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Republic of the Philippines
Region II
Province of Cagayan
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WHY CONTINGENCY PLAN IS ESSENTIAL?
A contingency plan in project management is a defined, actionable plan that is to be enacted if an identified risk becomes a reality. It is
essentially a “Plan B”, to be put in place when things go differently than expected. The Project Management Institute defines
contingency planning as, “involv[ing] defining action steps to be taken if an identified risk event should occur.” Contingency plans
in enterprise project management are a component of risk management, and should be part of the risk management plan, which may
include risk management software.
By creating a business contingency plan, project managers can identify potential risks and develop strategies to mitigate them, reducing
the likelihood of project delays, budget overruns, and other negative outcomes. We’ll walk you through when you should use a
contingency plan, the difference between contingency plans and mitigation plans, how to do contingency planning, four steps you can
take to develop your own contingency plan.
EXISTING DRRM-CCA RELATED POLICIES,
GUIDELINES AND RESOLUTIONS
 INTERNATIONAL BASES
Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in
Sendai, Japan on March 18, 2015)
The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 outlines seven clear targets and four priorities for action to
prevent new and reduce existing disaster risks:
1. Understanding Disaster Risks;
2. Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk;
3. Investing in disaster reduction for resilience;
4. Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build-Back-Better” in recovery,
rehabilitation and reconstruction.
It aims to achieve the substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic,
physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities, and countries over the next 15 years.
 NATIONAL BASES
AmBisyon Natin 2040
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This Long-term Vision for the Philippines aims to answer the question of “Where do we want to be? It is the vision that guides
the future and is the anchor of the country’s plans.
It is envisioned that in 2040, every Filipino will enjoy a stable and comfortable lifestyle, secure in the knowledge that there is
enough for the daily needs and unexpected expenses and prepared for all the future of the children.
This vision emphasizes that all Filipinos will have a strongly rooted (matatag), comfortable (maginhawa) and secured (panatag)
life in 2040 as they shall have their family together, time with friends, work-life in balance and volunteering. Also, they are free
from hunger and poverty, secure home ownership, good transport facilities, enough resources for daily needs, peace and security,
long and healthy life and comfortable retirement.
Climate Change Act of 2009
Republic 9729, otherwise known as the Climate Change Act of 2009 is an act mainstreaming climate change into government
policy formulations, establishing the framework strategy and program on climate change, creating for this purpose the Climate
Change Commission, and for other purposes.
It was enacted to mainstream and systematically integrate the concept of climate change in various phases of policy formulation,
development plans, poverty reduction strategies and other development tools and techniques by all agencies and instrumentalities
of the government. It mandated the formulation of a national Strategic Framework on Climate Change and its operational plan,
the National Climate Change Action Plan. It also aimed to integrate disaster risk reduction into climate change programs and
initiatives.
Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010
The Philippine government enacted Republic Act 10121, the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010,
antecedent to Presidential Decree Number 1566 of 1978 (PD 1566), An Act Strengthening the Philippine Disaster Control
Capability and Establishing the National Program on Community Disaster Preparedness, to provide legal basis for governmental
policies, plans, and programs to deal with disasters.
Republic Act No 11494 providing for COVID-19 response and economic recovery
This document sets the Philippines' legislative response to COVID-19 and a recovery plan. Passed in 2020.
Legal Basis of Incident Command System
1. Republic Act 10121
a. Section 9 (g): The Office of Civil Defense (OCD) shall formulate standard operating procedures for coordination…
b. Rule 7 (h), Implementing Rules and Regulations: The OCD shall establish ICS as part of the Philippines’ on- scene disaster
response system
2. NDRRMC Memorandum Circular No. 4, s2012 Signed on March 28, 2012, this provides the implementing guidelines on
the use of the ICS under the Philippine DRRM System
3. Executive Order No. 82, s2012 Signed on September 4, 2012, this mandates the activation of the ICS for human induced
crises.
4. NDRRMC Memorandum Circular No. 43, s2016 Signed on August 18, 2016, this provides the guidelines on the
interoperability of the Incident Management Teams and Response Clusters.
5. NDRRMC Memorandum Order No. 44, s2016 Also signed on August 18, 2016, this provides the guidelines on the
mobilization of Incident Management Teams
6. NDRRMC-NSC Joint Memorandum Circular No. 1, s2016 Approved on 30 August 2016, this JMC requires the use of ICS
as an integral component of contingency plan for both natural and human-induced hazards.
 LOCAL BASES
DRRM policy and practice in Baggao is regulated and organized by several related executive orders and ordinances. The most
pertinent of these are the following:
Executive Orders
1. Executive Order No. 01, Series of 2011, Organizing the Baggao MDRRMC and defining the functions, composition and
specific roles and responsibilities of its members;
2. Executive Order No. 20, Series 2011, Organizing the Climate Change Committee in the Municipality of Baggao;
3. Executive Order No. 03, Series of 2012, An Order Creating the GO-FAR Project Management Team to Implement NARDS
in the Municipality of Baggao;
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4. Executive Order No. 10, Series 2012, An Order Establishing and Adopting the Baggao MDRRMC Incident Command System;
5. Executive Order No. 17, Series of 2012, Executive Order Organizing the Special Technical Committee for the Preservation of
Century/Heritage Trees in the Municipality of Baggao, Cagayan;
6. Executive Order No. 17, Series of 2012, An Order Establishing and Adopting the Guidelines on Evacuation Center
Coordination and Management;
7. Executive Order No. 09, Series of 2013, Executive Order Activating the Rescue 116 and the MDRRM Operations Center to
Operate in a 24/7 Basis and Submission of Monthly Reports;
8. Executive Order No. 17, Series of 2013, Creating the Infrastructure Audit Team of the Municipality of Baggao;
9. Executive Order No. 20, Series of 2014, Re-organizing the Baggao MDRRMC and defining the functions, composition and
specific roles and responsibilities of its members;
10. Executive Order No., Series of 2015, Organizing the Baggao MDRRMC and defining the functions, composition and specific
roles and responsibilities of its members;
11. Executive Order No. 28, Series 2015, An Order Organizing the Operation Listo Cluster of the MDRRMC in the Municipality
of Baggao, Cagayan;
12. Executive Order No. 29, Series 2015, An Order Authorizing the Payment of Honorarium of the Rescue 116 Volunteers in the
Municipality of Baggao;
13. Executive Order No. 04, Series of 2016, Reorganizing the LGU Team for the Formulation, Planning and Implementation of
Local Climate Change Action Plan (LCCAP);
14. Executive Order No. 08, Series of 2016, Appointment and Designations to Specific Positions in the MDRRM Office;
15. Executive Order No. 18, Series of 2016, Re-Organizing the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and management Council
(MDRRMC) in the Municipality of Baggao;
16. Executive Order No. 47, Series of 2016, Converting Baggao Rescue 116 as Civil Society Organization into Government
Emergency Rescue Service to be known as Baggao Rescue 116;
17. Executive Order No. 31, Series of 2017, Appointments and Designations to Specific Positions in the MDRRM Office;
18. Executive Order No. 33, Series of 2017, An Executive Order to All Barangay Captains to Execute Pre-Emptive Evacuation to
All Low-Lying Houses in their Area of Responsibility and to Undertake Necessary Precautionary Measures for Possible
Landslide and Flooding due to Continuous Heavy Rainfall in the Municipality of Baggao;
19. Executive Order No. 05, Series of 2018, Re-organizing the Baggao Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management
Council;
20. Executive Order No. 27, Series of 2018, Creation of Inventory Committee to Conduct Assessment on the Present Facilities
along Tourist Destinations of the Municipality;
21. Executive Order No. 34, Series of 2018, An Order Authorizing the Baggao Rescue 116 Under the Municipal Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management Office (MDRRMO) to Operate the Tallang Sub-Station 24/7 Emergency Operations;
22. Executive Order No. 42, Series of 2019, Re-organizing the Baggao Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management
Council (MDRRMC) in the Municipality of Baggao;
23. Executive Order No. 104, Series of 2019, Executive Order Establishing the Task Force Team to Clear Roads and Streets of
Illegal Structures and Construction within the Municipality of Baggao;
24. Executive Order No. 104, Series of 2019: An Executive Order to all Barangay captains to Execute Pre-Emptive Evacuation to
All Low-Lying Houses in their Area of Responsibility and to Undertake Necessary Precautionary Measures for Possible
Landslide and Flooding caused by Tropical Cyclone Falcon in the Municipality;
25. Executive Order No. 104, Series of 2019: An Order Creating the Technical Working Group (TWG) for the Evacuation Center
Management Committee of the Municipality of Baggao;
26. Executive Order No. 24, Series of 2020, An Order Adopting and Implementing the Enhanced Community Quarantine in the
Municipality of Baggao;
27. Executive Order No. 41, Series of 2020, An Order Providing Protocols for the Implementation of General Community
Quarantine in the Municipality Excluding Barangays Under Enhanced Community Quarantine;
28. Executive Order No. 50, Series of 2020, An Order Re-Establishing the Municipal Task Force Against COVID-19 of Baggao,
Cagayan;
29. Executive Order No. 32, Series of 2021, An Order Institutionalizing the “Drug-Free” Workplace Policy of the Local
Government of Baggao and Adopting the Policies and Programs of the RA 9165 otherwise Known as “Comprehensive
Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002” and Creating the Committee of Drug-Free Workplace;
30. Executive Order No. 52, Series of 2021, Executive Order Creating the Bamboo Development Task Force of the Municipality;
31. Executive Order No. 63, Series of 2021, Strict Implementation of Protocols and Guidelines to Barangays Under Enhanced
Community Quarantine (ECQ) of this Municipality;
32. Executive Order No. 74, Series of 2021, Strict Implementation of the Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) Guidelines in
Baggao, Cagayan;
33. Executive Order No. 81, Series of 2021, An Order Creating the Technical Working Group (TWG) for the Identification of
Hazard Prone and Risk Assessment in the Municipality of Baggao, Cagayan;
SB Resolutions
1. Resolution No. 097, Series 2013, Resolution Authorizing the Local Chief Executive to Implement a Replication Activity of
the Project SHINE of the Province of Bulacan as a Model LGU in the Municipality of Baggao;
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2. Resolution No. 06, Series 2014, Resolution Enacting Ordinance No 2014-02 of the Municipality;
3. Resolution No. 65, Series 2014, Resolution Adopting the Municipal Contingency Plan on Flooding;
4. Resolution No. 66, Series 2014, Resolution Adopting the Standard Operating Procedure on Operation Paghahanda Flood
Warning and Response Flooding;
5. Resolution No. 105, Series of 2014, A Resolution Adopting the Three Year Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and
Management Plan (MDRRMP) CY 2014 to 2016 of the Municipality;
6. Resolution No. 125, Series 2014, A Resolution Adopting the Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) of the 24/7 Emergency
Operation of the Baggao Rescue 116, Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP)
7. Resolution No. 75, Series 2016, Resolution Reprogramming the Emergency Shelter Assistance from the 2015 MDRRMF
to Financial Assistance to Twelve (12) Families of Barangay san Miguel, Baggao who are at Risk to Riverbank Erosion for
their House Relocation;
8. Resolution No. 162, Series 2017, Resolution Adopting the MDRRMC Resolution No. 01, Series 2017 re: Reprogramming
Some of the Unexpended 2015-2016 MDRRMF to Disaster Preparedness Activities, Supplies and Equipment;
9. Resolution No. 151-A, Series 2018, A Resolution Adopting the Municipal Contingency Plan on Landslide;
10. Resolution No. 151-B, Series of 2018, Resolution Adopting the 2018-2020 Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and
Management Plan (MDRRMP);
11. Resolution No. 25, Series of 2020, Resolution Urging all Schools in the Municipality, Public and Private, in all Levels,
Government Offices and Civil Society Organizations to Conduct Massive Information Dissemination Drive Regarding the
Deadly Novel Corona Virus to be Spearheaded by the Municipal Health Office;
12. Resolution No. 162, Series of 2020, A Resolution Enacting Ordinance No. 202- 28, Series 2020 Entitles “An Ordinance
Mandating Every Owner of a Residential House to Have Sanitary Toilet/Latrine as One of the Prerequisites in the Issuance
of Barangay Clearance/Certificate to Achieve Zero Open Defecation”;
13. Resolution No. 172, Series of 2020. Resolution Approving the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan
(MDRRMP) for Calendar Year 2021;
14. Resolution No. 53, Series of 2020, Resolution Authorizing the Local Chief Executive and the MDRRM Officer to Enter
into MOU with Patiu Funeral Homes Relative to Handling of Remains of Confirmed Covid-19 Cases and Patients Under
Investigation;
15. Resolution No. 013, Series 2021, A Resolution Enacting Ordinance No. 2021-03 Entitled “An Ordinance Institutionalizing
the Implementation of Bamboo Development Project of Baggao and Providing Funds Thereof;
SB Ordinances
1. Ordinance No. 2012-08, “An Ordinance Regulating the Use of All Kinds of Passenger Water Crafts Crossing or Traversing
any Waterways Within the Municipality of Baggao”;
2. Ordinance No. 2012-37, “An Ordinance Enacting the Guidelines on Pre-Emptive or Forced Evacuation in Response to Man-
made and Natural Disasters”;
3. Ordinance No. 2014-01, “An Ordinance Regulating the Use of the Municipal Ambulance, Providing Penalties Thereof and
for Other Purposes”;
4. Ordinance No. 2019-24, “An Ordinance Implementing Force Evacuation as a Resort When Disaster or Emergency has been
Declared in the Municipality and Danger of Loss of Lives Becomes Imminent, Providing penalties thereof and for other
Purposes”
5. Ordinance No. 2020-09, “An Ordinance Requiring the Planting of Seedlings by Job Order, Casual and Permanent
Employees of the Local Government Unit of Baggao”;
6. Ordinance No. 2020-21, “An Ordinance Mandating the Immediate Arrest of All Abandoned Individuals with Mental Illness
Creating Public Disturbance or Property Damages within Baggao”;
7. Ordinance No. 157-A, Series 2020: “An Ordinance Prohibiting all Forms of Unauthorized Drag Racing in the Municipality
of Baggao and Providing Penalties for Violation Thereof;”
Memorandum Circulars
1. Memorandum Circular No. 01, S, 2020, General Guidelines for Public on the Localized Cancellation or Suspension of
Classes and Work in Government Offices;
2. Guidelines on COVID-19 Preparedness Measures for Rainy Season
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ACRONYMS/ABBREVIATIONS
AHIMT All-Hazards Incident Management Team
BDRRMC Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Committee
BDRRMF Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund
BDRRMP Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan
BLS Basic Life Support
BNS Barangay Nutrition Scholar
CAGELCO Cagayan Electric Cooperative
CBA Cost-benefit analysis or community-based adaptation
CCA Climate Change Adaptation
CCC Climate Change Commission
CBDRRM Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management
CDRA Climate and Disaster Risk Assessment
CDP Comprehensive Development Plan
CLUP Comprehensive Land Use Plan
CSO Civil Society Organization
DA Department of Agriculture
DENR Department on Environment and Natural Resources
DILG Department on Interior and Local Government
DOF Department of Finance
DOH Department of Health
DOLE Department of Labor and Employment
DOST Department of Science and Technology
DPWH Department of Public Works and Highways
DRM Disaster Risk Management
DRR Disaster Risk Reduction
DRRM Disaster Risk Reduction and Management
DSWD Department of Social Welfare and Development
ECQ Enhanced Community Quarantine
EO Executive Order
EOC Emergency Operations Center
EWS Early Warning System
GAD Gender and Development
GCQ General Community Quarantine
GIS Geographic Information System
GSO General Service Office
HFA Hyogo Framework of Action
ICT Information and Communication Technology
ICS Incident Command System
IDP Internally Displaced Population/Person
IEC Information Education Campaign
IMT Incident Management Team
LCE - Local Chief Executive
LDRRMF Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund
LDRRMO Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office
LFC Local Finance Committee
LGU Local Government Unit
LZBAA Local Zoning Board and Appeals
MDRRMC Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
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MECQ Modified Enhanced Community Quarantine
MENRO Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office
MEO Municipal Engineering Office
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MGB Mines and Geosciences Bureau
MGCQ Modified General Community Quarantine
MHO Municipal Health Office
MLGOO Municipal Local Government Operations Officer
MOA Memorandum of Agreement
MPDO Municipal Planning and Development Office/r
MSWDO Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office/r
NDRRMC National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management council
NDRRMF National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund
NGAs National Government Agency/ies
NGOs Non-Government Organizations
NEDA National Economic and Development Authority
NGO Nongovernmental Organization
OSCA Office of the Senior Citizen Association
PAGASA Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration
PAR Philippine Area of Responsibility
PDP Philippine Development Plan
PDRA - Participatory Disaster Risk Assessment
PPE Personal Protective Equipment
PSA Philippine Statistics Authority
PDRRMC Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
PHIVOLCS Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
RA Republic Act
RDRRMC Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
SB Sangguniang Bayan
SMART Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely
SNAP Strategic National Action Plan
SRR Search, Rescue and Retrieval
SWOC Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Challenges
ZO Zoning Ordinance
DEFINITION OF TERMS
1. “Adaptation”-the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which
moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.
