SlideShare a Scribd company logo
Once	
  upon	
  a	
  *me,	
  long,	
  long	
  ago,	
  people	
  communicated	
  and	
  socialized	
  in	
  curious	
  
ways.	
  	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                         1	
  
They	
  wrote	
  whole	
  paragraphs	
  at	
  a	
  *me	
  –	
  some*mes	
  more	
  -­‐-­‐	
  and	
  sent	
  them	
  through	
  
email,	
  delighted	
  that	
  the	
  recipient	
  might	
  read	
  their	
  message	
  that	
  very	
  day!	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                  2	
  
They	
  waited	
  un*l	
  they	
  had	
  taken	
  24	
  or	
  even	
  36	
  photos	
  before	
  geFng	
  them	
  printed	
  
on	
  paper..	
  	
  




                                                                                                                               3	
  
Then	
  they’d	
  get	
  together	
  with	
  people	
  in	
  person	
  and	
  tell	
  the	
  stories	
  depicted	
  in	
  the	
  
photos.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                    4	
  
And	
  some*mes,	
  also	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  room	
  together,	
  they	
  watched	
  a	
  
single	
  video	
  for	
  two	
  whole	
  hours	
  at	
  a	
  stretch.	
  	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                         5	
  
People	
  listened	
  to	
  12	
  songs	
  by	
  the	
  same	
  ar*st	
  -­‐-­‐	
  all	
  in	
  a	
  row	
  -­‐-­‐	
  stored	
  on	
  preKy	
  silver	
  
disks.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                                            6	
  
Now,	
  of	
  course,	
  the	
  world	
  has	
  changed.	
  	
  
-­‐ 	
  Content	
  now	
  comes	
  in	
  bite-­‐size	
  pieces:	
  status	
  updates	
  and	
  text	
  tweets,	
  3	
  minute	
  
videos,	
  and	
  people	
  send	
  one	
  photo	
  at	
  a	
  *me.	
  
-­‐ 	
  People	
  capture	
  their	
  experiences	
  in	
  many	
  more	
  ways	
  than	
  just	
  photos	
  and	
  videos.	
  
Now	
  they	
  track	
  their	
  loca*ons,	
  their	
  exercise	
  and	
  food	
  intake,	
  their	
  game	
  playing,	
  
even	
  their	
  sleeping	
  paKerns.	
  	
  
-­‐ 	
  They	
  access	
  this	
  content	
  from	
  just	
  about	
  anywhere	
  via	
  mobile	
  phones,	
  laptops,	
  
tablets,	
  music	
  players,	
  ereaders,	
  and	
  so	
  on.	
  
-­‐ 	
  And	
  people	
  connect	
  with	
  others	
  from	
  almost	
  anywhere	
  via	
  tex*ng,	
  video	
  chaFng,	
  
Facebook,	
  TwiKer,	
  phone	
  calls,	
  email,	
  and	
  so	
  on	
  

-­‐ We	
  wanted	
  to	
  understand	
  how	
  all	
  these	
  changes	
  have	
  affected	
  the	
  way	
  people	
  stay	
  
connected	
  with	
  friends	
  and	
  family	
  while	
  they’re	
  mobile.	
  Most	
  ethnographic	
  studies	
  of	
  
mobile	
  communica*on	
  tend	
  to	
  focus	
  on	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  a	
  single	
  technology,	
  but	
  we	
  
wanted	
  to	
  see	
  how	
  people	
  use	
  the	
  whole	
  assortment	
  of	
  technologies	
  available	
  to	
  
maintain	
  an	
  ongoing	
  connec*on	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                    7	
  
We	
  had	
  in	
  mind	
  that	
  it	
  might	
  look	
  something	
  like	
  this.	
  Maybe	
  people	
  would	
  have	
  a	
  
face-­‐to-­‐face	
  interac*on	
  in	
  the	
  morning,	
  then	
  perhaps	
  exchange	
  emails	
  or	
  IMs,	
  then	
  
later	
  in	
  the	
  day	
  maybe	
  they	
  send	
  a	
  photo	
  or	
  text,	
  and	
  then	
  they	
  get	
  back	
  together	
  in	
  
person	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  day.	
  The	
  ques*on	
  was,	
  how	
  could	
  we	
  study	
  this?	
  The	
  best	
  
way,	
  of	
  course,	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  there	
  all	
  day	
  so	
  you	
  can	
  watch	
  it	
  when	
  it	
  happen,	
  but	
  this	
  is	
  
difficult.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                                      8	
  
Grinter	
  &	
  Eldridge	
  in	
  2003	
  were	
  interested	
  in	
  studying	
  tex*ng,	
  said	
  they’d	
  ideally	
  like	
  
to	
  “directly	
  observe”	
  teenagers’	
  text	
  messaging	
  prac*ces,	
  but	
  found	
  “direct	
  
observa*on	
  highly	
  imprac*cal,”	
  so	
  they	
  felt	
  they	
  had	
  to	
  use	
  indirect	
  approaches	
  such	
  
as	
  interviewing	
  and	
  logging.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                     9	
  
Two	
  years	
  lager	
  Ito	
  &	
  Okabe	
  also	
  noted	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  “notoriously	
  difficult	
  the	
  flee*ng	
  
par*culari*es	
  of	
  mobile	
  communica*on,”	
  so	
  they,	
  too,	
  studied	
  tex*ng	
  using	
  “second-­‐
hand”	
  methods.	
  




                                                                                                                                  10	
  
But	
  we	
  started	
  to	
  think	
  that	
  things	
  have	
  changed	
  since	
  those	
  studies	
  were	
  done.	
  
People	
  are	
  now	
  video	
  recording	
  everything,	
  everywhere	
  –	
  in	
  restaurants,	
  train	
  
sta*ons,	
  drug	
  stores,	
  out	
  on	
  the	
  street	
  –	
  so	
  that	
  they	
  can	
  post	
  their	
  videos	
  on	
  
YouTube.	
  So	
  we	
  though,	
  maybe	
  we	
  can	
  do	
  it	
  too.	
  Maybe	
  we	
  can	
  follow	
  people	
  
around	
  and	
  video	
  record	
  them	
  and	
  it	
  won’t	
  seem	
  that	
  remarkable	
  to	
  people.	
  We	
  
were	
  crazy	
  enough	
  to	
  try	
  it.	
  




                                                                                                                                   11	
  
We	
  found	
  four	
  groups	
  of	
  close	
  friends	
  and	
  family	
  and	
  observed	
  each	
  of	
  them	
  for	
  half	
  
a	
  day.	
  Three	
  were	
  in	
  different	
  parts	
  of	
  the	
  San	
  Francisco	
  Bay	
  Area,	
  and	
  one	
  was	
  split	
  
between	
  California	
  and	
  Texas.	
  To	
  observe	
  them,	
  we	
  had	
  a	
  different	
  researcher	
  follow	
  
each	
  person	
  in	
  the	
  group	
  as	
  they	
  went	
  about	
  their	
  ac*vi*es	
  over	
  the	
  same	
  *me	
  
period	
  and	
  we	
  watched	
  how	
  they	
  stayed	
  in	
  touch,	
  either	
  through	
  technology	
  or	
  in	
  
person.	
  So	
  we	
  saw	
  each	
  person’s	
  point	
  of	
  view	
  as	
  they	
  connected,	
  engaged,	
  and	
  
disconnected.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                           12	
  
These	
  images	
  give	
  you	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  how	
  this	
  worked.	
  In	
  this	
  case,	
  we	
  studied	
  two	
  
roommates	
  who	
  also	
  worked	
  together	
  –whom	
  we’re	
  calling	
  	
  Anita	
  and	
  Cathy.	
  I	
  was	
  
following	
  Anita,	
  and	
  afer	
  work	
  she	
  first	
  drove	
  to	
  a	
  shopping	
  center	
  where	
  she	
  would	
  
meet	
  up	
  with	
  Cathy.	
  




