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Leadership Management® International Volume VIV, Number 1
Provided by Leadership Management, Inc.
4567 Lake Shore Drive, Waco, TX 76710, (800)568-1241, Email: info@lmi-usa.com, www.lmi-usa.com
The Total Leader®
“At times, the apparent problem is not the real one; it is
merely a symptom. The real problem may be hidden
beneath defensive accusations, confusing data, complex
processesandprocedures,orpoorlyconstructedreports.”
– continued on page 2 –
Taking a Closer Look at Problem Solving
The first step in problem solving is to define the problem
by evaluating the difference between the current situation
and the desired goal. In other words, a problem is the
difference between the goal and the result. The sooner you
observe and correct any deviation between the goal and
result, the smaller the problem will be. Problem solving is
closely related to decision
making. The processes are
much the same.
Part of defining the prob-
lem is also identifying the
causes.At times, the apparent
problem is not the real one; it
ismerelyasymptom.Thereal
problem may be hidden be-
neath defensive accusations,
confusing data, complex pro-
cesses and procedures, or
poorlyconstructedreports.Be
sure you address the causes
rather than the symptoms.
For example, one indi-
vidual on your team may
continually bombard you
with questions. You need
to ask yourself: Is that re-
ally the problem? Or is it a
symptom of a lack of train-
ing? Or is the real problem that this person once received a
harsh reprimand for a decision and is now hesitant to
proceed without prior approval? You can usually narrow
down inadequate performance to one of these three root
problems: training, environment, or motivation.
Afteryoudefinetheproblem,youneedtodecidewhether
it is even a problem that must be solved. Some problems
resolve themselves in a short time without any action. Other
problems are not worth your time to take action to solve.
Spend a hundred dollars’ worth of your time on hundred
dollar problems, not twenty dollar problems. If a problem is
not worth your time, assign the solving of it to someone else
who is paid less than you are.
Of course, you need to make
sure that it will be solved be-
fore it becomes a more costly
problem.
When the problem does re-
quire your attention to be
solved, use this time proven
formula for approaching the
problem:
x Make sure the real problem
isdefinedclearlyandrelatesto
an important organizational or
personal goal.Address causes,
not effects or symptoms. You
mayfindthatanumberofnega-
tivesymptomsmayallhavethe
same root cause. By dealing
with the root cause, you
may solve more than one prob-
lem at a time.
x Set a deadline for making
the final decision about a solution to be chosen. Allow
adequate time to gather information, suggestions, and
opinions from others.
x Identify the purpose to be met by the solution. Refer to
specific organizational and personal goals as guidelines
ImagecourtesyofstockimagesatFreeDigitalPhotos.net
EMPOWERMENT The Total Leader22222
– continued from page 1 –
for deciding exactly what the solution must accomplish.
This prevents investing too much time and material in
solvingarelativelyminorproblem.Specificallystateany
criteria that must be met, including budget, time frame,
quality requirements, efficiency, and simplicity.
x Compile and study information. Collect and assemble
information in a logical and useful form, and study the
facts to be sure that you understand everything involved.
x List possible solutions. List all of the possible solutions.
Makenoattempttoruleoutalternatives;usefreeassocia-
tion, visualization, and creativity to generate as many
solutions as possible. Consider the possibility that a
given solution could cause other problems. Decide if
other actions will need to be taken to ensure a net positive
effect, or if another solution altogether needs to be
considered.
x Make a choice. Look
over the list of pos-
sible solutions that
youhavemade.Cross
outanyitemsthatyou
know immediately
you do not want to
use.Foreachpossible
solution left on your
list, answer the ques-
tion, “What would
happen if I chose this
solution?” Then
choose the one that
appears to have the
best possible chance
of success.
x Decide what action must be taken to implement the
solution. The action may be simple and require the
attention of only one or two people, or it may have
several steps and involve the whole department. Make
sure that every person understands what to do, how, and
why. Then make sure the predetermined steps are fol-
lowed.
x Request feedback. Keep open the lines of communica-
tion between yourself and those who must carry out your
decision. Be open to their ideas, and do not judge
feedback based on your preconceived ideas about the
person giving it. Let your team members know you are
interestedintheirproblemsbutthatyourinstructionswill
be carried out. When necessary and practical, be willing
to modify the plan when the feedback you receive
indicates a need for adjustment.