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2. “Camp Management”- the process of disaster response functioning on coordinating and monitoring assistance and protection, setting
up and supporting governance and community participation mechanisms, managing and disseminating information, providing multi-
sector feedback mechanisms, and maintaining infrastructure.
3. “Capacity”- a combination of all strengths and resources available within a community, society or organization that can reduce the
level of risk, or effects of a disaster. Capacity may include infrastructure and physical means, institutions, societal coping abilities, as
well as human knowledge, skills, and collective attributes such as social relationships, leadership, and management. Capacity may also
describe as capability.
4. “Capacity Development”- the process by which people, organizations and society systematically stimulate and develop their
capacities over time to achieve social and economic goals, including through improvement of knowledge, skills, systems and institutions.
It extends the term of capacity building to encompass all aspects of creating and sustaining capacity growth over time. It involves
learning and various types of training but also continuous efforts to develop institutions, political awareness, financial resources,
technology systems and the wider social and cultural enabling environment (UNISDR, 2009)
5. “Civil Society Organization/s”- non-state actors whose aims are neither to generate profits nor seek governing power. They unite
people to advance shared goals and interest. They have a presence in public life, expressing the interest and values of their members and
others, and are basedon ethical, cultural, scientific, religious or philanthropic considerations. CSOs include non-government
organizations (NGOs), professional associations, foundations, idependent research institutes, community-based organizations (CBOs),
faith-based organizations, people’s organizations, social movements and labor unions.
6. “Climate Change”- a change in climate that can be identified by changes in the mean and/or variability of its properties and that
persists for an extended period typically decades or longer, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity.
7. “Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (CBDRRM)”- a process of disaster risk reduction and
management in which a risk communities are actively engaged in the identification, analysis, treatment, monitoring and evaluation of
disaster risks in order to reduce vulnerabilities and enhance their capabilities, and where the people are at heart of decision-making and
implementation of disaster risk reduction and management activities.
8. “Complex Emergency”- a form of human-induced emergency in which the cause of the emergency as well as the assistance to the
afflicted is complicated by intense level of political considerations.
9. “Contingency Plan”- a plan which includes management processes that analyzes specific potential events or emerging situations that
might threaten potential events or emerging situations that might threaten the society or the environment and establishes arrangements
in advance to enable timely, effective and appropriate responses to such events and situations. It is a set of responses you will do based
on valid information even before the disaster strikes. It is a sub-set of the comprehensive plan.
10. “Covid-19”- an acute respiratory illness in humans caused by a coronavirus, capable of producing severe symptoms and in some
cases death, especially in older people and those with underlying health conditions. It was originally identified in China in 2019 and
became pandemic in 2020. It is an infectious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
11. “Crisis”- from the Greek word krises, means “to separate.” It is turning point in progress of an affair or a series of events. A
progressive sequence of events, build-up of instability and growth of tension.
12. “Critical Facilities”- the primary structures, technical facilities and systems which are socially, economically or operationally
essential to the functioning of a society or community, both in routine circumstances and in the extreme circumstances of an emergency.
They include such things as transport systems, air and sea ports, electricity, water and communications systems, hospitals and health
clinics, and centers for fire, police, and public administration services (Terminology on DRR. UNISDR, 2009)
13. “Cultural Responsiveness”- the ability to learn from and relate respectfully with people of your own culture as well as those from
other cultures.
14. “Damage Assessment and Needs Analysis”- Damage assessment is of the greatest importance in obtaining a rapid diagnosis of the
remaining functions and operational capacity of the systems, the damage suffered its causes and required repairs and rehabilitation. Such
an assessment will help to locate and quantify the needs that must be met in order to establish key services and to estimate the time
needed until they can be back in operation. (PAHO/WHO)
15. “Disaster”- a serious disruption of the functioning of a community or a society involving widespread human, material, economic or
environmental losses and impacts which exceeds the ability of the affected community or society to cope using its own resources.
Disasters are often described as a result of the combination of: the4 exposure to a hazard; the conditions of vulnerability that are present;
and insufficient capacity or measures to reduce or to cope with the potential negative consequences. Disaster impacts may include loss
of life, injury, disease and other negative effects on human, physical, mental and social well-being, together with damage to property,
destruction of assets, loss of services, social and economic disruption and environmental degradation.
16. “Disaster Mitigation” - the lessening or limitation of the adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. Mitigation measures
include but not limited to the engineering techniques and hazard-resistant construction but includes as well as improved environmental
policies and programs and public awareness.
17. “Disaster Preparedness”- the knowledge and capacities developed by governments, professional response and recovery
organizations, communities and individuals to effectively anticipate, respond to, and recover from- the impacts of likely, imminent or
current hazard events or conditions. Preparedness action is carried out within the context of disaster risk reduction and management and
aims to build the capacities needed to efficiently manage all types of emergencies and achieve orderly transitions from response to
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sustained recovery. Preparedness id based on a sound analysis of disaster-risk, and good linkages with early warning systems, and
includes such activities as contingency planning, stockpiling of equipment and supplies, the development of arrangements for
coordination, evacuation and public information, and associated training and exercises. These must be supported by formal institutional,
legal and budgetary capacities.
18. “Disaster Prevention”- the outright avoidance of adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. It expresses the concept and
intention to completely avoid potential adverse impacts through action taken in advance such as construction of dams or embankments
that eliminate flood risks, land-use regulations that do not permit any settlement in high-risk zones, and seismic engineering designs that
ensure the survival and function of a critical building in any likely earthquake.
19. “Disaster Response”- the provision of emergency services and public assistance during or immediately after a disaster in order to
save lives, reduce health impacts, ensure public safety and meet the basic subsistence needs of the people affected. Disaster Response
is predominantly focused on immediate and short-term needs and is sometimes called “disaster relief.”
20. “Disaster Risk”- the potential disaster losses in lives, health status, livelihood, assets and services, which could occur to a particular
community or a society over some specified future time period.
21. “Disaster Risk Reduction”- the concept and practice of reducing disaster risks through systematic efforts to analyze and manage
the causal factors of disasters, including through reduced exposures to hazards, lessened vulnerability of people and property, wise
management of land and the environment, and improved preparedness for adverse events.
22. “Disaster Risk Reduction and Management”- the systematic process of using administrative directives, organizations, and
operational skills and capacities to implement strategies, policies and improved coping capacities in order to lessen the adverse impacts
of hazards and the possibility of disaster. Prospective disaster risk reduction and management refers to risk reduction and management
activities that address and seek to avoid the development of new or increased disaster risks, especially if risk reduction policies are not
in place.
23. “Early Recovery”- Multidimensional process of recovery that begins in a humanitarian setting. It is guided by development
principles that seek to build on humanitarian programs and catalyze sustainable development opportunities. It aims to generate self-
sustaining, nationally-owned, resilient processes for post-crisis recovery. It encompasses the restoration of basic services, livelihoods,
shelter, governance, security and rule of law, environment and social dimensions, including reintegration of displaced populations.
24. “Early Warning System”- the set of capacities needed to generate and disseminate timely and meaningful warning information to
enable individuals, communities and organizations threatened by a hazard to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to
reduce the possibility of harm or loss. A people- centered early warning system necessarily comprises four (4) key elements: knowledge
of the risks; monitoring, analysis and forecasting of the hazards; communication or dissemination of alerts and warnings; and local
capabilities to respond to the warnings received. The expression “end-to-end warning system” is also used to emphasize that warning
systems need to span all steps from hazard detection to community response.
25. “Emergency”- from the Latin word emergentia meaning a dipping or plunging. A sudden condition or state of affairs calling for
immediate action.
26. “Emergency response equipment”- all equipment designed for or typically used in the course of performing the duties required of
an emergency responder. (https://www.lawinsider.com › dictionary)
27. “Evacuation centers”- temporary shelter for persons displaced from their homes following a disaster. These facilities vary by
location and by the extent of damage to the area. Office buildings, sports stadiums, churches, residential homes, dormitories and
community centers may all serve as emergency shelters.
28. “Exposure”- the degree to which the elements at risk are likely to experience hazard events of different magnitudes.
29. “Gender Responsive”- outcomes that reflect an understanding of gender roles and inequalities and which make an effort to
encourage equal participation and equal and fair distribution of benefits. Gender responsiveness is accomplished through gender analysis
and gender inclusiveness.
30. “Hazard”- a dangerous phenomenon, substance, human activity or condition that may cause loss of life, injury or other health
impacts property damage, loss of livelihood and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage.
31. “Hazard Mapping”- process of establishing geography where and to what extent particular hazards/phenomena are likely to pose
a threat to people, property, infrastructure and economic activities.
32. “Incident Command System”- systematic tool used for the command, control and coordination of emergency response. It is a set
of personnel, policies, procedures, facilities and equipment, integrated into a common organizational structure designed to improve
emergency response operations of all types and complexities. It is based upon a flexible, scalable response organization providing a
common framework within which people can work together effectively.
ICS has been summarized as a “first-on-scene” structure, where the first responder of a scene has charge of the scene until the incident
has been declared resolved, a superior –ranking responder arrives on scene and receives command, or the Incident Commander appoints
another Incident Commander. (US for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance)
33. “Internally Displaced Population/Person”- are those who have been forced or obliged to leave their homes behind, notably for
reasons related to armed conflict or other violence, and who remain within the borders of their country.
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34. “Insurgency”- historically restricted to rebellious acts that did not reach the proportions of an organized revolution. It has
subsequently been applied to any such armed uprising, typically guerrilla in character, against the recognized government of a state or
country. Unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government or its citizens to further
certain political or social objectives.
35. “Post- Disaster Recovery”- the restoration and improvement where appropriate, of facilities, livelihood and living conditions of
disaster-affected communities, including efforts to reduce disaster risk factors, in accordance with the principles of “build-back-better.”
36. “Preparedness Plans”- There are 2 types of preparedness plans. One is focused on the various activities that need to be done to
ensure proper and timely disaster response operations. The other one is focused on the safety of the people and plans to increase their
level of awareness and preparedness in case disasters happen.
37. “Quarantine”- to put or hold in isolation to prevent the spread of disease or pests
38. “Rescue Equipment”- an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service. Floatation device, life preserver,
preserver-rescue equipment consisting of a buoyant belt or jacket to keep a person from dying.
39. “Resilience”- the ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate and recover from the
effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures
and functions.
