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9:00 a.m.– 11:30 a.m.
Foodservice Safety Training: Preventing Costly Workplace Injuries
Expert Speakers


Legal: Keith Pryatel, Kastner, Westman & Wilkins, LLP



Managed Care Organization: Ron Lucki, CareWorks



Safety: Jim Wirth & Brad Hunt, RiskControl360°



Workers Comp Safety & Hygiene: Mike Marr, BWC



Strategies to increase and support safe behaviors: Jim
Wirth, RiskControl360°(filling in for Tom Cunningham & Ray
Sinclair, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health)
Health and Safety
When a 1,000 things pile up, it’s easy to overlook the importance of
health & safety issues – that’s dangerous!

The Health & Safety section of the ORA’s website helps you stay on
top of concerns, offering solutions to today’s restaurant, food, and
alcohol safety issues.
www.ohiorestaurant.org/healthandsafety





Restaurant Safety & Training
Information Resources
Policies & Guides
Videos & Multimedia





Restaurant Safety Consultants
Food Safety
Alcohol Safety
Foodservice Safety Training: Preventing Costly Workplace Injuries
Restaurant/Food Service
Safety Issues &
How It Impacts Your Bottom
Line
Presented by Mike Marr, Safety Consultant
Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation
Division of Safety & Hygiene
Top Three Injuries By Frequency
2006 - 2009
699

Open Wounds
1432
Sprains

314
492

Burns
Misc
Top Three Injuries by Cost
Years 2006 - 2009
Open Wounds
$969,882

$879,178
Sprains
$674,135

Burns
Misc

$191,563
BWC
Safety Consulting Services
& Safety Resources
Benefits Of Using Services
o No additional cost to you
o Services designed to inform, educate and
assist employers in loss-prevention activities
o Consultative in nature – no fines or penalties
o Helps identify your specific areas of need
o Customizes services to meet your needs

o Increases awareness about helpful resources
o Can reduce workers’ compensation claims
Safety consulting services
o Safety team evaluation and design
o Hazard assessments
o Safety program advice

o Safety management
o Written program reviews
o Training
Industrial hygiene services
o Air sampling
o Noise sampling
o Ventilation assistance

o Respiratory protection
o Confined space identification
o Program assistance
Ergonomic services
o Repetitive motion issues
o Material handling issues
o Proper design of computer workstations
Division of Safety & Hygiene
o Training courses
o Video library
o Library
o Publications
o Ohio Safety Congress & Expo
o Safety Councils
Division of Safety & Hygiene Grants
Division of Safety & Hygiene Grants
o Wellness Grants
o SafetyGRANT$

o DFSP grants
o Long-Term Care Loan Program
Welcome

BACK TO BASICS
AGENDA:
Behavioral Considerations
Hierarchy of Hazard Control
Cuts & Lacerations
Burns & Scalds
Slips, Trips, and Falls
Or Is It?
It helps to understand that…
• People don’t try to have an accident!
• 98% are proud of what they do and where
they work.
• Understand peer pressure…bullies are all
ages (see second bullet!)
• People need and want to be trained.
• They tell you they have experience but…
• Consider ways to involve their families.
BUT…
Controlling the Hazard is
Number 1!
Hierarchy of Controls
Elimination
Substitution
Engineering Controls
Administrative Controls
Personal Protective Equipment
 Elimination:
Eliminating the hazard - physically removing it - is the most
effective hazard control.
Substitution:
Substitution, the second most effective hazard
control, involves replacing something that produces a
hazard (similar to elimination) with something that does not
produce a hazard.
 Engineering Controls:
The third most effective means of controlling hazards is
engineered controls. These do not eliminate hazards, but
rather isolate people from hazards. Capital costs of
engineered controls tend to be higher than less effective
controls in the hierarchy, however they may reduce future
costs.
Administrative Controls:
Administrative controls are changes to the way people work.
Examples of administrative controls include procedure
changes, employee training and installation of signs and
warning labels. Administrative controls do not remove
hazards, but limit or prevent people's exposure to the
hazards.

 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):
PPE includes Kevlar gloves, flame and heat resistant
aprons/sleeves, safety glasses, no slip shoes and other
safety footwear. PPE is the least effective means of
controlling hazards because of the high potential for damage
to render PPE ineffective.
Food Slicers

Box Cutters

Knives

Broken Glass
Powered Food Slicers
Powered Food Slicers
Amputations and cuts from
powered food slicers are a
serious problem for the food
processing industry. The
United States Department of
Labor considers these
machines to be
hazardous, therefore, only
employees over the age of
18 are permitted to operate
them. Many injuries can be
avoided by staying alert and
taking appropriate safety
precautions.

Elimination: X

Substitution: X
Engineering: Utilization of
guards

Administrative: Proper training
and alertness on the job
PPE: Wear gloves made of
Kevlar or other cut resistant
material
Powered Food Slicers:
Engineering Controls
Utilization of guards
Knives and Box Cutters:
Administrative Controls
•Train employees on equipment and guard
functions.
•Train employees on de-energizing for cleaning,
servicing and lockout/tagout.
•Have a Plan of Action if guards malfunction or
break.
• If the equipment is older, retrofit guards or
replace.
Knives & Box Cutters
Knives & Box Cutters
Two of the tools most commonly
used by food service workers
are knives and box cutters. Box
cutters usually have removable
razor-sharp blades you can
change when they get dull.
Many models have 3
retractable blade
lengths, allowing you to vary the
length of the exposed blade
depending on the thickness and
density of the material to be cut.

