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TEACHERS COLLEGE CALIFORNIA
SCHOOL OF
EDUCATION
SYLLABUS
Professor: Patrick D. Huff
EDOL 502
Educational Technology
Methods
Course
2017
Thursdays 4:30 PM-7:30 PM
West LA/ Main Campus
Room #300
You are what you think…all of the hierarchical structures in my neocortex
that define my personality, skills, and knowledge are the result of my own
thoughts and experiences. The people I choose to interact with and the
ideas and projects I choose to engage in are all primary determinations of
who I become.
-Ray Kurzweil, 2012
"In order to thrive in a digital economy, students will need digital age
proficiencies. It is important for the educational system to make parallel
changes in order to fulfill its mission in society, namely the preparation of
students for the world beyond the classroom. Therefore, the educational
system must understand and embrace the following 21st century skills
within the context of rigorous academic standards "
- NCREL & Metiri Group, 2010
Teachers College California
EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
Syllabus Roadmap
2
Table of Contents:
1.0 Introduction
2.0 Student Learning Objectives
3.0 Logistics
4.0 About the Professor
5.0 Class sessions
6.0 Required text(s)
7.0 Course schedule & assignments
8.0 Assignment clarifications
9.0 Grading standards
10.0 Class notes and workbooks
11.0 Extra credit
12.0 Additional readings & resources
13.0 Appendix-A, Curriculum and
Instructional Design
14.0 Appendix-B, General Concepts and
Design Principles
15.0 Appendix-C, Developing Your Personal
Teaching Beliefs
16.0 Appendix-D.1, Scheduling Assistant
16.0 Appendix-D.2, Scheduling Assistant
16.0 Appendix-D.3, Scheduling Assistant
16.0 Appendix-D.4, Scheduling Assistant
17.0 Appendix-F, The InTASC Model
1.0 Introduction
This course presents an overview of the educational development process from
inception and design through implementation and post-assessment. It considers education in
the broadest sense, that is, as a dynamic personal development process that impacts both the
student in her/his private life as well as in their professional life.
EDOL 502 is designed to not only expose the student to the literature and theories in
educational program development and evaluation but to apply practical and real-world tools
towards implementation. In this case, the focus of the course is to introduce students to: a
range of technologies that have been developed to inspire and enhance the teacher-student
relationship; increase understanding of the nature of human learning; and to explore and learn
how to identify, assess, and select the most appropriate technologies in support of the learning
environment so as to ensure the student’s passion to learn to engaged in the educational
process.
Whenever possible, this class will integrate the student’s knowledge and career
development experiences. The course will cover the following general principles: human
cognitive characteristics specific to learning, understanding the value of technological
intervention and its value as associated with motivation, the learning process, exploring new
and innovative ways of advancing critical learning processes, assessment, and individual growth
evaluations, performance metrics, diagnostics; and, as basic tools of instruction with an
emphasis on the digital classroom and standards of academic mastery and performance
measurement. Guest speakers augment selected course topics as appropriate. These guest
speakers will offer a range of P-12 experiences, higher education observations, and corporate
experiential learning insights.
Class meetings are conducted on the assumption that every educator and organizational
leader will need, at some point in his or her career, to design a learning intervention (e.g., course
or program) to promote an informal agenda, communicate with peers, or foster formal learning.
A primary objective of our time together is to provide the student with a basic operational
framework for the identification of the technologies that are available to integrate into the
learning environment and process from the standpoint of present and emerging web-based
operating software and system applications, tools; to include, the instructional techniques that
Use the radial buttons provided to navigate to each topic
in the table of contents above.
Teachers College California
EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
Syllabus Roadmap
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have been developed to maximize their effectiveness. This course will examine how this new
technology can and is being applied by teachers across a diverse K-12 educational environment
as well as a wide-range of different fields and/or disciplines in the context of the professional
development within institutions and the broader business community.
During this course we will address a variety of considerations that are associated with
the integration of emerging technologies into the process of education and learning in a
systematic way. The exploration of this topic will follow a standard approach where theory and
practice are intertwined and supported by the application of project management skills. That
said, the course utilizes standardized curriculum design, development, evaluation, and
instructional approaches, materials and information that are nationally recognized standards and
practices within the educational community.
This course approach, design, development, applied methods, implementation, and
evaluation plans were inspired by Dr. Jack Gregg, Associate Dean, Graduate Management
Programs, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA.; and by Dr. June Schmieder,
Associate Dean, Educational Doctorate of Leadership Program, College of Education and
Psychology, Pepperdine University; and Hon. John Tobin, US A.L. Judge (Dr. Tobin), and in
this case Dr. Kathleen Plinske, Campus President at Valencia College. Dr. Plinske was
instrumental in awakening me to the power of social media and the Internet as a basis for
supporting research and learning development.
Largely due to the experience and inspiration shared with me by Dr. Plinske while she
was teaching at Pepperdine University, I began a personal journey of discovery of the power of
digital Internet mediums and the emerging web-based software, programs, and dynamic tools
that can be used to improve the life of the educator and learner. As such, much of the
structure, unit modules, objectives, unique devices, instructional tools; emerging digital
assessment and evaluation techniques; and, the associated technical integration styles this course
examines are borrowed from these exceptional educators.
Throughout this course, students will be given the opportunity to develop a course
notebook take can form the basis of a professional educational portfolio that is aligned with
their teaching interests, materials, and information. One of the purposes for developing this
notebook is to further identify and build your personal Interstate Teacher Assessment and
Support Consortium (INTASC) understanding; as well as, increase your appreciation for the
value of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) professional standards
and assistance in increasing your teaching strengths.
1.1 Course Description
This course examines what we know about applying emerging technologies to the art of
effective teaching and learning in the context of the present evolving classroom. As such, the
topics covered take us on a journey of examination and discovery that delve into the very
nature of the human mind and how it functions as associated with the learning process and
how this process is being impacted by multiple emerging technologies.
For this reason, this course has been titled as the Educational Technology Methods
Course. This course emphasizes developing an understanding of the learner, human
information processing, and the various methods or approaches to teaching and the nature of
human learning as integrated by technology. The course undertakes this examination by
conducting an investigation into teacher-learning theories, applied technologies and methods,
instructional tools, the importance of style, classroom management, course content design,
Teachers College California
EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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implementation, assessment, and the application of a digitally-measured self-paced learning
evaluation.
In addition, the course explores the value of applied learning technology tools such as
structured training software and professional websites and/or social media courses that can
improve the learning process by increasing overall student performance outcomes.
Finally, the course is grounded the by examining the value and significance of engaging
and connecting with the student at a basic (inter-personal) level in the context of an integrated
learning technology environment so as to best accomplish learning breakthroughs. Given this,
the course attempts to establish an increased appreciation and understanding of the teacher—
learner partnership where both the teacher and learner can transfer and gain insights and a basis
of shared knowledge, each learning from the other.
2.0 Student Learning Objectives
This College is committed to a learner-centered approach in the programs in offers.
Each program has a set of objectives that a student graduating from the program is expected to
achieve. The knowledge and skills taught in the program are introduced across a collective of
courses, study, and learning objectives. As such, this course is likely to share some of the same
theories, concepts, and resources with others you will encounter in the course of your studies.
After successfully completing this course, a student will be able to:
 Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written scholarly communication
 Be able to apply theory and research to real-world settings
 Demonstrate the ability to synthesize approaches when addressing problems, issues or
dilemmas
 Understand the changing nature of the Internet and information literacy as applicable in
today’s scholarly and practice-oriented environments; expand concept of “mobile learning.”
 Understand the major concepts of educational program development and delivery as
associated with a range of integrated emerging technologies
 Understand the basic principles of curriculum design and increase the understanding and
appreciation of how these can be further empowered through the integration of new
technologies
 Define andragogy its use and value as a model of instruction and approach to learning
through the use of educationally based technologies
 Understand the difference between simple presentation and comprehensive learning
facilitation as instructional tools
 Model the best characteristics of self-directed learning and independent research by
applying technologies
 Recognize the connection between learning styles, teaching styles, and how best to
integrated them with applied technologies
 Apply the concept of “a learning organization” to your leadership style and organizational
career
 Be able to define and apply the concept of organizational learning as a core strategy towards
increasing performance and communities of influence by applying technologies
 Have a fundamental grasp of how to develop a viable technological learning intervention
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EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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such as a class, a course, or a program; and, demonstrate a working knowledge of the
technological integration
 Be able to identify important elements in an educational program plan, to include
conducting its evaluation and assessment by applying a specific web-based technology
or operating system (OS)
 Be able to write-papers that demonstrate the ability to integrate the course learning
objectives so as to apply them to real-world situations by using one or more applied
research and writing web-based technologies
 Write a literature review paper or lead a group facilitation, so as to demonstrate the
difference between merely making a presentation on a relevant topic in the field of
emerging technology application and practice in education as compared to engaging
students in a traditional learning environment and educational process. You may choose to
focus this paper on the pros and cons of the use of technologies in the classroom as viewed
from recent discoveries and research case studies, to include other investigations, insight
form subject matter experts, and/or your personal experiences.
Knowledge (K)
K2: Demonstrate the ability to synthesize approaches to addressing problems, issues or
dilemmas.
K3: Understand how to analyze an organization and the learning process from a social, political,
economic, legal, intercultural, and technological (SPELIT) framework or point of view.
K6: Understand the changing nature of the Internet and information literacy as applicable in
today’s scholarly and practice-oriented environments; expand concept of “mobile learning.”
Skills and Applied Knowledge (S)
S2: Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written scholarly communication; so as to demonstrate
an ability to lead and mentor students within a learning environment.
S3: Be able to apply theory, research and advanced educational techniques and digital tools to
real-world settings.
Attitudes (A)
A1: Value the cultural differences between countries that lead to different solutions to
economic, political, legal and social problems; and engage in expanding your perspective from a
European/North American or global viewpoint.
A2: Provide a powerful vision for the role of education, technology and training when dealing
with various organizational and social challenges and associated behavioral outcomes.
A4: Be able to demonstrate service to others by developing a service leadership plan that
integrates theory and practice into the professional practice of teaching.
Last, it is the objective of this course to explore teaching and learning cognitive
theories, and the various approaches or methods that have been designed to assist teachers
Teachers College California
EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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learn and to improve the transfer of learning to the student as a process of sharing and
understanding the desires, needs, dreams, and expectations of each.
The information provided in this course includes the introduction to and exploration
of advanced methods of study, reflection, questioning, the development of skills or styles
associated with instructional methods while; at the same time, gaining knowledge of new
ways to apply and practicing these methods in professional collaborative and constructive
setting.
Other major topics include: exploring the characteristics of effective and intentional
teaching; understanding student diversity, the examination of social and electronic media
influencers; the application of methods to instructional techniques and style; creating
effective lessons using a variety of approaches and technologies; classroom management;
assessment of student learning; and professional development.
3.0 Logistics
The course meets in room #300 on Thursday evenings from 4:30 until 7:30 as per the
location and schedule published by the College.
4.0 About the Professor
Professor Huff is an adjunct faculty member visiting from private enterprise and the
government services sector. Presently, he is the senior director of research at CRC Research
Consultancy and President of Global Performance Strategies-AG, Inc. in Los Angeles, CA.
where in conjunction to his administrative leadership of the company, he is responsible for
exploring and identifying client needs and desires related to their critical investigative research
requirements, findings, and assistance in developing recommendations. His company’s services
include guiding and developing the research approach to the exploration, design, development,
implementation, assessment, evaluation, administration, and subsequent program and
instrumentation modifications. His company typically gets involved in the creation of
professional or human resource development, building, and/or increasing the value and focus
of knowledge based learning and educational programs as may be applied to adult learners.
Professor has held leadership positions in public higher education (University of
Oklahoma, College of Architecture and Environmental Design; the California Board of
Architects, Oral exam commissioners and examination design and development for the State
board; the Secretary of the Army, acquisition and contract programs, training design and
implementation specific to the Army Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology Office (ASAALT),
Pentagon.
In addition to EDU 501, Professor Huff has taught graduate-level classes in
Engineering, Design, Technology, Program Administration and Construction Management,
Organizational Behavior, Performance Assessment, Leadership, and provided professional
consulting services to numerous public-private corporations. Among these include: Texaco,
Wells Fargo, Pacific Telesis, Hyundai Merchant Marine, General Electric Credit Corp.,
Chevron, Fox Sports, Panavision, Liberty-Telecom, and A&C Writer’s Union, Universal
Studios, Hallmark, Columbia Broadcast Corporation, and University Broadcast Corporation.
These services included the design and development of organizational learning & development,
strategic planning, innovation, and change.
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EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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Patrick holds three Bachelor’s Degrees: one from Wichita State University (Journalism,
Political Science, Geology), one from the University of Oklahoma (Architecture), and a
bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma in Environmental Design; to include a
Master’s Degree from the University of Oklahoma in Architecture.
Presently, professor Huff is completing his Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership from
Pepperdine University, College of Education and Psychology, with plans to complete a Ph.D. in
distance management and applied technologies for international organizations.
Professor Huff is a resident of Southern California where he lives with his wife and
three children and their families (all of which are research scientists and design engineers for a
major California research institute and public power corporation, to include the California
public systems.
4.01 Contact Information:
patrick.huff.usace@gmail.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrick-d-huff-70430010?trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile
Contact Professor Huff
5.0 Class Sessions
In addition to discussing adult learning, we will put theory to practice. Thus, the course will be
run as a graduate level seminar with group discussion of each week’s topics. I will guide the
discussion and contribute to the dialogue, but I will not deliver lengthy lectures. Therefore, it is
imperative that each student completes all of the reading assignments and come to class fully
prepared to discuss the readings, relevant professional experiences, and opinions related to the
topic. Class participation is an essential part of this course grade and is expected. As
such, please limit the use of your laptop during class discussions and guest speaker
presentations.
6.0 Required Texts
1. Biech, E. (2008). ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals, Elaine Biech (ed.) ISD
faster better easier. performance improvement. (6th ed.). Baltimore, Maryland: ASTD Press.
doi: ISBN-10: 1-56286-512-9
2. Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New York:
Viking Penguin.
3. Kurzweil, R. (1999). The age of intelligent machines. Massachusetts: MIT University Press.
4. Khan, Salman (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. (1st
ed.). New York:
MIT University Press. ISBN-10-145508373.
5. Collins, A., & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology (1st ed.)
Teachers College Press.
Use this radial button provided to
navigate back to the table of contents.
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EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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6. Bailey, J., & Schneider, C. (2013). Navigating the digital shift: Implementation strategies
for blended and online learning.
7. Burden, P.R. & Byrd, D. M. (2003). Methods for Effective Teaching (3rd. Edition). Boston, MA: Allyn
& Bacon
8. Felder, R., & Brent, R. (2015). Teaching and learning STEM: A practical guide. New York: Jossey-
Bass.
9. Verzuh, E. (2012). The fast forward MBA in project management-4th ed. New Jersey: John
Wiley & Sons. doi: ISBN 978-0470-24789-1
10. Various articles and readings will be distributed during the course as well as the use of selected
materials extracted from the
In addition to the assigned readings, please read about current developments in the world
of education in publications such as your local newspaper (e.g., The Los Angeles Times, OC
Register, etc.), The Chronicle of Higher Education, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal, and any other
relevant periodicals. Students are encouraged to bring articles, YouTube videos, or other
artifacts to class in order to support discussion points. A portion of class time will be devoted
to current issues that relate to course topics.
7.0 Course Schedule & Assignments
7.01 Week One – 1st
Class meeting: Course Introduction and Areas of Intended
Discovery – Technology and Human Learning
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 1.1)
Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New
York: Viking Penguin.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 1.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused discussion:
a. Overview of this course
b. The influencers and drivers of technology in education.
c. Exploring the human mind and its learning processes.
d. How far has science taken us in terms of a full-integration of digital
technologies and learning in the context of human biological intelligence?
Provide title and outline to the professor of your personal goals paper for this course
Task/Activity No. 1.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.02 Week Two – 2nd
Class meeting: Introduction to Technologies – Future Shock
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 2.1)
Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New
York: Viking Penguin.
Use this radial button provided to
navigate back to the table of contents.