40. “Risk Communication”- interactive exchange of information about risks among risk assessors, managers, news, media, interested
groups and the general public (IPCS Risk Assessment Terminology. WHO, Geneva 2004)
41. “Risk Transfer”- the process of formally or informally shifting the financial consequences of particular risks from one party to
another whereby a household, community, enterprise or state authority shall obtain resources from the other party after a disaster occurs,
in exchange for ongoing or compensatory social or financial benefits provided to that other party.
42. “State of Calamity”- a condition involving mass casualty and/or major damages to property, disruption of means of livelihoods,
roads and normal way of life of people in the affected areas as a result of the occurrence of natural or human-induced hazard.
43. “Vulnerability”- the characteristics and circumstances of a community, system or asset that make it susceptible to the damaging
effects of a hazard. Vulnerability may arise from various physical, social, economic, and environmental factors such as poor design and
construction of buildings, inadequate protection of assets, lack of public information and awareness, limited official recognition of risks
and preparedness measures, and disregard for wise environmental management.
44. “Weather”- refers to conditions of atmosphere over a short period of time, temperature, wind, humidity (rainfall) and cloudiness,
among others experienced day to day.
CHAPTER I: BACKGROUND
A. BRIEF HISTORY AND ECOLOGICAL PROFILE OF BAGGAO
1. ETYMOLOGY AND CREATION
20
Long before the issuance of the Royal Decree which officially detaching BAGGAO as a barrio of Amulung on November 27, 1896, the
place has already become famous as a hunting ground.
Old folks recount that the IBANAGS who frequently hunted in the locale, used to wash their catch in a mud hole before taking them
home which they called “ABBAGAOAN”. This “abbaggaoan” an Ibanag word, meaning a place to wash, became a noted landmark for
hunters from which the name of the municipality was eventually derived.
With the formal creation of Baggao as a separate municipality, Rev. Fr. Pedro Vicandi, O.P. who was then the Parish Priest of the area,
was designated officer-in-charge of the town. His chapel, and at the same time, the town hall consisted of a shack made of bamboo and
cogon built atop a hill one kilometer southeast of the old municipal building. However, the old municipal building was razed by fire by
lawless elements in 1985.
On April 18, 1899 Fr. Vicandi fled the area when Col. Daniel Tirona, under Gen. E. Aguinaldo, visited the Town and put to flame the
friar’s shanty. However, in September 1899, when civil order was finally restored, Don Rafael Catolico took over as the first mayor of
the New “Pueblo Civil”.
For more than 85 years since it was separated from its mother town of Amulung, the seat of the Municipal Government of Baggao has
been at Centro or Poblacion. In 1899, when Don Rafael Catolico took over as the first Mayor of the new “Pueblo Civil” there were 5,051
inhabitants living in sparse Built-up areas. The communities given the official status as a barrio were those immediately surrounding the
Poblacion. Most of the barangays, now established upstream were merely patches of forest clearings barely making the requirements of
becoming a full-fledge barrio.
However, with the continuous influx of immigrants from other towns and provinces, new communities sprouted continuously moving
further northeastward to the more fertile expanse of this municipality. As of today there are already 48 barangays settled by 85 percent
of the more than 66,264 inhabitants along the north-eastern portion of Baggao.
The Poblacion or Centro founded a century ago became snail-paced in terms of development. Basing on the context of “ripple effect”
approach of development, the site of the municipal government of Baggao became misplaced and un-strategically located as its pivotal
role of development. The town site, in fact, has caused an upsurge of factionalism and a desire of the people to split the municipality
into two.
In so doing, the Municipal Development Council arrived at a general consensus of selecting SAN JOSE, the most progressive barangay
of the town, as the next seat of the municipal government of Baggao.
Hence in 1985, public hearings led by the late Mayor Virgilio G. Herrero were conducted throughout the different barangays of Baggao
where 85 percent of the population expressed their support to the move. So, in a session conducted by the Sangguniang Bayan of Baggao,
the members passed a resolution transferring the site of the seat of municipal government of Baggao from the old Poblacion to Barangay
San Jose.
ROSTER OF LOCAL EXECUTIVES SINCE NOVEMBER 27, 1896
1. Fray Pedro Vicandi, O.P. 1896 -1899
2. Don Rafael Catolico 1899 -1904
3. Hon. Juan Canillas 1904 -1908
4. Hon. Benito Reboredo 1908 – 1912
5. Hon. Cipriano 1912 – 1916
6. Hon. Vicente Garcia 1916 – 1920
7. Hon. Jose Pallagao 1920 – 1921
8. Hon. Roman Canillas 1921 – 1924
9. Hon. Francisco Mendoza 1924 – 1928
10. Hon. Alejo Siazon 1928 – 1932
11. Hon. Isabelo Tobias 1932 – 1940
12. Hon. Domingo Herrero 1940 – 1944
13. Hon. Pastor Lorenzo 1944 – 1945
14. Hon. Walfrido Pallagao 1945 – 1946
15. Hon. Custavo Cruz Sr. 1946 – 1947
16. Hon. Angel Canillas 1947 – 1956
17. Hon. Felix Villanueva 1956 – 1960
18. Hon. Walfrido Pallagao 1960 – 1978
19. Hon. Virgilio G. Herrero 1978 - March 1987
20. Hon. Dante S. Ramirez, M.D. March 1987 to November 30, 1987
21. Hon. Virgilio H. Navarro December 01, 1987 to February 02, 1988
22. Hon. Virgilio G. Herrero February 03, 1988 to March 27, 1998
23. Hon. Emely D. Carmona, M.D. March 28, 1998 to June 30, 1998
24. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung, M.D. July 1, 1998 to June 30,2007
25. Hon. Rolando T. Uanang July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010
26. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung M. D July 1, 2010 to June 2013
27. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung M. D June 2013 to 2019
28. Hon. Joan C. Dunuan, LLB, MPA July 2019 to June 2022
29. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung M. D July 2022 to present
22
A. INTRODUCTION
Baggao is a coastal municipality in the province of Cagayan.
The municipality has a land area of 995.49 square kilometers or 384.36 square miles which constitutes 10.59% of Cagayan's total area.
Its population as determined by the 2020 Census was 87,753. This represented 6.92% of the total population of Cagayan province, or
2.38% of the overall population of the Cagayan Valley region. Based on these figures, the population density is computed at
88 inhabitants per square kilometer or 228 inhabitants per square mile.
Baggao is an interior municipality located on the eastern part of Cagayan, traverses the Sierra Madre Mountain Range which extends to
the Pacific Coast. It is gifted with clean lively rivers, falls, caves and beaches. It is surrounded by expansive hills and mountains clothed
with old growth forest gradually rising along east south corridor which serves as a formidable wall to the Philippine Sea. It is likened to
a scoop hand, its Inter-digital furrows and palm lines is the ramification of rivers, creeks and gullies, cascading into the three main rivers,
the Taboan river drain into Philippine Sea whereas Paranan and Pared drain into a national landmark, the Cagayan River. The fertile
plains and valleys along the water streams grow the bulk of the municipality’s agricultural products and house majority of the
Baggaoeños.
I. Basic Information
LGU Type: Municipality
Income Class: 1st
Population (CY 2020-PSA): 87,753
No. of Households (CY 2021-RBI): 23, 029
Land Area (in hectares.): 99,548.5922
It is also bounded on the north by the municipality of Gattaran, on the east by the Philippine Sea, on the southeast by the municipality
of Peñablanca; on the southwest by the municipality of Amulung and on the west by the municipality of Alcala, Cagayan. Based on the
great-circle distance (the shortest distance between two points over the surface of the Earth), the cities closest to Baggao are Tuguegarao,
Cagayan, Tabuk, Kalinga, Ilagan, Isabela, Cauayan, Isabela, Laoag, Ilocos Norte, and Batac, Ilocos Norte. The nearest municipalities
are Amulung, Cagayan, Alcala, Cagayan, Gattaran, Cagayan, Iguig, Cagayan, Santo Niño, Cagayan, and Lasam, Cagayan. Its distance
from the national capital is 379.67 kilometers (235.92 miles). The following list delineates such distance measurements.
great-circle distance
Nearest towns
Amulung, Cagayan, 12.01 kilometers (7.46 miles) to the South Southwest (S25°W)
Alcala, Cagayan, 12.72 kilometers (7.91 miles) to the West Southwest (S73°W)
Gattaran, Cagayan, 19.50 kilometers (12.12 miles) to the Northwest (N44°W)
Iguig, Cagayan, 20.54 kilometers (12.76 miles) to the South (S10°W)
Santo Niño, Cagayan, 22.21 kilometers (13.80 miles) to the West Southwest (S75°W)
Lasam, Cagayan, 23.02 kilometers (14.31 miles) to the Northwest (N51°W)
24
Nearest cities
Tuguegarao, Cagayan, 35.96 kilometers (22.34 miles) to the South (S7°W)
Tabuk, Kalinga, 60.57 kilometers (37.64 miles) to the South Southwest (S32°W)
Ilagan, Isabela, 88.42 kilometers (54.94 miles) to the South (S8°E)
Cauayan, Isabela, 110.78 kilometers (68.83 miles) to the South (S0°W)
Laoag, Ilocos Norte, 128.07 kilometers (79.58 miles) to the West Northwest (N77°W)
Batac, Ilocos Norte, 128.63 kilometers (79.93 miles) to the West (N84°W)
Distance from Manila: 379.67 kilometers (235.92 miles) to the South Southwest (S13°W)
Figure 1: Location Map
II. Financial Summary CY 2021
LGU Income
IRA Share: 385,236,552.00
Tax revenue: 12,965,147.95
Non-Tax revenue: 16,067,898.33
Total: 414,269,598.28
The determination of the extent of local municipal jurisdiction is at present an issue which is a cause of conflict between its neighboring
municipalities, Peñablanca and Gattaran. Based from the Atlas map, the municipality has a total land area of 92,060 hectares which is
the current basis of the National Government for the computation of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA). This total land area is divided
among the 48 barangays and about 10.226 percent of the total 900,270 hectares’ total land area of the Province of Cagayan.
Census date Population Growth rate
1903 Mar 2 3,857 –
1918 Dec 31 6,727 3.58%
1939 Jan 1 11,602 2.76%
1948 Oct 1 11,232 -0.33%
1960 Feb 15 21,597 5.92%
1970 May 6 36,471 5.26%
1975 May 1 41,011 2.38%
1980 May 1 44,081 1.45%
1990 May 1 55,264 2.29%
26
Census date Population Growth rate
1995 Sep 1 60,060 1.57%
2000 May 1 66,264 2.13%
2007 Aug 1 73,048 1.35%
2010 May 1 78,188 2.51%
2015 Aug 1 82,782 1.09%
2020 May 1 87,753 1.24%
Based on the 2020 census, the most thickly populated barangays of the municipality are barangay Hacienda Intal with a population of
5, 802 and a population density of 0.84 persons per hectare followed by barangay Sta. Margarita with a population of 5, 006 and a
population density of 1.30 persons per hectare and ranking third is barangay Imurung with a population of 3, 755 and population density
of 2.03 persons per hectare. Ranking 4th is barangay Poblacion with a population of 3, 408 persons and a population density of 8.16
persons per hectare.
Barangay
Population
Percentage
(2020)
Population 2020 Population 2015
Change
(2015-
2020)
Annual
Population
Growth Rate
(2015-2020)
Adaoag 1.34% 1,177 1,012 16.30% 3.23%
Agaman 1.27% 1,117 957 16.72% 3.31%
Agaman Norte 1.77% 1,551 1,610 -3.66% -0.78%
Agaman Sur 1.18% 1,035 944 9.64% 1.96%
Alba 1.97% 1,732 1,658 4.46% 0.92%
Annayatan 1.30% 1,143 1,235 -7.45% -1.62%
Asassi 2.93% 2,568 2,245 14.39% 2.87%
Asinga-Via 2.93% 2,573 2,168 18.68% 3.67%
Table 1: Population Growth Rate from 1903-2020 (source:www.philatlas.com)
Awallan 2.94% 2,583 2,321 11.29% 2.28%
Bacagan 1.57% 1,382 1,145 20.70% 4.04%
Bagunot 1.54% 1,351 1,244 8.60% 1.75%
Barsat East 1.57% 1,375 1,258 9.30% 1.89%
Barsat West 1.21% 1,066 1,062 0.38% 0.08%
Bitag Grande 3.83% 3,365 3,000 12.17% 2.45%
Bitag Pequeño 2.05% 1,802 1,623 11.03% 2.23%
Bunugan 1.56% 1,367 1,289 6.05% 1.24%
C. Verzosa 0.85% 746 640 16.56% 3.28%
Canagatan 0.57% 500 484 3.31% 0.69%
Carupian 1.55% 1,360 1,353 0.52% 0.11%
Catugay 0.96% 846 877 -3.53% -0.75%
Dabbac Grande 0.90% 789 718 9.89% 2.00%
Dalin 1.35% 1,186 1,165 1.80% 0.38%
Dalla 1.91% 1,673 1,602 4.43% 0.92%
Hacienda Intal 6.61% 5,802 5,661 2.49% 0.52%
Ibulo 0.35% 306 304 0.66% 0.14%
Imurong 4.28% 3,755 3,824 -1.80% -0.38%
J. Pallagao 1.02% 891 879 1.37% 0.29%
Lasilat 1.37% 1,204 1,287 -6.45% -1.39%
Mabini 1.35% 1,182 1,100 7.45% 1.52%
Masical 1.68% 1,477 1,408 4.90% 1.01%
Mocag 3.57% 3,135 2,870 9.23% 1.88%
Nangalinan 1.71% 1,499 1,612 -7.01% -1.52%
Poblacion 3.88% 3,408 3,296 3.40% 0.71%
Remus 3.41% 2,992 2,671 12.02% 2.42%
San Antonio 0.70% 612 442 38.46% 7.09%
San Francisco 2.71% 2,377 2,241 6.07% 1.25%
San Isidro 1.25% 1,097 937 17.08% 3.37%
San Jose 5.17% 4,535 4,375 3.66% 0.76%
San Miguel 1.87% 1,641 1,602 2.43% 0.51%
San Vicente 0.72% 636 503 26.44% 5.06%
Santa Margarita 5.70% 5,006 4,862 2.96% 0.62%
Santor 1.30% 1,140 1,140 0.00% 0.00%
28
Taguing 2.63% 2,312 2,190 5.57% 1.15%
Taguntungan 1.99% 1,746 1,458 19.75% 3.87%
Tallang 3.44% 3,015 3,113 -3.15% -0.67%
Taytay 1.65% 1,449 1,400 3.50% 0.73%
Temblique 1.15% 1,006 893 12.65% 2.54%
Tungel 1.42% 1,243 1,104 12.59% 2.53%
Baggao Total 87,753 82,782 6.00% 1.24%
There are 48 barangays of the municipality, three (3) barangays are classified as urban (Tallang, San Jose, Poblacion) and forty-five
(45) are rural.