Elimination: X

Substitution: X
Engineering: Safety Knives
Administrative: Proper
training, alertness on the job
PPE: Wear gloves made of
Kevlar or other cut resistant
material
Knives and Box Cutters:
Engineering Controls
Utilize Box Cutters with guards
Knives and Box Cutters:
Administrative Controls
Broken Glass
Safe Handling and
Cleanup of Broken Glass

Broken glass is a major
hazard not only for the
workers handling it but also
for consumers if, for
instance, tiny glass chips
contaminate food. Broken
glass that is not disposed of
properly can cause cuts and
deep wounds, some even
requiring amputations or
leading to blindness.

Elimination: X
Substitution: Plastic

Engineering: Heavier trash liners
and/or separate receptacles
specifically for glass
Administrative: Proper
training, alertness on the job, create
an exposure control plan/procedures
PPE: Wear gloves made of Kevlar
or other cut resistant material when
cleaning up broken glass. Protective
foot wear
Broken Glass:
Substitution Controls
Substitute plastic containers instead of glass

The absolute safest plastic numbers, for storing food are:
#2, HDPE, usually an opaque plastic used for milk
jugs, detergent bottles, juice bottles, toiletries and the like
#4, LDPE, used for things like plastic bags, food
storage, bread bags, some food wraps, squeezable
bottles

#5, polypropylene, used for a wide variety of applications
such as yogurt cups, medicine bottles, ketchup and syrup
bottles and straws
Broken Glass:
Engineering Controls
• Utilize heavier trash liners
• Use separate receptacles for
glass

Supplier to the dairy and food
processing industries since 1947
Toll Free 800-826-8302
http://NelsonJameson.com

Enter your zip, select your
material, find a facility, click and
navigate. It's that easy!
http://www.recyclerfinder.com/
Broken Glass:
Administrative Controls
• Create an exposure control plan/procedures.
• Example of a plan / procedure:
 Clear the area of patrons and personnel (utilize
caution signs to aid communication)
 If in the center of the broken glass, get
assistance from an employee in the vicinity.
 Before cleaning the glass utilize proper PPE
(shoes, gloves, safety glasses, etc.)
 Use a soft bristled broom to sweep all of the
pieces into a dust pan or tray.
 Properly dispose of the broken glass.
 Report and document the incident.
Cuts and Lacerations:
PPE Controls
Wear gloves made of Kevlar or
other cut resistant material
when handling knifes, other
sharp equipment or cleaning up
broken glass.
Ansell is a
manufacturer
of hand and arm
personal protective
equipment.

Safety Works is a joint venture of
MSA and privately-held MCR
Safety. The joint venture creates
the first, full-line glove, garment
and safety products company in
the North American retail market.
Burns and Scalds:
Grills, Burners, Fryers, Co
oking Pots and Steam
Potential Hazards: Any
person working around
heating equipment, like
steamers, ovens and
ranges, can potentially be
burned. There are several
ways that commercial
kitchen employees can be
burned.

Elimination: X

Substitution: X
Engineering: X
Administrative: Proper
training, house-keeping and
alertness on the job
PPE: Hot mitts, heat resistant
aprons, heat resistant
sleeves, eye/face protection
etc.
Hot Oil:
Administrative Controls
• Allow hot oil to drip
completely off before removing
the basket.
• Lower food and utensils into
hot oil slowly.
• Dry food and utensils before
putting them into hot oil.
• Do not drop food into a fryer.
Steam:
Administrative Controls
•Keep clear when opening
dishwashers.
• Communicate to other
employees to keep clear.
• Do NOT put head, hands
or torso over or near boiling
water or anything that is
steaming.
Hot Objects
(plates, pots, pans, etc.):
Administrative Controls
• Do not leave handles protruding over counter or
table edges.
• Do not touch anything hot (If unsure, ask or check
before handling).
• Use the buddy system to lift heavy stock pots.

• Consider the use of infrared thermometers.
• Observe and adjust foot-traffic patterns.
Burns and Scalds:
PPE Controls
• Use proper PPE: hot mitts, heat resistant
aprons, heat resistant sleeves, eye/face
protection etc.
Slips, trips, and falls and
contact with objects

Elimination: Utilize proper
storage to reduce clutter

These are most common lostworkday injury event in the
restaurant workplace. Most
slips and falls are caused by
water or grease on the floor.
Therefore, these sources for
potential accidents should be
emphasized and preventative
measures should be stressed.
Falls on ice and snow outside
in the parking lots (while going
to the dumpster, etc.) are also
quite common work-related
injuries.

Substitution: X
Engineering: Deploying slip
resistant floor mats

Administrative: Proper
training, housekeeping, communication and
alertness on the job
PPE: Slip resistant shoes and
other safety footwear
Slips, Trips and Falls:
Elimination Controls
• Keep kitchens and store rooms
organized

• Do not block aisle-ways
• Store materials and equipment
properly on shelves (do not allow to
overlap)
• Keep cords clear of water and other
liquids.
• Keep cords clear of aisle ways and
normal walking patterns.
• Winterize outside surfaces /
entryways
Slips, Trips and Falls:
Engineering Controls
• Utilize floor mats
and runners to make
floors less
slippery, and reduce
fatigue
• Upgrade to a more
slip resistant flooring
• Use non-slip floor
surface cleaners
Slips, Trips and Falls:
Administrative Controls
• Apply appropriate caution
signs to communicate when an
area is slippery or wet
• Enforce a “spill clean up”
policy
• “Spot mop” during rush times
to reduce affected surfaces
• Change water in mop bucket
often
Slips, Trips and Falls:
Administrative Controls
• Do not improvise: Use
ladders to reach high places do not use trash
cans, chairs, buckets, etc.

