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George Herbert
“ Living well is the best revenge.”
1593-1633
Mohammad.S.Moi’n
&
Alireza Alibakian
Fall -2016
George Herbert
Born & death:Wales city in the United Kingdom 1593-1633 died of
consumption
Education: University of Cambridge 1609-1616 MA.
Posts & Career: Poet, public orator and priest Starts working in the
church After the death of king Jane
Fame & Reputation: The talk of the countryside in the last three
years of his life. preached and prayed, visited the poor, stay at the bed of dying
Notable Work: “ His poems were published in “ The Temple” the
book was published after his death by his friend.
Herbert as a poet
Style : “ Metaphysical”
characteristics :
Herbert is quite, inward, subtle and neat.
His spiritual feeling is pure, fresh and free.
He is never flashy, nor even strongly dramatic; he is devoted to the
quiet middle way.
His quiet is never the quiet of emotional poverty or torpor(laziness).
Herbert’s poetry is believed to be similar to the parish church, which
is open for the humblest and simplest person to enter and read
His poems have been characterized by a deep religious devotion
Donne & Herbert
Similarities
They lived in the same time.
John Donne & George Herbert are the same in using :
‘Metaphysics ‘
‘Conceited and Ingenious Imagery.’
Donne & Herbert
Differences
Herbert : Shaped poems or concert Eastern Wing, the Alter
Donne : The tone of his poems seems to be darker Go and catch a
falling star
Donne may be described as the poet of religious doubt, of strain or
anxiety.
Herbert is the poet of religious faith of submission of acceptance.
Donne expresses his meaning through intellectual terms, and
answers them in the same way.
Herbert uses emotion to convey the meaning .
Herbert draw his metaphors from everyday experience, simple
imagery but Donne uses a complex imagery.
Selected Poems
Virtue
Easter wings
Man
The Collar
Critical Analysis of Virtue1-5
• Interpretation Of The Title
Base on that title; namely “virtue”, so in my mind appearance the human attitude
like friendly, care each other, beloved by God and a lot of people around us.
• Theme
‘ Virtue is never die.’
Because that poet is trying to convey kindness, “and all must die like day of the first
stanza, the rose of the second stanza, and the spring of the third,only a sweet and
virtuous soul that can be permanent”.
Critical Analysis of Virtue 2-5
• Summary Of The Poem
George Herbert's poem entitled, "Virtue," uses images of things that are
"sweet" and full of life, and couples them with the dark side of life: death.
There are spring day, beautiful day, beautiful rose all of them wrap in a
beautiful box but they are lie to be beautiful forever and actually they also die
but just only a sweet and virtuous soul will be permanent.
Critical Analysis of Virtue3-5
Interpretation Of The Poem
• First stanza
First stanza of the poem tell us about weather is not permanent; although, the day that very cool, bright, sweet
but if night come the beautiful of day will lost soon because they not constant.
• Second stanza
Rose is the symbol of breathy and root is symbol of power. The second stanza tell us about the breathy and
the power but finally it will lost and die.
• Third stanza
Third stanza tell us about lying or false. There are sweet spring day, sweet day, and beautiful rose that wrap in
beautiful box but actually they are lie to be beautiful and life forever. And they also die.
• Fourth stanza
The fourth stanza tell us about something that never die namely virtue. Although our body in the grave but our
soul still remember from many people if we always do something right to other people or to other Allah’s
creature.
Critical Analysis of Virtue4-5
Atmosphere
• Sadness
The poet used descriptions of sadness with cry, die.
Point of view
• Nature
Why? Because that poet view from nature,from the beginning until the ending.
Figurative Language
• Allegory is the comparison a situation with several figure of speech.
The bridal of the earth and sky-
Critical Analysis of Virtue5-5
The value
• Moral value
That poem convey about human behavior or character namely virtue.
The message
• The message that can we get in that poetry are, the people will always remember about our kindness
although we passed away, and as we know wickedness, anger, etc will defeated by kindness.
Because wickedness and kindness can not united. The kindness or virtue is permanent and the
wickedness, anger is impermanent. So keep our relation with God, nature, and human. And
remember that all of kindness come from Allah.
ll
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(1-8)
• Why is it famous ?
1- shaped like bird wings
2- Explains complex ideas of christianity
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(2-8)
• Interpretation Of The Title
“Easter Wings “
Easter: A christian holy day in March or April when they remember the
death of christ and his return to life.
It will give them the chance to over come sins by believing in christ
and becoming like him.
In a nutshell, according to christianity christ’s sacrifice, life us out of
sin and sadness like a pair of wings.
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(3-8)
• Themes
Religion
Religion Quotes
Lord, who createdst man in wealth and storeThou foolishly he lost the same (1-2)
Weakness
Weakness Quotes
Though foolishly he lost the same (2)
Sin
Sin Quotes
Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store,Though foolishly he lost the same (1-2)
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(4-8)
• Summary Of The Poem
1. This poem is a back and forth between despair and hope.
2. In the first half of each stanzas, Herbert describes the despairs and in the second
half of each he finds the hope.
3. The first two lines of the poem are referring to Adam, as the first man and the
first loser, because of Adam Herbert also has it bad. as you can see in the second
stanza he uses words like sad, shame, sickness and sin to show that they wore him
down into nothing.
4. When you think there is no way out of this endless darkness, Herbert asks to rise
up with the Easter and resurrected Christ.
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(5-8)
Interpretation Of The Poem
Line 1
Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store,
• Addressing God directly, Herbert begins at, well, the beginning. See, way back in Garden of
Eden times, God created humans and gave them a pretty sweet life. Since God probably didn't
forget this, the speaker isn't so much reminding him of the good ole days as just thinking aloud.
• "Wealth" here doesn't literally mean dollars in the bank. Along with "store," it refers more generally
to abundance. Adam had all he needed: food, wildlife, a wife.
Lines 2-5
Though foolishly he lost the same,