III. Economy
Source of livelihood and income in the municipality
Primary: Agriculture (crop production and fishery)
Secondary: Commerce and trade
Farming NSO 12,662
Corn Farmers MAO 8,635
Rice Farmers MAO 6,254
Livestock/poultry NSO 6,287
Fishing NSO 344
Forestry NSO 275
Bakery (2019)BPLO 27
Parlor/Barber Shop/Spa (2019)BPLO 23
Tailoring (2019)BPLO 6
Cooperatives (2019)BPLO 9
Farm and Poultry Supplies (2019)BPLO 59
Financial Institutions (2019)BPLO 29
Food Products (2019)BPLO 2
Table 2: Population Growth Rate from 2015-2020 (source:www.philatlas.com)
Funerals (2019)BPLO 2
Gasoline Stations (2019)BPLO 13
Grains Trading (2019)BPLO 44
Metal Works/ Glass and Aluminum Supply/Welding Shops (2019)BPLO 24
Vulcanizing Shops (2019)BPLO 6
Gravel and Sand/ Hollow Blocks/ Constructions (2019)BPLO 12
Wonder saw/Auto Repair Shop (2019)BPLO 14
Furniture Shops (2019)BPLO 24
Fruits/Vegetables/Fish/Meat (2019)BPLO 139
Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories/ Appliances, MRT Gas Supplies (2019)BPLO 44
Law and Notarial Office (2019)BPLO 2
Pharmacy (2019)BPLO 18
Service activities/Photo/Photo Frame/Internet Services (2019)BPLO 18
Amusement and Recreation Activities, n.e.c. (2019)BPLO 1
Office Supplies/Gen. Mdse/Dry Goods/Variety/Electrical Supply/Cellphones & Accessories
(2019)BPLO
138
Store/ Retailer (2019)BPLO 910
Travel and Tours (2019)BPLO 2
Water Refilling (2019)BPLO 20
Transportation (2018)Franchising Board 642
Construction 695
Mining and Quarrying 28
Hospital 1
Bank Primary Source 1
Medical Clinic (2019)BPLO 4
Dental Clinic (2019)BPLO 2
Tertiary School Primary Source 1
30
Secondary School Primary Source 8
Elementary School Primary Source 65*
Hotel/Restaurant/Eatery/Panciteria/Refreshment Stand (2019)BPLO 127
Cell Sites Primary Source 5
Market Center Primary Source 4
Figure 2: School Map
Table 3: Source of Livelihood and Income (source: MPDO)
A. EMPLOYMENT
The total population of 15 years old and over as per CBMS 2012 data is 53,984 of which 30,720 belongs to the labor force.
The total households engaged in the different entrepreneurial activities in the municipality are the following: engaged in crop farming
and gardening, 12,662 or 54.52%; engaged in livestock/poultry 6,287 or 27.07%; engaged in fishing 344 or 1.48%, engaged in forestry
275 or 1.11%, engaged in wholesale/ retail 1,294 or 5.57%, engaged in manufacturing are 209 or 0.90%; engaged in community, social
& personal service 162 or 0.70%; engaged in transportation, storage & communication 944 or 4.06%; engaged in construction 695 or
2.99%;engaged in mining and quarrying 28 or 0.12% and others nec. 344 or 1.48%.
B. AVERAGE FAMILY INCOME AND EXPENDITURES VIS-À-VIS POVERTY LEVEL
Baggao is a first class municipality in the province of Cagayan. It is composed of 48 barangays. Based from the National Statistics
Coordination Board (NSCB), the municipality has a population of 78,188 as of May 1, 2010. The National House Targeting System for
Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) is an information management system which identifies who and where the poor are. Proxy Means Test
(PMT) is a statistical model that estimates household income using proxy variables or income predictors. The assessment was supported
by two major activities- the On-Demand Application and Validation. These activities are the check and balance to the issues of exclusion
of poor and inclusion of non-poor household. The household assessments showed that among the 11,095 household subjected to Proxy
Mean Test, 3,059 or 27.6 percent were identified as poor in Baggao, Cagayan. This means that more than one (1) out of every four (4)
households subjected to PMT is poor.
C. POVERTY LEVEL OF THE MUNICIPALITY
CITY/MUNICIPALITY POOR %SHARE OF POOR HH’S
SOLANA 3,069 8.02%
BAGGAO 3,059 7.99%
APPARI 2,467 6.45%
TUAO 2,245 5.87%
AMULUNG 1,976 5.16%
GATTARAN 1,654 4.32%
PEÑABLANCA 1,556 4.07%
SANTO NIÑO (FAIRE) 1,508 3.94%
ALCALA 1,478 3.86%
CALAYAN 1,329 3.47%
32
LASAM 1,267 3.31%
ABULUG 1,191 3.11%
BUGUEY 1,187 3.10%
SANTA ANA 1,186 3.10%
BALLESTEROS 1,142 2.98%
GONZAGA 1,118 2.92%
ALLACAPAN 1,082 2.83%
LAL-LO 1,072 2.80%
ENRILE 1,051 2.75%
RIZAL 1,032 2.70%
PAMPLONA 1,017 2.66%
TUGUEGARAO CITY 1,007 2.63%
SANCHEZ MIRA 892 2.33%
IGUIG 762 1.99%
PIAT 737 1.93%
CALAMANIUGAN 702 1.83%
CLAVERIA 698 1.82%
SANTA TERESITA 668 1.75%
SANTA PRAXEDES 118 .31%
PROVINCE OF CAGAYAN 38,270 100%
The highest magnitude of poor household is found in barangay Hacienda-Intal (200), followed by Santa Margarita (141) and Bitag
Pequeño (134). Of the 3,059 poor household, 58.6% have an estimated average income that falls in decile 2, annual range per capita
income from P10, 060.00-P13, 363.00 while 41.4% of the poor households earn estimated income in decile 1, annual per capita income
below P10, 060.00. An individual member of a household in the municipality should earn at least P12, 928.00 annually or P35.42 per
day to be out of poverty.
IV. Transportation Means (2022)
LGU-Owned Units
Service Vehicles 6
Heavy Equipment 15
Ambulance 6
Rescue Vehicles 3
Garbage truck 2
Table 4: Poverty Level of Baggao/ Source: NHTS-PR 2010
BFP-owned Fire truck 2
PNP owned Patrol Car 5
PNP owned Motorcycle 4
CAFGU Service 1
Land transportation within the municipality is served by public utility buses, jeepneys and motorized tricycles. There are regular buses
routes and public utility vans originating from the municipality, the San Jose –Tuguegarao and Tallang – Tuguegarao route. Baggao is
likewise served by inter-provincial carrier, Air-conditioned Buses of Florida Transport Incorporated and Everlasting Guardian Bus Inc.
traversing regularly the San Jose-Manila route. Public utility jeepneys and tricycles traverse the San Jose-Tallang route and other
barangays in the municipality. Likewise, privately-owned cars, vans, mini trucks, jeepneys, motorcycles bound in the place. A total of
1016 tricycles with duly approved franchise, 18 buses, and 85 public utility vans are operating in the municipality.
RISK ASSESSMENT BY TYPE OF HAZARD
Looking at the predictions of the changes of climate for 2020 and 2050 the overall slight increase in temperature and precipitation is
eminent. However, this does not tell the whole story. What cannot be measured or predicted is how the weather will be more extreme.
Larger and more frequent storm events and longer and more common drought events can be expected. The manifestations of climate
change in the form of, drought, flooding, stronger and intensified typhoons, sea level rise, storm surge and climate change related
outbreaks have impacts on the municipality’s economy, environment, and infrastructure and on the municipality’s 48 barangays.
EXPOSURE ANALYSIS
Using historical trends, past accounts, and development patterns, the exposure of Baggao, to climate change was analyzed. During the
conduct of exposure analysis conducted by the LCCAP Core Teams and Stakeholders, they identified four (4) major climate-related
hazards based on the municipalities past experiences and taking into consideration the climate change projection of the DOST-PAGASA.
The Municipality of Baggao and its populace are exposed to exposed to, namely: a) Flooding b) Rain-induced landslides, c) Tropical
Cyclone, d) Drought, e) Vehicular Accidents and f) Fire Incidence
TWO TYPES OF HAZARD IN THE MUNICIPALITY
1. Natural-Induced Hazard
A widely accepted definition characterizes natural hazards as "those elements of the physical environment, harmful to man and
caused by forces extraneous to him. More specifically, in this document, the term "natural hazard" refers to all atmospheric,
Table 5: Means of Transportation (Source: MPDO)
34
hydrologic, geologic (especially seismic and volcanic), and wildfire phenomena that, because of their location, severity, and
frequency, have the potential to affect humans, their structures, or their activities adversely.
2. Man-Induced Hazard
Human-induced hazards are those resulting from modifications of natural processes in the Earth's system caused by human
activities that accelerate/aggravate the damage potential (e.g., land degradation, landslides, and forest fires). Human-made hazards
originate from technological or industrial accidents, dangerous procedures, infrastructure failures, or certain human activities or
human negligence, which may cause the loss of life or injury, property damage, social and economic disruption, or environmental
degradation (e.g., industrial pollution, nuclear activities and radioactivity, toxic wastes, dam failures, and transport, industrial, or
technological accidents such as explosions, fires, and oil spills).
NATURE-INDUCED HAZARD
FLOODING
Flooding is being triggered by heavy continuous rainfall which is being aggravated by reduced soil absorptive capacity in the upstream.
Flooding is identified as a result of both the change in the average in precipitation and an extreme event during occurrence of strong
tropical cyclones. There are two types of flood occurrence in Baggao. One is the River flooding, triggered by intense rainfall,
overcharging the existing drainage system which mainly cause flooding in poorly drained areas and overflowing of water along river
banks and flood plains. Another type of flood occurrence in the municipality is flashfloods coming the mountains due to continues
rainfall and drain to the low lying areas of the municipality
Result of the Vulnerability and Risk Assessment (VRA) conducted by the Geologists of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) on
Year 2021 shows that Barangays within the low-lying and flat floodplain of the Pared River are Barsat East, West, Nangalinan, San
Isidro, Catugay, Taytay, San Miguel, Bacagan, Imurong, San Francisco, Dabbac Grande, Tungal, San Jose, Annatayan, Tallang, Remus,
Dalin, J. Pallagao and Agaman Sur. Since most of the households in the aforementioned barangays are located along the banks, scouring
is progressive. These household will be relocated unless, otherwise mitigated with engineering measures since the erosion will continue
to erode the banks.
Population exposed to flooding According to the 2015 Census of the PSA, a total of about 82,782 people are residing in the Municipality
of Baggao. Data treatment for the exposure of the population will be relative to the location and size of the built-up area since the spatial
referencing of these people will be tied to the said other element at risk which are the residential areas. About 34.53% of the population
are at critical areas to flooding while about 33.79% are in moderately susceptible areas. On the other hand, 31.59% of the total population
are not exposed to flood hazard.
ANATOMY OF DISASTER ON FLOODING (based on CP on Flooding)
Root Causes Triggering Factors
Early Warning
Signs
Scope of Impact DRR Measures
River Siltation a. Narrow waterways
b. Log jam
c. Improper disposal of
garbage that clogs the
waterways
d. Excessive use of herbicides
PAGASA forecast,
info text, water
level gauge, public
address, water color
in the streams that
changes to brown
34 barangays that are
high risk to flooding
All houses located near
the riverbanks in the
municipality
-Sustainable
reforestation
- Sustainable upland
farming technique
-Strict implementation
of environmental laws
-Enact ordinance
regulating the entry of
illegal settlers
-Strict implementation
of RA 9003
-Regulate the use of
herbicide through
legislation
-Pre-emptive
evacuation
Forest Denudation
Kaingin
Illegal Settlers
Improper farming
practices/management
In Baggao, flooding usually occurs to low-lying and relatively flat areas. as per MGB Assessment, the barangays of Barsat East, Barsat
West, Nangalinan, San Isidro, Catugay, Taytay, San Miguel, Bacagan, Imurung, San Francisco, Dabbac Grande, Tungal, San Jose,
Annayatan, Tallang, Remus, Dalin, Pallagao, and Agaman Sur. most of the households of the aforementioned barangays are located
along banks where scouring is progressive. it is recommended that these households should be relocated, unless, otherwise mitigated
with engineering measures since the erosion will continue to erode the banks.
36
FLOOD ASESSMENT PER BARANGAY BASED ON 2019 MGB ASSESSMENT
Three largest population count at risk for critical cases of flooding or those with high to very high susceptibility to flooding are in Brgys.
San Jose (4370 which is about 100% of the barangay’s number of persons), Imurong (3450 or about 90% of their barangay population)
and Poblacion (2600 equivalent to about 79% of their barangay population). Said barangays were also those with largest built-up areas
that are susceptible to the same rating of the same geohazard.