• Keep ladders conveniently
located
• Train employees on proper
use
National Ladder Institute
www.laddersafety.org
Consider Other Ladder Styles
Look for these features:
• Work platform
• Deep, non-slip steps
• Extended rail height
• Wide stance
• Lighter weight
• Tool tray
Slips, Trips and Falls:
PPE Controls
Use of slip-resistant shoes
Resources & Vendors
www.floormatcompany.com
www.restaurantsource.com
www.uline.com
www.compliancesigns.com
www.foodservicewarehouse.com
www.smartkitchen.com
www.safetydirectory.com
www.msa.com
www.ansellpro.com
Questions?
Jim Wirth, CPEA
jwirth@riskcontrol360.com
614-827-0370
877-360-3608


Two Takeaways
Injury Reporting Packet
Initial Treating Provider


Injury Reporting Packet
First Report of Injury



Initial Treating Provider
Personalized Label for Packet Envelope
First Report of Injury (FROI) Steps to Follow
Personalized BWC First Report of Injury (FROI)
Form
Personalized I.D. Cards
CareWorks Key Information Contact Card
Personalized Workplace Injury Posters
 Triage
 Early Intervention - Diagnostic Testing
 Prior Authorization
 Coordination of Care

 Communication
 Injured Worker
 Provider
 Employer
 MCO can take drug utilization one step further

 Medical Case Management requires Pharmaceutical
Review
 Review all meds
 Provide counseling to injured worker
 Discuss with provider
 Checking for meds unrelated to claim
 Our database identified multiple docs and providers
 Drug Utilization Review - potential $$ savings
Pharmacy Report
Remember Your Takeaways!
Thomas Cunningham, Ph.D.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health
Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this
presentation have not been formally disseminated by
the National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health and should not be construed to represent any
agency determination or policy.




The safety culture of an organization is the
product of individual and group
values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies, and
patterns of behavior that determine the
commitment to, and the style and proficiency
of, an organization’s health and safety
management (HSC, 1993).
Or, the way we do things around here.


John’s manager sees that John is chopping
vegetables at an amazing speed…



Should the manager:
A: Nod in approval; the food will be prepped on time
B: Say nothing
C: Tell John “Be Careful”; we don’t want him to cut
himself and stop working
D: Ask John why he is working so fast; try to understand
why John feels like he needs to rush


Attitude vs. behavior change



Behavior is easier to see, and easier to change



Change the behavior and attitude may follow
Attribution of the causes of injuries
 Chance vs. “person” causes vs. latent causes
 Look at the whole picture


Injury logs can help identify trends and problem areas.
 Exploring and documenting near-misses

Thorough walk-through
 Identify trip/slip/fall hazards
 Employee involvement for continuous improvement

What types of controls can be implemented?
 Ongoing monitoring and review to ensure controls are
effective.


How can we be preventive rather than reactive?
Most Effective /
Protective
Elimination
Substitution
Engineering Controls
Administrative Controls
Personal Protective Equipment
Foodservice Safety Training: Preventing Costly Workplace Injuries
Coworker
reminder to
use
protective
glove

Employee
safely cuts
food

Employee
receives
appreciative
comment from
manager


Safety does not end with training



Must check for employee understanding



Have employees demonstrate safe behaviors
 Practice with feedback as part of training



Integrate behavior-based safety coaching into the culture
 Management commitment and employee involvement
 Peer observation and feedback
 Ongoing monitoring and review
Behavior
Load appropriate?
Back straight?
Use legs?
Hold load close to body?
Shoulders and hips aligned?
TOTAL

Safe

At-Risk

Total Safe Behaviors / Total Safe + At-Risk Behaviors
X 100 = % Safe


Consult managers and employees to get their
impressions of the problem areas and ideas / areas for
improvement.
e.g. Have them help to develop checklists



When people contribute to a safety effort, their
ownership and commitment to safety increases.
Employees communicate about safety



Perception of management/owner’s total buy-in for
safety practices and procedures increases employees’
participation.



Unsafe behavior is a symptom, not the disease
Unhealthy safety culture is a system problem
Email: Tcunningham@cdc.gov

phone: 513.533.8325
Keith L. Pryatel, Esq.
KASTNER WESTMAN & WILKINS, LLC
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87


“Serious” = $7,000 per violation
“Substantial probability of causing death or serious
physical harm”



Failure to abate = $7,000 per day



Willful = $70,000 per violation, not less $5,000



Repeat = $70,000 per violation, not less $5,000

88


Fatality & Willful
$10,000 fine
6 months imprisonment
2nd conviction = 1 year imprisonment



De Minimis = $0



Instance by Instance Assessment



↑ size, history, good faith (written programs)

89
90
 Training,

Training, Training

 Common

understanding between staffing
agency and place where worker works

91
 Corporate

 Lasts

wide, unannounced inspections

3 years

92


Changed OSHA criteria for classifying physical
and health hazards



Adopted standardized labeling requirements



Standardized order of information on MSDS



6/1/16 compliance deadline

93
 National

Emphasis Program

 119

workers killed in a Chinese poultry plant
because exit doors blocked or locked.

94


9,414 sites received letters based on 2011
illness/injury rates



Subject to unannounced inspections



Must have DART rate exceeding the
established “industry standard”



Letter – receiving establishments are prioritized
for inspections
95
96
 PPE

Survey
Include Workplace Violence

 Hazard

 Fire

Communication

Fighting

 Evacuation

97


PPE Usage
Write up for misconduct
Cuts are predominate injury



Driver Training



Workplace Violence



Lockout/Tagout?
Even if sub-contracted



Injury Reporting
98
99
 Call

a lawyer, a “good” one – ME!