                                                                                                                                   13	
  
She	
  did	
  a	
  liKle	
  shopping,	
  some*mes	
  on	
  her	
  own,	
  some*mes	
  browsing	
  together	
  with	
  
her	
  friend	
  Cathy.	
  




                                                                                                                         14	
  
Then	
  they	
  came	
  together	
  to	
  pay	
  for	
  their	
  purchases.	
  You	
  can	
  see	
  Yutaka	
  there	
  video	
  
recording	
  Cathy	
  while	
  I	
  recorded	
  Anita.	
  




                                                                                                                                   15	
  
Then	
  they	
  went	
  to	
  dinner	
  in	
  a	
  restaurant	
  while	
  each	
  of	
  them	
  connected	
  with	
  other	
  
people	
  through	
  their	
  phones	
  




                                                                                                                                 16	
  
Then	
  they	
  split	
  up	
  as	
  Anita	
  drove	
  to	
  the	
  grocery	
  store	
  




                                                                                           17	
  
She	
  picked	
  up	
  some	
  supplies	
  for	
  the	
  apartment	
  




                                                                         18	
  
Then	
  returned	
  to	
  her	
  apartment	
  in	
  California	
  and	
  had	
  a	
  video	
  chat	
  with	
  some	
  friends	
  
in	
  New	
  York	
  




                                                                                                                                    19	
  
while	
  Cathy	
  listened	
  in	
  from	
  her	
  room	
  while	
  also	
  doing	
  her	
  own	
  thing	
  –	
  and	
  I’ll	
  be	
  
showing	
  you	
  a	
  video	
  of	
  this	
  shortly	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                                         20	
  
Then	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  night	
  they	
  got	
  together	
  to	
  watch	
  TV	
  while	
  surfing	
  also	
  the	
  net	
  
and	
  chaFng	
  with	
  friends	
  on	
  their	
  phones.	
  




                                                                                                                                              21	
  
What	
  did	
  we	
  find?	
  In	
  a	
  nutshell,	
  we	
  saw	
  a	
  collec*on	
  of	
  related	
  behaviors	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  
calling	
  channel	
  blending.	
  First	
  I’ll	
  define	
  channel	
  blending	
  and	
  then	
  I’ll	
  show	
  you	
  a	
  few	
  
examples.	
  	
  
	
  
Channel	
  blending	
  is	
  the	
  integra*on	
  of	
  interac*ons	
  and	
  content,	
  over	
  mul*ple	
  
channels	
  –	
  and	
  face-­‐to-­‐face	
  counts	
  as	
  a	
  channel	
  –	
  into	
  one	
  coherent	
  conversa*on.	
  
The	
  conversa*ons	
  usually	
  involve	
  both	
  local	
  and	
  remote	
  par*cipants	
  –	
  meaning	
  there	
  
are	
  mul*ple	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  room	
  communica*ng	
  with	
  one	
  or	
  more	
  people	
  in	
  a	
  remote	
  
loca*on.	
  Some*mes	
  people	
  blended	
  channels	
  not	
  all	
  at	
  once	
  but	
  as	
  they	
  carried	
  on	
  a	
  
conversa*on	
  over	
  *me.	
  




                                                                                                                                          22	
  
You	
  can	
  think	
  of	
  channel	
  blending	
  as	
  both	
  similar	
  to	
  and	
  the	
  opposite	
  of	
  mul*tasking.	
  
So	
  on	
  the	
  lef,	
  two	
  people	
  are	
  face-­‐to-­‐face	
  watching	
  a	
  basketball	
  game	
  while	
  video	
  
chaFng	
  with	
  two	
  others	
  who	
  are	
  also	
  watching	
  the	
  game.	
  They’re	
  looking	
  up	
  
informa*on	
  on	
  their	
  tablet	
  and	
  phone	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  game	
  and	
  maybe	
  chaFng	
  with	
  
someone	
  else	
  about	
  the	
  game	
  on	
  the	
  laptop.	
  So	
  they’re	
  using	
  many	
  media	
  but	
  
converging	
  them	
  into	
  one	
  coherent	
  conversa*on	
  about	
  the	
  basketball	
  game.	
  On	
  the	
  
right,	
  you	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  configura*on	
  of	
  media	
  but	
  now	
  there’s	
  just	
  one	
  person	
  in	
  
each	
  space	
  having	
  mul*ple	
  interac*ons.	
  The	
  local	
  person	
  is	
  watching	
  the	
  game	
  while	
  
also	
  video	
  chaFng	
  with	
  someone	
  on	
  the	
  laptop,	
  and	
  they’re	
  both	
  engaged	
  with	
  their	
  
phones	
  for	
  different	
  purposes,	
  and	
  the	
  local	
  person	
  is	
  also	
  text	
  chaFng	
  with	
  
someone	
  about	
  something	
  else.	
  	
  
	
  
They	
  key	
  difference	
  is	
  that	
  on	
  the	
  lef,	
  there’s	
  one	
  conversa*on	
  going	
  on,	
  and	
  on	
  the	
  
right	
  there	
  are	
  mul*ple	
  conversa*ons.	
  The	
  discussion	
  might	
  move	
  on	
  from	
  
basketball,	
  of	
  course,	
  but	
  everyone	
  would	
  be	
  included	
  as	
  the	
  conversa*on	
  moved	
  on	
  
to	
  new	
  topics.	
  	
  
	
  
In	
  the	
  channel	
  blending	
  case,	
  there	
  are	
  two	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  local	
  space,	
  and	
  two	
  in	
  the	
  
remote.	
  This	
  was	
  very	
  common	
  –	
  to	
  have	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  person	
  together	
  in	
  one	
  
place,	
  possibly	
  connec*ng	
  with	
  mul*ple	
  remote	
  others	
  in	
  another	
  space.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                            23	
  
There	
  were	
  two	
  categories	
  of	
  channel	
  blending.	
  	
  Some*mes	
  people	
  channel	
  blended	
  
interac(ons	
  –	
  bringing	
  together	
  mul*ple	
  people	
  across	
  mul*ple	
  channels.	
  So	
  here	
  it’s	
  
the	
  video	
  chaFng,	
  face-­‐to-­‐face,	
  and	
  text	
  chaFng	
  all	
  blended	
  together.	
  	
  
	
  
And	
  some*mes	
  they	
  channel	
  blended	
  content	
  from	
  mul*ple	
  sources	
  into	
  the	
  one	
  
conversa*on.	
  So	
  here	
  it’s	
  the	
  game	
  and	
  all	
  the	
  things	
  they’re	
  looking	
  up	
  on	
  their	
  
devices.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                  24	
  
And	
  of	
  course	
  you	
  could	
  have	
  blending	
  of	
  both	
  interac*ons	
  and	
  content	
  in	
  one	
  
conversa*on.	
  