There are barangays that don’t have any population estimated to be residing in areas with high to very high susceptibility to flooding:
Adaoag, J. Pallagao, Mabini and San Antonio. For those areas with population with moderate susceptibility to flooding are Brgy. Remus
(2,501 which is about 94% of the total barangay population), Tallang (2,297 or 74%) and Hacienda Intal (1,867 or about 33%) with
average of 583. There are also barangays with no significant number of population exposed to the said rating: Brgys. Adaoag, Asinga-
Via, Bacagan, Bagunot, Bunugan, Carupian, Dabbac Grande, Ibulo, San Jose, San Vicente, Santor and Taguing.
Figure 3: Percentage of Population per Flood Susceptibility Figure 4: Population Exposed to Flood per Susceptibility
Kaingin, illegal logging, excessive use of herbicides and clogged waterways also causes the yearly occurrence of flood in the
municipality. It can also be increased due to tropical cyclones with heavy rains that strike the locality. The increase of water in Abusag
Bridge, Bagunot Bridge and other small bridges that connect to the interior barangays causes disaster to the people especially their basic
commodities. Flooding usually occurs in the months of July-December. During these months, the municipality experiences heavy rains
that cause flooding.
It is also the months that agricultural products are being planted up to the time of harvesting and if flood will occur, these crops are at
risk and farmers will be adversely affected.
LANDSLIDES
Landslides can be started by storms, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, fires and human modification of land. In a landslide, masses
of rock, earth, or debris move down a slope. Landslides may be small or large, slow or rapid.
Debris and mud flows are rivers of rock, earth and other debris saturated with water. They develop when water rapidly
accumulates in the ground, during heavy rainfall or rapid snowmelt, changing the earth into a flowing river of mud or “slurry.”
They flow can rapidly, striking with little or no warning at avalanche speeds. They also can travel several miles from their source,
growing in size as they pick up trees, boulders, cars, and other materials. Although landslides are highly localized, they can be
particularly hazardous due to their frequency of occurrence. Classes of landslide include:
1. Rock falls, which are characterized by free-falling rocks from overlying cliffs. These often collect at the cliff base in the form
of talus slopes which may pose an additional risk.
2. Slides and avalanches, a displacement of overburden due to shear failure along a structural feature. If the displacement occurs
in surface material without total deformation it is called a slump.
3. Flows and lateral spreads, which occur in recent unconsolidated material associated with a shallow water table. Although
associated with gentle topography, these liquefaction phenomena can travel significant distances from their origin.
The impact of these events depends on the specific nature of the landslide. Rockfalls are obvious dangers to life and property
but, in general, they pose only a localized threat due to their limited areal influence. In contrast, slides, avalanches, flows, and
lateral spreads, often having great areal extent, can result in massive loss of lives and property. Mudflows, associated with
volcanic eruptions, can travel at great speed from their point of origin and are one of the most destructive volcanic hazards.
Rain Induced Landslides (RIL) are downward and outward movement of materials caused by floods and excessive rain. It is a
geological phenomenon which includes a wide range of ground movement, such as rockfalls, deep failure of slopes and shallow
debris flows, which can occur in offshore, coastal and onshore environments.
38
Although the action of gravity is the primary driving force for a landslide to occur, there are other contributing factors affecting
the original slope stability
The Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) provided for the rating parameters on landslide susceptibility as follows:
HIGH:
● Presence of active and/or recent landslides
● Presence of numerous and large tension cracks that could directly affect the community
● Areas with drainages that are prone to landslide damming
● Steep slopes
MODERATE:
● Areas with indicative and/or old landslides
● Presence of small tension cracks and are located away from the community
● Moderates slopes
LOW:
● Low and gently slope
● No presence of tension cracks
In terms of landslide susceptibility, thirty-eight (38) out of forty-eight (48) barangays in Baggao include areas that are located on
and/or near slopes and have the potential for landslide occurrence. These barangays were also presented with Landslide Threat
Advisory that informs the barangays of their susceptibility to landslides and includes corresponding recommendations particular to
the barangay.
There are 15 barangays with high landslide susceptibility namely: Alba, Barsat West, Bitag Grande, Bitag Pequeno, Bunugan, C.
Versoza, Canagatan, Carupian, Mabini, Mocag, Nangalinan, Pallagao, Sta. Margarita, Taytay, and San Miguel. These barangays are
assessed by the MGB with almost the same characteristics which includes mass movement (landslide, tension cracks) which triggers
by the rapid increase/decrease in creek/river water levels accompanied by increase turbidity.
Landslides in the Municipality of Baggao, are mainly attributed to the instability of the steep slopes triggered by the oversaturation
especially during rainy season manifested by seepages and presence of springs. Barangays with reported embankment erosion are
in Poblacion, San Vicente, Tungel, Dabbac Grande, Bitag Grande, San Miguel and Annayatan due to the action of the Pared River;
Hacienda Intal due to the scouring of the waters from the Asinga River; Dalla, Barsat East and West, Nangalinan and San Isidro due
to the fluvial action of Paranan River; Asinga-Via along the bank of Asinga or Hot Spring River; Taguntungan due to scouring by
the Pulay River; Agaman Proper due to Malunlun & Paranan Rivers; and Remus beside the Pulakay River. Other mass movement
cases involve reactivation of old landslides such as in Brgys. Bunugan, Bacagan, Mocag, Bitag Grande and Mabini while others
have been noted with steep slopes, seepages, presence of springs and/or tension cracks in Brgys. Asassi, Taytay, Hacienda Intal,
Tallang, San Miguel, Temblique, C. Versoza, J. Pallagao, Sta. Margarita and Asinga-Via.
BUILT-UP AREA EXPOSED TO LANDSLIDE
For the whole built-up area (5.91km2) of the Municipality of Baggao, about 27.34% (1.62km2) are located in critical areas to
landslide while 1.78% (0.11 km2) are in moderately susceptible areas (Figure 23). Majority of the landslide-prone areas of the
municipality is identified as high in rating due to its steepness in slopes. Some are even rated higher due to records of historical
and active sliding.
40
Out of the 82,782 count, about 29.69% (24,578) are in critical areas for landslide while about 1.89% (1,565.71) are in moderately
susceptible areas.
Figure 5: Total Percentage of Built-up Area Exposed per Landslide Susceptibility Rating
Highest number of people exposed to critical conditions for mass movement are found in Brgys. Sta. Margarita, Bitag Grande, Taytay
and Taguing. Just like in the data treatment for the built-up areas, there are seven (7) barangays with no significant number of population
under critical zones for landslide: Barsat East, Catugay, Dabbac Grande, San Isidro, San Jose, Santor and Tungel. For the moderately
susceptible to landslide areas, top three largest number for exposed people are in Brgys. Catugay (476, 54%), Agaman Norte (326, 20%)
and Dalin (199, 17%) with an average of 33 and a total of eleven (11) barangays quantified. Such discrepancy in the comparison of the
built-up areas and population exposure is attributed to the spread and spatial distribution of the said elements.
During the occurrence of Typhoon Ulyssess with International Name “Vamco”, the municipality, Cagayan were not included to any
Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals (TCWS) but was affected by massive amount of rainfall due to the effect of typhoon Ulysses.
Typhoon water coming from upper Cagayan river basin and continuous rain the area that causes flooding in the lower basin with
occurrence of landslide that causes the death of four (4) residents of Sitio Tueg, Bitag Grande, Baggao, Cagayan on November 15, 2020.
In the event that Typhoon Ulysses brought mega flood cause by continuous heavy rains, landslide in various barangay is imminent,
especially for Taytay who has recorded with 136 houses from Zone 4 to Zone 7, to be at risk of soil erosion.
LOW MODERATE HIGH
Adaoag
Asassi
Catugay
Imurung
Lasilat
Poblacion
San Francisco
Tallang
Temblique
Agaman Proper
Agaman Norte
Agaman Sur
Asinga Via
Awallan
Bacagan
Bagunot
Dalin
Hacienda Intal
Masical
Remus
Alba
Barsat West
Bitag Grande
Bitag Pequeno
Buugan
C Versoza
Canagatan
Carupian
Mabini
Mocag
Nangalinan
Figure 6: Risk and Vulnerability Map on Landslide
42
San Antonio
San Vicente
Taguntungan
Pallagao
Sta. Margarita
Taytay
San Miguel
As per damage data gathered from the barangays and data from their Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plans
(BDRRMPs), below is the breakdown of families and individuals likely to be affected by landslide:
FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS SUSCEPTIBLE TO LANDSLIDE
BARANGAY Landslide
Susceptibility
Total Population Total Families Affected
Population
Affected Families
ADAOAG Low 1,170 287 69 15
Moderate 1,170 287 0 0
High 1,170 287 0 0
AGAMAN NORTE Low 1,805 393 229 59
Moderate 1,805 393 0 0
High 1,805 393 230 54
AGAMAN PROPER Low 1,200 280 0 0
Moderate 1,200 280 0 0
High 1,200 280 0 0
AGAMAN SUR Low 1,081 255 0 0
Moderate 1,081 255 0 0
High 1,081 255 7 2
ALBA Low 1,791 492 139 27
Moderate 1,791 492 138 23
High 1,791 492 200 60
ANNAYATAN Low 1,315 306 754 186
Moderate 1,315 306 0 0
Table 6: Landslide Susceptibility Matrix based from MGB Survey 2006
High 1,315 306 647 194
ASASSI Low 2,728 685 0 0
Moderate 2,728 685 0 0
High 2,728 685 100 23
ASINGA VIA Low 2,755 668 676 156
Moderate 2,755 668 610 153
High 2,755 668 1282 420
AWALLAN Low 2,790 659 0 0
Moderate 2,790 659 0 0
High 2,790 659 26 7
BACAGAN Low 1,419 334 53 10
Moderate 1,419 334 0 0
High 1,419 334 0 0
BAGUNOT Low 1,436 342 788 225
Moderate 1,436 342 301 81
High 1,436 342 202 55
BARSAT EAST Low 1,353 338 218 56
Moderate 1,353 338 197 71
High 1,353 338 617 160
BARSAT WEST Low 1,140 265 94 23
Moderate 1,140 265 760 219
High 1,140 265 287 74
BITAG GRANDE Low 3,556 894 261 89
Moderate 3,556 894 818 204
High 3,556 894 144 61
BITAG PEQUENO Low 1,809 433 363 95
Moderate 1,809 433 547 125
44
High 1,809 433 899 279
BUNUGAN Low 1,430 342 244 61
Moderate 1,430 342 0 0
High 1,430 342 0 0
C. VERSOZA Low 772 192 90 22
Moderate 772 192 0 0
High 772 192 0 0
CANAGATAN Low 532 145 24 2
Moderate 532 145 36 9
High 532 145 8 6
CARUPIAN Low 1,600 380 168 43
Moderate 1,600 380 138 41
High 1,600 380 24 10
CATUGAY Low 901 215 0 0
Moderate 901 215 0 0
High 901 215 0 0
DABBAC GRANDE Low 832 215 211 55
Moderate 832 215 0 0
High 832 215 0 0
DALIN Low 1,234 295 0 0
Moderate 1,234 295 0 0
High 1,234 295 14 4
DALLA Low 1,327 430 10 3
Moderate 1,327 430 0 0
High 1,327 430 111 27
HACIENDA INTAL Low 6,569 1,486 1662 472
Moderate 6,569 1,486 102 25
High 6,569 1,486 2152 527
IBULO Low 353 78 207 61
Moderate 353 78 0 0
High 353 78 0 0
IMURUNG Low 4,284 1,027 19 6
Moderate 4,284 1,027 0 0
High 4,284 1,027 0 0
LASILAT Low 1,327 300 248 62
Moderate 1,327 300 328 102
High 1,327 300 20 6
MABINI Low 1,269 304 636 159
Moderate 1,269 304 168 42
High 1,269 304 532 133
MASICAL Low 1,580 446 0 0
Moderate 1,580 446 0 0
High 1,580 446 452 129
MOCAG Low 3,168 831 452 113
Moderate 3,168 831 412 103
High 3,168 831 684 171
NANGALINAN Low 1,751 412 16 5
Moderate 1,751 412 23 8
High 1,751 412 247 63
PALLAGAO Low 962 255 33 8
Moderate 962 255 14 2
High 962 255 55 13
POBLACION Low 3,500 860 0 0
Moderate 3,500 860 0 0
High 3,500 860 0 0
46
REMUS Low 2,974 796 67 17
Moderate 2,974 796 256 52
High 2,974 796 0 0
SAN ANTONIO Low 594 159 0 0
Moderate 594 159 0 0
High 594 159 0 0
SAN FRANCISCO Low 2,382 618 557 175
Moderate 2,382 618 117 30
High 2,382 618 19 6
SAN ISDRO Low 1,212 297 0 0
Moderate 1,212 297 0 0
High 1,212 297 0 0
SAN JOSE Low 4,836 1,104 0 0
Moderate 4,836 1,104 0 0
High 4,836 1,104 0 0
SAN MIGUEL Low 1,715 383 0 0
Moderate 1,715 383 1060 279
High 1,715 383 0 0
SAN VICENTE Low 690 182 400 118
Moderate 690 182 129 37
High 690 182 101 33
SANTOR Low 1,260 302 0 0
Moderate 1,260 302 0 0
High 1,260 302 0 0
STA. MARGARITA Low 5,307 1,257 0 0
Moderate 5,307 1,257 0 0
High 5,307 1,257 282 95
TAGUING Low 2,419 609 789 215
Moderate 2,419 609 197 55
High 2,419 609 616 155
TAGUNTUNGAN Low 1,748 450 6 2
Moderate 1,748 450 68 20
High 1,748 450 622 146
TALLANG Low 3,457 988 482 139
Moderate 3,457 988 0 0
High 3,457 988 23 4
TAYTAY Low 1,512 386 133 62
Moderate 1,512 386 81 49
High 1,512 386 460 135
TEMBLIQUE Low 1,108 258 0 0
Moderate 1,108 258 271 88
High 1,108 258 0 0
TUNGEL Low 1,307 317 0 0
Moderate 1,307 317 0 0
High 1,307 317 272 93
TOTALS 28,204 7,704
With the total 82,782, 34.00% of it are landslide susceptible in low, moderate and high. 10, 098 or 12.19% in low susceptibility, 6771
or 8.17% are classified in moderate susceptibility, 11, 335 or 13.69% are under high susceptibility.