Decaying more and more,

Till he became

Most poor
• "Foolishly" Adam lost all his good stuff.
• This is Bad News for the first man. In lines 3-5 Herbert paints a grim picture of how everything went
bad.
"Decaying" means to be slowly destroyed.
as Adam gets poorer and poorer, the lines get smaller and smaller until "most poor" (5)
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(6-8)Lines 6-8
With thee

O let me rise

As larks, harmoniously,
• The speaker's still having the heart-to-heart with God at line 6, but now the speaker himself enters
the poem and we start getting me's instead of he's.
• We also get a new tense. Adam and his long-ago problems were narrated in past tense, but now
we get a present-tense speaker speaking passionately and hopefully about the future. Adam may
have ended up in a rough place, but our speaker, for one, is determined to ask for something better.
This is also where Easter enters the poem for the first time. Notice that the speaker wants to rise "with
thee," the "thee" here being "God."
Lines 9-10
And sing this day thy victories:

Then shall the fall further the flight in me.
• The speaker has just asked God to let him rise harmoniously like a lark and now he formalizes his
request for a bit of music.
• He wants to be allowed to sing his worship, in particular, the "victories" of God
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(7-8)Line 11
My tender age in sorrow did begin:
• And we're back to Adam. The speaker was born into "sorrow" because he and all other humans inherit Adam's
sin, according to the teachings of Christianity that Herbert adhered to. "Tender age" here just means "youth."
• Sounds like a pretty raw deal, right? You've done nothing, but as soon as you're born you're slapped with some
ancient dead guy's mistakes. No wonder the speaker wants to rise out of the sadness and pain and sin that
Adam left us.
Lines 12-15
And still with sicknesses and shame

Thou didst so punish sin,

That I became

Most thin.
• Just like in the first stanza, Herbert follows the downward spiral of human life—only this time, he's describing his
own life, not Adam's.
• Bad to begin with, life keeps getting worse as God punishes both the speaker's own sins and the sin he
inherited from Adam.
• As he describes in the poem, accumulated sickness and shame eventually whittle away at the speaker
physically and spiritually until at line 15 he becomes "most thin."
• Once again the poem's form reflects the content: the lines get littler as Herbert becomes thinner, with lines 15
and 16 petering out into 2 syllables each.
• Check out the sibilant bonanza of S's in lines 12-13: "still," "sicknesses" (that's 4 S's in one word), "shame,"
"didst," "so," "punish," "sin."
• Tricky Herbert's at it again. Just like its line 5 twin, line 15 smacks us upside the head with some poetic irony.
We've got "most" but then we get "thin," underlining the all-round bummer nature of the situation.
Critical Analysis of Easter Wings
(8-8)
Lines 16-18
With thee

Let me combine,

And feel this day thy victory:
• Line 16, an exact repeat of line 6, again marks the turn around the happy corner. The speaker may be sinful, ashamed,
and thin, but now things are looking up. The fact that these cheery words are "with thee" emphasizes how central God is
to these improvements.
• The switch from past tense to the hypothetical future in line 17 ("let me") marks the speaker's transformation from
passive victim of the past to awesome flying bird-man of the future.
Lines 19-20
For, if I imp my wing on thine,