                                                                                                                          25	
  
Now	
  I’d	
  like	
  to	
  show	
  you	
  a	
  case	
  of	
  channel	
  blending	
  an	
  interac(on	
  over	
  mul*ple	
  
channels.	
  	
  
	
  
It	
  involved	
  Anita	
  and	
  Cathy	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  back	
  at	
  their	
  apartment	
  in	
  California	
  and	
  
Anita	
  was	
  chaFng	
  with	
  two	
  friends	
  in	
  New	
  York.	
  In	
  the	
  adjacent	
  room,	
  Cathy	
  was	
  
packing	
  for	
  a	
  2-­‐month	
  trip	
  to	
  Dublin,	
  Ireland,	
  where	
  she	
  would	
  be	
  running	
  an	
  
internship	
  program	
  for	
  her	
  company.	
  Anita,	
  too,	
  would	
  soon	
  be	
  going	
  to	
  Los	
  Angeles	
  
to	
  run	
  another	
  internship	
  program	
  there.	
  Here	
  they’re	
  talking	
  about	
  the	
  upcoming	
  
travel.	
  In	
  it,	
  they	
  talk	
  about	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  movies	
  involving	
  danger	
  in	
  foreign	
  ci*es	
  
called	
  “Taken”	
  and	
  “Hos*le.”	
  	
  
	
  
You’ll	
  no*ce	
  how	
  Anita	
  acts	
  as	
  what	
  we	
  call	
  a	
  “pivot	
  person”	
  to	
  blends	
  the	
  two	
  
spaces	
  together,	
  relaying	
  comments	
  back	
  and	
  forth	
  and	
  keeping	
  everyone	
  involved	
  in	
  
the	
  one	
  conversa*on.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  [PLAY	
  CLIP]	
  
	
  
They	
  key	
  things	
  to	
  no*ce	
  here	
  are	
  how	
  Anita	
  is	
  interac*ng	
  with	
  people	
  remotely	
  and	
  
locally	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  *me,	
  and	
  she	
  is	
  integra*ng	
  the	
  two	
  “channels”	
  into	
  one	
  
conversa*on.	
  As	
  the	
  pivot	
  person,	
  she	
  some*mes	
  aKributes	
  Cathy’s	
  comments	
  to	
  
her,	
  as	
  when	
  she	
  says	
  “I	
  love	
  how	
  they	
  ask	
  as	
  if	
  you	
  have	
  a	
  choice”	
  or	
  at	
  the	
  end,	
  she	
  
just	
  integrates	
  Cathy’s	
  comments	
  as	
  her	
  own,	
  saying	
  “Anita	
  loves	
  LA!”	
  



                                                                                                                                                         26	
  
In	
  an	
  earlier	
  interac*on	
  at	
  dinner,	
  they	
  both	
  had	
  their	
  phones	
  out	
  and	
  they	
  both	
  
communicated	
  with	
  others	
  while	
  s*ll	
  talking	
  to	
  each	
  other.	
  Instead	
  of	
  carrying	
  on	
  
separate	
  conversa*ons	
  locally	
  and	
  remotely,	
  they	
  shared	
  with	
  each	
  other	
  what	
  they	
  
were	
  reading	
  or	
  typing	
  to	
  others,	
  blending	
  the	
  local	
  and	
  remote	
  spaces	
  into	
  one	
  
conversa*on.	
  
	
  
This	
  diagram	
  shows	
  their	
  conversa*on	
  over	
  the	
  9	
  minutes	
  before	
  the	
  waiter	
  took	
  
their	
  order.	
  The	
  orange	
  are	
  topics	
  they	
  generated	
  from	
  their	
  current	
  environment	
  
(things	
  about	
  the	
  restaurant	
  or	
  work	
  that	
  day),	
  and	
  the	
  blue	
  are	
  topics	
  that	
  emerged	
  
from	
  interac*ons	
  they	
  were	
  having	
  on	
  their	
  phones.	
  You	
  can	
  see	
  how	
  they	
  blended	
  
them	
  together	
  into	
  one	
  interac*on.	
  They	
  both	
  read	
  aloud	
  what	
  they	
  were	
  reading,	
  
and	
  verbalized	
  what	
  they	
  were	
  typing	
  as	
  they	
  texted	
  or	
  responded	
  to	
  a	
  tweet.	
  So	
  in	
  
this	
  case,	
  they	
  both	
  acted	
  as	
  pivot	
  people	
  for	
  their	
  interac*ons	
  with	
  different	
  remote	
  
others.	
  
	
  
We	
  also	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  interes*ng,	
  as	
  a	
  side	
  note,	
  that	
  their	
  conversa*on	
  –	
  with	
  its	
  
quick,	
  bursty	
  nature	
  about	
  many	
  different	
  topics	
  –	
  mirrored	
  exactly	
  the	
  type	
  of	
  online	
  
interac*ons	
  they	
  were	
  having	
  over	
  text	
  chat,	
  TwiKer,	
  Four	
  Square,	
  and	
  Facebook.	
  




                                                                                                                                        27	
  
This	
  next	
  example	
  shows	
  how	
  people	
  channel	
  blended	
  content	
  from	
  mul*ple	
  sources.	
  
In	
  this	
  case	
  they	
  were	
  all	
  face-­‐to-­‐face,	
  and	
  they	
  brought	
  in	
  content	
  from	
  their	
  phones	
  
and	
  a	
  laptop	
  as	
  the	
  conversa*on	
  unfolded.	
  This	
  example	
  is	
  interes*ng	
  because	
  it	
  also	
  
illustrates	
  channel	
  blending	
  over	
  *me.	
  	
  
	
  
These	
  three	
  people	
  are	
  musicians	
  and	
  a	
  few	
  days	
  before	
  this	
  conversa*on,	
  the	
  one	
  
on	
  the	
  lef	
  had	
  posted	
  a	
  link	
  to	
  a	
  recording	
  of	
  a	
  violin	
  concerto	
  that	
  was	
  played	
  by	
  a	
  
guy	
  who	
  at	
  the	
  *me	
  was	
  15	
  years	
  old.	
  It’s	
  a	
  very	
  difficult	
  piece	
  and	
  it’s	
  amazing	
  that	
  
someone	
  so	
  young	
  played	
  it	
  so	
  well,	
  but	
  there’s	
  one	
  sec*on	
  in	
  the	
  piece	
  where	
  he	
  
screws	
  up	
  and	
  has	
  trouble	
  hiFng	
  a	
  high	
  note.	
  It’s	
  a	
  funny	
  clip	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  squeaky	
  
notes.	
  They	
  had	
  all	
  played	
  the	
  clip	
  on	
  their	
  own	
  and	
  laughed,	
  but	
  now	
  that	
  they	
  got	
  
together,	
  it	
  comes	
  up	
  in	
  conversa*on	
  and	
  they	
  want	
  to	
  play	
  it	
  again.	
  So	
  you’ll	
  see	
  the	
  
woman	
  figuring	
  out	
  how	
  to	
  access	
  the	
  clip	
  on	
  her	
  phone,	
  with	
  help	
  from	
  the	
  others.	
  