Table 7: Families and Individual Susceptible to Landslide (Source: Barangay Reports)
48
Figure 7: Landslide Map of Baggao (excerpt from NOAH)
Barangays within the low-lying and flat floodplain of the Pared River are Barsat East, Barsat West, Nangalinan, San Isidro,
Catugay, Taytay, san Miguel, Bacagan, Imurung. San Francisco, Dabbac Grande, Tungal, San Jose, Annayatan, Tallang, Remus,
Dalin, J. Pallagao and Agaman Sur. Since most of the households in the aforementioned barangays are located along the banks,
scouring is progressive. These households will be relocated unless, otherwise mitigated with engineering measures since the
erosion will continue to erode the banks. Barangays with landslide- prone identified areas are Taytay, Hacienda Intal, Barsat
West, San Antonio, Bitag Grande, Asassi, Temblique, Alba Sta. Margarita, J. Pallagao, C. Versoza, Agaman Norte, Agaman Sur
and Adaoag.
TROPICAL CYCLONES
Climate change manifested through water level rise and more frequent and intense tropical cyclones will pose danger to the
municipality of Baggao. Having agriculture as its major source of income, crops, livestock and fish production will be greatly
affected. Coastal flooding will likewise have an adverse effect to fish-stocks in the area of Sta. Margarita, specifically at Sitio
Valley Cove and Linawan.
Tropical cyclones could also affect to things and properties being blown away, plants and trees being blown down and uprooted,
branches of flowering and fruit-bearing trees fell off and broken, fishing vessels in some sitios of Sta. Margarita cannot go out
fishing, transport are threatened and hindered from its operations greatly affecting peoples’ mobility.
Over-all impacts from these incidents are indicated in the loss of economic values and opportunities and increased overhead
costs for repairs, rehabilitation and reconstruction. As a result, production and productivity as well as revenues and income are
significantly reduced.
Super Typhoon Lawin and Ompong that hit the municipality, all of the barangays are were severely affected that resulted to the
in five (5) deaths, thirty seven (37) injuries, eighteen thousand eight hundred sixty eight (18,868) partially damaged houses and
two thousand nine hundred thirty seven (2,937) totally blown down houses, eight hundred nine million forty seven thousand and
500 pesos (809,047,500) damages in agriculture and one hundred thirty one million, eight hundred eleven thousand two and
60/100 Pesos (131,811,002.6) damages on Infrastructure.
During the occurrence of Typhoon Ulysses on November 2020, there are about 4, 562 families with 15, 324 individuals who
evacuated in the different evacuation centers in the municipality. There are five (5) casualties from Barangay Bitag Grande (4)
and one (1) from Barangay C. Versoza, Baggao, Cagayan. There are 15 partially blown down houses and 21 totally blown down
houses. For agriculture damages, the Municipal Agriculture Office assessed the amount of P7, 500, 000.00 cost of damages in
corn, P42, 875, 000.00 for rice, P281, 250.00 for vegetables, P100, 000.00 for fisheries and P948, 000.00 for livestock and
50
poultry. For Infrastructure, P364,770,000.00 cost of damages were recorded from the Municipal Engineering Office composed
of roads, bridges, schools and slope protection.
BIOPHYSICAL EFFECTS OF TYPHOON
The observed and projected changes in the climatic conditions have posed threats as well as new opportunities. The tables below show
the climate change drivers and its manifestations to the municipality.
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: IN “KROSA” TROPICAL STORM “VINTA”
Date: October 31, 2013 Typho
on
Catego
ry
Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 120 kph near the center, and gustiness of up to 150 kph
Movement: Moving West Northwest at 26 k/h Rainfall: 5-15mm/h within its 500 km dia TCWS: 3
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indiv
l
Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All
Barangays
12,381 47,248 School,
brgy. Hall ,
private
houses
Flood/
landslide
1 1 3443 478 49,963,000 5,383,000 55,348,000
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TYPHOON “INENG”
Date: August 19, 2015 Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum Sustained Winds of 180 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 215 kph
Movement: Moving west towards extreme Northern Luzon
Effects:
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TROPICAL STORM “LUIS”
Date: September 17, 2014, 1:40AM Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 120 kph near the center, and gustiness of up to 150 kph
Movement: Moving West Northwest at 30 kph Rainfall: 13.7mm (Baggao EOC) TCWS: 2
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All Barangays 4,350 26,000 7 1 28,891,000.00 2,000,000.00
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All
Barangays
1,100 6,600 School,
brgy.
Hall ,
private
houses
Flood/
landslide
1 2,880,000
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TROPICAL STORM “LANDO”
Date: October 18, 2015 Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum sustained winds of 175 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 210 kph
Movement: Moving West Northwest
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Patially Totally
Temblique, San
Miguel, Santor,
San Isidro,
Hacienda Intal,
Barsat East,
Masical, Sta
Margarita and
Taytay
351 2106 School,
brgy.
Hall ,
private
houses
Flood/
landslide
2 22,123,800.00 955,000.00
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: SUPER TYPHOON “LAWIN”
Date: October 20, 2016 Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 225 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 315 kph
Movement: Moving West North West at 26kph Rainfall: 450mm for 24 hrs near the center TCWS: 5
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All
Barangays
3774 16,605 School,
brgy.
Hall ,
private
houses
Flood/
landslide
3 23 5385 888 202,245,000.00 18,222,000.00
52
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: IN “MANGKHUT) SUPER TYPHOON “OMPONG”
Date: September 15, 2018,
1:40AM
Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 205kph near the center and gustiness of up to255 kph
Movement: Moving West Northwest at 30 kph Rainfall: TCWS: 4
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All
Barangays
10,332 40,732 School,
brgy.
Hall ,
private
houses
Flood/
landslide
2 14 13,483 2,049 606,802,500.00 113,589,002.5
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: SEVERE TROPICAL STORM “ULYSSES”
Date: November 11, 2020 Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 150 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 205 kph
Movement: Moving West Northwest at 15 kph Rainfall: 356.2 millimeters TCWS:
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All
Barangays
7602 26,079 School,
brgy.
Hall ,
private
houses
Flood/
landslide
5 21 15 51,704,000.00 364,770,000.00
INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TROPICAL STORM “MARING”
Date: October 11, 2021 Typhoon
Category
Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 55kph near the center
Movement: Moving West Northwest at 30 kph Rainfall: 5-10 millimeters per hour TCWS:
Effects:
Affected
Barangays
Summary of
Affected
Population
Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES
Houses Agri Infra Total
Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac
Area
Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally
All Barangays 150,482,600.00
Table __: Effects of TS Maring
Table 8: Biophysical Effects of Typhoon 2013-2021
DROUGHT
According to PAGASA, droughts in the Philippines are usually influenced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation or ENSO, a
phenomenon associated with an increased chance of drier conditions, in contrast to the La Niña event which is associated with
an increased chance of wetter conditions.
Aside from the observed rainfall changes, the increasing trend in the frequency of occurrence of extreme events, including the
episodes of El Nino and La Nina phenomenon, poses threat in the municipality.
PAGASA projections revealed that the number of days with maximum temperature greater than 35 °C will increase to 1276 days
and 2403 days in 2020 and 2050, respectively. Further, the current observation of dry days for the same time period has reached
8156 while the projected figure is 6498 days in 2020 and 6770 days in 2050. Further, the projected number of days that will pour
a rainfall amounting to more than 200 mm will be 33 days in 2020 and 24 days in 2050.
Drought in Baggao, Cagayan will have an adverse effect on agriculture, livestock, fishing industry and the wellbeing of the
people. This will lead to lesser productivity and will affect the total development system of the municipality. This will likewise
result in higher production costs but lesser agricultural yield thus affects supply chain.
Aside from the four major hazards identified in the municipality, the Municipal Risk Reduction and Management Office also
identified other hazards that the municipality is exposed to, as follows: Vehicular Accidents and Fire Incidence.
EARTHQUAKES
Earthquakes are caused by the sudden release of slowly accumulated strain energy along a fault in the earth's crust. Earthquakes
and volcanoes occur most commonly at the collision zone between tectonic plates. Earthquakes represent a particularly severe
threat due to the irregular time intervals between events, lack of adequate forecasting, and the hazards associated with these:
1. Ground shaking is a direct hazard to any structure located near the earthquake's center. Structural failure takes many human
lives in densely populated areas.
2. Faulting, or breaches of the surface material, occurs as the separation of bedrock along lines of weakness.
3. Landslides occur because of ground shaking in areas having relatively steep topography and poor slope stability.
4. Liquefaction of gently sloping unconsolidated material can be triggered by ground shaking. Flows and lateral spreads
(liquefaction phenomena) are among the most destructive geologic hazards.
54
5. Subsidence or surface depressions result from the settling of loose or unconsolidated sediment. Subsidence occurs in
waterlogged soils, fill, alluvium, and other materials that are prone to settle.
6. Tsunamis or seismic sea waves, usually generated by seismic activity under the ocean floor, cause flooding in coastal areas
and can affect areas thousands of kilometers from the earthquake center.
DROUGHT
Drought can be defined in several ways, though it is commonly described as "a long period with no rain, especially during a
planting season." Another definition of drought is a deficiency in surface and sub-surface water supplies, and is typically
measured in terms of water availability in a defined geographical area. In socioeconomic terms, drought occurs when a physical
water shortage begins to affect people, individually and collectively and the area’s economy.
Drought is not uncommon in the State of Oregon, and can occur in all parts of the state, in both summer and winter. The
environmental consequences also are far-reaching, particularly here in Clatsop County, where it can produce insect infestations
in our forests and a reduction in the stream flows that support endangered fish species. In addition, many of our local water
supplies are very local, and drought conditions can greatly affect the supply of water we use every day.
VOLCANOES
Volcanoes are perforations in the earth's crust through which molten rock and gases escape to the surface. Volcanic hazards stem
from two classes of eruptions:
1. Explosive eruptions which originate in the rapid dissolution and expansion of gas from the molten rock as it nears the earth's
surface. Explosions pose a risk by scattering rock blocks, fragments, and lava at varying distances from the source.
2. Effusive eruptions where material flow rather than explosions is the major hazard. Flows vary in nature (mud, ash, lava) and
quantity and may originate from multiple sources. Flows are governed by gravity, surrounding topography, and material
viscosity.
Hazards associated with volcanic eruptions include lava flows, falling ash and projectiles, mudflows, and toxic gases. Volcanic
activity may also trigger other natural hazardous events including local tsunamis, deformation of the landscape, floods when
lakes are breached or when streams and rivers are dammed, and tremor-provoked landslides.
HUMAN-INDUCED HAZARD
PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCIES
Public health emergencies are situations where health or medical circumstances exists that can affect an entire population usually
through shared interactions, or community spaces. They can be defined as much by their health consequences as by their causes
and precipitating events. These emergencies are situations whose scale, timing, or unpredictability threatens to overwhelm
routine capabilities, and require additional or extraordinary measure to contain or eliminate to ensure the safety of the public.
The severity of a public health emergency is often measured by the number of people affected by its geographical extent, or
the disease or death of the pathogenic process which it originates.
Communicable disease is perhaps the most common form of public health emergency. These diseases are those conditions that
can be spread to others through air, touch, or contact with contaminated body fluids. Some of the most common communicable
diseases are chlamydia, hepatitis A, B and C, giardia, salmonella, pertussis and campylobacter.
1. EPIDEMIC/PANDEMIC
a. Dengue
The Municipal Health Office (MHO) of LGU Baggao, under the Municipal Epidemiological Surveillance Unit (MESU), has
recorded all dengue cases occurred in the municipality. The table below shows the year where most number of dengue cases
happened from 2017 to 2021.
No Barangay 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
1 Adaoag
2 Agaman Norte 2 2 3
3 Agaman Proper
4 Agaman Sur 1
5 Alba 1 13
6 Annayatan 3
7 Asassi 10
8 Asinga Via 2 1 22
9 Awallan 2 8
10 Bacagan 4
56
11 Bagunot
12 Barsat East 1 7
13 Barsat West 5
14 Bitag Grande 16
15 Bitag Pequeno 2
16 Bunugan 1 1
17 C.Versoza
18 Canagatan
19 Carupian 5
20 Catugay
21 Dabbac Grande 3 2 1
22 Dalin 3
23 Dalla 1
24 Hacienda Intal 14 21
25 Ibulo
26 Imurung 3
27 J. Pallagao 3
28 Lasilat 1 12 24
29 Mabini 1 1
30 Masical
31 Mocag 8
32 Nangalinan 3
33 Poblacion 1 1
34 Remus 1 1 7
35 San Antonio
36 San Francisco 1 1
37 San Isidro 1 1
38 San Jose 1 14 1
39 San Miguel 1 1 1
40 San Vicente
41 Sta. Margarita 2 10
42 Santor 3
43 Taguing 10 3 1
44 Taguntungan 3
45 Tallang 5 1
46 Taytay 1 3 1
47 Temblique
48 Tungel
Total 21 175 91 4 8
Among the two hundred ninety-nine, the total death case recorded is six (6) from the following barangays: Asassi-1, Bitag
Grande- 1, hacienda Intal-1, Imurung-1 and Taguing-1.
b. Novel Corona Virus 2019
In the case of Corona Virus 2019 Pandemic, the MESU has recorded three thousand five hundred seventy-eight (3, 578)
recovered/treated cases from 2020 until September 2022. There are two hundred eight (208) recorded deaths from various
barangays. Table below shows the distribution of alive and deaths of CoVid-19 of Baggao.