Overcome Problems with a Vision
Oneofthemostdistinguishingcharacteristicsofhuman-
kind is the creative power of our imagination. There is
significant power in our ability to imagine our ideal future.
The LMI Process™ refers to this power as “vision.”
There were some studies conducted back in the 1960s
that scientifically substantiate the power of vision. A group
of behavioral scientist randomly selected a group of
junior high boys and girls and divided them into two
groups. The test was to shoot a basketball through the
hoopforasetnumberoffreethrowsfromthefreethrowline
on a basketball court. The two groups were given an
initial test without any practice to establish a base line.
Then each group was given one week to practice.
For a set time period each day, the two groups practiced
shooting free throws;
however, one group
physically practiced
with the ball and actu-
ally shooting it, while
thesecondgroupprac-
ticed mentally by
imagining standing at
thefoullineandshoot-
ing the ball success-
fullythroughthehoop.
After the one week
of physical vs. mental
practice, the two
groups were pitted
against each other in a
final test. The purpose was to measure and compare the
improvement from the first test. The result of the test
showed that not only did the group who mentally practiced
show the highest percentage of improvement but actually
beat the group that had practiced with the ball.
From this classic research grew the trend for profes-
sional athletes to spend specific practice time on positive
vision of a successful performance. Clear vision is the key
to your future. Clear vision is the key to the future of your
organization. Ask yourself these questions: What vision
do I hold for my future? How much time do I spend weekly
imagining my success? How clearly and vividly do I
see my future? How do I feel when I vision my success?
If you can answer these questions with clarity, you are well
on your way to your desired future vision. If, however,
you have difficulty with these questions, you would
benefit from learning how to build a clear vision for your
future and the future of your organization.
The Total Leader 33333STRATEGICLEADERSHIP
Table of Contents
Page 1-2:
Taking a Closer Look at Problem
Solving
Page 3: Growth
A Winner Never Gives Up
Page 4: Strategic Leadership
Determine What Success Means
to You
Page 5: Motivational Management
Develop Your Plan for Achievement
Page 6: Strategic Development
Bridging the Gap Between Potential
and Performance
A Winner Never Gives UpBecoming
More Effective
Most leaders are concerned
abouttwotypesofresults:Their
own personal success and suc-
cess of the organization. Al-
though the two areas may seem
distinct,inapracticalsensethey
cannot be separated. The pur-
pose of a leader is to achieve
results through the activities of
other people. Those “other
people” together with the leader
make up the team or organiza-
tion. If this group of individuals
fails, the leader shares in that
fate. If the leader fails, the
organization’s goals are not
achieved. On the other hand,
when the leader succeeds, the
organization benefits directly;
and when the team reaches its
goals, the leader shares in the
rewards.
Whatever you do to improve
your leadership success adds
directly to your personal suc-
cess. Because your purpose as a
leader is to achieve results
through directing the activities
of others, the goal is to set goals
tobecomeamoreeffective,mo-
tivational leader.
The new-found confidence that is yours from the exercise of personal leadership
attracts other people. Understanding and empathy are tools that enable you to motivate
others to search for their own potential and to achieve success for themselves. Just as
you have learned, those whose lives you touch will also learn that the only genuine
understanding is self-understanding; the only true peace is internal peace; the only
meaningful motivation is self-motivation based on an attitude of positive expectancy
and the conviction that we all possess limitless potential.
We live in a world of abundance – a world that was created for us and filled with
a wealth of resources that we may use to fulfill our needs and satisfy our desires. The
abundance in the physical world is mirrored in the abundance of human potential
within each individual.
Much attention is given to
thetragedyofwastednatu-
ralresources,andrightfully
so. Even more tragic, how-
ever, is the waste that oc-
curs when people fail to
usetheirfullpotential.Rec-
ognize the wealth of un-
tapped potential that lies
within you and you will
begintomarvelatitsabun-
dance.
When you are success-
ful, you draw vitality and
strength from the abundance of opportunity that surrounds you. By setting progres-
sively higher goals, you maintain the necessary momentum to keep yourself on a
constant course of personal leadership. The practice of goal setting is intended to be
a lifelong pattern. The goal setter, like all winners, is marked by the determination. A
winner never quits.
TapIntoYourCreativeSide
The crowning trait of personal leadership is creativity. Creativity is an even finer art
than pure inventive genius. It is a conceptual skill, the willingness to innovate, to try
the untried, and to see the usual in unusual ways, and to relate the normally unrelated.