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EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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Kurzweil, R. (2010). How my predictions are faring? 2010, 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.kurzweilai.net/images/How-My-Predictions-Are-Faring.pdf
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 2.2)
Lead by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments,
grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused discussion:
a. How will these technologies affect the future of learning, education, evaluation,
assessments, and related educational and professional credentialing?
b. How will these technologies affect the standards and structure of the present
educational process and supporting system?
c. How will these technologies affect the very nature of human existence?
Sign-up for team facilitation of weekly topics
Task/Activity No. 2.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.03 Week Three – 3rd
Class meeting: Technologies and Their Influence on Teacher-
Learner Relationships – Making the Connection
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 3.1)
Khan, Salman (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. (1st
ed.). New
York: MIT University Press. ISBN-10-145508373.Dublin, L. (2008).
Herrmann-Nehdi, A. (2008). The learner: What we need to know. In E. Biech (Ed.),
ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 213-232) ASTD
Press.
Dublin, L. (2008). Using technology to manage learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD
handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 749-764) ASTD Press.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 3.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused discussion:
a. The influencers and drivers of technology in education
b. Understanding how learners learn, learning styles and more
c. Learn what’s important about the brain in learning
d. Apply learning styles and brain dominance to create effective learning
e. What does technology do to change the future of education, structure,
environments, and teacher-learner relationships
Sign-up for team facilitation of weekly topics
Task/Activity No. 3.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
Use this radial button provided to
navigate back to the table of contents.
Teachers College California
EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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7.04 Week Four – 4th
Class meeting: Technologies and The Effect on Learner Peer-to-
Peer Relationships – A Highly Interactive Strategy
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 4.1)
Lawson, K. (2008). Instructional design and development. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD
handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 233-250) ASTD Press.
Silberman, M. (2008). Active learning strategies. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for
workplace learning professionals (pp. 309-318) ASTD Press.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 4.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. Re-learning how to create learning objectives
b. Re-learning how to create course (unit module) design matrix
c. Understanding how to reinvent the creation of an instructional plan and the
supporting methods
d. Re-examining eight strategies for successful active learning
e. Re-examining engagement with participants in your training sessions
Personal teaching and learning goals paper
(Due this class meeting)
Task/Activity No. 4.3.1
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
and
Sign-up for oral facilitations during this class meeting
Task/Activity No. 4.3.2
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.05 Week Five - 5th
Class meeting: Self-paced Learning and the World Schoolhouse or
Classroom – Factors That Empower a Mobile Learner Environment
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 5.1)
Chapman, B. (2008). Learning technology primer. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook
for workplace learning professionals (pp. 383-406) ASTD Press.
Collins, A., & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology (1st
ed.) Teachers College Press.
Toth, T. A. (2008). Authoring techniques and rapid E-learning. In E. Biech (Ed.),
ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 407-418) ASTD
Press.
Hofmann, J., & Bozath, J. (2008). Distance learning and web-based training. In E. Biech
(Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 453-466)
ASTD Press.
Use this radial button provided to
navigate back to the table of contents.
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Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 5.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. How to use technology to achieve learning goals
b. Targeting technologies to specific learning goals
c. Exploring and understanding how different types of learning technologies can
be applied
d. Re-examining three tools you need to build e-learning
e. programs rapidly
f. Re-examining the value of your old prototypes
g. Re-examining the old secrets of rapid e-learning development
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 5.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.06 Week Six – 6th
Class meeting: Mixed-classroom groups and traditional cultures –
Revising Attitudes About the Slow Learner
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 6.1)
Rossett, A. (2008). Performance support: Anytime, anyplace, including the classroom.
In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp.
439-452) ASTD Press.
Rosenberg, M. J. (2008). Learning meets web 2.0: Collaborative learning. In E. Biech
(Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 467-482)
ASTD Press.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 6.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. Using the technology to harness fingertip knowledge and information to
improve performance
b. Recognizing when to use on-demand resources and when to avoid them
c. Re-examining the understanding of the demands and pressures of modern-day
work and their effects on learning
d. Re-examining collaborative tools and techniques to share knowledge and
improve learning and performance
e. Re-creating a collaborative learning experience
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 6.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
Use this radial button provided to
navigate back to the table of contents.
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EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
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7.07 Week Seven – 7th
Class meeting: Using Technology to Manage Learning – Your
New Role in Guiding Learning and Increasing Performance Outcome
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 7.1)
Dublin, L. (2008). Using technology to manage learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD
handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 749-764) ASTD Press.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 7.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. Re-examining the evolving role of learning management technologies
b. Re-learning some processes for selecting and implementing technologies
c. Re-learning how to incorporate technology into your organizational culture
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 7.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.08 Week Eight – 8th
Class meeting: Technology and Ethics in the Learning Space and
Workplace – Performance and Value Implications
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 8.1)
Estep, T. (2008). Ethics for workplace learning and performance professionals. In E.
Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 845-
860) ASTD Press.
Estep, T. (2008). The evolution of the training profession. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD
handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 9-32) ASTD Press.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 8.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. How could learning technologies be used to corrupt positive performance
outcomes?
b. Why does ethics matter?
c. Re-examining common components in ethics codes for learning institutions and
the profession
d. Re-examining ways to build effective ethics programs in organizations
e. Increasing learning path, milestone measurables, and transparency
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 8.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
Use this radial button provided to
navigate back to the table of contents.
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EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course
Syllabus Roadmap
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7.09 Week Nine – 9th
Class meeting: 21st
Century Technologies and Skills Needed in the
Workplace and Social Environment – Putting it all together
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 9.1)
21st Century, P. (2016). New technologies & 21st century skills., 2016. Retrieved from
http://newtech.coe.uh.edu/index.html
Ray Kurzweil Introduced 300 Secondary-School Students Across Europe to Robotics
and AI in an Interactive Internet Chat Set Up by Xplora, the European Gateway
to Science Education. Originally Published on www.Xplora.org. Published on
KurzweilAI.Net November 9,2005. www.xplora.org. Retrieved from
http://www.kurzweilai.net/online-chat-with-ray-kurzweil-and-european-
schoolnet
Riedel, C. (2014). 10 major technology trends in education., 2016. Retrieved from
https://thejournal.com/articles/2014/02/03/10-major-technology-trends-in-
education.aspx
Phillips, J. J. (2008). Return-on-investment. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for
workplace learning professionals (pp. 555-576) ASTD Press.
Kurzweil, R. (2005). The singularity is near: When humans transcend biology. New
York, NY: Viking Press; Penguin Group, Inc.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 9.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. Looking at the next step
b. Predicting the technology continuum
c. How to prepare for the next generation of disruptive innovation and change
d. When does the return-on-investment diminish?
e. How will the genius pill impact the education and the teacher-learner
relationship in the future?
f. Peer teaching assignment:
How your teaching aligns with and reflects personal philosophy of teaching and
learning in the context of instructional technologies and social media
applications, or interventions when compared to four (4) professional educators
or trainers that could be considered to be subject matter experts in learning
technologies. Compare and contrast your teaching theory, approach, methods,
implementation, instructional style, tools, techniques, methods of assessment
and evaluation as compared to four educators that apply technology in learning:
Example 1 (educator or trainer elected by student)
Example 2 (elected by students)
Example 3 (elected by students)
Example 4 (elected by students)
g. Work in teams to plan and teach a 15 to 20 minute lesson that demonstrates the
teaching strategy/strategies assigned to your group. You will have class time to
work on planning your lesson. If you prefer not to use this class time to work
on this lesson, your group may arrange an alternative time among yourselves to
conduct your planning and the complete the lesson to be presented. You and
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your team will teach the lesson on the date negotiated and approved by the
professor.
h. Apprenticeship teaching analyses : Analyze at least 2 different lessons that you
have taught at your apprenticeship site (if applicable) were you have applied
learning technologies. Include a brief description of your lesson plans,
experiences (inclusion of your lesson plan is optional) and your analysis of your
lesson’s successes and improvement needs.
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 9.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.10 Week Ten – 10th
Class meeting: The Future Role of Education and Learning in the
Age of Intelligent Machines
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 10.1)
Kurzweil, R. (1999). The age of intelligent machines. Massachusetts: MIT University
Press.
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 10.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
a. Develop lesson plans that demonstrate your ability to integrate multiple learning
technologies into a matrix that summarizes key teaching or learning strategies
that demonstrate a coherent, well organized, detailed plans that include the key
elements of lesson plan design.
b. These can be the same plans that you developed for teaching at your
apprenticeship site.
c. You should have at least 2 different lesson plans, each demonstrating the use of
technologies within the context of different teaching strategies.
d. Develop a matrix using this link:
1. Develop a matrix that summarizes key teaching strategies
2. You might use in your subject area, examples of situations in which each
strategy might be appropriate.
e. Be sure to include as part of this how you will use technology as a tool to
enhance student learning. (Group assignment: group size 2-5 students).
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 10.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.11 Week Eleven – 11th
Class meeting: Assessments and evaluations: How technology is
or will affect your teaching methods
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 11.1)
By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings
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Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 11.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
Develop assessments that show your ability to: Use an understanding by design
(UBD) as a template to outline backwards a design process for a lesson/unit that
heavily relies on emerging learning technologies, and then; create a test in your
subject area(s). Assess students using some form of authentic assessment
technology (web-based system) which includes the development of a digital rubric
to evaluate student work. All development and completion of this project in writing
is due at the end of this period. You may utilize the template of your choice to
outline the backward design process for a lesson/unit, and then: create a test in your
subject area. Ideally, this exercise will test your design as you administer it to our
students at your apprenticeship site, or test it using the class as simulated learners.
During this exercise you are to assess the students or mock class by using some
form of authentic assessment. Your assessment should include a rubric that you
would use to evaluate the student or class work. (Group assignment: group size 2-5
students).
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 11.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.12 Week Twelve – 12th
Class meeting: Classroom management:
Your Teaching Methods and Style as Affected by Learning Technologies
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 12.1)
By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 12.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
In-class project: Use the example information provided by the professor to create a
framework for a world schoolhouse (class or course) environment and management
plan. This should include the development of a classroom layout and a matrix of the
types of rules that would apply. Provide a reflective analysis explaining how the
environment you create reflects your philosophy of classroom management and
understanding of student diversity. All development and completion of this project in
writing is due at the end of this period.
You will create this for EDU 501 (this course). Be sure to include in this assignment in
your portfolio or course notebook under a section called general methods. Follow the
guidelines an examples in the information provided in this syllabus, or as provided by
the professor. The product you develop should follow the type of framework described
in the following:
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1. How you plan to set up your classroom in the context of emerging learning
technologies so as to create an environment that reflects your beliefs about teaching,
learning, students and student diversity?
2. What types of rules would you will have in your class and how will learning
technologies affect them?
3. What type of approach would you take for responding to students who do
not follow these rules?
4. Provide a reflective analysis to support your responses to the first three
questions; and, explain how the learning technology environment (world schoolhouse
classroom) you create will reflect your philosophy of classroom management and your
understanding of student diversity.
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 12.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.13 Week Thirteen – 13th
Class meeting: Is the Teacher Ready and Sufficiently Trained
and Equipped to Effectively Engage and Teach in Bold New World
Schoolhouse?
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 13.1)
Khan, Salman (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. (1st
ed.). New
York: MIT University Press. ISBN-10-145508373.
Verzuh, E. (2012). The fast forward MBA in project management-4th ed.. New Jersey:
John Wiley & Sons. doi: ISBN 978-0470-24789-1
By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 13.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
1. Comparing project management applied to teaching and learning in the context of
emerging learning technologies and metrics: A key to thriving in a project-driven
world within the applied technology space.
2. Foundation principles of project management
3. Know your key stakeholders and win their cooperation.
4. Write the rules: Five key documents to manage expectations and define success.
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 13.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.14 Week Fourteen – 14th
Class meeting: Work breakdown structure and the technology
driven world classroom: Breaking your project into manageable mobile
and readily accessible units of work
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 14.1)
By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings
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Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 14.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
1. Work breakdown structure and the technology driven world classroom: Breaking
your project into manageable mobile and readily accessible units of work
2. Re-thinking realistic scheduling in mixed-level collaborative of learners
3. Re-thinking how progress is measured
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 14.3
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
7.15 Week Fifteen: - 15th
Class meeting: Solving new project problems within the
emerging learning technology space: Exploring the detailed planning
model
Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 15.1)
By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings
Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 15.2)
Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design,
structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project
assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations.
Focused Dialogue:
1. Exploring a detailed planning model in the context of emerging technologies.
2. Extra credit - class notebook submittals and preliminary reviews prior to final
submittal for grading. (Optional)
Paper and Class Presentation
Task/Activity No. 15.3.1
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
Class Notebooks are due at the end of this period
Task/Activity No. 15.3.2
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
8.0 Assignment clarifications
8.01 Personal goals paper: In this paper you will present your desired outcomes for this class.
Among the questions to be addressed are:
 What are you hoping to learn from this course?
 How you expect to be able to apply the learning objectives from this course to your
professional life?
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 What is the relevance of the topics in this course to your professional, academic, and/ or
personal interests?
As this paper is personal and subjective, there are no right or wrong answers. Please be honest
in addressing the issues. The paper will be evaluated based on the thoroughness with which you
address, the issues, its clarity, and the quality of writing. As a general guideline, this paper
will be a minimum of five pages.
Due date: the papers are due during the class period you have signed up for or as
established (negotiated) with the professor.
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
8.02 Papers and supporting class presentations or facilitation
8.02.01 Each student will write a paper outlining his or her real-world application of one or
more of the concepts presented in this course. The paper may be retrospective or prospective
(i.e.: how you have applied the relevant concepts or how you will apply them). While the paper
is primarily a first-person account, it must be based on course learning objectives, grounded in
the literature, and cited appropriately. Among the questions you might want to address in this
paper are:
 What were the most relevant concepts from the course to you?
 How do those concepts impact you professionally?
 What have you learned from this course that has significantly impacted you professionally
as you have progressed through this course?
 What are the key concepts presented in this course that you believe will make an impact on
your professional success as you move forward in your career?
 Knowing what you know after taking this course, what will you do differently from now
on?
8.02.01 As you answer these questions, be as specific as possible. The important criteria in this
paper are application and specificity. Your success with this paper will depend not only on how
well you demonstrate an understanding of concepts, but on how well you are able to apply
them to real world situations. The more specificity you bring to your discussion, the better the
application will be.
8.02.03 As a general guideline, this paper will be a minimum of 10 pages.
Due date: the papers and presentations are due during the class period you have signed
up for or as established (negotiated) with the professor.
(See assignment tracker in appendices)
8.03 Options: Note, There are TWO options for this assignment. You are to choose
only ONE option that best serves your professional development and/or academic
agenda.
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8.03.01 Option A: Review of Literature Paper: A student selecting this option will write a
thorough, in-depth literature review paper on one of the major topics from this course. The
subject may be any of the major topics of the course (e.g.: Principles of Human Learning,
Principles of Instructional Methods, Cognitive and Learning Methods Theory, Learning
Engagement, Relationships Between Teaching and Learning Methods, The Application of
Program or Instructional Methods in Corporate, Non-Traditional, or Distance Learning
Environments as effected by current or emerging learning technologies). Feel free to provide
your own “slant” or point of view, but the paper must be research-based and thorough. If you
are contemplating an education-based dissertation, this paper may serve as a good portion of
your literature review. I anticipate this paper to be in the neighborhood of 10 pages.
--OR--
8.03.02 Option B: Course Design Practicum Paper. A student selecting this option will
choose a course topic (for example, your dissertation topic or an area of personal or
professional interest) and design a real or a hypothetical full term-length course or possibly a
degree program of instruction based upon a thorough needs assessment, target audience
analysis, etc. that includes all the elements of instructional design as discussed in the course
readings, guest speaker presentations, and class discussions. The paper should include sections
on learning objectives, discussion of learning technology course or unit design methodology,
course assignments, assessments, grading rubrics, financial concerns such as cost budgeting &
student pricing, implementation issues, and other topics based upon a comprehensive review of
the literature to justify your choices and decisions with an emphasis on learning technologies.
8.03.03 The purpose of the options is to provide you with an opportunity for practical
application and professional skill development based upon rigorous analysis and research. As
such, the professor requests the framework for student research and the associated approach to
their papers follow the most recently published APA guidelines and methods.
I would also like to encourage your creativity and innovation in terms of curriculum design, use
of learning technologies, instructional methodologies, and/or emerging educational needs that
best serve your learning and/or program needs as associated with this course. I anticipate this
paper to be in the neighborhood of 10 pages.