 Abatement

proof

Pictures, bills, investment
 15

work days to request informal

 Informal
 Don’t

conference

take OSHA 1st offer of reduction

10
0


Bring helpful information
OSHA-300 logs for past years

Proof training
Proof disciplines

Is the citation correct?
Past inspections?
BWC Division of Safety & Hygiene

10
1
Questions?
Foodservice Safety Training: Preventing Costly Workplace Injuries

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Foodservice Safety Training: Preventing Costly Workplace Injuries

  • 3. Expert Speakers  Legal: Keith Pryatel, Kastner, Westman & Wilkins, LLP  Managed Care Organization: Ron Lucki, CareWorks  Safety: Jim Wirth & Brad Hunt, RiskControl360°  Workers Comp Safety & Hygiene: Mike Marr, BWC  Strategies to increase and support safe behaviors: Jim Wirth, RiskControl360°(filling in for Tom Cunningham & Ray Sinclair, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health)
  • 4. Health and Safety When a 1,000 things pile up, it’s easy to overlook the importance of health & safety issues – that’s dangerous! The Health & Safety section of the ORA’s website helps you stay on top of concerns, offering solutions to today’s restaurant, food, and alcohol safety issues. www.ohiorestaurant.org/healthandsafety     Restaurant Safety & Training Information Resources Policies & Guides Videos & Multimedia    Restaurant Safety Consultants Food Safety Alcohol Safety
  • 6. Restaurant/Food Service Safety Issues & How It Impacts Your Bottom Line Presented by Mike Marr, Safety Consultant Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Division of Safety & Hygiene
  • 7. Top Three Injuries By Frequency 2006 - 2009 699 Open Wounds 1432 Sprains 314 492 Burns Misc
  • 8. Top Three Injuries by Cost Years 2006 - 2009 Open Wounds $969,882 $879,178 Sprains $674,135 Burns Misc $191,563
  • 10. Benefits Of Using Services o No additional cost to you o Services designed to inform, educate and assist employers in loss-prevention activities o Consultative in nature – no fines or penalties o Helps identify your specific areas of need o Customizes services to meet your needs o Increases awareness about helpful resources o Can reduce workers’ compensation claims
  • 11. Safety consulting services o Safety team evaluation and design o Hazard assessments o Safety program advice o Safety management o Written program reviews o Training
  • 12. Industrial hygiene services o Air sampling o Noise sampling o Ventilation assistance o Respiratory protection o Confined space identification o Program assistance
  • 13. Ergonomic services o Repetitive motion issues o Material handling issues o Proper design of computer workstations
  • 14. Division of Safety & Hygiene o Training courses o Video library o Library o Publications o Ohio Safety Congress & Expo o Safety Councils
  • 15. Division of Safety & Hygiene Grants
  • 16. Division of Safety & Hygiene Grants o Wellness Grants o SafetyGRANT$ o DFSP grants o Long-Term Care Loan Program
  • 18. AGENDA: Behavioral Considerations Hierarchy of Hazard Control Cuts & Lacerations Burns & Scalds Slips, Trips, and Falls
  • 20. It helps to understand that… • People don’t try to have an accident! • 98% are proud of what they do and where they work. • Understand peer pressure…bullies are all ages (see second bullet!) • People need and want to be trained. • They tell you they have experience but… • Consider ways to involve their families.
  • 22. Hierarchy of Controls Elimination Substitution Engineering Controls Administrative Controls Personal Protective Equipment
  • 23.  Elimination: Eliminating the hazard - physically removing it - is the most effective hazard control. Substitution: Substitution, the second most effective hazard control, involves replacing something that produces a hazard (similar to elimination) with something that does not produce a hazard.  Engineering Controls: The third most effective means of controlling hazards is engineered controls. These do not eliminate hazards, but rather isolate people from hazards. Capital costs of engineered controls tend to be higher than less effective controls in the hierarchy, however they may reduce future costs.
  • 24. Administrative Controls: Administrative controls are changes to the way people work. Examples of administrative controls include procedure changes, employee training and installation of signs and warning labels. Administrative controls do not remove hazards, but limit or prevent people's exposure to the hazards.  Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): PPE includes Kevlar gloves, flame and heat resistant aprons/sleeves, safety glasses, no slip shoes and other safety footwear. PPE is the least effective means of controlling hazards because of the high potential for damage to render PPE ineffective.
  • 26. Powered Food Slicers Powered Food Slicers Amputations and cuts from powered food slicers are a serious problem for the food processing industry. The United States Department of Labor considers these machines to be hazardous, therefore, only employees over the age of 18 are permitted to operate them. Many injuries can be avoided by staying alert and taking appropriate safety precautions. Elimination: X Substitution: X Engineering: Utilization of guards Administrative: Proper training and alertness on the job PPE: Wear gloves made of Kevlar or other cut resistant material
  • 27. Powered Food Slicers: Engineering Controls Utilization of guards
  • 28. Knives and Box Cutters: Administrative Controls •Train employees on equipment and guard functions. •Train employees on de-energizing for cleaning, servicing and lockout/tagout. •Have a Plan of Action if guards malfunction or break. • If the equipment is older, retrofit guards or replace.
