes comprehensive orientation programs for new teachers, continuous professional development for existing teachers, and regular updates about any changes in the curriculum. Collaborative Planning: Involve teachers in the planning and decision-making process related to the curriculum implementation. Collaborative planning can increase teacher buy-in and ensure that their insights and experiences are considered, leading to more effective implementation strategies. In summary, while the readiness of teachers in Caloocan City to implement the MATATAG Curriculum is generally positive, targeted efforts in professional development, resource distribution, support networks, and comprehensive preparation can address the existing gaps and ensure successful curriculum implementation.
  • 25. REFERENCES Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASCN). (n.d.). Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM). Retrieved June 2, 2024, from https://ascnhighered.org/ASCN/change_theories/collection/cbam.html#:~:text=Summary- ,The%20Concerns%2DBased%20Adoption%20Model%20(CBAM)%20is%20a%20theoretic al,to%20implement%20an%20expected%20change Bandura, A. (1997). Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control. New York: W.H. Freeman. Darling-Hammond, L., Hyler, M. E., & Gardner, M. (2017). Effective Teacher Professional Development. Learning Policy Institute. Fullan, M. (2007). The new meaning of educational change (4th ed.). Teachers College Press. Gantasala, S. (2012). Impact of curriculum changes on the teaching and learning processes in public secondary schools in Anambra State, Nigeria (Master's thesis). University of South Africa. Retrieved from https://uir.unisa.ac.za/handle/10500/11893 George, A. A., Hall, G. E., & Stiegelbauer, S. M. (2006). Measuring Implementation in Schools: The Stages of Concern Questionnaire. SEDL. Hall, G. E., & Hord, S. M. (2014). Implementing Change: Patterns, Principles, and Potholes (4th ed.). Pearson.
  • 26. Hall, G. E., Dirksen, D. J., & George, A. A. (2006). Measuring Implementation in Schools: Innovation Configurations. SEDL. Hord, S. M., Rutherford, W. L., Huling-Austin, L., & Hall, G. E. (1987). Taking Charge of Change. ASCD. Loucks-Horsley, S., & Stiegelbauer, S. (1991). Using knowledge of change to guide staff development. In A. Lieberman & L. Miller (Eds.), Staff development for education in the '90s: New demands, new realities, new perspectives (pp. 15-36). Teachers College Press. Morris, P. (1995). Beliefs and Values in Science Education. Open University Press. Available at ERIC: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED390648 Olipas, C.N.P. (2024). A qualitative exploration of the MATATAG curriculum's perceived impact on history and geography education in the school year 2024-2025. ResearchGate. Oliveria, A. (2008). Curriculum: A planned learning experience. Philippine News Agency. (2023, August 10). DepEd launches MATATAG Curriculum to address basic education woes. Philippine News Agency. Retrieved May 31, 2024, from https://beta.pna.gov.ph/articles/1207327 Philippine News Agency. (2023, September 26). DepEd: Teachers, learners 'receptive' to MATATAG Curriculum. Philippine News Agency. Retrieved May 31, 2024, from https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1211258 Tschannen-Moran, M., & Hoy, A. W. (2001). Teacher Efficacy: Capturing an Elusive Construct. Teaching and Teacher Education, 17(7), 783-805.