No Barangay
Alive Death Total Case
2020 2021 2022 2021 2022
1 Adaoag 15 7 1 23
2 Agaman Norte 23 2 2 27
3 Agaman Proper 1 20 5 1 27
4 Agaman Sur 32 3 2 37
5 Alba 1 44 4 3 1 50
6 Annayatan 60 8 3 71
7 Asassi 1 57 7 3 1 69
8 Asinga Via 1 67 5 5 1 79
9 Awallan 3 90 8 2 2 105
10 Bacagan 13 6 3 1 23
11 Bagunot 6 1 1 8
12 Barsat East 67 13 1 81
13 Barsat West 40 5 2 47
14 Bitag Grande 2 113 16 9 2 142
Table 9: Number of Dengue Cases from 2017-2021 (Source: MHO)
58
15 Bitag Pequeno 53 6 4 63
16 Bunugan 32 1 2 35
17 C.Versoza 8 5 13
18 Canagatan 12 1 1 14
19 Carupian 8 2 10
20 Catugay 12 3 15
21 Dabbac Grande 36 1 2 1 40
22 Dalin 1 41 5 2 1 50
23 Dalla 2 76 4 3 85
24 Hacienda Intal 4 139 32 5 2 182
25 Ibulo 1 11 1 13
26 Imurung 1 93 12 8 1 115
27 J Pallagao 18 7 3 28
28 Lasilat 1 83 3 6 93
29 Mabini 21 7 1 29
30 Masical 28 10 2 1 41
31 Mocag 123 25 8 2 158
32 Nangalinan 47 4 51
33 Poblacion 3 211 26 9 2 251
34 Remus 2 149 12 6 1 170
35 San Antonio 1 1
36 San Francisco 79 17 6 1 103
37 San Isidro 58 5 5 1 69
38 San Jose 17 485 50 24 2 278
39 San Miguel 1 20 8 3 1 33
40 San Vicente 9 4 1 14
41 Sta. Margarita 48 12 3 63
42 Santor 1 59 4 3 67
43 Taguing 1 23 7 2 33
44 Taguntungan 1 44 6 3 2 56
45 Tallang 2 225 10 16 253
46 Taytay 5 64 12 5 86
47 Temblique 4 44 3 3 54
48 Tungel 1 113 8 6 128
Total 57 3119 402 177 31 3,786
Most cases were recorded from the three urban barangays lead by Barangay San Jose, followed by Tallang and Poblacion.
Greatest number of death is from Barangay san Jose with a total of twenty-six (26) deaths.
In the case of animal bites, the total recorded vaccinated patients of the MHO are three thousand three hundred eight (3, 738)
from 2019 to October 2022.
AFRICAN SWINE FEVER (ASF) VIRUS
The African Swine Fever (ASF) Virus occurred in the municipality simultaneously with the occurrence of the CoVid 19 that
contributed to the life difficulties of the people of Baggao, both to producers and consumers.
Year Barangays Affected Number of Cases
2020 Alba 1
2021
Tembleque Unprocessed
Masical 46 hog growers/150 heads
Poblacion 2 hog growers/5 heads
Bunugan 4 hog growers/10 heads
Carupian 55 hog growers/123 heads
Bagunot 6 hog growers/12 heads
San Vicente 5 hog growers/12 heads
August 2022 Taytay 3
VEHICULAR ACCIDENTS
Record taken from the Municipal Rescue Team from January 2021 to December 31, 2022, hereunder are the consolidated run
for the Calendar Year 2021. There are One Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty (1,960) which are unevenly happened to forty-eight
(48) barangays in the municipality. Records show that highest response within the year is vehicular accident which totaled to
Table 10: Number of Corona Virus Victims from 2020-2022 (Source: MHO)
Table 11: Number of ASF Cases from 2020-2022 (Source: MAO)
60
ninety-three (93); followed by obstetrician case with eighty-seven (87); fall with twelve (12); mauling with eleven (11); stoning
with six (6); hacking, with three (3); drowning, burns and stabbing with two (2) cases each; animal bite, goring, strangulation
with one (1) each.
Out of the total number of road accidents, hereunder is the distribution of occurrences:
BARANGAY NO. OF CASES
San Isidro 8
San Isidro 6
Poblacion 5
Sta. Margarita 5
Taguntungan 5
Bitag Pequeño 4
Masical 4
Temblique 4
Remus 3
Mocag 3
Bagunot 2
Bitag Grande 2
C. Versoza 2
Dalin 2
Dalla 2
Hacienda Intal 2
FIRE INCIDENCE
As per record from the Bureau of Fire Protection of this municipality, fire incidence from Calendar Year (CY) 2019 to June
2021 is fifteen (15) unevenly happened in the different barangays of the municipality as presented in the table below:
BARANGAY 2019 2020 2021 2022 (JAN-JUN)
San Jose 1 1 1 1
Agaman Proper 1
Hacienda Intal 1
Table 12: Number of Road Accidents from 2021-2022 (Source: MDRRMO)
Bitag Grande 1
Poblacion 1
Catugay 1
Agaman Norte 1
Sta. Margarita 1
Mocag 1
Asassi 1
San Francisco (dumpsite) 1
Tallang 1
Remus 1
San Isidro 1
Dabbac Grande 1
TOTAL 5 7 2 4
Origin of the fire are faulty electrical wirings and accidental.
Records also shows that the incidents happened during the following months from 2019 to June 2021:
MONTH NUMBER OF INCIDENTS
January 2
March 1
June 1
August 2
September 4
October 2
November 1
December 2
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
Table 13: Number of Fire Incidents per Barangay from 2019-2022 (Source: BFP)
Table 14: Fire Distribution per Month from 2019-2021 (Source: BFP)
62
Chemicals are found everywhere. They purify drinking water, increase crop production, and simplify household chores. But
chemicals also can be hazardous to humans or the environment if used or released improperly. Hazards can occur during
production, storage, transportation, use or disposal. You and your community are at risk if a chemical is used unsafely or released
in harmful amounts into the environment where you live, work or play.
Hazardous materials in various forms can cause death, serious injury, long-lasting health effects, and damage to buildings, homes
and other property. Many products containing hazardous chemicals are used and stored in homes routinely. These products are
also shipped daily on the nation's highways, railroads, waterways, and pipelines.
TERRORISM
Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the Philippines for
purposes of intimidation, coercion or ransom. Terrorists bypass established institutions (such as courts), using violence against
citizens to force changes in society and force governments to change policies toward their cause.
Terrorists might use weapons of mass destruction, which include toxic or poisonous chemicals, disease organisms, dangerous
radiation, explosive incendiary or poison gas bombs, grenades, rockets or missiles, mines or similar devices. Terrorists also use
traditional weapons such as automatic guns or grenades in armed attacks on targets, but have also used non-conventional means
to carry out attacks
B. HAZARD ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION
CP FORM 1: HAZARD ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION
HAZARD PROBABILITY IMPACT AVERAGE
PROBABILITY +
IMPACT
2
RANK
RATE REMARKS RATE REMARKS
TYPHOON 5 ST and other weather
disturbances frequently
pass the municipality
5 Typhoon Ompong in 2018
brought heavy rains and
wind speed ranging from
205km/h to 255km/h that
caused infrastructure and
agricultural damages and
5 1
wide spread flooding in the
municipality
RAIN INDUCED
FLOODINGS
5 Baggao is a Flood prone
municipality caused by
silted river Lying along
the various barangays.
Surface water flooding is
the common scenario.
Narrow watervways ,
accumulation of debries,
improper disposal of
garbage that clogs the
waterways
5 Effects of typhoon ulysses
and northeast monsoon
caused almost all the
barangays flooded from 0.5
to 3m height
5 1
EARTHQUAKE 3 5 Loss and damages to
properties
(school buildings)
4 3
SOIL EROSION /
RAIN-INDUCED
LANDSLIDE
4 15 of the 48 barangays
are landslide prone due
to forest denudation
5 Structural interventions to
prevent soil erosion/
landslide
4.5 2
DROUGHT 3 As per report of the NIA
and Barangays, several
farmers with wide area of
rice fields, especialy the
non- irrigated are affected
with drought
5 Great loss and damages to
agriculture in the
municipality
4 3
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  • 1. Republic of the Philippines Region II Province of Cagayan
  • 2. 2 WHY CONTINGENCY PLAN IS ESSENTIAL? A contingency plan in project management is a defined, actionable plan that is to be enacted if an identified risk becomes a reality. It is essentially a “Plan B”, to be put in place when things go differently than expected. The Project Management Institute defines contingency planning as, “involv[ing] defining action steps to be taken if an identified risk event should occur.” Contingency plans in enterprise project management are a component of risk management, and should be part of the risk management plan, which may include risk management software. By creating a business contingency plan, project managers can identify potential risks and develop strategies to mitigate them, reducing the likelihood of project delays, budget overruns, and other negative outcomes. We’ll walk you through when you should use a contingency plan, the difference between contingency plans and mitigation plans, how to do contingency planning, four steps you can take to develop your own contingency plan.
  • 3. EXISTING DRRM-CCA RELATED POLICIES, GUIDELINES AND RESOLUTIONS  INTERNATIONAL BASES Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan on March 18, 2015) The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 outlines seven clear targets and four priorities for action to prevent new and reduce existing disaster risks: 1. Understanding Disaster Risks; 2. Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk; 3. Investing in disaster reduction for resilience; 4. Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build-Back-Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction. It aims to achieve the substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities, and countries over the next 15 years.  NATIONAL BASES AmBisyon Natin 2040
  • 4. 4 This Long-term Vision for the Philippines aims to answer the question of “Where do we want to be? It is the vision that guides the future and is the anchor of the country’s plans. It is envisioned that in 2040, every Filipino will enjoy a stable and comfortable lifestyle, secure in the knowledge that there is enough for the daily needs and unexpected expenses and prepared for all the future of the children. This vision emphasizes that all Filipinos will have a strongly rooted (matatag), comfortable (maginhawa) and secured (panatag) life in 2040 as they shall have their family together, time with friends, work-life in balance and volunteering. Also, they are free from hunger and poverty, secure home ownership, good transport facilities, enough resources for daily needs, peace and security, long and healthy life and comfortable retirement. Climate Change Act of 2009 Republic 9729, otherwise known as the Climate Change Act of 2009 is an act mainstreaming climate change into government policy formulations, establishing the framework strategy and program on climate change, creating for this purpose the Climate Change Commission, and for other purposes. It was enacted to mainstream and systematically integrate the concept of climate change in various phases of policy formulation, development plans, poverty reduction strategies and other development tools and techniques by all agencies and instrumentalities of the government. It mandated the formulation of a national Strategic Framework on Climate Change and its operational plan, the National Climate Change Action Plan. It also aimed to integrate disaster risk reduction into climate change programs and initiatives. Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010 The Philippine government enacted Republic Act 10121, the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010, antecedent to Presidential Decree Number 1566 of 1978 (PD 1566), An Act Strengthening the Philippine Disaster Control Capability and Establishing the National Program on Community Disaster Preparedness, to provide legal basis for governmental policies, plans, and programs to deal with disasters. Republic Act No 11494 providing for COVID-19 response and economic recovery This document sets the Philippines' legislative response to COVID-19 and a recovery plan. Passed in 2020. Legal Basis of Incident Command System
  • 5. 1. Republic Act 10121 a. Section 9 (g): The Office of Civil Defense (OCD) shall formulate standard operating procedures for coordination… b. Rule 7 (h), Implementing Rules and Regulations: The OCD shall establish ICS as part of the Philippines’ on- scene disaster response system 2. NDRRMC Memorandum Circular No. 4, s2012 Signed on March 28, 2012, this provides the implementing guidelines on the use of the ICS under the Philippine DRRM System 3. Executive Order No. 82, s2012 Signed on September 4, 2012, this mandates the activation of the ICS for human induced crises. 4. NDRRMC Memorandum Circular No. 43, s2016 Signed on August 18, 2016, this provides the guidelines on the interoperability of the Incident Management Teams and Response Clusters. 5. NDRRMC Memorandum Order No. 44, s2016 Also signed on August 18, 2016, this provides the guidelines on the mobilization of Incident Management Teams 6. NDRRMC-NSC Joint Memorandum Circular No. 1, s2016 Approved on 30 August 2016, this JMC requires the use of ICS as an integral component of contingency plan for both natural and human-induced hazards.  LOCAL BASES DRRM policy and practice in Baggao is regulated and organized by several related executive orders and ordinances. The most pertinent of these are the following: Executive Orders 1. Executive Order No. 01, Series of 2011, Organizing the Baggao MDRRMC and defining the functions, composition and specific roles and responsibilities of its members; 2. Executive Order No. 20, Series 2011, Organizing the Climate Change Committee in the Municipality of Baggao; 3. Executive Order No. 03, Series of 2012, An Order Creating the GO-FAR Project Management Team to Implement NARDS in the Municipality of Baggao;
  • 6. 6 4. Executive Order No. 10, Series 2012, An Order Establishing and Adopting the Baggao MDRRMC Incident Command System; 5. Executive Order No. 17, Series of 2012, Executive Order Organizing the Special Technical Committee for the Preservation of Century/Heritage Trees in the Municipality of Baggao, Cagayan; 6. Executive Order No. 17, Series of 2012, An Order Establishing and Adopting the Guidelines on Evacuation Center Coordination and Management; 7. Executive Order No. 09, Series of 2013, Executive Order Activating the Rescue 116 and the MDRRM Operations Center to Operate in a 24/7 Basis and Submission of Monthly Reports; 8. Executive Order No. 17, Series of 2013, Creating the Infrastructure Audit Team of the Municipality of Baggao; 9. Executive Order No. 20, Series of 2014, Re-organizing the Baggao MDRRMC and defining the functions, composition and specific roles and responsibilities of its members; 10. Executive Order No., Series of 2015, Organizing the Baggao MDRRMC and defining the functions, composition and specific roles and responsibilities of its members; 11. Executive Order No. 28, Series 2015, An Order Organizing the Operation Listo Cluster of the MDRRMC in the Municipality of Baggao, Cagayan; 12. Executive Order No. 29, Series 2015, An Order Authorizing the Payment of Honorarium of the Rescue 116 Volunteers in the Municipality of Baggao; 13. Executive Order No. 04, Series of 2016, Reorganizing the LGU Team for the Formulation, Planning and Implementation of Local Climate Change Action Plan (LCCAP); 14. Executive Order No. 08, Series of 2016, Appointment and Designations to Specific Positions in the MDRRM Office; 15. Executive Order No. 18, Series of 2016, Re-Organizing the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and management Council (MDRRMC) in the Municipality of Baggao; 16. Executive Order No. 47, Series of 2016, Converting Baggao Rescue 116 as Civil Society Organization into Government Emergency Rescue Service to be known as Baggao Rescue 116; 17. Executive Order No. 31, Series of 2017, Appointments and Designations to Specific Positions in the MDRRM Office; 18. Executive Order No. 33, Series of 2017, An Executive Order to All Barangay Captains to Execute Pre-Emptive Evacuation to All Low-Lying Houses in their Area of Responsibility and to Undertake Necessary Precautionary Measures for Possible Landslide and Flooding due to Continuous Heavy Rainfall in the Municipality of Baggao; 19. Executive Order No. 05, Series of 2018, Re-organizing the Baggao Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council; 20. Executive Order No. 27, Series of 2018, Creation of Inventory Committee to Conduct Assessment on the Present Facilities along Tourist Destinations of the Municipality;