  • 29. Knives & Box Cutters Knives & Box Cutters Two of the tools most commonly used by food service workers are knives and box cutters. Box cutters usually have removable razor-sharp blades you can change when they get dull. Many models have 3 retractable blade lengths, allowing you to vary the length of the exposed blade depending on the thickness and density of the material to be cut. Elimination: X Substitution: X Engineering: Safety Knives Administrative: Proper training, alertness on the job PPE: Wear gloves made of Kevlar or other cut resistant material
  • 30. Knives and Box Cutters: Engineering Controls Utilize Box Cutters with guards
  • 31. Knives and Box Cutters: Administrative Controls
  • 32. Broken Glass Safe Handling and Cleanup of Broken Glass Broken glass is a major hazard not only for the workers handling it but also for consumers if, for instance, tiny glass chips contaminate food. Broken glass that is not disposed of properly can cause cuts and deep wounds, some even requiring amputations or leading to blindness. Elimination: X Substitution: Plastic Engineering: Heavier trash liners and/or separate receptacles specifically for glass Administrative: Proper training, alertness on the job, create an exposure control plan/procedures PPE: Wear gloves made of Kevlar or other cut resistant material when cleaning up broken glass. Protective foot wear
  • 33. Broken Glass: Substitution Controls Substitute plastic containers instead of glass The absolute safest plastic numbers, for storing food are: #2, HDPE, usually an opaque plastic used for milk jugs, detergent bottles, juice bottles, toiletries and the like #4, LDPE, used for things like plastic bags, food storage, bread bags, some food wraps, squeezable bottles #5, polypropylene, used for a wide variety of applications such as yogurt cups, medicine bottles, ketchup and syrup bottles and straws
  • 34. Broken Glass: Engineering Controls • Utilize heavier trash liners • Use separate receptacles for glass Supplier to the dairy and food processing industries since 1947 Toll Free 800-826-8302 http://NelsonJameson.com Enter your zip, select your material, find a facility, click and navigate. It's that easy! http://www.recyclerfinder.com/
  • 35. Broken Glass: Administrative Controls • Create an exposure control plan/procedures. • Example of a plan / procedure:  Clear the area of patrons and personnel (utilize caution signs to aid communication)  If in the center of the broken glass, get assistance from an employee in the vicinity.  Before cleaning the glass utilize proper PPE (shoes, gloves, safety glasses, etc.)  Use a soft bristled broom to sweep all of the pieces into a dust pan or tray.  Properly dispose of the broken glass.  Report and document the incident.
  • 36. Cuts and Lacerations: PPE Controls Wear gloves made of Kevlar or other cut resistant material when handling knifes, other sharp equipment or cleaning up broken glass.
  • 37. Ansell is a manufacturer of hand and arm personal protective equipment. Safety Works is a joint venture of MSA and privately-held MCR Safety. The joint venture creates the first, full-line glove, garment and safety products company in the North American retail market.
  • 38. Burns and Scalds: Grills, Burners, Fryers, Co oking Pots and Steam Potential Hazards: Any person working around heating equipment, like steamers, ovens and ranges, can potentially be burned. There are several ways that commercial kitchen employees can be burned. Elimination: X Substitution: X Engineering: X Administrative: Proper training, house-keeping and alertness on the job PPE: Hot mitts, heat resistant aprons, heat resistant sleeves, eye/face protection etc.
  • 39. Hot Oil: Administrative Controls • Allow hot oil to drip completely off before removing the basket. • Lower food and utensils into hot oil slowly. • Dry food and utensils before putting them into hot oil. • Do not drop food into a fryer.
  • 40. Steam: Administrative Controls •Keep clear when opening dishwashers. • Communicate to other employees to keep clear. • Do NOT put head, hands or torso over or near boiling water or anything that is steaming.
  • 41. Hot Objects (plates, pots, pans, etc.): Administrative Controls • Do not leave handles protruding over counter or table edges. • Do not touch anything hot (If unsure, ask or check before handling). • Use the buddy system to lift heavy stock pots. • Consider the use of infrared thermometers. • Observe and adjust foot-traffic patterns.
  • 42. Burns and Scalds: PPE Controls • Use proper PPE: hot mitts, heat resistant aprons, heat resistant sleeves, eye/face protection etc.
  • 43. Slips, trips, and falls and contact with objects Elimination: Utilize proper storage to reduce clutter These are most common lostworkday injury event in the restaurant workplace. Most slips and falls are caused by water or grease on the floor. Therefore, these sources for potential accidents should be emphasized and preventative measures should be stressed. Falls on ice and snow outside in the parking lots (while going to the dumpster, etc.) are also quite common work-related injuries. Substitution: X Engineering: Deploying slip resistant floor mats Administrative: Proper training, housekeeping, communication and alertness on the job PPE: Slip resistant shoes and other safety footwear
  • 44. Slips, Trips and Falls: Elimination Controls • Keep kitchens and store rooms organized • Do not block aisle-ways • Store materials and equipment properly on shelves (do not allow to overlap) • Keep cords clear of water and other liquids. • Keep cords clear of aisle ways and normal walking patterns. • Winterize outside surfaces / entryways
  • 45. Slips, Trips and Falls: Engineering Controls • Utilize floor mats and runners to make floors less slippery, and reduce fatigue • Upgrade to a more slip resistant flooring • Use non-slip floor surface cleaners
  • 46. Slips, Trips and Falls: Administrative Controls • Apply appropriate caution signs to communicate when an area is slippery or wet • Enforce a “spill clean up” policy • “Spot mop” during rush times to reduce affected surfaces • Change water in mop bucket often