Affliction shall advance the flight in me.
• The speaker explains his meaning more clearly in line 19, turning again to his feathered friends. This time, however, he
uses hawks instead of larks and, instead of just rising with God, he asks for an extra boost: he wants to "imp" his wing to
God's. 
• What the heck is "to imp"? If you keep pet hawks (we don't either, since it's no longer the 17th century), you might know
that it's a technical term meaning to repair a damaged feather by attaching part of a new feather. This implies (eh? eh?)
that the speaker is too damaged by sin, too thin and sick, to fly properly on his own. He needs some of God's feathers to
strengthen him.
• In line 20 he reaches a similar conclusion to line 10. Just as Adam's fall increased the distance of his flight in stanza 1,
now his own affliction (his sin and God's punishment) lengthens his flight. "Advance" here means "increase."
Metaphysical Poetry & Metaphysical Conceit
Metaphysical poetry is concerned with the whole experience of man, but the intelligence,
learning and seriousness of the poets means that the poetry is about the profound areas of
experience especially - about love, romantic and sensual; about man's relationship with
God - the eternal perspective, and, to a less extent, about pleasure, learning and art.
The metaphysical conceit, associated with the Metaphysical poets of the 17th century, is
a more intricate and intellectual device. It usually sets up an analogy between one
entity's spiritual qualities and an object in the physical world and sometimes controls
the whole structure of the poem.
Shape Poem
Concrete poetry—sometimes also called ‘shape poetry’—is
poetry whose visual appearance matches the topic of the poem.
The words form shapes which illustrate the poem’s subject as a
picture, as well as through their literal meaning.
Vertue
(page-249)
Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright,
The bridal of the earth and sky:
The dew shall weep thy fall to night;
For thou must die.
Sweet rose, whose hue angry and brave
Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye:
Thy root is ever in its grave
And thou must die.
Sweet spring, full of sweet days and roses,
A box where sweets compacted lie;
My music shows ye have your closes,
And all must die.
Onely a sweet and virtuous soul,
Like season’d timber, never gives;
But though the whole world turn to coal,
Then chiefly lives.
George Herbert
Easter Wings (page-253)
Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store,
Though foolishly he lost the same,
Decaying more and more,
Till he became
Most poor:
With thee
O let me rise
As larks, harmoniously,
And sing this day thy victories:
Then shall the fall further the flight in me.
My tender age in sorrow did begin:
And still with sicknesses and shame
Thou didst so punish sin,
That I became
Most thin.
With thee
Let me combine,
And feel this day thy victory:
For, if I imp my wing on thine,
Affliction shall advance the flight in me.