Due date: End of class as published in the schedule located in the appendix of this
syllabus, or as established (negotiated) with the professor.
8.04 Oral Facilitation/Presentations: Each student (and/or the designated student groups at
are arranged during the assignment sign-ups) will deliver an oral facilitation/ presentation of his
or her selected topic(s) for this assignment and related options. See the detailed scheduling
assistant in appendix. This facilitated discussion led by you and your group should be between
15 and 20 minutes in duration (including questions and discussion). Please share your findings,
but do not read your presentation or paper to the class. This facilitation/presentation will
be graded on your facilitation/presentation delivery skills as well as its content (and timing is
important. A firm 20-minute delivery deadline will be enforced.
Remember: This is facilitation – not a presentation. I integrate the modifier presentation, as
you may choose to use a form of presentation as a tool to conduct your facilitation. You will
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be expected to engage the class using best practices (methods) as extracted from the course
materials, text, and/or suggested additional readings, videos, or other information presented in
our class discussions.
Due date: As published in the schedule located in the appendix of this syllabus, or as
established (negotiated) with the professor during signing up for the task or activity.
9.0 Grading Standards
9.01 Written work will be graded based on the thoroughness of topical coverage, the quality of
the research, and the quality of the writing. Papers should be written in adherence to APA style.
http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/basics-tutorial.aspx . Your papers should be written at
a level consistent with a doctoral-level program.
9.02 Papers and presentations that are submitted late are not eligible for full credit. Any
request for a deadline extension must be made prior to the deadline. With or without a
deadline extension any paper that is one to six days late will be reduced by one grade (for
example, from A- to B+). A paper that is seven to 13 days late will be reduced by two grades
(e.g.: A- to B). A paper 14 days late or more will be reduced by three grades (A- to B-). You
must complete all work in order to receive a passing grade for the course.
9.03 Oral facilitations will be graded based on both delivery and content. The other students
in the class are your peers and are genuinely interested in hearing about your topic. Present your
information in a way that will be useful and interesting to your colleagues. A big portion of your
grade for your oral presentation will be based on the level of engagement of your audience.
Remember to practice what you have learned about andragogy.
9.04 Class participation is a vital component of this course. You will be graded on the
quality of your contributions as well as the quantity. You are expected to contribute to the class
discussion every week; therefore your attendance is essential. Good class participation consists
of attentive engagement with the professor, guest speakers, and your fellow students. E.g.,
laptop use of email or mobile phone texting does not signal class engagement.
9.05 Peer Review. As you may know, peer reviews are critical to becoming an accomplished
researcher, teacher, and presenter that inspires students to become engaged as life learners.
That said, in addition to your instructor’s evaluation of your class participation, written
assignments, and oral presentations, be aware that your fellow classmates will be asked to
provide critical and positive feedback in the context of an in-class peer review process as
associated with your individual and group contributions. When peer reviews are requested by
the professor from the class, an assessment rubric and survey will be distributed. This
information will be provided the students participating in the class so as to utilize this
information as a guide towards developing their presentations.
9.06 Grading Assignments and Weight Max. Percent % Points
 1st
Paper and facilitation 10% 10
(Task/activity No. as elected by student)
 2nd
Paper (Task/activity No.) 10% 10
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(Task/activity No. as elected by student)
 3rd
Paper (Task/activity No.) 10% 10
(Task/activity No. as elected by student)
 4th
Paper (Task/activity No.) 10% 10
(Task/activity No. as elected by student)
 Oral Facilitations (Covers tasks/activity No.(s)) 40% 40
(Task/activity No. as elected by student)
 Readings and class participation 20% 20
(Covers tasks/activity No.(s), not optional)
Maximum total points (available) 100% 100
9.06.01 Student work requirement clarification: Each student must elect to participate in no
less than developing and submitting four papers on the topic(s) of their choice as mutually
agreed upon in their class negotiations.
9.06.02 Extra Credit Points: Maximum total points (available) for the extra credit assignment
(14 points) of completing a course notebook may be added to a student’s cumulated course
points, but in no event shall the extra credit points exceed a total point score for the course that
exceeds a total of 100 points. As an example should a student’s total points accumulated for all
class assignments, participation, and presentations add to 96 points, and has requested and
received 5 points credit for completed extra credit work, the total points the student will be
awarded for the class is will not exceed 100 points.
Academic Integrity
9.07 Cheating and plagiarism: Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated. The College’s
academic integrity policy will be followed; there are no exceptions. If you are unfamiliar with
the College’s policy, please consult the requisite articles or portions of the Academic Catalog,
dealing with Student Conduct.
Attendance
9.08 Attendance: This is a participatory, team-focused course; hence, attendance at each class
session is mandatory. Excused absences must be arranged with the professor well in advance to
allow for additional or reallocated assignments. If a student is ill on the day of class, contact the
professor immediately (to allow arrangements resulting in the student to keep their germs to
him or herself!); if a student is a presenter on a day when likely to be absent, the student WILL
arrange for a substitute.
Writing proficiency
9.09 Writing proficiency: At the graduate level, students are expected to have mastered
advanced composition skills, to include sentence/ paragraph structure, grammar, punctuation,
and spelling. Excessive errors may result in referral to the writing program or other
rehabilitative disposition.
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Maintaining copies of assigned course work for program evaluation
9.10 Copies of course work submitted for grades: The College evaluates its programs on an
ongoing basis. The data from such evaluations provide us with information to help improve
the quality of the educational experience we provide our students. In addition, the data are
used by our accrediting bodies, such as the Western Association of Schools and Colleges
(WASC). California Council on Teacher Credentials, and the American Psychological
Association (APA), to make decisions as to whether we can maintain our accredited status with
these respective associations. To this end, we may archive copies of the papers, examinations,
exercises, etc. that students complete as part of their required course work so that we can track
if students appear to be meeting the objectives of the program in which they are enrolled.
Names will be removed from the assignments we opt to archive for evaluation purposes. If
you prefer that your course work not be archived for evaluation purposes, please let me
know immediately so that I can make such a notation in the files I keep for each
student who enrolls in my courses.
Code of conduct
9.11 Code of conduct: The College strives to create a learning environment which is
respectful of the rights and dignity of all members of our learning community. Students are
expected to conduct themselves in a collegial, respectful, and professional manner while
participating in all activities associated with this course. Students are expected to exhibit
behaviors and attitudes consistent with appropriate ethical-legal standards, and to refrain from
any fraudulent, dishonest, or harmful behaviors such as plagiarism, cheating, or harassment,
which compromise the integrity of the academic standards of the College and/or impact the
safety and security of fellow students, staff, and faculty. Failure to comply with appropriate
standards of conduct may result in a grade of “F” in the course and dismissal from the
program.
Respectful discourse
9.12 Respect discourse: The College values and respects the perspectives and diversity of our
students in regard to ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status,
religion, age, and ability status. Thus, it is critical that classroom discussions include respectful
dialogue about any issue that impacts the lives of our students, and the individuals, families, and
communities that our students serve.
Plagiarism
9.13 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is commonly understood in the academic community to involve
taking the ideas or words of another and passing them off as one’s own. When paraphrasing or
quoting an author directly, one must credit the source appropriately. Plagiarism is not tolerated
at the College.
Disability statement
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9.14 Disabilities: Any student with a documented disability (physical, learning, or
psychological) needing academic accommodations should contact the Disability Services
Officer (School Campus) as early in the semester as possible. All discussions will remain
confidential. Please visit the College’s website for additional information.
10.0 Class notes and workbooks
10.01 This requirement is custom tailored to each class group by the professor once all
participants are confirmed as fully enrolled in the class and have successfully completed the first
two weeks.
10.02 Maintaining a class notebook or workbook can the counted as extra credit work. See
notes on extra credit work and related point structure and conditions.
10.03 See appendix for additional information pertaining to completing requirements to receive
extra credit points associated with submitting class notes and/or workbook.
11.0 Extra credit
11.0.1 Students be request a “one time only” extra credit assignment from the professor. The
ability to be granted this opportunity is at the sole discretion of the professor and is subject to a
set of minimum standards and a performance evaluation rubric specially designed for the
negotiated extra credit assignment or project.
11.0.2 If elected and successfully completed, the student will be entitled to a maximum of 14
points.
12.0 Additional readings and resources
12.01 This course is designed for students to be enabled to conduct intensive and independent
research in association with each of the selected topics and learning objectives.
12.02 The following additional readings and resources provided are to assist each student in
located information and other literature that supports the course learning objectives and
individual learner advanced appreciation and understanding of each lesson’s objectives.
12.03 This additional information offers another voice or perspective to appreciating and
understanding the material. Looking into what the additional readings and resources offer the
learner will enhance your learning experience, advanced understanding, and increase personal
enjoyment in class participation.
12.04 The following is the recommended list of readings and information resources:
Printed and electronic text references:
21st Century, P. (2016). New technologies & 21st century skills., 2016. Retrieved from
http://newtech.coe.uh.edu/index.html
Bailey, J., & Schneider, C. (2013). Navigating the digital shift: Implementation strategies for
blended and online learning.
Cavallone, J. (2016). Technology in education: A blueprint for a successful foundation. New
York: CreateSpace Independent Publishing.
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Chapman, B. (2008). Learning technology primer. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for
workplace learning professionals (pp. 383-406) ASTD Press.
Collins, A., & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology (1st ed.)
Teachers College Press.
Dublin, L. (2008). Using technology to manage learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook
for workplace learning professionals (pp. 749-764) ASTD Press.
Estep, T. (2008). Ethics for workplace learning and performance professionals. In E. Biech
(Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 845-860) ASTD
Press.
Estep, T. (2008). The evolution of the training profession. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook
for workplace learning professionals (pp. 9-32) ASTD Press.
Gardner, J., N. (2007). In Kurzweil R. (Ed.), The intelligent universe: AI, ET, and the emerging
mind of the Cosmos. Massachusetts: MIT University Press.
Herrmann-Nehdi, A. (2008). The learner: What we need to know. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD
handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 213-232) ASTD Press.
Hofmann, J., & Bozath, J. (2008). Distance learning and web-based training. In E. Biech (Ed.),
ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 453-466) ASTD Press.
Khan, S. (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. Massachusetts: MIT
University Press.
Kurzweil, R. (1999). The age of intelligent machines. Massachusetts: MIT University Press.
Kurzweil, R. (2005). The singularity is near: When humans transcend biology ["Ray Kurzwell is
the best person I know at predicting the future of artificial intelligence. His intriguing
new book envisions a future in which information technologies have advanced so far
and fast that they enable humanity to transcend its biological limitations - transforming
our lives in ways we can't yet imagine", Bill Gates.]. New York, NY: Viking Press;
Penguin Group, Inc.
Kurzweil, R. (2010). How my predictions are faring? 2010, 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.kurzweilai.net/images/How-My-Predictions-Are-Faring.pdf
Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New York:
Viking Penguin.
Kurzweil, R. (2016). Ray Kurzweil biography: The Kurzweil Collection., 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.kurzweilai.net/ray-kurzweil-biography
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Kurzweil, R., & Grossman, T. M. D. (2004). Fantastic voyage: Life long enough to live forever.
Massachusetts: MIT University Press.
Kurzweil, R., & Sarnow, K. (2005). Online chat with Ray Kurzweil and European Schoolnet.
Paper presented at the Online Chat with Ray Kurzweil and European Schoolnet.
November 9, 2005 by Ray Kurzweil
Ray Kurzweil Introduced 300 Secondary-School Students Across Europe to Robotics and AI in
an Interactive Internet Chat Set Up by Xplora, the European Gateway to Science
Education. Originally Published on www.Xplora.org. Published on KurzweilAI.Net
November 9,2005. www.xplora.org. Retrieved from http://www.kurzweilai.net/online-
chat-with-ray-kurzweil-and-european-schoolnet
Lawson, K. (2008). Instructional design and development. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook
for workplace learning professionals (pp. 233-250) ASTD Press.
McManis, L. D., & Gunnewig. (2012). Finding the education in educational technology with
early learners., 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.naeyc.org/yc/files/yc/file/201205/McManis_YC0512.pdf
Phillips, J. J. (2008). Return-on-investment. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace
learning professionals (pp. 555-576) ASTD Press.
Richards, J. W., Kurzweil, R., & Gilder, G. (2001). In Richards J. w. (Ed.), Are we spiritual
machines? Ray Kurzweil vs. the critics of strong A.I. Massachusetts: Discovery
Institute; MIT University Press.
Riedel, C. (2014). 10 major technology trends in education., 2016. Retrieved from
https://thejournal.com/articles/2014/02/03/10-major-technology-trends-in-
education.aspx
Rosenberg, M. J. (2008). Learning meets web 2.0: Collaborative learning. In E. Biech (Ed.),
ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 467-482) ASTD Press.
Rossett, A. (2008). Performance support: Anytime, anyplace, including the classroom. In E.
Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 439-452) ASTD
Press.
Silberman, M. (2008). Active learning strategies. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for
workplace learning professionals (pp. 309-318) ASTD Press.
Toth, T. A. (2008). Authoring techniques and rapid E-learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD
handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 407-418) ASTD Press.
Wardle, F. (2012). The role of technology in early childhood programs., 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=302
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Petrina, Stephen (2006). Advanced Teaching Methods for the Technology Classroom., British
Columbia University Press. ISBN-10 1599043378
Electronic or digital mobile learning publication references:
Code Red (Producer), & Elon Musk (Director). (2016). Elon musk: Full interview: Code
conference 2016. [Video/DVD]: Retrieved from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsixsRI-Sz4;
MIT Electronic Press (Producer), & Khan, S. (Director). (2012). Rethinking education: Sal
khan, 3 MIT degrees, 85, 487, 485 lessons delivered. [Video/DVD] MIT: Retrieved
from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9JCpMCQ5qM
MIT Electronic Press (Producer), & Khan, S. (Director). (2013). Sal khan's big idea.
[Video/DVD] Khan, S. Studios. Retrieved from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivGtcjM_ZbU
Khan, S. (Producer), & Khan, S. (Director). (2014). Khan academy - the future of education.
[Video/DVD] New York: Khan Academy. Retrieved from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5WkPM1Dghs
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“The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive
advantage in the future.”
Arie De Geus, Head of Planning, Royal Dutch/Shell
(Senge, 1994)
Applying advanced technologies is critical when aligning learning to student desires and needs
when assisting them in building the skills necessary to empower them to enter the world fully
empowered to be agents of change and innovation.
Dr. June Schmeider, 2014
Associate Dean & Professor
Pepperdine University
College of Education and Psychology
Doctorate of Education in Organizational Leadership Program
As a teacher and coach…I help students gain clarity about their professional objectives and
how they can build balance in their life.
United States
Dr. Jack Gregg, 2014
Associate Dean, Graduate Management Programs at Loyola Marymount University
Pepperdine University Professor
It is my pleasure to welcome you to this College and this course.
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13.0 Appendix - A
Cognitive Development and Effectiveness of Methodologies in Teaching
and Instructional Design
Advanced Teaching Methods for the Technology Classroom
by P.D. Huff
I. Introduction
Teachers have had a century of freedom in designing and customizing their curriculum
and instruction to suit themselves, their community, or the students. This had advantages in
offering diversity. The disadvantages, however, were related to inconsistencies from school to
school. When the teacher departed from a school she/he typically departed with the curriculum
and instructional materials. New teachers often began their first school year with little more
than what they carried with them from their teacher preparation programs and student teaching
experiences.
One major problem was that when it came time for governments to identify priorities
in the schools, innovative instructional methods, tools, and advanced technologies were
overlooked. As international trends are quickly shifting toward standards and unified
curriculum in design, a central focus on developing consistent scopes and sequences of content
for the study of curriculum design and instruction while maintaining an eye on including
significant content improvements becomes a major challenge.
Common curriculum and goals along with content and performance standards are the
trends. From a perspective of professional vitality and political finesse, these trends are healthy.