	
  
Afer	
  this,	
  they	
  con*nue	
  to	
  discuss	
  musical	
  pieces	
  and	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  men	
  in	
  turn	
  brings	
  
out	
  their	
  phone	
  to	
  access	
  a	
  different	
  song	
  and	
  the	
  one	
  on	
  the	
  lef	
  opens	
  his	
  laptop	
  
when	
  he	
  can’t	
  find	
  it	
  on	
  his	
  phone.	
  Then	
  he	
  uses	
  it	
  to	
  find	
  a	
  picture	
  of	
  the	
  sheet	
  music	
  
on	
  Facebook.	
  
	
  
[PLAY	
  CLIP]	
  
	
  
So	
  each	
  used	
  their	
  own	
  devices	
  –	
  phones	
  and	
  laptops	
  –	
  to	
  access	
  content	
  based	
  on	
  	
  



                                                                                                                                                      28	
  
Those	
  are	
  just	
  a	
  few	
  of	
  the	
  many	
  examples	
  we	
  saw,	
  and	
  more	
  are	
  described	
  in	
  the	
  
paper.	
  So	
  when	
  we	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  our	
  original	
  concep*on	
  of	
  what	
  we	
  might	
  find	
  when	
  
watching	
  how	
  people	
  communicate	
  throughout	
  the	
  day,	
  we	
  discovered	
  that	
  instead	
  
of	
  looking	
  like	
  this…	
  




                                                                                                                                      29	
  
It	
  looks	
  much	
  more	
  like	
  this.	
  With	
  mul*ple	
  people	
  together	
  in	
  a	
  shared	
  space,	
  
communica*ng	
  with	
  mul*ple	
  remote	
  others	
  using	
  mul*ple	
  devices,	
  and	
  sharing	
  
different	
  types	
  of	
  content.	
  
	
  
We	
  want	
  to	
  be	
  clear	
  that	
  other	
  have	
  no*ced	
  different	
  aspects	
  of	
  this,	
  like	
  people	
  
carrying	
  on	
  a	
  conversa*on	
  with	
  both	
  local	
  and	
  remote	
  par*cipants,	
  or	
  carrying	
  on	
  a	
  
conversa*on	
  over	
  *me.	
  What	
  we’re	
  proposing	
  here	
  is	
  that	
  it’s	
  useful	
  to	
  think	
  of	
  these	
  
cases	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  larger	
  phenomenon	
  that	
  involves	
  blending	
  different	
  channels	
  into	
  
one	
  conversa*on.	
  We	
  think	
  this	
  may	
  happen	
  rela*vely	
  ofen,	
  and	
  it’s	
  likely	
  that	
  at	
  
least	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  cases	
  that	
  are	
  reported	
  as	
  mul*tasking	
  may	
  actually	
  be	
  channel	
  
blending.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                                      30	
  
Now	
  let’s	
  think	
  about	
  the	
  technology	
  people	
  are	
  currently	
  using.	
  Most	
  of	
  it	
  is	
  
designed	
  to	
  connect	
  just	
  two	
  people,	
  with	
  the	
  assump*on	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  each	
  alone	
  
with	
  a	
  single	
  device.	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  case	
  with	
  phone	
  calls.	
  




                                                                                                                              31	
  
And	
  with	
  tex*ng	
  or	
  IM.	
  




                                         32	
  
Other	
  technology	
  is	
  designed	
  for	
  many-­‐to-­‐many	
  interac*ons,	
  but	
  even	
  s*ll,	
  the	
  
assump*on	
  is	
  s*ll	
  that	
  each	
  one	
  is	
  alone	
  in	
  their	
  space	
  with	
  a	
  single	
  device,	
  not	
  
sharing	
  with	
  people	
  in	
  their	
  local	
  space.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                     33	
  
Yet,	
  what	
  was	
  saw	
  was	
  that	
  communica*on	
  looked	
  much	
  more	
  like	
  this.	
  Where	
  you	
  
have	
  mul*ple	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  space,	
  and	
  small	
  groups	
  of	
  people	
  are	
  trying	
  to	
  
connect	
  –	
  not	
  two	
  people,	
  but	
  more	
  like	
  3	
  or	
  4	
  or	
  5.	
  	
  
	
  
Here	
  the	
  two	
  men	
  are	
  on	
  the	
  phone,	
  and	
  she’s	
  chiming	
  in	
  as	
  he	
  relays	
  comments	
  
back	
  and	
  forth.	
  At	
  one	
  point	
  he	
  uses	
  his	
  computer	
  to	
  enter	
  in	
  some	
  informa*on	
  they	
  
give	
  him	
  




                                                                                                                                      34	
  
Here	
  she’s	
  IM-­‐ing	
  with	
  that	
  same	
  person	
  and	
  now	
  she’s	
  relaying	
  comments	
  back	
  and	
  
forth.	
  They	
  also	
  discuss	
  a	
  Words	
  With	
  Friends	
  game	
  they’ve	
  been	
  playing	
  on	
  their	
  
phones.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                35	
  
This	
  one	
  is	
  a	
  case	
  of	
  massive	
  content	
  blending	
  –	
  they	
  all	
  got	
  together	
  to	
  watch	
  a	
  
sequence	
  of	
  videos	
  projected	
  from	
  a	
  computer	
  onto	
  the	
  TV	
  while	
  also	
  looking	
  up	
  
related	
  informa*on	
  on	
  their	
  phones	
  and	
  laptops.	
  At	
  one	
  point	
  they	
  all	
  pulled	
  out	
  
their	
  phones	
  to	
  compare	
  their	
  sleep	
  cycles,	
  which	
  they’d	
  all	
  recorded	
  with	
  an	
  app.	
  	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                                        36	
  
In	
  this	
  case	
  this	
  woman	
  is	
  video	
  chaFng	
  with	
  her	
  husband	
  while	
  also	
  text	
  chaFng	
  
with	
  a	
  woman	
  in	
  this	
  IM	
  window	
  –	
  and	
  she’s	
  relaying	
  comments	
  back	
  and	
  forth	
  as	
  
they	
  work	
  together	
  to	
  coordinate	
  an	
  upcoming	
  visit,	
  which	
  they	
  had	
  all	
  discussed	
  in	
  
an	
  earlier	
  email.	
  




                                                                                                                                  37	
  
This	
  one	
  looks	
  simple	
  but	
  is	
  complicated.	
  The	
  daughter	
  is	
  talking	
  with	
  a	
  friend	
  about	
  
some	
  documents	
  on	
  her	
  screen,	
  which	
  he	
  had	
  emailed	
  her	
  and	
  is	
  asking	
  her	
  to	
  print	
  
out	
  and	
  bring	
  to	
  him	
  when	
  they	
  meet	
  up	
  later.	
  Meanwhile,	
  the	
  mother	
  is	
  talking	
  with	
  
another	
  daughter	
  –	
  who	
  this	
  daughter	
  had	
  just	
  been	
  talking	
  with	
  before	
  she	
  handed	
  
her	
  mother	
  the	
  phone.	
  