  • 47. Slips, Trips and Falls: Administrative Controls • Do not improvise: Use ladders to reach high places do not use trash cans, chairs, buckets, etc. • Keep ladders conveniently located • Train employees on proper use National Ladder Institute www.laddersafety.org
  • 48. Consider Other Ladder Styles Look for these features: • Work platform • Deep, non-slip steps • Extended rail height • Wide stance • Lighter weight • Tool tray
  • 49. Slips, Trips and Falls: PPE Controls Use of slip-resistant shoes
  • 53.  Two Takeaways Injury Reporting Packet Initial Treating Provider
  • 54.  Injury Reporting Packet First Report of Injury  Initial Treating Provider
  • 55. Personalized Label for Packet Envelope
  • 56. First Report of Injury (FROI) Steps to Follow
  • 57. Personalized BWC First Report of Injury (FROI) Form
  • 61.  Triage  Early Intervention - Diagnostic Testing  Prior Authorization  Coordination of Care  Communication  Injured Worker  Provider  Employer
  • 62.  MCO can take drug utilization one step further  Medical Case Management requires Pharmaceutical Review  Review all meds  Provide counseling to injured worker  Discuss with provider  Checking for meds unrelated to claim  Our database identified multiple docs and providers  Drug Utilization Review - potential $$ savings
  • 65. Thomas Cunningham, Ph.D. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this presentation have not been formally disseminated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and should not be construed to represent any agency determination or policy.
  • 66.   The safety culture of an organization is the product of individual and group values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies, and patterns of behavior that determine the commitment to, and the style and proficiency of, an organization’s health and safety management (HSC, 1993). Or, the way we do things around here.
  • 67.  John’s manager sees that John is chopping vegetables at an amazing speed…  Should the manager: A: Nod in approval; the food will be prepped on time B: Say nothing C: Tell John “Be Careful”; we don’t want him to cut himself and stop working D: Ask John why he is working so fast; try to understand why John feels like he needs to rush
  • 68.  Attitude vs. behavior change  Behavior is easier to see, and easier to change  Change the behavior and attitude may follow
  • 69. Attribution of the causes of injuries  Chance vs. “person” causes vs. latent causes  Look at the whole picture  Injury logs can help identify trends and problem areas.  Exploring and documenting near-misses Thorough walk-through  Identify trip/slip/fall hazards  Employee involvement for continuous improvement What types of controls can be implemented?  Ongoing monitoring and review to ensure controls are effective.  How can we be preventive rather than reactive?
  • 70. Most Effective / Protective Elimination Substitution Engineering Controls Administrative Controls Personal Protective Equipment
  • 73.  Safety does not end with training  Must check for employee understanding  Have employees demonstrate safe behaviors  Practice with feedback as part of training  Integrate behavior-based safety coaching into the culture  Management commitment and employee involvement  Peer observation and feedback  Ongoing monitoring and review
  • 74. Behavior Load appropriate? Back straight? Use legs? Hold load close to body? Shoulders and hips aligned? TOTAL Safe At-Risk Total Safe Behaviors / Total Safe + At-Risk Behaviors X 100 = % Safe
  • 75.  Consult managers and employees to get their impressions of the problem areas and ideas / areas for improvement. e.g. Have them help to develop checklists  When people contribute to a safety effort, their ownership and commitment to safety increases. Employees communicate about safety  Perception of management/owner’s total buy-in for safety practices and procedures increases employees’ participation.  Unsafe behavior is a symptom, not the disease Unhealthy safety culture is a system problem
  • 77. Keith L. Pryatel, Esq. KASTNER WESTMAN & WILKINS, LLC
  • 78. 78
  • 79. 79
  • 80. 80
  • 81. 81
  • 82. 82
  • 83. 83
  • 84. 84
  • 85. 85
  • 86. 86
  • 87. 87
  • 88.  “Serious” = $7,000 per violation “Substantial probability of causing death or serious physical harm”  Failure to abate = $7,000 per day  Willful = $70,000 per violation, not less $5,000  Repeat = $70,000 per violation, not less $5,000 88
  • 89.  Fatality & Willful $10,000 fine 6 months imprisonment 2nd conviction = 1 year imprisonment  De Minimis = $0  Instance by Instance Assessment  ↑ size, history, good faith (written programs) 89
  • 90. 90
  • 91.  Training, Training, Training  Common understanding between staffing agency and place where worker works 91
  • 92.  Corporate  Lasts wide, unannounced inspections 3 years 92
  • 93.  Changed OSHA criteria for classifying physical and health hazards  Adopted standardized labeling requirements  Standardized order of information on MSDS  6/1/16 compliance deadline 93
  • 94.  National Emphasis Program  119 workers killed in a Chinese poultry plant because exit doors blocked or locked. 94
  • 95.  9,414 sites received letters based on 2011 illness/injury rates  Subject to unannounced inspections  Must have DART rate exceeding the established “industry standard”  Letter – receiving establishments are prioritized for inspections 95
  • 96. 96
  • 97.  PPE Survey Include Workplace Violence  Hazard  Fire Communication Fighting  Evacuation 97
  • 98.  PPE Usage Write up for misconduct Cuts are predominate injury  Driver Training  Workplace Violence  Lockout/Tagout? Even if sub-contracted  Injury Reporting 98
  • 99. 99
  • 100.  Call a lawyer, a “good” one – ME!  Abatement proof Pictures, bills, investment  15 work days to request informal  Informal  Don’t conference take OSHA 1st offer of reduction 10 0
  • 101.  Bring helpful information OSHA-300 logs for past years Proof training Proof disciplines Is the citation correct? Past inspections? BWC Division of Safety & Hygiene 10 1