Creativity abounds when your attitudes are uninhibited by conditioning and
convention. Creativity allows you to face a changing world and an uncertain future
without fear. You are competitive. You are comparatively at ease in unstructured
situations and unperturbed even when conditions around you are out of control. You
are never awed by mystery. You are a good person to have around during a crisis.
As a creative person, you can listen to others with understanding – not only for
facts, but to absorb the emotional overtones of what is said. You evaluate what you
hear with calmness and self-confidence; you trust your competence to decide when
it is time to act.
Creativity operates not as a flash of light, but as the logical result of your ability to
restructure previously unrelated bits of information.You investigate new relationships
between facts, ignoring “the way it has always been done.” Creativity builds on a
strong, mature personality and is expressed through self-respect, self-confidence and
positive expectancy. It is the natural outgrowth of personal leadership.
Image courtesy of stockimages at
FreeDigitalPhotos.net
The Total Leader44444 PERSONALLEADERSHIP
Determine What Success Means to You
Success means something different to every person. For
some, success means advancement to even higher posi-
tions within the organization. Others count the contribu-
tions they are able to make to the lives of other people. Still
others measure success by the size of their bank accounts.
The success you seek likely consists of bits and pieces of
these elements. But here is a definition of success that
works for everyone: Success is the progressive realization
of worthwhile, predetermined personal goals.
This definition implies that success is the result of your
own choice – the choice of the specific goals you pursue.
The most important factor
in making satisfying
choices is a positive self-
image. A positive self-im-
ageenablesyoutosetgoals
that reflect your values and
provide meaning and ful-
fillment through their
achievement.
Although no two lead-
ers are identical in person-
ality or approach to man-
agement,alleffectivelead-
ers share one characteris-
tic: a positive self-image. Effective leaders see themselves
as capable individuals, worthy of self-respect and deserv-
ing of the respect of others.
Your self-image, or the mental picture you have of
yourself, determines to a large extent the level of success
you achieve as a leader. The level of success you achieve
as a leader, of course, helps determine the level of success
your organization will achieve. The more positive your
self-image, the more opportunities you have to pursue
success for yourself and your team.
Your self-image determines the measure of confidence
you bring to the challenge of using your potential and
working toward the goals you have set. Psychologists
estimate that, on average, people use less than a third of
their actual potential. This means that by using only a small
additional portion of your potential, you can make a sizable
increase in your effectiveness. If, for example, you are now
using 30 percent of your potential, you could choose to
increase that amount by another 10 percent – a total of 40
percent of your potential. With relatively little effort you
can be 10 percent more effective than you are now.
The factor controlling how much of your real potential
you can use is your self-image. You begin to acquire your
self-image almost immediately after birth. As people in
your environment reacted to you with approval or disap-
proval, you began to form a mental picture of who you were
based on that feedback. If many of the messages you
received implied that you lacked ability, that you were too
young, too inexperienced, or limited in some other way, you
may have internalized that message and believed it. Even
now, you may be limiting your success based on these old
messages, and ignoring the fact that you are now more
experienced and more capable than you were in the past.
In contrast, if the people in your early environment were
strongly supportive, praised you for your achievements, and
expressed belief in your ability
to succeed, you may be follow-
ing that estimate of yourself
and using a larger percentage
of your potential. But regard-
less of your background, what
you are now is what counts.
What you are now depends to a
great extent upon what you are
willing to believe and become,
and what you are willing to do
about your self-image.You can
change your self-image if you
wish. You can enhance the re-
lationship between your self-image and success. The more
positive your self-image, the more successful you become as
an effective motivational leader!
Choosing to develop your self-image sets the stage for
significant contributions to your team and organization. A
positive self-image enables you to view organizational op-
portunities and challenges in new and exciting ways. Then
you are ready to develop clear plans for the achievement of
organizational goals. Armed with a strong belief in your
potential for success, you and your team members are
positioned to achieve the objectives which may now seem
remote and out of reach.
Dream Big to Succeed
Your self-image is the key to your future. Develop it and
use it to help you capture your dreams and to achieve your
goals. An ancient Scripture says, “Where there is no vision,
the people perish.” Crystallize your vision of what you want
to be. Work hard to fulfill the positive self-image that you
were created to enjoy. Make use of your unique strengths
instead of merely conforming to circumstances. You may
have some unique strengths that for some obscure purpose
you have kept hidden, even from your own view. Encourage
yourself to bring them out and act upon them.
Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
The Total Leader 55555PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY
Develop Your Plan for Achievement
Effective leaders dare to make their own decisions and
to direct their organization toward success. Goals create the
confidence that comes from knowing where you and your
team are going and how you intend to get there. Goals serve
as a filter to eliminate extraneous demands. Goals bring to
life a sense of order and purpose that sustains desire and
motivation over a long period of time.
Goal setting is the most powerful tool at your disposal in
the development of your organization. Used effectively,
goal setting principles can greatly enhance your skill as an
effective motivational leader. Throughout history strong
leaders and organizations, armed with specific goals and
the force of commitment,
have shaped the destinies
of millions. You and your
organization can leave an
imprint on the lives of oth-
ers by setting worthwhile
goals and committing to
their achievement.
Your organization is a
unique entity. No one out-
side your organization can
choose the direction in
which you will grow. You
and your team members
must dream your own
dreams, identify your own goals, and design your own
destiny. Define a logical starting place and an ultimate
destination where your goals program will lead you. With
these two points clearly stated, planning how to move from
where you are now to your destination is relatively simple.
Where your organization stands now. Spend some time
inhonestassessmentandevaluationofyourpresentlevelof
growth in the various aspects of your organization. Orga-
nizational evaluation helps you gain insight into your
present situation. You will discover some outstanding
strengths and some areas of needed growth. Use this
information to build on your strengths and to select chal-
lenging goals for growth.
Where you want to go. Once you have defined your
present status, next decide where you want the organization
to go. Identify ultimate goals for you and your team – goals
that define your leadership style and the results you wish to
achieve from your effort. Next, identify a number of
intermediate milestones along the way to those ultimate
goals. Those short- and intermediate-range goals involve
all aspects of your organization – from people and produc-
tivity to maintenance and inventory. Carefully coordinate
them so they are mutually supportive and so each one builds
organizational growth and progress.
Where you want the organization to go may also include
the long-range career plan you choose to pursue. Perhaps
your career goal is to hold one of the top leadership positions
in your company for a specific number of years before
retirement. To support achievement of that career goal, set
specific department or team goals for this year – goals that
represent your appropriate contribution to the overall goals
of the organization. Success in your present job brings you
closer to success in your long-range career plan.
Defining where you and your organization want to go is
a continuing process. Look-
ingfarintothefuturetoward
ultimategoalsincludescare-
fully choosing where you
and your team want to be
next year, next month, or by
the end of this week or even
day.
How you will reach your
destination. When the first
two steps have been com-
pleted, begin to develop
workable plans for reaching
your destination. Just as a
travel agent must know
when and where you want to begin and where you want to
go before arranging reservations, you need to know where
to begin and where you want to go.
As you develop plans for achievement, include both
short-range and long-range goals. Short-range goals are
those that can be achieved in a relatively brief time frame.
Begin by setting goals you and your team can achieve within
the next two weeks. Each short-range goal you achieve
generates a feeling of accomplishment, energizes your mo-
tivation, and increases your team’s belief in your leadership
ability.
Also establish long-range goals that provide overall di-
rection for the organization. Long-range goals may take six
months, a year, or several years to achieve. Plan to reach
them by setting short-range goals that move you closer to
their ultimate attainment.
It is valuable to sit down and think about what you and
your team have achieved so far, to consider where you want
to go in the future, and to dream of the strategies you will
followinpursuitofthoseideals. Andremember,goalsetting
works best through a written plan.
Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Since 1966, Leadership Management Interna-
tional™ has been bridging the gap between
potential and performance by helping or-
ganizations and individuals evaluate
their strengths and opportunities
through implementation of the
unique and proven LMI Process™
.
The LMI Process™
...
q Develops leaders who, in turn,
empower their people to use their
untapped talents and abilities.
q Identifies key areas the organiza-
tion should focus on in order
to reach the next level of success.
q Gives direction to an effective solu-
tion and delivers measurable results.
q Practices a 93 percent effective
leadership model.
The LMI Process™
is designed around a Strategic Devel-
opment™
model with four vital components:
q Awareness
q Planning
LMI®
tools and processes have been making a difference in organizations
and individuals for nearly 50 years in more than 70 countries.