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George herbert

  • 1. George Herbert “ Living well is the best revenge.” 1593-1633 Mohammad.S.Moi’n & Alireza Alibakian Fall -2016
  • 2. George Herbert Born & death:Wales city in the United Kingdom 1593-1633 died of consumption Education: University of Cambridge 1609-1616 MA. Posts & Career: Poet, public orator and priest Starts working in the church After the death of king Jane Fame & Reputation: The talk of the countryside in the last three years of his life. preached and prayed, visited the poor, stay at the bed of dying Notable Work: “ His poems were published in “ The Temple” the book was published after his death by his friend.
  • 3. Herbert as a poet Style : “ Metaphysical” characteristics : Herbert is quite, inward, subtle and neat. His spiritual feeling is pure, fresh and free. He is never flashy, nor even strongly dramatic; he is devoted to the quiet middle way. His quiet is never the quiet of emotional poverty or torpor(laziness). Herbert’s poetry is believed to be similar to the parish church, which is open for the humblest and simplest person to enter and read His poems have been characterized by a deep religious devotion
  • 4. Donne & Herbert Similarities They lived in the same time. John Donne & George Herbert are the same in using : ‘Metaphysics ‘ ‘Conceited and Ingenious Imagery.’
  • 5. Donne & Herbert Differences Herbert : Shaped poems or concert Eastern Wing, the Alter Donne : The tone of his poems seems to be darker Go and catch a falling star Donne may be described as the poet of religious doubt, of strain or anxiety. Herbert is the poet of religious faith of submission of acceptance. Donne expresses his meaning through intellectual terms, and answers them in the same way. Herbert uses emotion to convey the meaning . Herbert draw his metaphors from everyday experience, simple imagery but Donne uses a complex imagery.
  • 7. Critical Analysis of Virtue1-5 • Interpretation Of The Title Base on that title; namely “virtue”, so in my mind appearance the human attitude like friendly, care each other, beloved by God and a lot of people around us. • Theme ‘ Virtue is never die.’ Because that poet is trying to convey kindness, “and all must die like day of the first stanza, the rose of the second stanza, and the spring of the third,only a sweet and virtuous soul that can be permanent”.
  • 8. Critical Analysis of Virtue 2-5 • Summary Of The Poem George Herbert's poem entitled, "Virtue," uses images of things that are "sweet" and full of life, and couples them with the dark side of life: death. There are spring day, beautiful day, beautiful rose all of them wrap in a beautiful box but they are lie to be beautiful forever and actually they also die but just only a sweet and virtuous soul will be permanent.
  • 9. Critical Analysis of Virtue3-5 Interpretation Of The Poem • First stanza First stanza of the poem tell us about weather is not permanent; although, the day that very cool, bright, sweet but if night come the beautiful of day will lost soon because they not constant. • Second stanza Rose is the symbol of breathy and root is symbol of power. The second stanza tell us about the breathy and the power but finally it will lost and die. • Third stanza Third stanza tell us about lying or false. There are sweet spring day, sweet day, and beautiful rose that wrap in beautiful box but actually they are lie to be beautiful and life forever. And they also die. • Fourth stanza The fourth stanza tell us about something that never die namely virtue. Although our body in the grave but our soul still remember from many people if we always do something right to other people or to other Allah’s creature.
  • 10. Critical Analysis of Virtue4-5 Atmosphere • Sadness The poet used descriptions of sadness with cry, die. Point of view • Nature Why? Because that poet view from nature,from the beginning until the ending. Figurative Language • Allegory is the comparison a situation with several figure of speech. The bridal of the earth and sky-
  • 11. Critical Analysis of Virtue5-5 The value • Moral value That poem convey about human behavior or character namely virtue. The message • The message that can we get in that poetry are, the people will always remember about our kindness although we passed away, and as we know wickedness, anger, etc will defeated by kindness. Because wickedness and kindness can not united. The kindness or virtue is permanent and the wickedness, anger is impermanent. So keep our relation with God, nature, and human. And remember that all of kindness come from Allah. ll
  • 12. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (1-8) • Why is it famous ? 1- shaped like bird wings 2- Explains complex ideas of christianity
  • 13. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (2-8) • Interpretation Of The Title “Easter Wings “ Easter: A christian holy day in March or April when they remember the death of christ and his return to life. It will give them the chance to over come sins by believing in christ and becoming like him. In a nutshell, according to christianity christ’s sacrifice, life us out of sin and sadness like a pair of wings.
  • 14. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (3-8) • Themes Religion Religion Quotes Lord, who createdst man in wealth and storeThou foolishly he lost the same (1-2) Weakness Weakness Quotes Though foolishly he lost the same (2) Sin Sin Quotes Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store,Though foolishly he lost the same (1-2)
  • 15. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (4-8) • Summary Of The Poem 1. This poem is a back and forth between despair and hope. 2. In the first half of each stanzas, Herbert describes the despairs and in the second half of each he finds the hope. 3. The first two lines of the poem are referring to Adam, as the first man and the first loser, because of Adam Herbert also has it bad. as you can see in the second stanza he uses words like sad, shame, sickness and sin to show that they wore him down into nothing. 4. When you think there is no way out of this endless darkness, Herbert asks to rise up with the Easter and resurrected Christ.
  • 16. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (5-8) Interpretation Of The Poem Line 1 Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store, • Addressing God directly, Herbert begins at, well, the beginning. See, way back in Garden of Eden times, God created humans and gave them a pretty sweet life. Since God probably didn't forget this, the speaker isn't so much reminding him of the good ole days as just thinking aloud. • "Wealth" here doesn't literally mean dollars in the bank. Along with "store," it refers more generally to abundance. Adam had all he needed: food, wildlife, a wife. Lines 2-5 Though foolishly he lost the same,