These trends offer the potential for long-term sustainability of technology studies in the
schools. Nevertheless, given that all curricula are fallible and have shortcomings, teachers will
always have a need for dispositions toward, or skills and knowledge in, curriculum and
instructional design. The questions "what should be learned?" and "how should it be organized
for teaching?" are eventually resolved, whether by consensus, fiat or might, through processes
of curriculum and instructional design. One is basically a question of content, the other a
question of form. Neither can be resolved without changing the other— the questions are
dialectically related. We can say that curriculum and instructional design involve the forming of
educational content and the contents of educational forms. Curriculum theorists take it for
granted that curriculum flows from the "what" of "what should be learned?" Instructional
designers take it for granted that instruction flows from the "how" of "how should it be
organized?"
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1.0 Theory
Curriculum and Instruction for teachers often neglects theory. Teachers, however,
cannot afford to neglect either theory or design; they have to be theorists and designers. In this
chapter, curriculum and instructional design are explained along with a focus on the design of
projects, units and modules. This chapter combines background knowledge with techniques of
curriculum and instructional design. In some of the previous chapters, the emphasis was on
"what should be learned?" This chapter focuses on "how should it be organized for teaching?"
2.0 Academic rationalism
Academic rationalist orientations are primarily about disciplinary knowledge and
cultural canons. Cognitive process orientations are primarily about intellectual reasoning skills
such as problem solving. Self-actualization, or personal relevance, orientations stress
psychological conditions and are concerned with individuality and personal expression. Social
reconstruction, generally called critical pedagogy, stresses sociological conditions, social justice
and collective reform. Utilitarian orientations are primarily concerned with functional
competencies, performance, procedure and instructional efficiency. Curriculum designs are
conceptually grounded in any one or a mix of these orientations.
In 1992, a special issue of the Journal of Technology Education was published to
explore each of these five designs (see Herschbach and Sanders, 1992). A basic conclusion from
this is that generic, neutral theoretical orientations and designs for organizing curriculum simply
do not exist (Beyer and Apple, 1988; Eisner, 1979; Zuga, 1989).
Nevertheless, theorists of these five designs play into the hands of educators and policy
makers who for centuries ranked curriculum by political value: liberal arts and university
preparation curriculum are valued over practical or technical curriculum. Four theoretical
orientations, generally ranked in the order previously introduced, hold not only historical status,
but also theoretical status over the instrumental or utilitarian curriculum. Furthermore, theorists
conflated utilitarian orientations with technology, making things more confusing. As a result,
curriculum and instruction any school curriculum that takes "practical" work as its subject has a low theoretical
status and, as it has nearly always been, a questionable historical status.
Today, business, home economics and technology in the curriculum connote
instrumental, transmissivity and technical practices. Historically, business educators, home
economists and technology educators may have designed instrumental curriculum, but this was
never any more instrumental or utilitarian than the arts, humanities, math, or sciences for
instance.
Other theorists conclude that there are three basic orientations to curriculum: transitive and
transformative curriculums or technical, practical, and emancipatory curriculums. If we can hold off on
ranking these, there is great value in theorizing transmissivity, transitive and transformative
orientations to curriculum. In fact, teachers can be quite empowered by the knowledge and
skills in designing curriculum that is at times trans missive, and other times trans active or
transformative.
A trans missive orientation typically means that information is transmitted from teacher
to students. For example, safety procedures are best taught from a trans missive orientation.
Here, the teacher simply has to say "pay attention, this is the way it is done— step 1 through
step 6."
A trans active orientation typically means that the question "what should be learned?" is
democratically negotiated. Here, the teacher may work with small groups and say: "Let's discuss
Teachers College California
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your ideas for how we should handle this situation." In a transformative mode, the teacher
provides content and methods that are truly empowering for the students. For example, the
teacher may provide a civil liberties lesson that empowers the students to take advantage of
their freedoms of speech in a zine or on a web site. There are time when teachers consciously
ought to be trans missive and other times when they ought to be in a trans active or
transformative mode. The key is to know and recognize the difference in designing curriculum.
In 1949, Ralph Tyler summed up centuries of curriculum design into four simple steps. For Tyler,
the process of curriculum design amounted to a way of resolving four questions, or a rationale:
1. What educational purposes should the school seek to attain?
2. How can learning experiences be selected which are likely to be useful in attaining
these purposes?
3. How can learning experiences be organized for effective instruction?
4. How can the effectiveness of learning experiences be evaluated?
3.0 Teaching Methods and Instructional Tools
Selecting an appropriate teaching method and series of instructional tools is critical to
success in achieving the learning objectives in the classroom. Particularly challenging is being
able to read where the student is coming from, what their level of interest or passion is, and
being able to determine the environmental factors or drivers that are influencers to their
learning process (Schmeider, 2014). As referenced in some of my other course instructional
materials, in the 1960s, educational experts such as Hilda Taba reduced Tyler's teaching
rationale to a simple set of steps so as to achieve a connection between the teacher and the
learner. Professor Huff has taken Taba’s and Tyler’s process and modified as outlined in the
following:
1. Diagnose the learner’s needs
2. Identify and formulate the learner’s objectives
3. Select a content that meets the learner’s objectives
4. Organize the content in ways that best enable the engagement of the learner
5. Identify and select activities and experiences that best enable the learner
6. Assess and evaluate the teaching method applied and make the necessary
improvements
6. Organize a methodical learning experience so as in ensure continuing learner interest,
engagement, and passion
7. Reassess and determine the effectiveness of the process towards the learner’s
objectives and needs
It is a good practice to introduce content and teaching methods that involve extremely
relevant questions about the world as it is today. Each time teachers purchase educational
software, a textbook, wood for carpentry or other materials from a vendor, they are addressing
questions about what kind of student and world they want and what will inspire them to begin
their journey in a life of continuing discovery and learning. Each time that teachers assign a
project, design an activity or curriculum materials they address these questions which are critical
to identifying and selecting the methodologies that are best fit to apply.
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Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
Note: This course places emphasis on those areas of the teaching process that have
been highlighted in yellow.
4.0 The selection of appropriate methods
In the next section, the background and process of instructional design, exploration,
and selection of the appropriate teaching methods are explained. The intent is to move from
theory utilizing the outlines stepped procedure to the appropriate and most effective teaching
methods as a means to connect with learners.
All aspects of the traditional
learning unit module are
affected by technologies
All aspects of the traditional
learning unit module are
affected by technologies
Teachers College California
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Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
Note: This course places emphasis on those areas of the teaching process that have
been highlighted in yellow.
5.0 Model of the Learner – A Methods Integration Process
Unable to completely identify with Tyler's rationale, instructional designers contrived an
ID rationale:
1. For whom is the program developed? (characteristics of learners or trainees)
2. What do you want the learners or trainees to learn or demonstrate? (objectives)
3. How is the subject or skill best learned? (instructional strategies)
4. How do you determine the extent to which learning is achieved? (evaluation
procedures); and, similar to Taba's simplification of curriculum design, instructional designers
reduce the ID to a simple procedure (Fig. 9.3).
Not wanting to limit ID to isolated instructional episodes and events, designers
extended the notion of an instructional system to include a larger share of curriculum design.
Basically since the 1970s, the process of ID included:
1. Analysis of Needs, Goals and Priorities
2. Analysis of Resources, Constraints, and Alternate Delivery Systems
3. Determination of Scope and Sequence of Curriculum and Courses; Delivery Systems
Design
4. Determining Course Structure and Design
5. Analysis of Course Objectives
6. Definition of Performance Objectives
7. Preparing Lessons Plans (or Modules)
8. Developing, Selecting Materials, Mass Media
9. Assessing Student Performance (Performance Measures)
6.0 Designing and Developing Effective Learning
Ned Herrmann
Ned Herrmann was one of the first to study the human brain within the context of
business and how individuals think as pertaining to establishing preferences that affect the way
they work, learn, and communicate. Herrmann developed the Herrmann Whole Brain Model,
which concluded that the brain has four distinct types of thinking: rational, practical, feeling,
and experimental functions.
However, each person tends to favor one type of thinking over the others. To gauge
what type of thinking an individual favors and to what degree, Herrmann developed the
Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument in 1979. By gaining an understanding of their
preferred thinking styles, individuals can be motivated to improve in other styles and types of
behavior.
In 1988, Herrmann published The Creative Brain, which traced the historical and
scientific background of his ideas. Later he expanded his ideas and showed how to apply them
in his, The Whole Brain Business Book (1996).
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There are eight general principles of C&I design, which were articulated rather clearly
by the University of Guelph (Fig. 9.4):
Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
Note: This course places emphasis on those areas of the teaching process that have
been highlighted in yellow.
7.0 Can Stress Affect Learning and Retention
Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007
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8.0 The Learning Centers of the Human Brain
Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007
Teachers College California
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In the first half of the book, we explained the theory that underwrites the adoption,
design or creation of C&I and materials, such as overheads, videos and manipulatives. In the
first and second chapters, we emphasized the goals of formal communication, noting that the
materials and resources you create and use reflect on your professionalism. Visuals (images,
text, etc.) play an essential role in the communication of both procedural and propositional
knowledge. Visuals reinforce our demonstrations and the image our students develop of the
demonstrator.
An additional reason to create effective visuals relates to the accommodation of
different learning styles. Some students are visual learners. Visuals and manipulatives are
supported by learning theories. For example, Dale's Cone of Experience arranges the three
major modes of learning (Enactive (direct experience), Iconic (pictorial experience) and
Symbolic (highly abstract experience) into a hierarchy. This helps us to understand the
interrelations among the three modes. They reinforce each other.
We did not, however, address the evaluation of C&I resources, or the criteria that
teachers use for adoption. Criteria for evaluating products of C&I are divided into four
categories: Content, Instructional Design, Technical Design, and Ecological and Social
Considerations.
Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007
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There are also additional media-specific criteria. Teacher-evaluators must be aware of
general learning resource considerations in these four general areas (Table 9.2). Table 9.2.
General Criteria for Evaluating C&I Materials (BC MOE, 2000)
Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007
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9.0 Standard Evaluation Rubric
Specific criteria apply to the evaluation of materials, in addition to our general criteria.
An example digital resources evaluation form from British Columbia is provided below.
Evaluation Rubric
Form
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Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
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Given what we know about digital and instructional design, the following general
considerations for selecting websites ought to be considered.
Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
In the mid1920s, Henry Morrison (1926, 1931) combined the initial notion of unit (i.e.,
unit of experience) with disciplinary notions for his practices in the secondary school at the
University of Chicago. Here, unit meant a large block of related subject matter, which provided
a theme, combined with activities, problems and projects over several weeks to generate
understandings of the theme and related knowledge. For example, Morrison used themes such
as the French Revolution in history, and the Earth as a Planet in science. The form of a unit
was divided into five steps:
1. Exploration— teacher explores what students know through pre-test and discussion
2. Presentation— teacher provides a concrete sketch of the unit and theme
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3. Assimilation—students scatter for individualized and small-group work; teacher
evaluates
4. Organization— teacher organizes knowledge, represents unit and theme
5. Recitation— students demonstrate attitudes, knowledge and skill; public
performances
By the 1950s, the form of a unit was generally a combination of Kilpatrick's idea of a
project and Morrison's ideas. Our current form for a unit was established at this time as a
progression from an introductory phase through constructive and culminating phases. A unit is
basically a three day to three-week progression that includes methods such as activities,
modules, projects, lessons and demonstrations that coalesce around a theme (Fig. 9.7).
Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
The very form of the unit is designed to discourage fence sitting. Neutrality and apathy
on the part of the students are signs that their core beliefs and feelings have not been touched
by the unit. Normative units hold a possibility for providing insight into controversial issues
such as those listed in Chapter 4 (Fig. 9.8).
All aspects of the traditional
learning unit module are
affected by technologies
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Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
10.0 Modules
In the early 1970s, an individualized learning package or container for modular teaching
was called a module— "a self-contained, independent unit of a planned series of learning
activities designed to help the student accomplish certain well-defined objectives." Modules are
freestanding, self-contained and comprehensive instructional packages, meaning that basically
everything that the student needs is in the module. Whereas a unit is directed by the teacher and
may involve the use of modules, a module provides for self-direction, or self-paced learning of
a realm of content.
In the late 1980s and through the 1990s, modules became immensely popular in
England and Scotland in a context of "flexible learning," educators' response to flexible
economics. One proponent of modularity referred to this proliferation in higher education as
"The Container Revolution," reflected in the 700+ modules at Oxford Polytechnic. Modules
are currently a world-wide phenomenon and the preferred containers for distance education via
the world wide web.
All aspects of the traditional
learning unit module are
affected by technologies
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The basic form of modules was established by instructional designers in the 1970s (Fig.
9.9).
Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf
Module Objectives Pre-Test Rationale Interactivities Post-Test Resources Attitudes
Knowledge Skills Quiz Discussion Prior Learning Assessment Relevance Justifications
Activities Multimedia Problems Assessment Links Projections Figure 9.9.
Modules are immensely popular and extremely important for anyone interested in the
development of digital learning resources and on-line education. Most schools are moving
toward mixed modes of teaching, which invariably involves the use of digital modules. Modules
need not be digital, but a vast majority are taking a digital form in this context. In the next
section, the details of a digital module format are provided. In technology studies, the
popularity of modular instruction increased throughout the 1990s. In 2001 in the US, 72.5% of
technology education programs in public schools were using teacher-made modules and 48.5%
use commercial modules (Sanders, 2001). During the 1990s, the commercial production of
modules became an attractive endeavor for vendors who marketed their modules at prices
ranging from $8.00 for a paper packet to $12,980.00 for integrated learning systems (Petrina,
1993).
It is important to stress that there are two connotations of modules: (1) The self-
contained instructional (often digital) packages already described; and (2) Self-contained
instructional packages integrated within a self-contained architectural station. This second type
refers to modular "stations" that are basically self-contained mini-facilities.
All aspects of the traditional
learning unit module are
affected by technologies
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We can think of the first type as software modules and the second type as a integrated
stations of software, hardware and architecture (Chapter 11). Hence, modules range from do-it-
yourself packages to desk-top trainers to architectural spaces defined by specialized equipment.
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14.0 Appendix - B
General Concepts and Design Principles
There are many different concepts that can guide in the selection of learner instructional
methods, development, implementation, and review as associated with all types of curricula at
both the program and course level. Of these considerations are the following as extracted from
Helen Mongan-Rallis:
1.0 Course Outcomes
In Interstate New Teacher
Assessment and Support
Consortium (INTASC)
Standards & MN Standards of
Effective Practice
National Educational
Technology Standards for
Teachers (NETS-T)
UMD Education Department
Conceptual Framework
Themes
(a conceptual framework)
1. Knowing subject
matter
2. Human development
and learning
3. Diversity in learning
4. Variety of instructional
strategies
5. Motivation and
management
6. Communication skills
7. Instructional planning
skills
8. Assessment
9. Reflection and
responsibility
10. Relationships and
partners
1. Technology
operations and
concepts
2. Planning and
designing effective
learning
environments and
experiences
3. Teaching, learning
and the curriculum
4. Assessment and
evaluation
5. Productivity and
professional practice
6. Social, ethical, legal,
and human issues
1. Diversity (D)
2. Reflection (R)
3. Empowerment (E)
4. Collaboration (C)
5. Technology (T)
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2.0 An example of a philosophy of education
My Educational Philosophy
By Kelly Lent
I believe that in order for a teacher to be a successful teacher, they must care about their
students. When a person cares for another person they go out of their way to try and improve
that person's life. I believe teachers have a chance to do that every single day. I want to be the
teacher that makes a positive impact on my students. I want them to be able to see their own
worth and be successful. In order to achieve this, I need to set my students up to succeed right
from the beginning. I am not there to make their lives even more difficult, rather to give them
the tools to help them to succeed. One of these tools is self-worth. I believe no child should
be made to feel embarrassed in the classroom. The classroom is a place where ideas are formed
and challenged. If a child feels embarrassed, they are more apt to not participate in class
discussions.
This will also make the child feel safe in my classroom because we have built a level of
trust. It is important that students have at least one positive adult impact in their lives cheering
them on. In order to create a safe classroom, students have to understand that they will not be
criticized for their ideas. I want to encourage students to think outside of the box and take the
road less traveled.
I believe teachers are important role models. Students see these adults for at least 180
days out of the year. Whether teachers realize it or not, they are making an impression on
students. One way I plan to make a positive impression is to treat the students with
respect. One way in which students will understand this is by having them define respect. I
will also have the students make up the classroom rules together. That way they know that I
value their opinions and they have a voice. The students will also learn how to work in groups
and start to understand each other. I believe that, as a society, if we can start to understand
each other, than many of our differences will not cause problems but that we would embrace
on another as human beings.