                                                                                                                                       38	
  
Finally,	
  these	
  three	
  sisters	
  are	
  having	
  a	
  three-­‐way	
  phone	
  call	
  while	
  two	
  of	
  them	
  also	
  
look	
  at	
  and	
  discuss	
  a	
  website	
  on	
  their	
  computers,	
  but	
  the	
  third	
  one	
  can’t	
  share	
  in	
  it.	
  
In	
  fact,	
  she	
  then	
  complains	
  about	
  the	
  problems	
  with	
  sharing	
  in	
  this	
  short	
  clip.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                             39	
  
40	
  
So	
  what	
  does	
  all	
  mean	
  for	
  technology	
  design?	
  If	
  people	
  are	
  doing	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  channel	
  
blending,	
  how	
  should	
  we	
  be	
  suppor*ng	
  it?	
  	
  
	
  
We	
  think	
  technology	
  needs	
  to	
  support	
  small	
  groups	
  of	
  people	
  –	
  not	
  just	
  one-­‐to-­‐one	
  
or	
  many-­‐to-­‐many	
  
	
  
Some	
  together,	
  some	
  apart	
  –	
  not	
  just	
  with	
  each	
  person	
  alone	
  in	
  separate	
  loca*ons	
  
	
  
With	
  fluid	
  levels	
  of	
  par*cipa*on	
  –	
  like	
  with	
  the	
  Pepper	
  Spray	
  example,	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  
same	
  space	
  ofen	
  monitor	
  conversa*ons	
  and	
  engage	
  to	
  different	
  degrees	
  at	
  different	
  
*mes	
  
	
  
As	
  they	
  show	
  &	
  tell	
  &	
  react	
  to	
  the	
  stories	
  of	
  their	
  lives,	
  since	
  that’s	
  what	
  people	
  are	
  
doing	
  
	
  
Using	
  mul*ple	
  media	
  and	
  devices.	
  People	
  aren’t	
  just	
  using	
  a	
  single	
  device	
  at	
  a	
  *me	
  or	
  
even	
  a	
  single	
  device	
  per	
  person	
  
	
  
Over	
  mul*ple	
  interac*ons	
  –	
  people	
  not	
  only	
  con*nue	
  their	
  conversa*ons	
  across	
  *me	
  
and	
  media,	
  they	
  also	
  want	
  to	
  re-­‐share	
  the	
  same	
  content	
  when	
  they	
  get	
  together	
  face	
  
to	
  face	
  or	
  afer	
  they	
  separate	
  and	
  reconnect	
  remotely.	
  	
  




                                                                                                                                                 41	
  
Once	
  upon	
  a	
  *me,	
  long,	
  long	
  ago,	
  people	
  communicated	
  and	
  socialized	
  in	
  curious	
  
ways.	
  	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                         42	
  

More Related Content

More from PARC, a Xerox company

Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...
Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...
Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening Remarks
CCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening RemarksCCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening Remarks
CCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening Remarks
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates & Roadmap
CCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates &  RoadmapCCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates &  Roadmap
CCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates & Roadmap
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN: A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN:  A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN:  A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN: A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCNCCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCN
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCNCCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCN
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a Hierarchical
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a HierarchicalCCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a Hierarchical
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a Hierarchical
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric Networking
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric NetworkingCCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric Networking
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric Networking
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issues
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issuesCCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issues
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issues
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R Networks
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R NetworksCCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R Networks
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R Networks
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and Pepys
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and PepysCCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and Pepys
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and Pepys
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar: a Content Router for High Speed Forwarding
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar:  a Content Router for High Speed ForwardingCCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar:  a Content Router for High Speed Forwarding
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar: a Content Router for High Speed Forwarding
PARC, a Xerox company
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFN
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFNCCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFN
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFN
PARC, a Xerox company
 

More from PARC, a Xerox company (20)

Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...
Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...
Enterprise Gamification – Exploiting People by Letting Them Have Fun [PARC Fo...
 
CCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening Remarks
CCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening RemarksCCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening Remarks
CCNxCon2012: Welcome: Event Kickoff & Opening Remarks
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates & Roadmap
CCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates &  RoadmapCCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates &  Roadmap
CCNxCon2012: Session 1: CCN Updates & Roadmap
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Content-Centric Approach for Requesting and Dissemi...
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN: A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN:  A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN:  A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: DASH over CCN: A CCN Use-Case for a SocialMedia Base...
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: A Distributed Server-based Conference Control and Man...
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCNCCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Embedding Cloud-Centric-Networking in CCN
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...
CCNxCon2012: Session 2: Network Management Framework for Future Internet Scen...
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCNCCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCN
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: FIB Optimizations in CCN
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a Hierarchical
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a HierarchicalCCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a Hierarchical
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Cache Coordination in a Hierarchical
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric Networking
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric NetworkingCCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric Networking
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Live Streaming with Content Centric Networking
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session:On a Novel Joint Replicating and Caching Strategy...
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: Parallelizing FIB Lookup in Content-Centric Netw...
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: ICN Architecture Evaluation — A Discussion on CC...
 
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...
CCNxCon2012: Poster Session: A Backward-Compatible CCNx Extension for Improve...
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issues
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issuesCCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issues
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Content-centric VANETs: routing and transport issues
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R Networks
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R NetworksCCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R Networks
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: NDN Applicability to V2V and V2R Networks
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and Pepys
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and PepysCCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and Pepys
CCNxCon2012: Session 3: Juxtaposition of CCN and Pepys
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar: a Content Router for High Speed Forwarding
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar:  a Content Router for High Speed ForwardingCCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar:  a Content Router for High Speed Forwarding
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: Caesar: a Content Router for High Speed Forwarding
 
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFN
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFNCCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFN
CCNxCon2012: Session 4: OSPFN
 

Recently uploaded

Unlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdf
Unlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdfUnlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdf
Unlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdf
Malak Abu Hammad
 
Choosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptx
Choosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptxChoosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptx
Choosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptx
Brandon Minnick, MBA
 
Uni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdf
Uni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdfUni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdf
Uni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdf
Uni Systems S.M.S.A.
 
Generating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and Milvus
Generating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and MilvusGenerating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and Milvus
Generating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and Milvus
Zilliz
 
Ocean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptx
Ocean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptxOcean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptx
Ocean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptx
SitimaJohn
 
Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024
Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024
Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024
Jason Packer
 
CAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on Blockchain
CAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on BlockchainCAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on Blockchain
CAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on Blockchain
Claudio Di Ciccio
 
UI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentation
UI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentationUI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentation
UI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentation
Wouter Lemaire
 
Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?
Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?
Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?
Speck&Tech
 
HCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAU
HCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAUHCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAU
HCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAU
panagenda
 
Removing Uninteresting Bytes in Software Fuzzing
Removing Uninteresting Bytes in Software FuzzingRemoving Uninteresting Bytes in Software Fuzzing
Removing Uninteresting Bytes in Software Fuzzing
Aftab Hussain
 
Things to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUU
Things to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUUThings to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUU
Things to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUU
FODUU
 
20240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 2024
20240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 202420240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 2024
20240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 2024
Matthew Sinclair
 
How to use Firebase Data Connect For Flutter
How to use Firebase Data Connect For FlutterHow to use Firebase Data Connect For Flutter
How to use Firebase Data Connect For Flutter
Daiki Mogmet Ito
 
みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...
みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...
みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...
名前 です男
 
UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6
UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6
UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6
DianaGray10
 
Microsoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdf
Microsoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdfMicrosoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdf
Microsoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdf
Uni Systems S.M.S.A.
 
TrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy Survey
TrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy SurveyTrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy Survey
TrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy Survey
TrustArc
 
Monitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdf
Monitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdfMonitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdf
Monitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdf
Tosin Akinosho
 
Building Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and Milvus
Building Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and MilvusBuilding Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and Milvus
Building Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and Milvus
Zilliz
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Unlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdf
Unlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdfUnlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdf
Unlock the Future of Search with MongoDB Atlas_ Vector Search Unleashed.pdf
 
Choosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptx
Choosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptxChoosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptx
Choosing The Best AWS Service For Your Website + API.pptx
 
Uni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdf
Uni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdfUni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdf
Uni Systems Copilot event_05062024_C.Vlachos.pdf
 
Generating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and Milvus
Generating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and MilvusGenerating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and Milvus
Generating privacy-protected synthetic data using Secludy and Milvus
 
Ocean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptx
Ocean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptxOcean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptx
Ocean lotus Threat actors project by John Sitima 2024 (1).pptx
 
Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024
Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024
Columbus Data & Analytics Wednesdays - June 2024
 
CAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on Blockchain
CAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on BlockchainCAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on Blockchain
CAKE: Sharing Slices of Confidential Data on Blockchain
 
UI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentation
UI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentationUI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentation
UI5 Controls simplified - UI5con2024 presentation
 
Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?
Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?
Cosa hanno in comune un mattoncino Lego e la backdoor XZ?
 
HCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAU
HCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAUHCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAU
HCL Notes and Domino License Cost Reduction in the World of DLAU
 
Removing Uninteresting Bytes in Software Fuzzing
Removing Uninteresting Bytes in Software FuzzingRemoving Uninteresting Bytes in Software Fuzzing
Removing Uninteresting Bytes in Software Fuzzing
 
Things to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUU
Things to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUUThings to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUU
Things to Consider When Choosing a Website Developer for your Website | FODUU
 
20240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 2024
20240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 202420240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 2024
20240605 QFM017 Machine Intelligence Reading List May 2024
 
How to use Firebase Data Connect For Flutter
How to use Firebase Data Connect For FlutterHow to use Firebase Data Connect For Flutter
How to use Firebase Data Connect For Flutter
 
みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...
みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...
みなさんこんにちはこれ何文字まで入るの?40文字以下不可とか本当に意味わからないけどこれ限界文字数書いてないからマジでやばい文字数いけるんじゃないの?えこ...
 
UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6
UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6
UiPath Test Automation using UiPath Test Suite series, part 6
 
Microsoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdf
Microsoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdfMicrosoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdf
Microsoft - Power Platform_G.Aspiotis.pdf
 
TrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy Survey
TrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy SurveyTrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy Survey
TrustArc Webinar - 2024 Global Privacy Survey
 
Monitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdf
Monitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdfMonitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdf
Monitoring and Managing Anomaly Detection on OpenShift.pdf
 
Building Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and Milvus
Building Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and MilvusBuilding Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and Milvus
Building Production Ready Search Pipelines with Spark and Milvus
 