Editor's Notes

  1. Good Morning. It’s my pleasure to welcome you to this free Ohio Restaurant Association – Restaurant Education Series event. “Foodservice Safety Training: Preventing Costly Workplace Injuries” seminar. Offered to you through a partnership between the Ohio Restaurant Association, the Ohio BWC Division of Safety & Hygiene, RiskControl360, Careworks Consultants, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health., this course is designed specifically for the restaurant industry.
  2. I’m Laura Morrison, Director of Member Services & IT with the Ohio Restaurant Association. My primary responsibility with the association is managing the ORA sponsored Workers’ Compensation Group Rating Plans and safety efforts.
  3. Today’s session will be full of information that will help you better manage your business safely, reducing injuries and therefore reducing workers’ compensation costs. You’ll hear from these Experts: Discussing the legal aspects will be Keith Pryatel, Kastner, Westman & WilkinsPresenting Managed Care Organization information will be Ron Lucki, CareWorksFrom our safety partner, RiskControl360°, will be Jim Wirth and Brad Hunt Strategies to increase and support safe behaviors: Filling in for Ray Sinclair, with National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health who couldn’t be here today due to the Government shutdown is: Jim Wirth of RiskControl360°. Before we get started, I want to review a few housekeeping items and let you know how to best participate in today’s event. A few housekeeping items: You will need to be present throughout this session to receive credit with the BWC for meeting their 2-hour training requirement for companies experiencing injury claims. Restrooms are located out this door and down the hall. We will have a break today, however, please feel free to utilize these facilities and to get up and get a refill anytime during the session. The speakers today have provided their time and expertise as a service to you. Questions are great, however please know that the speakers may have to limit answers if they appear to be part of a larger discussion that will need to be held offline.In the folder provided to you are: a copy of all of the presentations, including blank areas so you can make notes if you choose and an agenda for today. You’ll be given a course evaluation. Please provide feedback in order for us to improve our offerings.  So let’s get started: The ORA is the largest non-profit trade association dedicated exclusively to the Ohio Foodservice industry, your industry. We help more than 5,000 locations in Ohio save time, money and safeguard their business.
  4. When a 1,000 things pile up, it’s easy to overlook the importance of health & safety issues – that’s dangerous! ORAs Health & Safety section of our website, ohiorestaurant.org, helps you stay on top of concerns, offering solutions to today’s restaurant, food, and alcohol safety issues by providing policies, manuals, webinars and resource links. Check these out today by heading over to www.ohiorestaurant.org/healthandsafety!
  5. In addition to this valuable resource, annually we publish a special theme issue of our “a’ la Carte” quarterly magazine focusing on safety and workers' compensation. Covering such topics as: The Changes to the Ohio BWC’s Alternative Rating ProgramsReducing the Incidence of Workplace Injuries through Strategic Incident Response PoliciesEmployee Safety articles on: Properly protecting hands; Reducing the Risk of Cutting Injuries; Chemical Safety in the Workplace; Utilizing Safety Coordinators to Oversee Operations Workplace Safety Standards. Distributed earlier this year, the electronic version is available on the ORA website under the news section. Look for the Winter “a’ la Carte” magazine focused on safety and workers’ compensation information to hit your e-mail and mail boxes after the holidays!As you can see through our resources, our experts is available to support you. Because of this support, over 1,300 companies participate in the ORA workers’ compensation group rating plan. This results in offering the best Workers’ Compensation Group Rating Plan for the Ohio restaurant industry. The ORA group has a high rate of member satisfaction with a consistent 95% retention rate. Unfortunately, you won’t know until you’ve had a claim how important service is to the future of your business. And now I’d like to turn this over to Brad Hunt, Director of RiskControl360.
  6. OCOSH classes in industrial safety, construction safety, industrial hygiene, ergonomics, safety management, and risk managementLIBRARY provides free informational services on occupational safety and health, workers’ compensation and rehabilitation.PUBLICATIONS available for injured workers, employers, safety, and medical providersSafety Congress: FREEMarch 30 to April 1Greater Columbus Convention Center150 educational sessionsEarn CEUs200 exhibitsLive demonstrationsSafety CouncilsGoal: Increase safety awarenessRebate program2% for meeting eligibility requirements2% performance bonusExcludes self insured employers, state agencies, employers enrolled in group rating and group retrospective programsSafety awardsBased on accident statisticsAwards include: Group award, 100% award, Achievement award, and Special awardSafetyGRANTSPurpose of program is to gather information about the effectiveness of safety interventionsQualifications: Pay into insurance fund, maintain active coverage, be current on monies owed BWC and demonstrate need for safety interventionPrivate and public employers eligible2 to 1 matching grant, maximum $40,000Drug Free WorkplaceDFWPDFWP EZPrivate employers up to $10,000Public employers up to $15,000Grant money can be used for:Employee education, supervisor training, employee education train-the-trainer
  7. OCOSH classes in industrial safety, construction safety, industrial hygiene, ergonomics, safety management, and risk managementLIBRARY provides free informational services on occupational safety and health, workers’ compensation and rehabilitation.PUBLICATIONS available for injured workers, employers, safety, and medical providersSafety Congress: FREEMarch 30 to April 1Greater Columbus Convention Center150 educational sessionsEarn CEUs200 exhibitsLive demonstrationsSafety CouncilsGoal: Increase safety awarenessRebate program2% for meeting eligibility requirements2% performance bonusExcludes self insured employers, state agencies, employers enrolled in group rating and group retrospective programsSafety awardsBased on accident statisticsAwards include: Group award, 100% award, Achievement award, and Special awardSafetyGRANTSPurpose of program is to gather information about the effectiveness of safety interventionsQualifications: Pay into insurance fund, maintain active coverage, be current on monies owed BWC and demonstrate need for safety interventionPrivate and public employers eligible2 to 1 matching grant, maximum $40,000Drug Free WorkplaceDFWPDFWP EZPrivate employers up to $10,000Public employers up to $15,000Grant money can be used for:Employee education, supervisor training, employee education train-the-trainer