When I enter a school, I want that school to be supportive of its teachers. Teachers are
the backbone of a school. There needs to be good, positive communication between school
administrators, teachers, as well as parents. These groups need to work together in order to
successfully achieve the goal of preparing students with life tools. Another aspect that I would
expect from a school is one that encouraged collaboration. It is important that teachers work
together. The new movement in education is intergraded curriculum. Studies have shown that
the brain works better when concepts are grouped in chunks and it is easier to
understand. This is the main idea behind intergraded curriculum. I do not expect the school to
be doing this already, but to have an open mind and allow teachers to experiment with this.
From my students I would like them to have an open mind. One way in which to do
this is to expose students to new ideas and viewpoints. For instance, in history, new ideas as to
why Christopher Columbus went on his voyage are coming out all the time. It is known that at
the time, navigators knew that the world was round. Yet in schools they are still teaching that
they thought the world was flat. By exposing students to new ideas that go against the main
stream thought, I hope to encourage students to think of their own ideas and present them to
the class. I also want students to understand bigger concepts such as democracy, freedom, and
independence. I want to be the teacher that students can trust, teachers can work with and
administrators can depend on.
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EDU 502_Teaching Technologies_TCC_Syllabus_160613-10

  • 1. TEACHERS COLLEGE CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF EDUCATION SYLLABUS Professor: Patrick D. Huff EDOL 502 Educational Technology Methods Course 2017 Thursdays 4:30 PM-7:30 PM West LA/ Main Campus Room #300 You are what you think…all of the hierarchical structures in my neocortex that define my personality, skills, and knowledge are the result of my own thoughts and experiences. The people I choose to interact with and the ideas and projects I choose to engage in are all primary determinations of who I become. -Ray Kurzweil, 2012 "In order to thrive in a digital economy, students will need digital age proficiencies. It is important for the educational system to make parallel changes in order to fulfill its mission in society, namely the preparation of students for the world beyond the classroom. Therefore, the educational system must understand and embrace the following 21st century skills within the context of rigorous academic standards " - NCREL & Metiri Group, 2010
  • 2. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 2 Table of Contents: 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Student Learning Objectives 3.0 Logistics 4.0 About the Professor 5.0 Class sessions 6.0 Required text(s) 7.0 Course schedule & assignments 8.0 Assignment clarifications 9.0 Grading standards 10.0 Class notes and workbooks 11.0 Extra credit 12.0 Additional readings & resources 13.0 Appendix-A, Curriculum and Instructional Design 14.0 Appendix-B, General Concepts and Design Principles 15.0 Appendix-C, Developing Your Personal Teaching Beliefs 16.0 Appendix-D.1, Scheduling Assistant 16.0 Appendix-D.2, Scheduling Assistant 16.0 Appendix-D.3, Scheduling Assistant 16.0 Appendix-D.4, Scheduling Assistant 17.0 Appendix-F, The InTASC Model 1.0 Introduction This course presents an overview of the educational development process from inception and design through implementation and post-assessment. It considers education in the broadest sense, that is, as a dynamic personal development process that impacts both the student in her/his private life as well as in their professional life. EDOL 502 is designed to not only expose the student to the literature and theories in educational program development and evaluation but to apply practical and real-world tools towards implementation. In this case, the focus of the course is to introduce students to: a range of technologies that have been developed to inspire and enhance the teacher-student relationship; increase understanding of the nature of human learning; and to explore and learn how to identify, assess, and select the most appropriate technologies in support of the learning environment so as to ensure the student’s passion to learn to engaged in the educational process. Whenever possible, this class will integrate the student’s knowledge and career development experiences. The course will cover the following general principles: human cognitive characteristics specific to learning, understanding the value of technological intervention and its value as associated with motivation, the learning process, exploring new and innovative ways of advancing critical learning processes, assessment, and individual growth evaluations, performance metrics, diagnostics; and, as basic tools of instruction with an emphasis on the digital classroom and standards of academic mastery and performance measurement. Guest speakers augment selected course topics as appropriate. These guest speakers will offer a range of P-12 experiences, higher education observations, and corporate experiential learning insights. Class meetings are conducted on the assumption that every educator and organizational leader will need, at some point in his or her career, to design a learning intervention (e.g., course or program) to promote an informal agenda, communicate with peers, or foster formal learning. A primary objective of our time together is to provide the student with a basic operational framework for the identification of the technologies that are available to integrate into the learning environment and process from the standpoint of present and emerging web-based operating software and system applications, tools; to include, the instructional techniques that Use the radial buttons provided to navigate to each topic in the table of contents above.
  • 3. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 3 have been developed to maximize their effectiveness. This course will examine how this new technology can and is being applied by teachers across a diverse K-12 educational environment as well as a wide-range of different fields and/or disciplines in the context of the professional development within institutions and the broader business community. During this course we will address a variety of considerations that are associated with the integration of emerging technologies into the process of education and learning in a systematic way. The exploration of this topic will follow a standard approach where theory and practice are intertwined and supported by the application of project management skills. That said, the course utilizes standardized curriculum design, development, evaluation, and instructional approaches, materials and information that are nationally recognized standards and practices within the educational community. This course approach, design, development, applied methods, implementation, and evaluation plans were inspired by Dr. Jack Gregg, Associate Dean, Graduate Management Programs, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA.; and by Dr. June Schmieder, Associate Dean, Educational Doctorate of Leadership Program, College of Education and Psychology, Pepperdine University; and Hon. John Tobin, US A.L. Judge (Dr. Tobin), and in this case Dr. Kathleen Plinske, Campus President at Valencia College. Dr. Plinske was instrumental in awakening me to the power of social media and the Internet as a basis for supporting research and learning development. Largely due to the experience and inspiration shared with me by Dr. Plinske while she was teaching at Pepperdine University, I began a personal journey of discovery of the power of digital Internet mediums and the emerging web-based software, programs, and dynamic tools that can be used to improve the life of the educator and learner. As such, much of the structure, unit modules, objectives, unique devices, instructional tools; emerging digital assessment and evaluation techniques; and, the associated technical integration styles this course examines are borrowed from these exceptional educators. Throughout this course, students will be given the opportunity to develop a course notebook take can form the basis of a professional educational portfolio that is aligned with their teaching interests, materials, and information. One of the purposes for developing this notebook is to further identify and build your personal Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) understanding; as well as, increase your appreciation for the value of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) professional standards and assistance in increasing your teaching strengths. 1.1 Course Description This course examines what we know about applying emerging technologies to the art of effective teaching and learning in the context of the present evolving classroom. As such, the topics covered take us on a journey of examination and discovery that delve into the very nature of the human mind and how it functions as associated with the learning process and how this process is being impacted by multiple emerging technologies. For this reason, this course has been titled as the Educational Technology Methods Course. This course emphasizes developing an understanding of the learner, human information processing, and the various methods or approaches to teaching and the nature of human learning as integrated by technology. The course undertakes this examination by conducting an investigation into teacher-learning theories, applied technologies and methods, instructional tools, the importance of style, classroom management, course content design,
  • 4. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 4 implementation, assessment, and the application of a digitally-measured self-paced learning evaluation. In addition, the course explores the value of applied learning technology tools such as structured training software and professional websites and/or social media courses that can improve the learning process by increasing overall student performance outcomes. Finally, the course is grounded the by examining the value and significance of engaging and connecting with the student at a basic (inter-personal) level in the context of an integrated learning technology environment so as to best accomplish learning breakthroughs. Given this, the course attempts to establish an increased appreciation and understanding of the teacher— learner partnership where both the teacher and learner can transfer and gain insights and a basis of shared knowledge, each learning from the other. 2.0 Student Learning Objectives This College is committed to a learner-centered approach in the programs in offers. Each program has a set of objectives that a student graduating from the program is expected to achieve. The knowledge and skills taught in the program are introduced across a collective of courses, study, and learning objectives. As such, this course is likely to share some of the same theories, concepts, and resources with others you will encounter in the course of your studies. After successfully completing this course, a student will be able to:  Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written scholarly communication  Be able to apply theory and research to real-world settings  Demonstrate the ability to synthesize approaches when addressing problems, issues or dilemmas  Understand the changing nature of the Internet and information literacy as applicable in today’s scholarly and practice-oriented environments; expand concept of “mobile learning.”  Understand the major concepts of educational program development and delivery as associated with a range of integrated emerging technologies  Understand the basic principles of curriculum design and increase the understanding and appreciation of how these can be further empowered through the integration of new technologies  Define andragogy its use and value as a model of instruction and approach to learning through the use of educationally based technologies  Understand the difference between simple presentation and comprehensive learning facilitation as instructional tools  Model the best characteristics of self-directed learning and independent research by applying technologies  Recognize the connection between learning styles, teaching styles, and how best to integrated them with applied technologies  Apply the concept of “a learning organization” to your leadership style and organizational career  Be able to define and apply the concept of organizational learning as a core strategy towards increasing performance and communities of influence by applying technologies  Have a fundamental grasp of how to develop a viable technological learning intervention
  • 5. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 5 such as a class, a course, or a program; and, demonstrate a working knowledge of the technological integration  Be able to identify important elements in an educational program plan, to include conducting its evaluation and assessment by applying a specific web-based technology or operating system (OS)  Be able to write-papers that demonstrate the ability to integrate the course learning objectives so as to apply them to real-world situations by using one or more applied research and writing web-based technologies  Write a literature review paper or lead a group facilitation, so as to demonstrate the difference between merely making a presentation on a relevant topic in the field of emerging technology application and practice in education as compared to engaging students in a traditional learning environment and educational process. You may choose to focus this paper on the pros and cons of the use of technologies in the classroom as viewed from recent discoveries and research case studies, to include other investigations, insight form subject matter experts, and/or your personal experiences. Knowledge (K) K2: Demonstrate the ability to synthesize approaches to addressing problems, issues or dilemmas. K3: Understand how to analyze an organization and the learning process from a social, political, economic, legal, intercultural, and technological (SPELIT) framework or point of view. K6: Understand the changing nature of the Internet and information literacy as applicable in today’s scholarly and practice-oriented environments; expand concept of “mobile learning.” Skills and Applied Knowledge (S) S2: Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written scholarly communication; so as to demonstrate an ability to lead and mentor students within a learning environment. S3: Be able to apply theory, research and advanced educational techniques and digital tools to real-world settings. Attitudes (A) A1: Value the cultural differences between countries that lead to different solutions to economic, political, legal and social problems; and engage in expanding your perspective from a European/North American or global viewpoint. A2: Provide a powerful vision for the role of education, technology and training when dealing with various organizational and social challenges and associated behavioral outcomes. A4: Be able to demonstrate service to others by developing a service leadership plan that integrates theory and practice into the professional practice of teaching. Last, it is the objective of this course to explore teaching and learning cognitive theories, and the various approaches or methods that have been designed to assist teachers
  • 6. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 6 learn and to improve the transfer of learning to the student as a process of sharing and understanding the desires, needs, dreams, and expectations of each. The information provided in this course includes the introduction to and exploration of advanced methods of study, reflection, questioning, the development of skills or styles associated with instructional methods while; at the same time, gaining knowledge of new ways to apply and practicing these methods in professional collaborative and constructive setting. Other major topics include: exploring the characteristics of effective and intentional teaching; understanding student diversity, the examination of social and electronic media influencers; the application of methods to instructional techniques and style; creating effective lessons using a variety of approaches and technologies; classroom management; assessment of student learning; and professional development. 3.0 Logistics The course meets in room #300 on Thursday evenings from 4:30 until 7:30 as per the location and schedule published by the College. 4.0 About the Professor Professor Huff is an adjunct faculty member visiting from private enterprise and the government services sector. Presently, he is the senior director of research at CRC Research Consultancy and President of Global Performance Strategies-AG, Inc. in Los Angeles, CA. where in conjunction to his administrative leadership of the company, he is responsible for exploring and identifying client needs and desires related to their critical investigative research requirements, findings, and assistance in developing recommendations. His company’s services include guiding and developing the research approach to the exploration, design, development, implementation, assessment, evaluation, administration, and subsequent program and instrumentation modifications. His company typically gets involved in the creation of professional or human resource development, building, and/or increasing the value and focus of knowledge based learning and educational programs as may be applied to adult learners. Professor has held leadership positions in public higher education (University of Oklahoma, College of Architecture and Environmental Design; the California Board of Architects, Oral exam commissioners and examination design and development for the State board; the Secretary of the Army, acquisition and contract programs, training design and implementation specific to the Army Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology Office (ASAALT), Pentagon. In addition to EDU 501, Professor Huff has taught graduate-level classes in Engineering, Design, Technology, Program Administration and Construction Management, Organizational Behavior, Performance Assessment, Leadership, and provided professional consulting services to numerous public-private corporations. Among these include: Texaco, Wells Fargo, Pacific Telesis, Hyundai Merchant Marine, General Electric Credit Corp., Chevron, Fox Sports, Panavision, Liberty-Telecom, and A&C Writer’s Union, Universal Studios, Hallmark, Columbia Broadcast Corporation, and University Broadcast Corporation. These services included the design and development of organizational learning & development, strategic planning, innovation, and change.