Integrating Local and Remote Worlds Through Channel Blending

  • 1. Once  upon  a  *me,  long,  long  ago,  people  communicated  and  socialized  in  curious   ways.       1  
  • 2. They  wrote  whole  paragraphs  at  a  *me  –  some*mes  more  -­‐-­‐  and  sent  them  through   email,  delighted  that  the  recipient  might  read  their  message  that  very  day!     2  
  • 3. They  waited  un*l  they  had  taken  24  or  even  36  photos  before  geFng  them  printed   on  paper..     3  
  • 4. Then  they’d  get  together  with  people  in  person  and  tell  the  stories  depicted  in  the   photos.     4  
  • 5. And  some*mes,  also  when  they  were  in  the  same  room  together,  they  watched  a   single  video  for  two  whole  hours  at  a  stretch.       5  
  • 6. People  listened  to  12  songs  by  the  same  ar*st  -­‐-­‐  all  in  a  row  -­‐-­‐  stored  on  preKy  silver   disks.     6  
  • 7. Now,  of  course,  the  world  has  changed.     -­‐   Content  now  comes  in  bite-­‐size  pieces:  status  updates  and  text  tweets,  3  minute   videos,  and  people  send  one  photo  at  a  *me.   -­‐   People  capture  their  experiences  in  many  more  ways  than  just  photos  and  videos.   Now  they  track  their  loca*ons,  their  exercise  and  food  intake,  their  game  playing,   even  their  sleeping  paKerns.     -­‐   They  access  this  content  from  just  about  anywhere  via  mobile  phones,  laptops,   tablets,  music  players,  ereaders,  and  so  on.   -­‐   And  people  connect  with  others  from  almost  anywhere  via  tex*ng,  video  chaFng,   Facebook,  TwiKer,  phone  calls,  email,  and  so  on   -­‐ We  wanted  to  understand  how  all  these  changes  have  affected  the  way  people  stay   connected  with  friends  and  family  while  they’re  mobile.  Most  ethnographic  studies  of   mobile  communica*on  tend  to  focus  on  the  use  of  a  single  technology,  but  we   wanted  to  see  how  people  use  the  whole  assortment  of  technologies  available  to   maintain  an  ongoing  connec*on  over  the  course  of  the  day.     7  
  • 8. We  had  in  mind  that  it  might  look  something  like  this.  Maybe  people  would  have  a   face-­‐to-­‐face  interac*on  in  the  morning,  then  perhaps  exchange  emails  or  IMs,  then   later  in  the  day  maybe  they  send  a  photo  or  text,  and  then  they  get  back  together  in   person  at  the  end  of  the  day.  The  ques*on  was,  how  could  we  study  this?  The  best   way,  of  course,  is  to  be  there  all  day  so  you  can  watch  it  when  it  happen,  but  this  is   difficult.     8  
  • 9. Grinter  &  Eldridge  in  2003  were  interested  in  studying  tex*ng,  said  they’d  ideally  like   to  “directly  observe”  teenagers’  text  messaging  prac*ces,  but  found  “direct   observa*on  highly  imprac*cal,”  so  they  felt  they  had  to  use  indirect  approaches  such   as  interviewing  and  logging.     9  
  • 10. Two  years  lager  Ito  &  Okabe  also  noted  that  it  is  “notoriously  difficult  the  flee*ng   par*culari*es  of  mobile  communica*on,”  so  they,  too,  studied  tex*ng  using  “second-­‐ hand”  methods.   10  
  • 11. But  we  started  to  think  that  things  have  changed  since  those  studies  were  done.   People  are  now  video  recording  everything,  everywhere  –  in  restaurants,  train   sta*ons,  drug  stores,  out  on  the  street  –  so  that  they  can  post  their  videos  on   YouTube.  So  we  though,  maybe  we  can  do  it  too.  Maybe  we  can  follow  people   around  and  video  record  them  and  it  won’t  seem  that  remarkable  to  people.  We   were  crazy  enough  to  try  it.   11  
  • 12. We  found  four  groups  of  close  friends  and  family  and  observed  each  of  them  for  half   a  day.  Three  were  in  different  parts  of  the  San  Francisco  Bay  Area,  and  one  was  split   between  California  and  Texas.  To  observe  them,  we  had  a  different  researcher  follow   each  person  in  the  group  as  they  went  about  their  ac*vi*es  over  the  same  *me   period  and  we  watched  how  they  stayed  in  touch,  either  through  technology  or  in   person.  So  we  saw  each  person’s  point  of  view  as  they  connected,  engaged,  and   disconnected.     12  
  • 13. These  images  give  you  a  sense  of  how  this  worked.  In  this  case,  we  studied  two   roommates  who  also  worked  together  –whom  we’re  calling    Anita  and  Cathy.  I  was   following  Anita,  and  afer  work  she  first  drove  to  a  shopping  center  where  she  would   meet  up  with  Cathy.   13  
  • 14. She  did  a  liKle  shopping,  some*mes  on  her  own,  some*mes  browsing  together  with   her  friend  Cathy.   14  
  • 15. Then  they  came  together  to  pay  for  their  purchases.  You  can  see  Yutaka  there  video   recording  Cathy  while  I  recorded  Anita.   15  
  • 16. Then  they  went  to  dinner  in  a  restaurant  while  each  of  them  connected  with  other   people  through  their  phones   16  
  • 17. Then  they  split  up  as  Anita  drove  to  the  grocery  store   17  
  • 18. She  picked  up  some  supplies  for  the  apartment   18  
  • 19. Then  returned  to  her  apartment  in  California  and  had  a  video  chat  with  some  friends   in  New  York   19  
  • 20. while  Cathy  listened  in  from  her  room  while  also  doing  her  own  thing  –  and  I’ll  be   showing  you  a  video  of  this  shortly     20  
  • 21. Then  at  the  end  of  the  night  they  got  together  to  watch  TV  while  surfing  also  the  net   and  chaFng  with  friends  on  their  phones.   21  
  • 22. What  did  we  find?  In  a  nutshell,  we  saw  a  collec*on  of  related  behaviors  that  we  are   calling  channel  blending.  First  I’ll  define  channel  blending  and  then  I’ll  show  you  a  few   examples.       Channel  blending  is  the  integra*on  of  interac*ons  and  content,  over  mul*ple   channels  –  and  face-­‐to-­‐face  counts  as  a  channel  –  into  one  coherent  conversa*on.   The  conversa*ons  usually  involve  both  local  and  remote  par*cipants  –  meaning  there   are  mul*ple  people  in  the  room  communica*ng  with  one  or  more  people  in  a  remote   loca*on.  Some*mes  people  blended  channels  not  all  at  once  but  as  they  carried  on  a   conversa*on  over  *me.   22  
  • 23. You  can  think  of  channel  blending  as  both  similar  to  and  the  opposite  of  mul*tasking.   So  on  the  lef,  two  people  are  face-­‐to-­‐face  watching  a  basketball  game  while  video   chaFng  with  two  others  who  are  also  watching  the  game.  They’re  looking  up   informa*on  on  their  tablet  and  phone  related  to  the  game  and  maybe  chaFng  with   someone  else  about  the  game  on  the  laptop.  So  they’re  using  many  media  but   converging  them  into  one  coherent  conversa*on  about  the  basketball  game.  On  the   right,  you  have  the  same  configura*on  of  media  but  now  there’s  just  one  person  in   each  space  having  mul*ple  interac*ons.  The  local  person  is  watching  the  game  while   also  video  chaFng  with  someone  on  the  laptop,  and  they’re  both  engaged  with  their   phones  for  different  purposes,  and  the  local  person  is  also  text  chaFng  with   someone  about  something  else.       They  key  difference  is  that  on  the  lef,  there’s  one  conversa*on  going  on,  and  on  the   right  there  are  mul*ple  conversa*ons.  The  discussion  might  move  on  from   basketball,  of  course,  but  everyone  would  be  included  as  the  conversa*on  moved  on   to  new  topics.       In  the  channel  blending  case,  there  are  two  people  in  the  local  space,  and  two  in  the   remote.  This  was  very  common  –  to  have  more  than  one  person  together  in  one   place,  possibly  connec*ng  with  mul*ple  remote  others  in  another  space.     23  
  • 24. There  were  two  categories  of  channel  blending.    Some*mes  people  channel  blended   interac(ons  –  bringing  together  mul*ple  people  across  mul*ple  channels.  So  here  it’s   the  video  chaFng,  face-­‐to-­‐face,  and  text  chaFng  all  blended  together.       And  some*mes  they  channel  blended  content  from  mul*ple  sources  into  the  one   conversa*on.  So  here  it’s  the  game  and  all  the  things  they’re  looking  up  on  their   devices.     24  
  • 25. And  of  course  you  could  have  blending  of  both  interac*ons  and  content  in  one   conversa*on.   25  