 Decaying more and more,
 Till he became
 Most poor • "Foolishly" Adam lost all his good stuff. • This is Bad News for the first man. In lines 3-5 Herbert paints a grim picture of how everything went bad. "Decaying" means to be slowly destroyed. as Adam gets poorer and poorer, the lines get smaller and smaller until "most poor" (5)
  • 17. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (6-8)Lines 6-8 With thee
 O let me rise
 As larks, harmoniously, • The speaker's still having the heart-to-heart with God at line 6, but now the speaker himself enters the poem and we start getting me's instead of he's. • We also get a new tense. Adam and his long-ago problems were narrated in past tense, but now we get a present-tense speaker speaking passionately and hopefully about the future. Adam may have ended up in a rough place, but our speaker, for one, is determined to ask for something better. This is also where Easter enters the poem for the first time. Notice that the speaker wants to rise "with thee," the "thee" here being "God." Lines 9-10 And sing this day thy victories:
 Then shall the fall further the flight in me. • The speaker has just asked God to let him rise harmoniously like a lark and now he formalizes his request for a bit of music. • He wants to be allowed to sing his worship, in particular, the "victories" of God
  • 18. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (7-8)Line 11 My tender age in sorrow did begin: • And we're back to Adam. The speaker was born into "sorrow" because he and all other humans inherit Adam's sin, according to the teachings of Christianity that Herbert adhered to. "Tender age" here just means "youth." • Sounds like a pretty raw deal, right? You've done nothing, but as soon as you're born you're slapped with some ancient dead guy's mistakes. No wonder the speaker wants to rise out of the sadness and pain and sin that Adam left us. Lines 12-15 And still with sicknesses and shame
 Thou didst so punish sin,
 That I became
 Most thin. • Just like in the first stanza, Herbert follows the downward spiral of human life—only this time, he's describing his own life, not Adam's. • Bad to begin with, life keeps getting worse as God punishes both the speaker's own sins and the sin he inherited from Adam. • As he describes in the poem, accumulated sickness and shame eventually whittle away at the speaker physically and spiritually until at line 15 he becomes "most thin." • Once again the poem's form reflects the content: the lines get littler as Herbert becomes thinner, with lines 15 and 16 petering out into 2 syllables each. • Check out the sibilant bonanza of S's in lines 12-13: "still," "sicknesses" (that's 4 S's in one word), "shame," "didst," "so," "punish," "sin." • Tricky Herbert's at it again. Just like its line 5 twin, line 15 smacks us upside the head with some poetic irony. We've got "most" but then we get "thin," underlining the all-round bummer nature of the situation.
  • 19. Critical Analysis of Easter Wings (8-8) Lines 16-18 With thee
 Let me combine,
 And feel this day thy victory: • Line 16, an exact repeat of line 6, again marks the turn around the happy corner. The speaker may be sinful, ashamed, and thin, but now things are looking up. The fact that these cheery words are "with thee" emphasizes how central God is to these improvements. • The switch from past tense to the hypothetical future in line 17 ("let me") marks the speaker's transformation from passive victim of the past to awesome flying bird-man of the future. Lines 19-20 For, if I imp my wing on thine,
 Affliction shall advance the flight in me. • The speaker explains his meaning more clearly in line 19, turning again to his feathered friends. This time, however, he uses hawks instead of larks and, instead of just rising with God, he asks for an extra boost: he wants to "imp" his wing to God's.  • What the heck is "to imp"? If you keep pet hawks (we don't either, since it's no longer the 17th century), you might know that it's a technical term meaning to repair a damaged feather by attaching part of a new feather. This implies (eh? eh?) that the speaker is too damaged by sin, too thin and sick, to fly properly on his own. He needs some of God's feathers to strengthen him. • In line 20 he reaches a similar conclusion to line 10. Just as Adam's fall increased the distance of his flight in stanza 1, now his own affliction (his sin and God's punishment) lengthens his flight. "Advance" here means "increase."
  • 20. Metaphysical Poetry & Metaphysical Conceit Metaphysical poetry is concerned with the whole experience of man, but the intelligence, learning and seriousness of the poets means that the poetry is about the profound areas of experience especially - about love, romantic and sensual; about man's relationship with God - the eternal perspective, and, to a less extent, about pleasure, learning and art. The metaphysical conceit, associated with the Metaphysical poets of the 17th century, is a more intricate and intellectual device. It usually sets up an analogy between one entity's spiritual qualities and an object in the physical world and sometimes controls the whole structure of the poem.
  • 21. Shape Poem Concrete poetry—sometimes also called ‘shape poetry’—is poetry whose visual appearance matches the topic of the poem. The words form shapes which illustrate the poem’s subject as a picture, as well as through their literal meaning.
  • 22. Vertue (page-249) Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright, The bridal of the earth and sky: The dew shall weep thy fall to night; For thou must die. Sweet rose, whose hue angry and brave Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye: Thy root is ever in its grave And thou must die. Sweet spring, full of sweet days and roses, A box where sweets compacted lie; My music shows ye have your closes, And all must die. Onely a sweet and virtuous soul, Like season’d timber, never gives; But though the whole world turn to coal, Then chiefly lives. George Herbert
  • 23. Easter Wings (page-253) Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store, Though foolishly he lost the same, Decaying more and more, Till he became Most poor: With thee O let me rise As larks, harmoniously, And sing this day thy victories: Then shall the fall further the flight in me. My tender age in sorrow did begin: And still with sicknesses and shame Thou didst so punish sin, That I became Most thin. With thee Let me combine, And feel this day thy victory: For, if I imp my wing on thine, Affliction shall advance the flight in me.