  • 7. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 7 Patrick holds three Bachelor’s Degrees: one from Wichita State University (Journalism, Political Science, Geology), one from the University of Oklahoma (Architecture), and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma in Environmental Design; to include a Master’s Degree from the University of Oklahoma in Architecture. Presently, professor Huff is completing his Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership from Pepperdine University, College of Education and Psychology, with plans to complete a Ph.D. in distance management and applied technologies for international organizations. Professor Huff is a resident of Southern California where he lives with his wife and three children and their families (all of which are research scientists and design engineers for a major California research institute and public power corporation, to include the California public systems. 4.01 Contact Information: patrick.huff.usace@gmail.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrick-d-huff-70430010?trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile Contact Professor Huff 5.0 Class Sessions In addition to discussing adult learning, we will put theory to practice. Thus, the course will be run as a graduate level seminar with group discussion of each week’s topics. I will guide the discussion and contribute to the dialogue, but I will not deliver lengthy lectures. Therefore, it is imperative that each student completes all of the reading assignments and come to class fully prepared to discuss the readings, relevant professional experiences, and opinions related to the topic. Class participation is an essential part of this course grade and is expected. As such, please limit the use of your laptop during class discussions and guest speaker presentations. 6.0 Required Texts 1. Biech, E. (2008). ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals, Elaine Biech (ed.) ISD faster better easier. performance improvement. (6th ed.). Baltimore, Maryland: ASTD Press. doi: ISBN-10: 1-56286-512-9 2. Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New York: Viking Penguin. 3. Kurzweil, R. (1999). The age of intelligent machines. Massachusetts: MIT University Press. 4. Khan, Salman (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. (1st ed.). New York: MIT University Press. ISBN-10-145508373. 5. Collins, A., & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology (1st ed.) Teachers College Press. Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 8. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 8 6. Bailey, J., & Schneider, C. (2013). Navigating the digital shift: Implementation strategies for blended and online learning. 7. Burden, P.R. & Byrd, D. M. (2003). Methods for Effective Teaching (3rd. Edition). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon 8. Felder, R., & Brent, R. (2015). Teaching and learning STEM: A practical guide. New York: Jossey- Bass. 9. Verzuh, E. (2012). The fast forward MBA in project management-4th ed. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. doi: ISBN 978-0470-24789-1 10. Various articles and readings will be distributed during the course as well as the use of selected materials extracted from the In addition to the assigned readings, please read about current developments in the world of education in publications such as your local newspaper (e.g., The Los Angeles Times, OC Register, etc.), The Chronicle of Higher Education, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal, and any other relevant periodicals. Students are encouraged to bring articles, YouTube videos, or other artifacts to class in order to support discussion points. A portion of class time will be devoted to current issues that relate to course topics. 7.0 Course Schedule & Assignments 7.01 Week One – 1st Class meeting: Course Introduction and Areas of Intended Discovery – Technology and Human Learning Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 1.1) Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New York: Viking Penguin. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 1.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused discussion: a. Overview of this course b. The influencers and drivers of technology in education. c. Exploring the human mind and its learning processes. d. How far has science taken us in terms of a full-integration of digital technologies and learning in the context of human biological intelligence? Provide title and outline to the professor of your personal goals paper for this course Task/Activity No. 1.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.02 Week Two – 2nd Class meeting: Introduction to Technologies – Future Shock Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 2.1) Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New York: Viking Penguin. Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 9. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 9 Kurzweil, R. (2010). How my predictions are faring? 2010, 2016. Retrieved from http://www.kurzweilai.net/images/How-My-Predictions-Are-Faring.pdf Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 2.2) Lead by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused discussion: a. How will these technologies affect the future of learning, education, evaluation, assessments, and related educational and professional credentialing? b. How will these technologies affect the standards and structure of the present educational process and supporting system? c. How will these technologies affect the very nature of human existence? Sign-up for team facilitation of weekly topics Task/Activity No. 2.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.03 Week Three – 3rd Class meeting: Technologies and Their Influence on Teacher- Learner Relationships – Making the Connection Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 3.1) Khan, Salman (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. (1st ed.). New York: MIT University Press. ISBN-10-145508373.Dublin, L. (2008). Herrmann-Nehdi, A. (2008). The learner: What we need to know. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 213-232) ASTD Press. Dublin, L. (2008). Using technology to manage learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 749-764) ASTD Press. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 3.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused discussion: a. The influencers and drivers of technology in education b. Understanding how learners learn, learning styles and more c. Learn what’s important about the brain in learning d. Apply learning styles and brain dominance to create effective learning e. What does technology do to change the future of education, structure, environments, and teacher-learner relationships Sign-up for team facilitation of weekly topics Task/Activity No. 3.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 10. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 10 7.04 Week Four – 4th Class meeting: Technologies and The Effect on Learner Peer-to- Peer Relationships – A Highly Interactive Strategy Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 4.1) Lawson, K. (2008). Instructional design and development. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 233-250) ASTD Press. Silberman, M. (2008). Active learning strategies. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 309-318) ASTD Press. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 4.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. Re-learning how to create learning objectives b. Re-learning how to create course (unit module) design matrix c. Understanding how to reinvent the creation of an instructional plan and the supporting methods d. Re-examining eight strategies for successful active learning e. Re-examining engagement with participants in your training sessions Personal teaching and learning goals paper (Due this class meeting) Task/Activity No. 4.3.1 (See assignment tracker in appendices) and Sign-up for oral facilitations during this class meeting Task/Activity No. 4.3.2 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.05 Week Five - 5th Class meeting: Self-paced Learning and the World Schoolhouse or Classroom – Factors That Empower a Mobile Learner Environment Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 5.1) Chapman, B. (2008). Learning technology primer. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 383-406) ASTD Press. Collins, A., & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology (1st ed.) Teachers College Press. Toth, T. A. (2008). Authoring techniques and rapid E-learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 407-418) ASTD Press. Hofmann, J., & Bozath, J. (2008). Distance learning and web-based training. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 453-466) ASTD Press. Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 11. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 11 Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 5.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. How to use technology to achieve learning goals b. Targeting technologies to specific learning goals c. Exploring and understanding how different types of learning technologies can be applied d. Re-examining three tools you need to build e-learning e. programs rapidly f. Re-examining the value of your old prototypes g. Re-examining the old secrets of rapid e-learning development Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 5.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.06 Week Six – 6th Class meeting: Mixed-classroom groups and traditional cultures – Revising Attitudes About the Slow Learner Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 6.1) Rossett, A. (2008). Performance support: Anytime, anyplace, including the classroom. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 439-452) ASTD Press. Rosenberg, M. J. (2008). Learning meets web 2.0: Collaborative learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 467-482) ASTD Press. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 6.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. Using the technology to harness fingertip knowledge and information to improve performance b. Recognizing when to use on-demand resources and when to avoid them c. Re-examining the understanding of the demands and pressures of modern-day work and their effects on learning d. Re-examining collaborative tools and techniques to share knowledge and improve learning and performance e. Re-creating a collaborative learning experience Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 6.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 12. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 12 7.07 Week Seven – 7th Class meeting: Using Technology to Manage Learning – Your New Role in Guiding Learning and Increasing Performance Outcome Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 7.1) Dublin, L. (2008). Using technology to manage learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 749-764) ASTD Press. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 7.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. Re-examining the evolving role of learning management technologies b. Re-learning some processes for selecting and implementing technologies c. Re-learning how to incorporate technology into your organizational culture Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 7.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.08 Week Eight – 8th Class meeting: Technology and Ethics in the Learning Space and Workplace – Performance and Value Implications Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 8.1) Estep, T. (2008). Ethics for workplace learning and performance professionals. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 845- 860) ASTD Press. Estep, T. (2008). The evolution of the training profession. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 9-32) ASTD Press. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 8.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. How could learning technologies be used to corrupt positive performance outcomes? b. Why does ethics matter? c. Re-examining common components in ethics codes for learning institutions and the profession d. Re-examining ways to build effective ethics programs in organizations e. Increasing learning path, milestone measurables, and transparency Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 8.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 13. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 13 7.09 Week Nine – 9th Class meeting: 21st Century Technologies and Skills Needed in the Workplace and Social Environment – Putting it all together Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 9.1) 21st Century, P. (2016). New technologies & 21st century skills., 2016. Retrieved from http://newtech.coe.uh.edu/index.html Ray Kurzweil Introduced 300 Secondary-School Students Across Europe to Robotics and AI in an Interactive Internet Chat Set Up by Xplora, the European Gateway to Science Education. Originally Published on www.Xplora.org. Published on KurzweilAI.Net November 9,2005. www.xplora.org. Retrieved from http://www.kurzweilai.net/online-chat-with-ray-kurzweil-and-european- schoolnet Riedel, C. (2014). 10 major technology trends in education., 2016. Retrieved from https://thejournal.com/articles/2014/02/03/10-major-technology-trends-in- education.aspx Phillips, J. J. (2008). Return-on-investment. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 555-576) ASTD Press. Kurzweil, R. (2005). The singularity is near: When humans transcend biology. New York, NY: Viking Press; Penguin Group, Inc. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 9.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. Looking at the next step b. Predicting the technology continuum c. How to prepare for the next generation of disruptive innovation and change d. When does the return-on-investment diminish? e. How will the genius pill impact the education and the teacher-learner relationship in the future? f. Peer teaching assignment: How your teaching aligns with and reflects personal philosophy of teaching and learning in the context of instructional technologies and social media applications, or interventions when compared to four (4) professional educators or trainers that could be considered to be subject matter experts in learning technologies. Compare and contrast your teaching theory, approach, methods, implementation, instructional style, tools, techniques, methods of assessment and evaluation as compared to four educators that apply technology in learning: Example 1 (educator or trainer elected by student) Example 2 (elected by students) Example 3 (elected by students) Example 4 (elected by students) g. Work in teams to plan and teach a 15 to 20 minute lesson that demonstrates the teaching strategy/strategies assigned to your group. You will have class time to work on planning your lesson. If you prefer not to use this class time to work on this lesson, your group may arrange an alternative time among yourselves to conduct your planning and the complete the lesson to be presented. You and
  • 14. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 14 your team will teach the lesson on the date negotiated and approved by the professor. h. Apprenticeship teaching analyses : Analyze at least 2 different lessons that you have taught at your apprenticeship site (if applicable) were you have applied learning technologies. Include a brief description of your lesson plans, experiences (inclusion of your lesson plan is optional) and your analysis of your lesson’s successes and improvement needs. Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 9.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.10 Week Ten – 10th Class meeting: The Future Role of Education and Learning in the Age of Intelligent Machines Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 10.1) Kurzweil, R. (1999). The age of intelligent machines. Massachusetts: MIT University Press. Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 10.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: a. Develop lesson plans that demonstrate your ability to integrate multiple learning technologies into a matrix that summarizes key teaching or learning strategies that demonstrate a coherent, well organized, detailed plans that include the key elements of lesson plan design. b. These can be the same plans that you developed for teaching at your apprenticeship site. c. You should have at least 2 different lesson plans, each demonstrating the use of technologies within the context of different teaching strategies. d. Develop a matrix using this link: 1. Develop a matrix that summarizes key teaching strategies 2. You might use in your subject area, examples of situations in which each strategy might be appropriate. e. Be sure to include as part of this how you will use technology as a tool to enhance student learning. (Group assignment: group size 2-5 students). Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 10.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.11 Week Eleven – 11th Class meeting: Assessments and evaluations: How technology is or will affect your teaching methods Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 11.1) By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 15. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 15 Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 11.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: Develop assessments that show your ability to: Use an understanding by design (UBD) as a template to outline backwards a design process for a lesson/unit that heavily relies on emerging learning technologies, and then; create a test in your subject area(s). Assess students using some form of authentic assessment technology (web-based system) which includes the development of a digital rubric to evaluate student work. All development and completion of this project in writing is due at the end of this period. You may utilize the template of your choice to outline the backward design process for a lesson/unit, and then: create a test in your subject area. Ideally, this exercise will test your design as you administer it to our students at your apprenticeship site, or test it using the class as simulated learners. During this exercise you are to assess the students or mock class by using some form of authentic assessment. Your assessment should include a rubric that you would use to evaluate the student or class work. (Group assignment: group size 2-5 students). Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 11.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.12 Week Twelve – 12th Class meeting: Classroom management: Your Teaching Methods and Style as Affected by Learning Technologies Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 12.1) By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 12.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: In-class project: Use the example information provided by the professor to create a framework for a world schoolhouse (class or course) environment and management plan. This should include the development of a classroom layout and a matrix of the types of rules that would apply. Provide a reflective analysis explaining how the environment you create reflects your philosophy of classroom management and understanding of student diversity. All development and completion of this project in writing is due at the end of this period. You will create this for EDU 501 (this course). Be sure to include in this assignment in your portfolio or course notebook under a section called general methods. Follow the guidelines an examples in the information provided in this syllabus, or as provided by the professor. The product you develop should follow the type of framework described in the following: Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 16. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 16 1. How you plan to set up your classroom in the context of emerging learning technologies so as to create an environment that reflects your beliefs about teaching, learning, students and student diversity? 2. What types of rules would you will have in your class and how will learning technologies affect them? 3. What type of approach would you take for responding to students who do not follow these rules? 4. Provide a reflective analysis to support your responses to the first three questions; and, explain how the learning technology environment (world schoolhouse classroom) you create will reflect your philosophy of classroom management and your understanding of student diversity. Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 12.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.13 Week Thirteen – 13th Class meeting: Is the Teacher Ready and Sufficiently Trained and Equipped to Effectively Engage and Teach in Bold New World Schoolhouse? Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 13.1) Khan, Salman (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. (1st ed.). New York: MIT University Press. ISBN-10-145508373. Verzuh, E. (2012). The fast forward MBA in project management-4th ed.. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. doi: ISBN 978-0470-24789-1 By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 13.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: 1. Comparing project management applied to teaching and learning in the context of emerging learning technologies and metrics: A key to thriving in a project-driven world within the applied technology space. 2. Foundation principles of project management 3. Know your key stakeholders and win their cooperation. 4. Write the rules: Five key documents to manage expectations and define success. Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 13.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.14 Week Fourteen – 14th Class meeting: Work breakdown structure and the technology driven world classroom: Breaking your project into manageable mobile and readily accessible units of work Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 14.1) By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 17. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 17 Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 14.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: 1. Work breakdown structure and the technology driven world classroom: Breaking your project into manageable mobile and readily accessible units of work 2. Re-thinking realistic scheduling in mixed-level collaborative of learners 3. Re-thinking how progress is measured Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 14.3 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 7.15 Week Fifteen: - 15th Class meeting: Solving new project problems within the emerging learning technology space: Exploring the detailed planning model Pre-reading(s): (Task/Activity No. 15.1) By presenter(s): Apply the appropriate class and/or outside readings Class discussion: (Task/Activity No. 15.2) Led by the professor – covers the basics of the course, learning modules, class design, structure, implementation, instructional tools, specific course unit or project assignments, grading and methodology, and shared outcome expectations. Focused Dialogue: 1. Exploring a detailed planning model in the context of emerging technologies. 2. Extra credit - class notebook submittals and preliminary reviews prior to final submittal for grading. (Optional) Paper and Class Presentation Task/Activity No. 15.3.1 (See assignment tracker in appendices) Class Notebooks are due at the end of this period Task/Activity No. 15.3.2 (See assignment tracker in appendices) 8.0 Assignment clarifications 8.01 Personal goals paper: In this paper you will present your desired outcomes for this class. Among the questions to be addressed are:  What are you hoping to learn from this course?  How you expect to be able to apply the learning objectives from this course to your professional life? Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 18. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 18  What is the relevance of the topics in this course to your professional, academic, and/ or personal interests? As this paper is personal and subjective, there are no right or wrong answers. Please be honest in addressing the issues. The paper will be evaluated based on the thoroughness with which you address, the issues, its clarity, and the quality of writing. As a general guideline, this paper will be a minimum of five pages. Due date: the papers are due during the class period you have signed up for or as established (negotiated) with the professor. (See assignment tracker in appendices) 8.02 Papers and supporting class presentations or facilitation 8.02.01 Each student will write a paper outlining his or her real-world application of one or more of the concepts presented in this course. The paper may be retrospective or prospective (i.e.: how you have applied the relevant concepts or how you will apply them). While the paper is primarily a first-person account, it must be based on course learning objectives, grounded in the literature, and cited appropriately. Among the questions you might want to address in this paper are:  What were the most relevant concepts from the course to you?  How do those concepts impact you professionally?  What have you learned from this course that has significantly impacted you professionally as you have progressed through this course?  What are the key concepts presented in this course that you believe will make an impact on your professional success as you move forward in your career?  Knowing what you know after taking this course, what will you do differently from now on? 8.02.01 As you answer these questions, be as specific as possible. The important criteria in this paper are application and specificity. Your success with this paper will depend not only on how well you demonstrate an understanding of concepts, but on how well you are able to apply them to real world situations. The more specificity you bring to your discussion, the better the application will be. 8.02.03 As a general guideline, this paper will be a minimum of 10 pages. Due date: the papers and presentations are due during the class period you have signed up for or as established (negotiated) with the professor. (See assignment tracker in appendices) 8.03 Options: Note, There are TWO options for this assignment. You are to choose only ONE option that best serves your professional development and/or academic agenda.