  • 26. Now  I’d  like  to  show  you  a  case  of  channel  blending  an  interac(on  over  mul*ple   channels.       It  involved  Anita  and  Cathy  when  they  were  back  at  their  apartment  in  California  and   Anita  was  chaFng  with  two  friends  in  New  York.  In  the  adjacent  room,  Cathy  was   packing  for  a  2-­‐month  trip  to  Dublin,  Ireland,  where  she  would  be  running  an   internship  program  for  her  company.  Anita,  too,  would  soon  be  going  to  Los  Angeles   to  run  another  internship  program  there.  Here  they’re  talking  about  the  upcoming   travel.  In  it,  they  talk  about  a  couple  of  movies  involving  danger  in  foreign  ci*es   called  “Taken”  and  “Hos*le.”       You’ll  no*ce  how  Anita  acts  as  what  we  call  a  “pivot  person”  to  blends  the  two   spaces  together,  relaying  comments  back  and  forth  and  keeping  everyone  involved  in   the  one  conversa*on.        [PLAY  CLIP]     They  key  things  to  no*ce  here  are  how  Anita  is  interac*ng  with  people  remotely  and   locally  at  the  same  *me,  and  she  is  integra*ng  the  two  “channels”  into  one   conversa*on.  As  the  pivot  person,  she  some*mes  aKributes  Cathy’s  comments  to   her,  as  when  she  says  “I  love  how  they  ask  as  if  you  have  a  choice”  or  at  the  end,  she   just  integrates  Cathy’s  comments  as  her  own,  saying  “Anita  loves  LA!”   26  
  • 27. In  an  earlier  interac*on  at  dinner,  they  both  had  their  phones  out  and  they  both   communicated  with  others  while  s*ll  talking  to  each  other.  Instead  of  carrying  on   separate  conversa*ons  locally  and  remotely,  they  shared  with  each  other  what  they   were  reading  or  typing  to  others,  blending  the  local  and  remote  spaces  into  one   conversa*on.     This  diagram  shows  their  conversa*on  over  the  9  minutes  before  the  waiter  took   their  order.  The  orange  are  topics  they  generated  from  their  current  environment   (things  about  the  restaurant  or  work  that  day),  and  the  blue  are  topics  that  emerged   from  interac*ons  they  were  having  on  their  phones.  You  can  see  how  they  blended   them  together  into  one  interac*on.  They  both  read  aloud  what  they  were  reading,   and  verbalized  what  they  were  typing  as  they  texted  or  responded  to  a  tweet.  So  in   this  case,  they  both  acted  as  pivot  people  for  their  interac*ons  with  different  remote   others.     We  also  thought  it  was  interes*ng,  as  a  side  note,  that  their  conversa*on  –  with  its   quick,  bursty  nature  about  many  different  topics  –  mirrored  exactly  the  type  of  online   interac*ons  they  were  having  over  text  chat,  TwiKer,  Four  Square,  and  Facebook.   27  
  • 28. This  next  example  shows  how  people  channel  blended  content  from  mul*ple  sources.   In  this  case  they  were  all  face-­‐to-­‐face,  and  they  brought  in  content  from  their  phones   and  a  laptop  as  the  conversa*on  unfolded.  This  example  is  interes*ng  because  it  also   illustrates  channel  blending  over  *me.       These  three  people  are  musicians  and  a  few  days  before  this  conversa*on,  the  one   on  the  lef  had  posted  a  link  to  a  recording  of  a  violin  concerto  that  was  played  by  a   guy  who  at  the  *me  was  15  years  old.  It’s  a  very  difficult  piece  and  it’s  amazing  that   someone  so  young  played  it  so  well,  but  there’s  one  sec*on  in  the  piece  where  he   screws  up  and  has  trouble  hiFng  a  high  note.  It’s  a  funny  clip  because  of  the  squeaky   notes.  They  had  all  played  the  clip  on  their  own  and  laughed,  but  now  that  they  got   together,  it  comes  up  in  conversa*on  and  they  want  to  play  it  again.  So  you’ll  see  the   woman  figuring  out  how  to  access  the  clip  on  her  phone,  with  help  from  the  others.     Afer  this,  they  con*nue  to  discuss  musical  pieces  and  each  of  the  men  in  turn  brings   out  their  phone  to  access  a  different  song  and  the  one  on  the  lef  opens  his  laptop   when  he  can’t  find  it  on  his  phone.  Then  he  uses  it  to  find  a  picture  of  the  sheet  music   on  Facebook.     [PLAY  CLIP]     So  each  used  their  own  devices  –  phones  and  laptops  –  to  access  content  based  on     28  
  • 29. Those  are  just  a  few  of  the  many  examples  we  saw,  and  more  are  described  in  the   paper.  So  when  we  go  back  to  our  original  concep*on  of  what  we  might  find  when   watching  how  people  communicate  throughout  the  day,  we  discovered  that  instead   of  looking  like  this…   29  
  • 30. It  looks  much  more  like  this.  With  mul*ple  people  together  in  a  shared  space,   communica*ng  with  mul*ple  remote  others  using  mul*ple  devices,  and  sharing   different  types  of  content.     We  want  to  be  clear  that  other  have  no*ced  different  aspects  of  this,  like  people   carrying  on  a  conversa*on  with  both  local  and  remote  par*cipants,  or  carrying  on  a   conversa*on  over  *me.  What  we’re  proposing  here  is  that  it’s  useful  to  think  of  these   cases  as  part  of  a  larger  phenomenon  that  involves  blending  different  channels  into   one  conversa*on.  We  think  this  may  happen  rela*vely  ofen,  and  it’s  likely  that  at   least  some  of  the  cases  that  are  reported  as  mul*tasking  may  actually  be  channel   blending.         30  
  • 31. Now  let’s  think  about  the  technology  people  are  currently  using.  Most  of  it  is   designed  to  connect  just  two  people,  with  the  assump*on  that  they  are  each  alone   with  a  single  device.  This  is  the  case  with  phone  calls.   31  
  • 32. And  with  tex*ng  or  IM.   32  
  • 33. Other  technology  is  designed  for  many-­‐to-­‐many  interac*ons,  but  even  s*ll,  the   assump*on  is  s*ll  that  each  one  is  alone  in  their  space  with  a  single  device,  not   sharing  with  people  in  their  local  space.     33  
  • 34. Yet,  what  was  saw  was  that  communica*on  looked  much  more  like  this.  Where  you   have  mul*ple  people  in  the  same  space,  and  small  groups  of  people  are  trying  to   connect  –  not  two  people,  but  more  like  3  or  4  or  5.       Here  the  two  men  are  on  the  phone,  and  she’s  chiming  in  as  he  relays  comments   back  and  forth.  At  one  point  he  uses  his  computer  to  enter  in  some  informa*on  they   give  him   34  
  • 35. Here  she’s  IM-­‐ing  with  that  same  person  and  now  she’s  relaying  comments  back  and   forth.  They  also  discuss  a  Words  With  Friends  game  they’ve  been  playing  on  their   phones.     35  
  • 36. This  one  is  a  case  of  massive  content  blending  –  they  all  got  together  to  watch  a   sequence  of  videos  projected  from  a  computer  onto  the  TV  while  also  looking  up   related  informa*on  on  their  phones  and  laptops.  At  one  point  they  all  pulled  out   their  phones  to  compare  their  sleep  cycles,  which  they’d  all  recorded  with  an  app.       36  
  • 37. In  this  case  this  woman  is  video  chaFng  with  her  husband  while  also  text  chaFng   with  a  woman  in  this  IM  window  –  and  she’s  relaying  comments  back  and  forth  as   they  work  together  to  coordinate  an  upcoming  visit,  which  they  had  all  discussed  in   an  earlier  email.   37  
  • 38. This  one  looks  simple  but  is  complicated.  The  daughter  is  talking  with  a  friend  about   some  documents  on  her  screen,  which  he  had  emailed  her  and  is  asking  her  to  print   out  and  bring  to  him  when  they  meet  up  later.  Meanwhile,  the  mother  is  talking  with   another  daughter  –  who  this  daughter  had  just  been  talking  with  before  she  handed   her  mother  the  phone.   38  
  • 39. Finally,  these  three  sisters  are  having  a  three-­‐way  phone  call  while  two  of  them  also   look  at  and  discuss  a  website  on  their  computers,  but  the  third  one  can’t  share  in  it.   In  fact,  she  then  complains  about  the  problems  with  sharing  in  this  short  clip.     39  
  • 40. 40  
  • 41. So  what  does  all  mean  for  technology  design?  If  people  are  doing  a  lot  of  channel   blending,  how  should  we  be  suppor*ng  it?       We  think  technology  needs  to  support  small  groups  of  people  –  not  just  one-­‐to-­‐one   or  many-­‐to-­‐many     Some  together,  some  apart  –  not  just  with  each  person  alone  in  separate  loca*ons     With  fluid  levels  of  par*cipa*on  –  like  with  the  Pepper  Spray  example,  people  in  the   same  space  ofen  monitor  conversa*ons  and  engage  to  different  degrees  at  different   *mes     As  they  show  &  tell  &  react  to  the  stories  of  their  lives,  since  that’s  what  people  are   doing     Using  mul*ple  media  and  devices.  People  aren’t  just  using  a  single  device  at  a  *me  or   even  a  single  device  per  person     Over  mul*ple  interac*ons  –  people  not  only  con*nue  their  conversa*ons  across  *me   and  media,  they  also  want  to  re-­‐share  the  same  content  when  they  get  together  face   to  face  or  afer  they  separate  and  reconnect  remotely.     41  
  • 42. Once  upon  a  *me,  long,  long  ago,  people  communicated  and  socialized  in  curious   ways.       42