Bridging the Gap Between Potential
and Performance
STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT
The Total Leader® ms published for Leader-
ship Management International™ by Ruther-
ford Communications, P.O. Box 8853,
Waco, Texas 76710, 1-800-815-2323, E-
mail: rpublish@rpublish.com. Website:
www.rutherfordcommunications.com.
Copyright © 2015 Rutherford Communica-
tions. All rights reserved. Material may not
be reproduced in whole or part in any
form without the written permission of
the publisher.
Publisher: Ronnie Marroquin
Managing Editor: Kimberly Denman
LMI Editor: Staci Dalton
q Development
q Results Management.
The Total Leader66666

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lmitotal leader-jan15-lmidevelopment2

  • 1. Leadership Management® International Volume VIV, Number 1 Provided by Leadership Management, Inc. 4567 Lake Shore Drive, Waco, TX 76710, (800)568-1241, Email: info@lmi-usa.com, www.lmi-usa.com The Total Leader® “At times, the apparent problem is not the real one; it is merely a symptom. The real problem may be hidden beneath defensive accusations, confusing data, complex processesandprocedures,orpoorlyconstructedreports.” – continued on page 2 – Taking a Closer Look at Problem Solving The first step in problem solving is to define the problem by evaluating the difference between the current situation and the desired goal. In other words, a problem is the difference between the goal and the result. The sooner you observe and correct any deviation between the goal and result, the smaller the problem will be. Problem solving is closely related to decision making. The processes are much the same. Part of defining the prob- lem is also identifying the causes.At times, the apparent problem is not the real one; it ismerelyasymptom.Thereal problem may be hidden be- neath defensive accusations, confusing data, complex pro- cesses and procedures, or poorlyconstructedreports.Be sure you address the causes rather than the symptoms. For example, one indi- vidual on your team may continually bombard you with questions. You need to ask yourself: Is that re- ally the problem? Or is it a symptom of a lack of train- ing? Or is the real problem that this person once received a harsh reprimand for a decision and is now hesitant to proceed without prior approval? You can usually narrow down inadequate performance to one of these three root problems: training, environment, or motivation. Afteryoudefinetheproblem,youneedtodecidewhether it is even a problem that must be solved. Some problems resolve themselves in a short time without any action. Other problems are not worth your time to take action to solve. Spend a hundred dollars’ worth of your time on hundred dollar problems, not twenty dollar problems. If a problem is not worth your time, assign the solving of it to someone else who is paid less than you are. Of course, you need to make sure that it will be solved be- fore it becomes a more costly problem. When the problem does re- quire your attention to be solved, use this time proven formula for approaching the problem: x Make sure the real problem isdefinedclearlyandrelatesto an important organizational or personal goal.Address causes, not effects or symptoms. You mayfindthatanumberofnega- tivesymptomsmayallhavethe same root cause. By dealing with the root cause, you may solve more than one prob- lem at a time. x Set a deadline for making the final decision about a solution to be chosen. Allow adequate time to gather information, suggestions, and opinions from others. x Identify the purpose to be met by the solution. Refer to specific organizational and personal goals as guidelines ImagecourtesyofstockimagesatFreeDigitalPhotos.net
  • 2. EMPOWERMENT The Total Leader22222 – continued from page 1 – for deciding exactly what the solution must accomplish. This prevents investing too much time and material in solvingarelativelyminorproblem.Specificallystateany criteria that must be met, including budget, time frame, quality requirements, efficiency, and simplicity. x Compile and study information. Collect and assemble information in a logical and useful form, and study the facts to be sure that you understand everything involved. x List possible solutions. List all of the possible solutions. Makenoattempttoruleoutalternatives;usefreeassocia- tion, visualization, and creativity to generate as many solutions as possible. Consider the possibility that a given solution could cause other problems. Decide if other actions will need to be taken to ensure a net positive effect, or if another solution altogether needs to be considered. x Make a choice. Look over the list of pos- sible solutions that youhavemade.Cross outanyitemsthatyou know immediately you do not want to use.Foreachpossible solution left on your list, answer the ques- tion, “What would happen if I chose this solution?” Then choose the one that appears to have the best possible chance of success. x Decide what action must be taken to implement the solution. The action may be simple and require the attention of only one or two people, or it may have several steps and involve the whole department. Make sure that every person understands what to do, how, and why. Then make sure the predetermined steps are fol- lowed. x Request feedback. Keep open the lines of communica- tion between yourself and those who must carry out your decision. Be open to their ideas, and do not judge feedback based on your preconceived ideas about the person giving it. Let your team members know you are interestedintheirproblemsbutthatyourinstructionswill be carried out. When necessary and practical, be willing to modify the plan when the feedback you receive indicates a need for