  • 19. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 19 8.03.01 Option A: Review of Literature Paper: A student selecting this option will write a thorough, in-depth literature review paper on one of the major topics from this course. The subject may be any of the major topics of the course (e.g.: Principles of Human Learning, Principles of Instructional Methods, Cognitive and Learning Methods Theory, Learning Engagement, Relationships Between Teaching and Learning Methods, The Application of Program or Instructional Methods in Corporate, Non-Traditional, or Distance Learning Environments as effected by current or emerging learning technologies). Feel free to provide your own “slant” or point of view, but the paper must be research-based and thorough. If you are contemplating an education-based dissertation, this paper may serve as a good portion of your literature review. I anticipate this paper to be in the neighborhood of 10 pages. --OR-- 8.03.02 Option B: Course Design Practicum Paper. A student selecting this option will choose a course topic (for example, your dissertation topic or an area of personal or professional interest) and design a real or a hypothetical full term-length course or possibly a degree program of instruction based upon a thorough needs assessment, target audience analysis, etc. that includes all the elements of instructional design as discussed in the course readings, guest speaker presentations, and class discussions. The paper should include sections on learning objectives, discussion of learning technology course or unit design methodology, course assignments, assessments, grading rubrics, financial concerns such as cost budgeting & student pricing, implementation issues, and other topics based upon a comprehensive review of the literature to justify your choices and decisions with an emphasis on learning technologies. 8.03.03 The purpose of the options is to provide you with an opportunity for practical application and professional skill development based upon rigorous analysis and research. As such, the professor requests the framework for student research and the associated approach to their papers follow the most recently published APA guidelines and methods. I would also like to encourage your creativity and innovation in terms of curriculum design, use of learning technologies, instructional methodologies, and/or emerging educational needs that best serve your learning and/or program needs as associated with this course. I anticipate this paper to be in the neighborhood of 10 pages. Due date: End of class as published in the schedule located in the appendix of this syllabus, or as established (negotiated) with the professor. 8.04 Oral Facilitation/Presentations: Each student (and/or the designated student groups at are arranged during the assignment sign-ups) will deliver an oral facilitation/ presentation of his or her selected topic(s) for this assignment and related options. See the detailed scheduling assistant in appendix. This facilitated discussion led by you and your group should be between 15 and 20 minutes in duration (including questions and discussion). Please share your findings, but do not read your presentation or paper to the class. This facilitation/presentation will be graded on your facilitation/presentation delivery skills as well as its content (and timing is important. A firm 20-minute delivery deadline will be enforced. Remember: This is facilitation – not a presentation. I integrate the modifier presentation, as you may choose to use a form of presentation as a tool to conduct your facilitation. You will Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 20. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 20 be expected to engage the class using best practices (methods) as extracted from the course materials, text, and/or suggested additional readings, videos, or other information presented in our class discussions. Due date: As published in the schedule located in the appendix of this syllabus, or as established (negotiated) with the professor during signing up for the task or activity. 9.0 Grading Standards 9.01 Written work will be graded based on the thoroughness of topical coverage, the quality of the research, and the quality of the writing. Papers should be written in adherence to APA style. http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/basics-tutorial.aspx . Your papers should be written at a level consistent with a doctoral-level program. 9.02 Papers and presentations that are submitted late are not eligible for full credit. Any request for a deadline extension must be made prior to the deadline. With or without a deadline extension any paper that is one to six days late will be reduced by one grade (for example, from A- to B+). A paper that is seven to 13 days late will be reduced by two grades (e.g.: A- to B). A paper 14 days late or more will be reduced by three grades (A- to B-). You must complete all work in order to receive a passing grade for the course. 9.03 Oral facilitations will be graded based on both delivery and content. The other students in the class are your peers and are genuinely interested in hearing about your topic. Present your information in a way that will be useful and interesting to your colleagues. A big portion of your grade for your oral presentation will be based on the level of engagement of your audience. Remember to practice what you have learned about andragogy. 9.04 Class participation is a vital component of this course. You will be graded on the quality of your contributions as well as the quantity. You are expected to contribute to the class discussion every week; therefore your attendance is essential. Good class participation consists of attentive engagement with the professor, guest speakers, and your fellow students. E.g., laptop use of email or mobile phone texting does not signal class engagement. 9.05 Peer Review. As you may know, peer reviews are critical to becoming an accomplished researcher, teacher, and presenter that inspires students to become engaged as life learners. That said, in addition to your instructor’s evaluation of your class participation, written assignments, and oral presentations, be aware that your fellow classmates will be asked to provide critical and positive feedback in the context of an in-class peer review process as associated with your individual and group contributions. When peer reviews are requested by the professor from the class, an assessment rubric and survey will be distributed. This information will be provided the students participating in the class so as to utilize this information as a guide towards developing their presentations. 9.06 Grading Assignments and Weight Max. Percent % Points  1st Paper and facilitation 10% 10 (Task/activity No. as elected by student)  2nd Paper (Task/activity No.) 10% 10
  • 21. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 21 (Task/activity No. as elected by student)  3rd Paper (Task/activity No.) 10% 10 (Task/activity No. as elected by student)  4th Paper (Task/activity No.) 10% 10 (Task/activity No. as elected by student)  Oral Facilitations (Covers tasks/activity No.(s)) 40% 40 (Task/activity No. as elected by student)  Readings and class participation 20% 20 (Covers tasks/activity No.(s), not optional) Maximum total points (available) 100% 100 9.06.01 Student work requirement clarification: Each student must elect to participate in no less than developing and submitting four papers on the topic(s) of their choice as mutually agreed upon in their class negotiations. 9.06.02 Extra Credit Points: Maximum total points (available) for the extra credit assignment (14 points) of completing a course notebook may be added to a student’s cumulated course points, but in no event shall the extra credit points exceed a total point score for the course that exceeds a total of 100 points. As an example should a student’s total points accumulated for all class assignments, participation, and presentations add to 96 points, and has requested and received 5 points credit for completed extra credit work, the total points the student will be awarded for the class is will not exceed 100 points. Academic Integrity 9.07 Cheating and plagiarism: Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated. The College’s academic integrity policy will be followed; there are no exceptions. If you are unfamiliar with the College’s policy, please consult the requisite articles or portions of the Academic Catalog, dealing with Student Conduct. Attendance 9.08 Attendance: This is a participatory, team-focused course; hence, attendance at each class session is mandatory. Excused absences must be arranged with the professor well in advance to allow for additional or reallocated assignments. If a student is ill on the day of class, contact the professor immediately (to allow arrangements resulting in the student to keep their germs to him or herself!); if a student is a presenter on a day when likely to be absent, the student WILL arrange for a substitute. Writing proficiency 9.09 Writing proficiency: At the graduate level, students are expected to have mastered advanced composition skills, to include sentence/ paragraph structure, grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Excessive errors may result in referral to the writing program or other rehabilitative disposition.
  • 22. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 22 Maintaining copies of assigned course work for program evaluation 9.10 Copies of course work submitted for grades: The College evaluates its programs on an ongoing basis. The data from such evaluations provide us with information to help improve the quality of the educational experience we provide our students. In addition, the data are used by our accrediting bodies, such as the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). California Council on Teacher Credentials, and the American Psychological Association (APA), to make decisions as to whether we can maintain our accredited status with these respective associations. To this end, we may archive copies of the papers, examinations, exercises, etc. that students complete as part of their required course work so that we can track if students appear to be meeting the objectives of the program in which they are enrolled. Names will be removed from the assignments we opt to archive for evaluation purposes. If you prefer that your course work not be archived for evaluation purposes, please let me know immediately so that I can make such a notation in the files I keep for each student who enrolls in my courses. Code of conduct 9.11 Code of conduct: The College strives to create a learning environment which is respectful of the rights and dignity of all members of our learning community. Students are expected to conduct themselves in a collegial, respectful, and professional manner while participating in all activities associated with this course. Students are expected to exhibit behaviors and attitudes consistent with appropriate ethical-legal standards, and to refrain from any fraudulent, dishonest, or harmful behaviors such as plagiarism, cheating, or harassment, which compromise the integrity of the academic standards of the College and/or impact the safety and security of fellow students, staff, and faculty. Failure to comply with appropriate standards of conduct may result in a grade of “F” in the course and dismissal from the program. Respectful discourse 9.12 Respect discourse: The College values and respects the perspectives and diversity of our students in regard to ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, religion, age, and ability status. Thus, it is critical that classroom discussions include respectful dialogue about any issue that impacts the lives of our students, and the individuals, families, and communities that our students serve. Plagiarism 9.13 Plagiarism: Plagiarism is commonly understood in the academic community to involve taking the ideas or words of another and passing them off as one’s own. When paraphrasing or quoting an author directly, one must credit the source appropriately. Plagiarism is not tolerated at the College. Disability statement
  • 23. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 23 9.14 Disabilities: Any student with a documented disability (physical, learning, or psychological) needing academic accommodations should contact the Disability Services Officer (School Campus) as early in the semester as possible. All discussions will remain confidential. Please visit the College’s website for additional information. 10.0 Class notes and workbooks 10.01 This requirement is custom tailored to each class group by the professor once all participants are confirmed as fully enrolled in the class and have successfully completed the first two weeks. 10.02 Maintaining a class notebook or workbook can the counted as extra credit work. See notes on extra credit work and related point structure and conditions. 10.03 See appendix for additional information pertaining to completing requirements to receive extra credit points associated with submitting class notes and/or workbook. 11.0 Extra credit 11.0.1 Students be request a “one time only” extra credit assignment from the professor. The ability to be granted this opportunity is at the sole discretion of the professor and is subject to a set of minimum standards and a performance evaluation rubric specially designed for the negotiated extra credit assignment or project. 11.0.2 If elected and successfully completed, the student will be entitled to a maximum of 14 points. 12.0 Additional readings and resources 12.01 This course is designed for students to be enabled to conduct intensive and independent research in association with each of the selected topics and learning objectives. 12.02 The following additional readings and resources provided are to assist each student in located information and other literature that supports the course learning objectives and individual learner advanced appreciation and understanding of each lesson’s objectives. 12.03 This additional information offers another voice or perspective to appreciating and understanding the material. Looking into what the additional readings and resources offer the learner will enhance your learning experience, advanced understanding, and increase personal enjoyment in class participation. 12.04 The following is the recommended list of readings and information resources: Printed and electronic text references: 21st Century, P. (2016). New technologies & 21st century skills., 2016. Retrieved from http://newtech.coe.uh.edu/index.html Bailey, J., & Schneider, C. (2013). Navigating the digital shift: Implementation strategies for blended and online learning. Cavallone, J. (2016). Technology in education: A blueprint for a successful foundation. New York: CreateSpace Independent Publishing.
  • 24. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 24 Chapman, B. (2008). Learning technology primer. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 383-406) ASTD Press. Collins, A., & Halverson, R. (2009). Rethinking education in the age of technology (1st ed.) Teachers College Press. Dublin, L. (2008). Using technology to manage learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 749-764) ASTD Press. Estep, T. (2008). Ethics for workplace learning and performance professionals. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 845-860) ASTD Press. Estep, T. (2008). The evolution of the training profession. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 9-32) ASTD Press. Gardner, J., N. (2007). In Kurzweil R. (Ed.), The intelligent universe: AI, ET, and the emerging mind of the Cosmos. Massachusetts: MIT University Press. Herrmann-Nehdi, A. (2008). The learner: What we need to know. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 213-232) ASTD Press. Hofmann, J., & Bozath, J. (2008). Distance learning and web-based training. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 453-466) ASTD Press. Khan, S. (2013). The one world schoolhouse: Education reimagined. Massachusetts: MIT University Press. Kurzweil, R. (1999). The age of intelligent machines. Massachusetts: MIT University Press. Kurzweil, R. (2005). The singularity is near: When humans transcend biology ["Ray Kurzwell is the best person I know at predicting the future of artificial intelligence. His intriguing new book envisions a future in which information technologies have advanced so far and fast that they enable humanity to transcend its biological limitations - transforming our lives in ways we can't yet imagine", Bill Gates.]. New York, NY: Viking Press; Penguin Group, Inc. Kurzweil, R. (2010). How my predictions are faring? 2010, 2016. Retrieved from http://www.kurzweilai.net/images/How-My-Predictions-Are-Faring.pdf Kurzweil, R. (2012). How to create a mind: The secret of human thought revealed. New York: Viking Penguin. Kurzweil, R. (2016). Ray Kurzweil biography: The Kurzweil Collection., 2016. Retrieved from http://www.kurzweilai.net/ray-kurzweil-biography
  • 25. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 25 Kurzweil, R., & Grossman, T. M. D. (2004). Fantastic voyage: Life long enough to live forever. Massachusetts: MIT University Press. Kurzweil, R., & Sarnow, K. (2005). Online chat with Ray Kurzweil and European Schoolnet. Paper presented at the Online Chat with Ray Kurzweil and European Schoolnet. November 9, 2005 by Ray Kurzweil Ray Kurzweil Introduced 300 Secondary-School Students Across Europe to Robotics and AI in an Interactive Internet Chat Set Up by Xplora, the European Gateway to Science Education. Originally Published on www.Xplora.org. Published on KurzweilAI.Net November 9,2005. www.xplora.org. Retrieved from http://www.kurzweilai.net/online- chat-with-ray-kurzweil-and-european-schoolnet Lawson, K. (2008). Instructional design and development. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 233-250) ASTD Press. McManis, L. D., & Gunnewig. (2012). Finding the education in educational technology with early learners., 2016. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/yc/files/yc/file/201205/McManis_YC0512.pdf Phillips, J. J. (2008). Return-on-investment. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 555-576) ASTD Press. Richards, J. W., Kurzweil, R., & Gilder, G. (2001). In Richards J. w. (Ed.), Are we spiritual machines? Ray Kurzweil vs. the critics of strong A.I. Massachusetts: Discovery Institute; MIT University Press. Riedel, C. (2014). 10 major technology trends in education., 2016. Retrieved from https://thejournal.com/articles/2014/02/03/10-major-technology-trends-in- education.aspx Rosenberg, M. J. (2008). Learning meets web 2.0: Collaborative learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 467-482) ASTD Press. Rossett, A. (2008). Performance support: Anytime, anyplace, including the classroom. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 439-452) ASTD Press. Silberman, M. (2008). Active learning strategies. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 309-318) ASTD Press. Toth, T. A. (2008). Authoring techniques and rapid E-learning. In E. Biech (Ed.), ASTD handbook for workplace learning professionals (pp. 407-418) ASTD Press. Wardle, F. (2012). The role of technology in early childhood programs., 2016. Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=302
  • 26. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 26 Petrina, Stephen (2006). Advanced Teaching Methods for the Technology Classroom., British Columbia University Press. ISBN-10 1599043378 Electronic or digital mobile learning publication references: Code Red (Producer), & Elon Musk (Director). (2016). Elon musk: Full interview: Code conference 2016. [Video/DVD]: Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsixsRI-Sz4; MIT Electronic Press (Producer), & Khan, S. (Director). (2012). Rethinking education: Sal khan, 3 MIT degrees, 85, 487, 485 lessons delivered. [Video/DVD] MIT: Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9JCpMCQ5qM MIT Electronic Press (Producer), & Khan, S. (Director). (2013). Sal khan's big idea. [Video/DVD] Khan, S. Studios. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivGtcjM_ZbU Khan, S. (Producer), & Khan, S. (Director). (2014). Khan academy - the future of education. [Video/DVD] New York: Khan Academy. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5WkPM1Dghs Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 27. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 27 “The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage in the future.” Arie De Geus, Head of Planning, Royal Dutch/Shell (Senge, 1994) Applying advanced technologies is critical when aligning learning to student desires and needs when assisting them in building the skills necessary to empower them to enter the world fully empowered to be agents of change and innovation. Dr. June Schmeider, 2014 Associate Dean & Professor Pepperdine University College of Education and Psychology Doctorate of Education in Organizational Leadership Program As a teacher and coach…I help students gain clarity about their professional objectives and how they can build balance in their life. United States Dr. Jack Gregg, 2014 Associate Dean, Graduate Management Programs at Loyola Marymount University Pepperdine University Professor It is my pleasure to welcome you to this College and this course. Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 28. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 28 13.0 Appendix - A Cognitive Development and Effectiveness of Methodologies in Teaching and Instructional Design Advanced Teaching Methods for the Technology Classroom by P.D. Huff I. Introduction Teachers have had a century of freedom in designing and customizing their curriculum and instruction to suit themselves, their community, or the students. This had advantages in offering diversity. The disadvantages, however, were related to inconsistencies from school to school. When the teacher departed from a school she/he typically departed with the curriculum and instructional materials. New teachers often began their first school year with little more than what they carried with them from their teacher preparation programs and student teaching experiences. One major problem was that when it came time for governments to identify priorities in the schools, innovative instructional methods, tools, and advanced technologies were overlooked. As international trends are quickly shifting toward standards and unified curriculum in design, a central focus on developing consistent scopes and sequences of content for the study of curriculum design and instruction while maintaining an eye on including significant content improvements becomes a major challenge. Common curriculum and goals along with content and performance standards are the trends. From a perspective of professional vitality and political finesse, these trends are healthy. These trends offer the potential for long-term sustainability of technology studies in the schools. Nevertheless, given that all curricula are fallible and have shortcomings, teachers will always have a need for dispositions toward, or skills and knowledge in, curriculum and instructional design. The questions "what should be learned?" and "how should it be organized for teaching?" are eventually resolved, whether by consensus, fiat or might, through processes of curriculum and instructional design. One is basically a question of content, the other a question of form. Neither can be resolved without changing the other— the questions are dialectically related. We can say that curriculum and instructional design involve the forming of educational content and the contents of educational forms. Curriculum theorists take it for granted that curriculum flows from the "what" of "what should be learned?" Instructional designers take it for granted that instruction flows from the "how" of "how should it be organized?"