  8. OCOSH classes in industrial safety, construction safety, industrial hygiene, ergonomics, safety management, and risk managementLIBRARY provides free informational services on occupational safety and health, workers’ compensation and rehabilitation.PUBLICATIONS available for injured workers, employers, safety, and medical providersSafety Congress: FREEMarch 30 to April 1Greater Columbus Convention Center150 educational sessionsEarn CEUs200 exhibitsLive demonstrationsSafety CouncilsGoal: Increase safety awarenessRebate program2% for meeting eligibility requirements2% performance bonusExcludes self insured employers, state agencies, employers enrolled in group rating and group retrospective programsSafety awardsBased on accident statisticsAwards include: Group award, 100% award, Achievement award, and Special awardSafetyGRANTSPurpose of program is to gather information about the effectiveness of safety interventionsQualifications: Pay into insurance fund, maintain active coverage, be current on monies owed BWC and demonstrate need for safety interventionPrivate and public employers eligible2 to 1 matching grant, maximum $40,000Drug Free WorkplaceDFWPDFWP EZPrivate employers up to $10,000Public employers up to $15,000Grant money can be used for:Employee education, supervisor training, employee education train-the-trainer
  9. CW state-of-the-art technology, trained claim and medical professionals, and quality standards to help ensure that each and every file is managed effectively and fairly. Our mission has been and remains returning injured employees to their jobs, assuring quality medical treatment for injured employees, and generating significant total loss cost savings for our customers. We are confident that our design allows us to meet and exceed that mission for our customers. Early intervention on all new claims has proven to have a positive impact on length of disability and ultimately, claim payout. Timely recognition and reporting of workplace incidents to our toll-free claim reporting number or online:Enhances our ability to make prompt contact with the injured workerFacilitates active case management that impacts payout and early return-to-work planningProvides for the timely delivery of benefitsPreserves investigative facts that can affect compensability and/or offset opportunitiesEnhances our ability to provide appropriate medical managementPrevents the potential loss of policy or statutory defenses
  10. CW state-of-the-art technology, trained claim and medical professionals, and quality standards to help ensure that each and every file is managed effectively and fairly. Our mission has been and remains returning injured employees to their jobs, assuring quality medical treatment for injured employees, and generating significant total loss cost savings for our customers. We are confident that our design allows us to meet and exceed that mission for our customers. Early intervention on all new claims has proven to have a positive impact on length of disability and ultimately, claim payout. Timely recognition and reporting of workplace incidents to our toll-free claim reporting number or online:Enhances our ability to make prompt contact with the injured workerFacilitates active case management that impacts payout and early return-to-work planningProvides for the timely delivery of benefitsPreserves investigative facts that can affect compensability and/or offset opportunitiesEnhances our ability to provide appropriate medical managementPrevents the potential loss of policy or statutory defenses
  11. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employerCommunication is vital to the success of your program.If you are in doubt about anything, call your CareWorks Account Executive.Don’t “assume” anything.
  12. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employer
  13. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employer
  14. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employer
  15. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employer
  16. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employerIdentifying an initial treating providerCommunicationSet expectationsIntroduce the provider to the workplaceEmployers have the right to recommend a treatment facility to an injured workerInjured workers have right to select any provider
  17. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employerSpeak directly with Physician of Record (POR) to obtain treatment plan, anticipated length of recovery and address return to work issues.Assess an injured worker’s motivation toward recovery and return to work, identifying when an injured worker slows down or loses focus on recovery or other return to work barriers.Explain services and benefits of vocational rehabilitation to injured worker and physician office staff. Clarify questions and suggest action plans to promote safe return to workWork with employer to identify/clarify physical demands of job.Identify potential to return to work, with or without restrictions.Promptly coordinate services including therapies, consultations, diagnostic and home services
  18. To reduce overuse, misfills, early refills, drug interactions, and payment for unrelated drugs, our system compares all drug requests against currently prescribed medications for dangerous interactions and early refills.2/1/2012: Existing therapy (one bill within last 90 days) for OxyContin, Opana ER, Exalgo or fentanyl patches is covered without restrictions.  2/1/2012: New prescriptions (no paid bill last 90 days) for OxyContin (GPI 651000751074%), Opana ER (GPI 651000801074%), Exalgo (GPI 651000351075%) and fentanyl patches (GPI 651000250086%) require prior authorization. (All plans) The following Step Therapy applies to new OxyContin, Opana ER, Exalgo and fentanyl patches bills beginning 2/1/2012 (all plans): Morphine sulfate ER - GPI 651000551070% and MSC Y (no limitations, no PA-required), If documented pain treatment failure or allergy to morphine ER,then OxyContin lifetime PA is approved,
  19. 90% of the time, an injured worker will seek medical treatment where directed by the employerSpeak directly with Physician of Record (POR) to obtain treatment plan, anticipated length of recovery and address return to work issues.Assess an injured worker’s motivation toward recovery and return to work, identifying when an injured worker slows down or loses focus on recovery or other return to work barriers.Explain services and benefits of vocational rehabilitation to injured worker and physician office staff. Clarify questions and suggest action plans to promote safe return to workWork with employer to identify/clarify physical demands of job.Identify potential to return to work, with or without restrictions.Promptly coordinate services including therapies, consultations, diagnostic and home services
  20. Prompts for safe behaviors (e.g., handrail use) and warnings (e.g., swinging door)PPE to reduce cuts, burns, slips
  21. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank our panelists…Please join us for our next Restaurant Education Series Event: “Grow Revenue: get online and boost sales” on Monday, October 28 in Columbus. Postcards about the event are over on the table. Also, look for future Restaurant Education Series events by heading to our website, ohiorestaurant.org, under the events tab. Thank you for your participation today and for your continued investment in the Ohio Restaurant Association through membership.