adjustment. Overcome Problems with a Vision Oneofthemostdistinguishingcharacteristicsofhuman- kind is the creative power of our imagination. There is significant power in our ability to imagine our ideal future. The LMI Process™ refers to this power as “vision.” There were some studies conducted back in the 1960s that scientifically substantiate the power of vision. A group of behavioral scientist randomly selected a group of junior high boys and girls and divided them into two groups. The test was to shoot a basketball through the hoopforasetnumberoffreethrowsfromthefreethrowline on a basketball court. The two groups were given an initial test without any practice to establish a base line. Then each group was given one week to practice. For a set time period each day, the two groups practiced shooting free throws; however, one group physically practiced with the ball and actu- ally shooting it, while thesecondgroupprac- ticed mentally by imagining standing at thefoullineandshoot- ing the ball success- fullythroughthehoop. After the one week of physical vs. mental practice, the two groups were pitted against each other in a final test. The purpose was to measure and compare the improvement from the first test. The result of the test showed that not only did the group who mentally practiced show the highest percentage of improvement but actually beat the group that had practiced with the ball. From this classic research grew the trend for profes- sional athletes to spend specific practice time on positive vision of a successful performance. Clear vision is the key to your future. Clear vision is the key to the future of your organization. Ask yourself these questions: What vision do I hold for my future? How much time do I spend weekly imagining my success? How clearly and vividly do I see my future? How do I feel when I vision my success? If you can answer these questions with clarity, you are well on your way to your desired future vision. If, however, you have difficulty with these questions, you would benefit from learning how to build a clear vision for your future and the future of your organization.
  • 3. The Total Leader 33333STRATEGICLEADERSHIP Table of Contents Page 1-2: Taking a Closer Look at Problem Solving Page 3: Growth A Winner Never Gives Up Page 4: Strategic Leadership Determine What Success Means to You Page 5: Motivational Management Develop Your Plan for Achievement Page 6: Strategic Development Bridging the Gap Between Potential and Performance A Winner Never Gives UpBecoming More Effective Most leaders are concerned abouttwotypesofresults:Their own personal success and suc- cess of the organization. Al- though the two areas may seem distinct,inapracticalsensethey cannot be separated. The pur- pose of a leader is to achieve results through the activities of other people. Those “other people” together with the leader make up the team or organiza- tion. If this group of individuals fails, the leader shares in that fate. If the leader fails, the organization’s goals are not achieved. On the other hand, when the leader succeeds, the organization benefits directly; and when the team reaches its goals, the leader shares in the rewards. Whatever you do to improve your leadership success adds directly to your personal suc- cess. Because your purpose as a leader is to achieve results through directing the activities of others, the goal is to set goals tobecomeamoreeffective,mo- tivational leader. The new-found confidence that is yours from the exercise of personal leadership attracts other people. Understanding and empathy are tools that enable you to motivate others to search for their own potential and to achieve success for themselves. Just as you have learned, those whose lives you touch will also learn that the only genuine understanding is self-understanding; the only true peace is internal peace; the only meaningful motivation is self-motivation based on an attitude of positive expectancy and the conviction that we all possess limitless potential. We live in a world of abundance – a world that was created for us and filled with a wealth of resources that we may use to fulfill our needs and satisfy our desires. The abundance in the physical world is mirrored in the abundance of human potential within each individual. Much attention is given to thetragedyofwastednatu- ralresources,andrightfully so. Even more tragic, how- ever, is the waste that oc- curs when people fail to usetheirfullpotential.Rec- ognize the wealth of un- tapped potential that lies within you and you will begintomarvelatitsabun- dance. When you are success- ful, you draw vitality and strength from the abundance of opportunity that surrounds you. By setting progres- sively higher goals, you maintain the necessary momentum to keep yourself on a constant course of personal leadership. The practice of goal setting is intended to be a lifelong pattern. The goal setter, like all winners, is marked by the determination. A winner never quits. TapIntoYourCreativeSide The crowning trait of personal leadership is creativity. Creativity is an even finer art than pure inventive genius. It is a conceptual skill, the willingness to innovate, to try the untried, and to see the usual in unusual ways, and to relate the normally unrelated. Creativity abounds when your attitudes are uninhibited by conditioning and convention. Creativity allows you to face a changing world and an uncertain future without fear. You are competitive. You are comparatively at ease in unstructured situations and unperturbed even when conditions around you are out of control. You are never awed by mystery. You are a good person to have around during a crisis. As a creative person, you can listen to others with understanding – not only for facts, but to absorb the emotional overtones of what is said. You evaluate what you hear with calmness and self-confidence; you trust your competence to decide when it is time to act. Creativity operates not as a flash of light, but as the logical result of your ability to restructure previously unrelated bits of information.You investigate new relationships between facts, ignoring “the way it has always been done.” Creativity builds on a strong, mature personality and is expressed through self-respect, self-confidence and positive expectancy. It is the natural outgrowth of personal leadership. Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  • 4. The Total Leader44444 PERSONALLEADERSHIP Determine What Success Means to You Success means something different to every person. For some, success means advancement to even higher posi- tions within the organization. Others count the contribu- tions they are able to make to the lives of other people. Still others measure success by the size of their bank accounts. The success you seek likely consists of bits and pieces of these elements. But here is a definition of success that works for everyone: Success is the progressive realization of worthwhile, predetermined personal goals. This definition implies that success is the result of your own choice – the choice of the specific goals you pursue. The most important factor in making satisfying choices is a positive self- image. A positive self-im- ageenablesyoutosetgoals that reflect your values and provide meaning and ful- fillment through their achievement. Although no two lead- ers are identical in person- ality or approach to man- agement,alleffectivelead- ers share one characteris- tic: a positive self-image. Effective leaders see themselves as capable individuals, worthy of self-respect and deserv- ing of the respect of others. Your self-image, or the mental picture you have of yourself, determines to a large extent the level of success you achieve as a leader. The level of success you achieve as a leader, of course, helps determine the level of success your organization will achieve. The more positive your self-image, the more opportunities you have to pursue success for yourself and your team. Your self-image determines the measure of confidence you bring to the challenge of using your potential and working toward the goals you have set. Psychologists estimate that, on average, people use less than a third of their actual potential. This means that by using only a small additional portion of your potential, you can make a sizable increase in your effectiveness. If, for example, you are now using 30 percent of your potential, you could choose to increase that amount by another 10 percent – a total of 40 percent of your potential. With relatively little effort you can be 10 percent more effective than you are now. The factor controlling how much of your real potential you can use is your self-image. You begin to acquire your self-image almost immediately after birth. As people in your environment reacted to you with approval or disap- proval, you began to form a mental picture of who you were based on that feedback. If many of the messages you received implied that you lacked ability, that you were too young, too inexperienced, or limited in some other way, you may have internalized that message and believed it. Even now, you may be limiting your success based on these old messages, and ignoring the fact that you are now more experienced and more capable than you were in the past. In contrast, if the people in your early environment were strongly supportive, praised you for your achievements, and expressed belief in your ability to succeed, you may be follow- ing that estimate of yourself and using a larger percentage of your potential. But regard- less of your background, what you are now is what counts. What you are now depends to a great extent upon what you are willing to believe and become, and what you are willing to do about your self-image.You can change your self-image if you wish. You can enhance the re- lationship between your self-image and success. The more positive your self-image, the more successful you become as an effective motivational leader! Choosing to develop your self-image sets the stage for significant contributions to your team and organization. A positive self-image enables you to view organizational op- portunities and challenges in new and exciting ways. Then you are ready to develop clear plans for the achievement of organizational goals. Armed with a strong belief in your potential for success, you and your team members are positioned to achieve the objectives which may now seem remote and out of reach. Dream Big to Succeed Your self-image is the key to your future. Develop it and use it to help you capture your dreams and to achieve your goals. An ancient Scripture says, “Where there is no vision, the people perish.” Crystallize your vision of what you want to be. Work hard to fulfill the positive self-image that you were created to enjoy. Make use of your unique strengths instead of merely conforming to circumstances. You may have some unique strengths that for some obscure purpose you have kept hidden, even from your own view. Encourage yourself to bring them out and act upon them. Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  • 5. The Total Leader 55555PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY Develop Your Plan for Achievement Effective leaders dare to make their own decisions and to direct their organization toward success. Goals create the confidence that comes from knowing where you and your team are going and how you intend to get there. Goals serve as a filter to eliminate extraneous demands. Goals bring to life a sense of order and purpose that sustains desire and motivation over a long period of time. Goal setting is the most powerful tool at your disposal in the development of your organization. Used effectively, goal setting principles can greatly enhance your skill as an effective motivational leader. Throughout history strong leaders and organizations, armed with specific goals and the force of commitment, have shaped the destinies of millions. You and your organization can leave an imprint on the lives of oth- ers by setting worthwhile goals and committing to their achievement. Your organization is a unique entity. No one out- side your organization can choose the direction in which you will grow. You and your team members must dream your own dreams, identify your own goals, and design your own destiny. Define a logical starting place and an ultimate destination where your goals program will lead you. With these two points clearly stated, planning how to move from where you are now to your destination is relatively simple. Where your organization stands now. Spend some time inhonestassessmentandevaluationofyourpresentlevelof growth in the various aspects of your organization. Orga- nizational evaluation helps you gain insight into your present situation. You will discover some outstanding strengths and some areas of needed growth. Use this information to build on your strengths and to select chal- lenging goals for growth. Where you want to go. Once you have defined your present status, next decide where you want the organization to go. Identify ultimate goals for you and your team – goals that define your leadership style and the results you wish to achieve from your effort. Next, identify a number of intermediate milestones along the way to those ultimate goals. Those short- and intermediate-range goals involve all aspects of your organization – from people and produc- tivity to maintenance and inventory. Carefully coordinate them so they are mutually supportive and so each one builds organizational growth and progress. Where you want the organization to go may also include the long-range career plan you choose to pursue. Perhaps your career goal is to hold one of the top leadership positions in your company for a specific number of years before retirement. To support achievement of that career goal, set specific department or team goals for this year – goals that represent your appropriate contribution to the overall goals of the organization. Success in your present job brings you closer to success in your long-range career plan. Defining where you and your organization want to go is a continuing process. Look- ingfarintothefuturetoward ultimategoalsincludescare- fully choosing where you and your team want to be next year, next month, or by the end of this week or even day. How you will reach your destination. When the first two steps have been com- pleted, begin to develop workable plans for reaching your destination. Just as a travel agent must know when and where you want to begin and where you want to go before arranging reservations, you need to know where to begin and where you want to go. As you develop plans for achievement, include both short-range and long-range goals. Short-range goals are those that can be achieved in a relatively brief time frame. Begin by setting goals you and your team can achieve within the next two weeks. Each short-range goal you achieve generates a feeling of accomplishment, energizes your mo- tivation, and increases your team’s belief in your leadership ability. Also establish long-range goals that provide overall di- rection for the organization. Long-range goals may take six months, a year, or several years to achieve. Plan to reach them by setting short-range goals that move you closer to their ultimate attainment. It is valuable to sit down and think about what you and your team have achieved so far, to consider where you want to go in the future, and to dream of the strategies you will followinpursuitofthoseideals. Andremember,goalsetting works best through a written plan. Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  • 6. Since 1966, Leadership Management Interna- tional™ has been bridging the gap between potential and performance by helping or- ganizations and individuals evaluate their strengths and opportunities through implementation of the unique and proven LMI Process™ . The LMI Process™ ... q Develops leaders who, in turn, empower their people to use their untapped talents and abilities. q Identifies key areas the organiza- tion should focus on in order to reach the next level of success. q Gives direction to an effective solu- tion and delivers measurable results. q Practices a 93 percent effective leadership model. The LMI Process™ is designed around a Strategic Devel- opment™ model with four vital components: q Awareness q Planning LMI® tools and processes have been making a difference in organizations and individuals for nearly 50 years in more than 70 countries. Bridging the Gap Between Potential and Performance STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT The Total Leader® ms published for Leader- ship Management International™ by Ruther- ford Communications, P.O. Box 8853, Waco, Texas 76710, 1-800-815-2323, E- mail: rpublish@rpublish.com. Website: www.rutherfordcommunications.com. Copyright © 2015 Rutherford Communica- tions. All rights reserved. Material may not be reproduced in whole or part in any form without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher: Ronnie Marroquin Managing Editor: Kimberly Denman LMI Editor: Staci Dalton q Development q Results Management. The Total Leader66666