  • 29. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 29 1.0 Theory Curriculum and Instruction for teachers often neglects theory. Teachers, however, cannot afford to neglect either theory or design; they have to be theorists and designers. In this chapter, curriculum and instructional design are explained along with a focus on the design of projects, units and modules. This chapter combines background knowledge with techniques of curriculum and instructional design. In some of the previous chapters, the emphasis was on "what should be learned?" This chapter focuses on "how should it be organized for teaching?" 2.0 Academic rationalism Academic rationalist orientations are primarily about disciplinary knowledge and cultural canons. Cognitive process orientations are primarily about intellectual reasoning skills such as problem solving. Self-actualization, or personal relevance, orientations stress psychological conditions and are concerned with individuality and personal expression. Social reconstruction, generally called critical pedagogy, stresses sociological conditions, social justice and collective reform. Utilitarian orientations are primarily concerned with functional competencies, performance, procedure and instructional efficiency. Curriculum designs are conceptually grounded in any one or a mix of these orientations. In 1992, a special issue of the Journal of Technology Education was published to explore each of these five designs (see Herschbach and Sanders, 1992). A basic conclusion from this is that generic, neutral theoretical orientations and designs for organizing curriculum simply do not exist (Beyer and Apple, 1988; Eisner, 1979; Zuga, 1989). Nevertheless, theorists of these five designs play into the hands of educators and policy makers who for centuries ranked curriculum by political value: liberal arts and university preparation curriculum are valued over practical or technical curriculum. Four theoretical orientations, generally ranked in the order previously introduced, hold not only historical status, but also theoretical status over the instrumental or utilitarian curriculum. Furthermore, theorists conflated utilitarian orientations with technology, making things more confusing. As a result, curriculum and instruction any school curriculum that takes "practical" work as its subject has a low theoretical status and, as it has nearly always been, a questionable historical status. Today, business, home economics and technology in the curriculum connote instrumental, transmissivity and technical practices. Historically, business educators, home economists and technology educators may have designed instrumental curriculum, but this was never any more instrumental or utilitarian than the arts, humanities, math, or sciences for instance. Other theorists conclude that there are three basic orientations to curriculum: transitive and transformative curriculums or technical, practical, and emancipatory curriculums. If we can hold off on ranking these, there is great value in theorizing transmissivity, transitive and transformative orientations to curriculum. In fact, teachers can be quite empowered by the knowledge and skills in designing curriculum that is at times trans missive, and other times trans active or transformative. A trans missive orientation typically means that information is transmitted from teacher to students. For example, safety procedures are best taught from a trans missive orientation. Here, the teacher simply has to say "pay attention, this is the way it is done— step 1 through step 6." A trans active orientation typically means that the question "what should be learned?" is democratically negotiated. Here, the teacher may work with small groups and say: "Let's discuss
  • 30. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 30 your ideas for how we should handle this situation." In a transformative mode, the teacher provides content and methods that are truly empowering for the students. For example, the teacher may provide a civil liberties lesson that empowers the students to take advantage of their freedoms of speech in a zine or on a web site. There are time when teachers consciously ought to be trans missive and other times when they ought to be in a trans active or transformative mode. The key is to know and recognize the difference in designing curriculum. In 1949, Ralph Tyler summed up centuries of curriculum design into four simple steps. For Tyler, the process of curriculum design amounted to a way of resolving four questions, or a rationale: 1. What educational purposes should the school seek to attain? 2. How can learning experiences be selected which are likely to be useful in attaining these purposes? 3. How can learning experiences be organized for effective instruction? 4. How can the effectiveness of learning experiences be evaluated? 3.0 Teaching Methods and Instructional Tools Selecting an appropriate teaching method and series of instructional tools is critical to success in achieving the learning objectives in the classroom. Particularly challenging is being able to read where the student is coming from, what their level of interest or passion is, and being able to determine the environmental factors or drivers that are influencers to their learning process (Schmeider, 2014). As referenced in some of my other course instructional materials, in the 1960s, educational experts such as Hilda Taba reduced Tyler's teaching rationale to a simple set of steps so as to achieve a connection between the teacher and the learner. Professor Huff has taken Taba’s and Tyler’s process and modified as outlined in the following: 1. Diagnose the learner’s needs 2. Identify and formulate the learner’s objectives 3. Select a content that meets the learner’s objectives 4. Organize the content in ways that best enable the engagement of the learner 5. Identify and select activities and experiences that best enable the learner 6. Assess and evaluate the teaching method applied and make the necessary improvements 6. Organize a methodical learning experience so as in ensure continuing learner interest, engagement, and passion 7. Reassess and determine the effectiveness of the process towards the learner’s objectives and needs It is a good practice to introduce content and teaching methods that involve extremely relevant questions about the world as it is today. Each time teachers purchase educational software, a textbook, wood for carpentry or other materials from a vendor, they are addressing questions about what kind of student and world they want and what will inspire them to begin their journey in a life of continuing discovery and learning. Each time that teachers assign a project, design an activity or curriculum materials they address these questions which are critical to identifying and selecting the methodologies that are best fit to apply.
  • 31. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 31 Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf Note: This course places emphasis on those areas of the teaching process that have been highlighted in yellow. 4.0 The selection of appropriate methods In the next section, the background and process of instructional design, exploration, and selection of the appropriate teaching methods are explained. The intent is to move from theory utilizing the outlines stepped procedure to the appropriate and most effective teaching methods as a means to connect with learners. All aspects of the traditional learning unit module are affected by technologies All aspects of the traditional learning unit module are affected by technologies
  • 32. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 32 Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf Note: This course places emphasis on those areas of the teaching process that have been highlighted in yellow. 5.0 Model of the Learner – A Methods Integration Process Unable to completely identify with Tyler's rationale, instructional designers contrived an ID rationale: 1. For whom is the program developed? (characteristics of learners or trainees) 2. What do you want the learners or trainees to learn or demonstrate? (objectives) 3. How is the subject or skill best learned? (instructional strategies) 4. How do you determine the extent to which learning is achieved? (evaluation procedures); and, similar to Taba's simplification of curriculum design, instructional designers reduce the ID to a simple procedure (Fig. 9.3). Not wanting to limit ID to isolated instructional episodes and events, designers extended the notion of an instructional system to include a larger share of curriculum design. Basically since the 1970s, the process of ID included: 1. Analysis of Needs, Goals and Priorities 2. Analysis of Resources, Constraints, and Alternate Delivery Systems 3. Determination of Scope and Sequence of Curriculum and Courses; Delivery Systems Design 4. Determining Course Structure and Design 5. Analysis of Course Objectives 6. Definition of Performance Objectives 7. Preparing Lessons Plans (or Modules) 8. Developing, Selecting Materials, Mass Media 9. Assessing Student Performance (Performance Measures) 6.0 Designing and Developing Effective Learning Ned Herrmann Ned Herrmann was one of the first to study the human brain within the context of business and how individuals think as pertaining to establishing preferences that affect the way they work, learn, and communicate. Herrmann developed the Herrmann Whole Brain Model, which concluded that the brain has four distinct types of thinking: rational, practical, feeling, and experimental functions. However, each person tends to favor one type of thinking over the others. To gauge what type of thinking an individual favors and to what degree, Herrmann developed the Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument in 1979. By gaining an understanding of their preferred thinking styles, individuals can be motivated to improve in other styles and types of behavior. In 1988, Herrmann published The Creative Brain, which traced the historical and scientific background of his ideas. Later he expanded his ideas and showed how to apply them in his, The Whole Brain Business Book (1996).
  • 33. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 33 There are eight general principles of C&I design, which were articulated rather clearly by the University of Guelph (Fig. 9.4): Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf Note: This course places emphasis on those areas of the teaching process that have been highlighted in yellow. 7.0 Can Stress Affect Learning and Retention Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007 Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents. All aspects of the traditional learning unit module are affected by technologies
  • 34. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 34 8.0 The Learning Centers of the Human Brain Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007
  • 35. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 35 In the first half of the book, we explained the theory that underwrites the adoption, design or creation of C&I and materials, such as overheads, videos and manipulatives. In the first and second chapters, we emphasized the goals of formal communication, noting that the materials and resources you create and use reflect on your professionalism. Visuals (images, text, etc.) play an essential role in the communication of both procedural and propositional knowledge. Visuals reinforce our demonstrations and the image our students develop of the demonstrator. An additional reason to create effective visuals relates to the accommodation of different learning styles. Some students are visual learners. Visuals and manipulatives are supported by learning theories. For example, Dale's Cone of Experience arranges the three major modes of learning (Enactive (direct experience), Iconic (pictorial experience) and Symbolic (highly abstract experience) into a hierarchy. This helps us to understand the interrelations among the three modes. They reinforce each other. We did not, however, address the evaluation of C&I resources, or the criteria that teachers use for adoption. Criteria for evaluating products of C&I are divided into four categories: Content, Instructional Design, Technical Design, and Ecological and Social Considerations. Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007
  • 36. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 36 There are also additional media-specific criteria. Teacher-evaluators must be aware of general learning resource considerations in these four general areas (Table 9.2). Table 9.2. General Criteria for Evaluating C&I Materials (BC MOE, 2000) Source: Herrmann International, copyright 1982-2007 Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 37. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 37 9.0 Standard Evaluation Rubric Specific criteria apply to the evaluation of materials, in addition to our general criteria. An example digital resources evaluation form from British Columbia is provided below. Evaluation Rubric Form
  • 38. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 38 Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 39. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 39 Given what we know about digital and instructional design, the following general considerations for selecting websites ought to be considered. Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf In the mid1920s, Henry Morrison (1926, 1931) combined the initial notion of unit (i.e., unit of experience) with disciplinary notions for his practices in the secondary school at the University of Chicago. Here, unit meant a large block of related subject matter, which provided a theme, combined with activities, problems and projects over several weeks to generate understandings of the theme and related knowledge. For example, Morrison used themes such as the French Revolution in history, and the Earth as a Planet in science. The form of a unit was divided into five steps: 1. Exploration— teacher explores what students know through pre-test and discussion 2. Presentation— teacher provides a concrete sketch of the unit and theme
  • 40. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 40 3. Assimilation—students scatter for individualized and small-group work; teacher evaluates 4. Organization— teacher organizes knowledge, represents unit and theme 5. Recitation— students demonstrate attitudes, knowledge and skill; public performances By the 1950s, the form of a unit was generally a combination of Kilpatrick's idea of a project and Morrison's ideas. Our current form for a unit was established at this time as a progression from an introductory phase through constructive and culminating phases. A unit is basically a three day to three-week progression that includes methods such as activities, modules, projects, lessons and demonstrations that coalesce around a theme (Fig. 9.7). Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf The very form of the unit is designed to discourage fence sitting. Neutrality and apathy on the part of the students are signs that their core beliefs and feelings have not been touched by the unit. Normative units hold a possibility for providing insight into controversial issues such as those listed in Chapter 4 (Fig. 9.8). All aspects of the traditional learning unit module are affected by technologies
  • 41. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 41 Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf 10.0 Modules In the early 1970s, an individualized learning package or container for modular teaching was called a module— "a self-contained, independent unit of a planned series of learning activities designed to help the student accomplish certain well-defined objectives." Modules are freestanding, self-contained and comprehensive instructional packages, meaning that basically everything that the student needs is in the module. Whereas a unit is directed by the teacher and may involve the use of modules, a module provides for self-direction, or self-paced learning of a realm of content. In the late 1980s and through the 1990s, modules became immensely popular in England and Scotland in a context of "flexible learning," educators' response to flexible economics. One proponent of modularity referred to this proliferation in higher education as "The Container Revolution," reflected in the 700+ modules at Oxford Polytechnic. Modules are currently a world-wide phenomenon and the preferred containers for distance education via the world wide web. All aspects of the traditional learning unit module are affected by technologies
  • 42. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 42 The basic form of modules was established by instructional designers in the 1970s (Fig. 9.9). Source: http://people.uwplatt.edu/~steck/Petrina%20Text/Chapter%209.pdf Module Objectives Pre-Test Rationale Interactivities Post-Test Resources Attitudes Knowledge Skills Quiz Discussion Prior Learning Assessment Relevance Justifications Activities Multimedia Problems Assessment Links Projections Figure 9.9. Modules are immensely popular and extremely important for anyone interested in the development of digital learning resources and on-line education. Most schools are moving toward mixed modes of teaching, which invariably involves the use of digital modules. Modules need not be digital, but a vast majority are taking a digital form in this context. In the next section, the details of a digital module format are provided. In technology studies, the popularity of modular instruction increased throughout the 1990s. In 2001 in the US, 72.5% of technology education programs in public schools were using teacher-made modules and 48.5% use commercial modules (Sanders, 2001). During the 1990s, the commercial production of modules became an attractive endeavor for vendors who marketed their modules at prices ranging from $8.00 for a paper packet to $12,980.00 for integrated learning systems (Petrina, 1993). It is important to stress that there are two connotations of modules: (1) The self- contained instructional (often digital) packages already described; and (2) Self-contained instructional packages integrated within a self-contained architectural station. This second type refers to modular "stations" that are basically self-contained mini-facilities. All aspects of the traditional learning unit module are affected by technologies
  • 43. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 43 We can think of the first type as software modules and the second type as a integrated stations of software, hardware and architecture (Chapter 11). Hence, modules range from do-it- yourself packages to desk-top trainers to architectural spaces defined by specialized equipment. Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 44. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 44 14.0 Appendix - B General Concepts and Design Principles There are many different concepts that can guide in the selection of learner instructional methods, development, implementation, and review as associated with all types of curricula at both the program and course level. Of these considerations are the following as extracted from Helen Mongan-Rallis: 1.0 Course Outcomes In Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) Standards & MN Standards of Effective Practice National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T) UMD Education Department Conceptual Framework Themes (a conceptual framework) 1. Knowing subject matter 2. Human development and learning 3. Diversity in learning 4. Variety of instructional strategies 5. Motivation and management 6. Communication skills 7. Instructional planning skills 8. Assessment 9. Reflection and responsibility 10. Relationships and partners 1. Technology operations and concepts 2. Planning and designing effective learning environments and experiences 3. Teaching, learning and the curriculum 4. Assessment and evaluation 5. Productivity and professional practice 6. Social, ethical, legal, and human issues 1. Diversity (D) 2. Reflection (R) 3. Empowerment (E) 4. Collaboration (C) 5. Technology (T) Use this radial button provided to navigate back to the table of contents.
  • 45. Teachers College California EDU 502: Educational Technology Methods Course Syllabus Roadmap 45 2.0 An example of a philosophy of education My Educational Philosophy By Kelly Lent I believe that in order for a teacher to be a successful teacher, they must care about their students. When a person cares for another person they go out of their way to try and improve that person's life. I believe teachers have a chance to do that every single day. I want to be the teacher that makes a positive impact on my students. I want them to be able to see their own worth and be successful. In order to achieve this, I need to set my students up to succeed right from the beginning. I am not there to make their lives even more difficult, rather to give them the tools to help them to succeed. One of these tools is self-worth. I believe no child should be made to feel embarrassed in the classroom. The classroom is a place where ideas are formed and challenged. If a child feels embarrassed, they are more apt to not participate in class discussions. This will also make the child feel safe in my classroom because we have built a level of trust. It is important that students have at least one positive adult impact in their lives cheering them on. In order to create a safe classroom, students have to understand that they will not be criticized for their ideas. I want to encourage students to think outside of the box and take the road less traveled. I believe teachers are important role models. Students see these adults for at least 180 days out of the year. Whether teachers realize it or not, they are making an impression on students. One way I plan to make a positive impression is to treat the students with respect. One way in which students will understand this is by having them define respect. I will also have the students make up the classroom rules together. That way they know that I value their opinions and they have a voice. The students will also learn how to work in groups and start to understand each other. I believe that, as a society, if we can start to understand each other, than many of our differences will not cause problems but that we would embrace on another as human beings. When I enter a school, I want that school to be supportive of its teachers. Teachers are the backbone of a school. There needs to be good, positive communication between school administrators, teachers, as well as parents. These groups need to work together in order to successfully achieve the goal of preparing students with life tools. Another aspect that I would expect from a school is one that encouraged collaboration. It is important that teachers work together. The new movement in education is intergraded curriculum. Studies have shown that the brain works better when concepts are grouped in chunks and it is easier to understand. This is the main idea behind intergraded curriculum. I do not expect the school to be doing this already, but to have an open mind and allow teachers to experiment with this. From my students I would like them to have an open mind. One way in which to do this is to expose students to new ideas and viewpoints. For instance, in history, new ideas as to why Christopher Columbus went on his voyage are coming out all the time. It is known that at the time, navigators knew that the world was round. Yet in schools they are still teaching that they thought the world was flat. By exposing students to new ideas that go against the main stream thought, I hope to encourage students to think of their own ideas and present them to the class. I also want students to understand bigger concepts such as democracy, freedom, and independence. I want to be the teacher that students can trust, teachers can work with and administrators can depend on.