  • 7. 21. Executive Order No. 34, Series of 2018, An Order Authorizing the Baggao Rescue 116 Under the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (MDRRMO) to Operate the Tallang Sub-Station 24/7 Emergency Operations; 22. Executive Order No. 42, Series of 2019, Re-organizing the Baggao Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (MDRRMC) in the Municipality of Baggao; 23. Executive Order No. 104, Series of 2019, Executive Order Establishing the Task Force Team to Clear Roads and Streets of Illegal Structures and Construction within the Municipality of Baggao; 24. Executive Order No. 104, Series of 2019: An Executive Order to all Barangay captains to Execute Pre-Emptive Evacuation to All Low-Lying Houses in their Area of Responsibility and to Undertake Necessary Precautionary Measures for Possible Landslide and Flooding caused by Tropical Cyclone Falcon in the Municipality; 25. Executive Order No. 104, Series of 2019: An Order Creating the Technical Working Group (TWG) for the Evacuation Center Management Committee of the Municipality of Baggao; 26. Executive Order No. 24, Series of 2020, An Order Adopting and Implementing the Enhanced Community Quarantine in the Municipality of Baggao; 27. Executive Order No. 41, Series of 2020, An Order Providing Protocols for the Implementation of General Community Quarantine in the Municipality Excluding Barangays Under Enhanced Community Quarantine; 28. Executive Order No. 50, Series of 2020, An Order Re-Establishing the Municipal Task Force Against COVID-19 of Baggao, Cagayan; 29. Executive Order No. 32, Series of 2021, An Order Institutionalizing the “Drug-Free” Workplace Policy of the Local Government of Baggao and Adopting the Policies and Programs of the RA 9165 otherwise Known as “Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002” and Creating the Committee of Drug-Free Workplace; 30. Executive Order No. 52, Series of 2021, Executive Order Creating the Bamboo Development Task Force of the Municipality; 31. Executive Order No. 63, Series of 2021, Strict Implementation of Protocols and Guidelines to Barangays Under Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) of this Municipality; 32. Executive Order No. 74, Series of 2021, Strict Implementation of the Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) Guidelines in Baggao, Cagayan; 33. Executive Order No. 81, Series of 2021, An Order Creating the Technical Working Group (TWG) for the Identification of Hazard Prone and Risk Assessment in the Municipality of Baggao, Cagayan; SB Resolutions 1. Resolution No. 097, Series 2013, Resolution Authorizing the Local Chief Executive to Implement a Replication Activity of the Project SHINE of the Province of Bulacan as a Model LGU in the Municipality of Baggao;
  • 8. 8 2. Resolution No. 06, Series 2014, Resolution Enacting Ordinance No 2014-02 of the Municipality; 3. Resolution No. 65, Series 2014, Resolution Adopting the Municipal Contingency Plan on Flooding; 4. Resolution No. 66, Series 2014, Resolution Adopting the Standard Operating Procedure on Operation Paghahanda Flood Warning and Response Flooding; 5. Resolution No. 105, Series of 2014, A Resolution Adopting the Three Year Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan (MDRRMP) CY 2014 to 2016 of the Municipality; 6. Resolution No. 125, Series 2014, A Resolution Adopting the Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) of the 24/7 Emergency Operation of the Baggao Rescue 116, Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP) 7. Resolution No. 75, Series 2016, Resolution Reprogramming the Emergency Shelter Assistance from the 2015 MDRRMF to Financial Assistance to Twelve (12) Families of Barangay san Miguel, Baggao who are at Risk to Riverbank Erosion for their House Relocation; 8. Resolution No. 162, Series 2017, Resolution Adopting the MDRRMC Resolution No. 01, Series 2017 re: Reprogramming Some of the Unexpended 2015-2016 MDRRMF to Disaster Preparedness Activities, Supplies and Equipment; 9. Resolution No. 151-A, Series 2018, A Resolution Adopting the Municipal Contingency Plan on Landslide; 10. Resolution No. 151-B, Series of 2018, Resolution Adopting the 2018-2020 Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan (MDRRMP); 11. Resolution No. 25, Series of 2020, Resolution Urging all Schools in the Municipality, Public and Private, in all Levels, Government Offices and Civil Society Organizations to Conduct Massive Information Dissemination Drive Regarding the Deadly Novel Corona Virus to be Spearheaded by the Municipal Health Office; 12. Resolution No. 162, Series of 2020, A Resolution Enacting Ordinance No. 202- 28, Series 2020 Entitles “An Ordinance Mandating Every Owner of a Residential House to Have Sanitary Toilet/Latrine as One of the Prerequisites in the Issuance of Barangay Clearance/Certificate to Achieve Zero Open Defecation”; 13. Resolution No. 172, Series of 2020. Resolution Approving the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan (MDRRMP) for Calendar Year 2021; 14. Resolution No. 53, Series of 2020, Resolution Authorizing the Local Chief Executive and the MDRRM Officer to Enter into MOU with Patiu Funeral Homes Relative to Handling of Remains of Confirmed Covid-19 Cases and Patients Under Investigation; 15. Resolution No. 013, Series 2021, A Resolution Enacting Ordinance No. 2021-03 Entitled “An Ordinance Institutionalizing the Implementation of Bamboo Development Project of Baggao and Providing Funds Thereof; SB Ordinances
  • 9. 1. Ordinance No. 2012-08, “An Ordinance Regulating the Use of All Kinds of Passenger Water Crafts Crossing or Traversing any Waterways Within the Municipality of Baggao”; 2. Ordinance No. 2012-37, “An Ordinance Enacting the Guidelines on Pre-Emptive or Forced Evacuation in Response to Man- made and Natural Disasters”; 3. Ordinance No. 2014-01, “An Ordinance Regulating the Use of the Municipal Ambulance, Providing Penalties Thereof and for Other Purposes”; 4. Ordinance No. 2019-24, “An Ordinance Implementing Force Evacuation as a Resort When Disaster or Emergency has been Declared in the Municipality and Danger of Loss of Lives Becomes Imminent, Providing penalties thereof and for other Purposes” 5. Ordinance No. 2020-09, “An Ordinance Requiring the Planting of Seedlings by Job Order, Casual and Permanent Employees of the Local Government Unit of Baggao”; 6. Ordinance No. 2020-21, “An Ordinance Mandating the Immediate Arrest of All Abandoned Individuals with Mental Illness Creating Public Disturbance or Property Damages within Baggao”; 7. Ordinance No. 157-A, Series 2020: “An Ordinance Prohibiting all Forms of Unauthorized Drag Racing in the Municipality of Baggao and Providing Penalties for Violation Thereof;” Memorandum Circulars 1. Memorandum Circular No. 01, S, 2020, General Guidelines for Public on the Localized Cancellation or Suspension of Classes and Work in Government Offices; 2. Guidelines on COVID-19 Preparedness Measures for Rainy Season
  • 10. 10 ACRONYMS/ABBREVIATIONS AHIMT All-Hazards Incident Management Team BDRRMC Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Committee BDRRMF Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund BDRRMP Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan BLS Basic Life Support BNS Barangay Nutrition Scholar CAGELCO Cagayan Electric Cooperative CBA Cost-benefit analysis or community-based adaptation CCA Climate Change Adaptation CCC Climate Change Commission CBDRRM Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management CDRA Climate and Disaster Risk Assessment CDP Comprehensive Development Plan
  • 11. CLUP Comprehensive Land Use Plan CSO Civil Society Organization DA Department of Agriculture DENR Department on Environment and Natural Resources DILG Department on Interior and Local Government DOF Department of Finance DOH Department of Health DOLE Department of Labor and Employment DOST Department of Science and Technology DPWH Department of Public Works and Highways DRM Disaster Risk Management DRR Disaster Risk Reduction DRRM Disaster Risk Reduction and Management DSWD Department of Social Welfare and Development ECQ Enhanced Community Quarantine EO Executive Order EOC Emergency Operations Center EWS Early Warning System GAD Gender and Development GCQ General Community Quarantine GIS Geographic Information System GSO General Service Office HFA Hyogo Framework of Action ICT Information and Communication Technology ICS Incident Command System IDP Internally Displaced Population/Person IEC Information Education Campaign IMT Incident Management Team LCE - Local Chief Executive LDRRMF Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund LDRRMO Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office LFC Local Finance Committee LGU Local Government Unit LZBAA Local Zoning Board and Appeals MDRRMC Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
  • 12. 12 MECQ Modified Enhanced Community Quarantine MENRO Municipal Environment and Natural Resources Office MEO Municipal Engineering Office M&E Monitoring and Evaluation MGB Mines and Geosciences Bureau MGCQ Modified General Community Quarantine MHO Municipal Health Office MLGOO Municipal Local Government Operations Officer MOA Memorandum of Agreement MPDO Municipal Planning and Development Office/r MSWDO Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office/r NDRRMC National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management council NDRRMF National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund NGAs National Government Agency/ies NGOs Non-Government Organizations NEDA National Economic and Development Authority NGO Nongovernmental Organization OSCA Office of the Senior Citizen Association PAGASA Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration PAR Philippine Area of Responsibility PDP Philippine Development Plan PDRA - Participatory Disaster Risk Assessment PPE Personal Protective Equipment PSA Philippine Statistics Authority PDRRMC Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council PHIVOLCS Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology RA Republic Act RDRRMC Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council SB Sangguniang Bayan SMART Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely SNAP Strategic National Action Plan SRR Search, Rescue and Retrieval SWOC Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Challenges ZO Zoning Ordinance
  • 13. DEFINITION OF TERMS 1. “Adaptation”-the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.
  • 14. 14 2. “Camp Management”- the process of disaster response functioning on coordinating and monitoring assistance and protection, setting up and supporting governance and community participation mechanisms, managing and disseminating information, providing multi- sector feedback mechanisms, and maintaining infrastructure. 3. “Capacity”- a combination of all strengths and resources available within a community, society or organization that can reduce the level of risk, or effects of a disaster. Capacity may include infrastructure and physical means, institutions, societal coping abilities, as well as human knowledge, skills, and collective attributes such as social relationships, leadership, and management. Capacity may also describe as capability. 4. “Capacity Development”- the process by which people, organizations and society systematically stimulate and develop their capacities over time to achieve social and economic goals, including through improvement of knowledge, skills, systems and institutions. It extends the term of capacity building to encompass all aspects of creating and sustaining capacity growth over time. It involves learning and various types of training but also continuous efforts to develop institutions, political awareness, financial resources, technology systems and the wider social and cultural enabling environment (UNISDR, 2009) 5. “Civil Society Organization/s”- non-state actors whose aims are neither to generate profits nor seek governing power. They unite people to advance shared goals and interest. They have a presence in public life, expressing the interest and values of their members and others, and are basedon ethical, cultural, scientific, religious or philanthropic considerations. CSOs include non-government organizations (NGOs), professional associations, foundations, idependent research institutes, community-based organizations (CBOs), faith-based organizations, people’s organizations, social movements and labor unions. 6. “Climate Change”- a change in climate that can be identified by changes in the mean and/or variability of its properties and that persists for an extended period typically decades or longer, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity. 7. “Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (CBDRRM)”- a process of disaster risk reduction and management in which a risk communities are actively engaged in the identification, analysis, treatment, monitoring and evaluation of disaster risks in order to reduce vulnerabilities and enhance their capabilities, and where the people are at heart of decision-making and implementation of disaster risk reduction and management activities. 8. “Complex Emergency”- a form of human-induced emergency in which the cause of the emergency as well as the assistance to the afflicted is complicated by intense level of political considerations. 9. “Contingency Plan”- a plan which includes management processes that analyzes specific potential events or emerging situations that might threaten potential events or emerging situations that might threaten the society or the environment and establishes arrangements in advance to enable timely, effective and appropriate responses to such events and situations. It is a set of responses you will do based on valid information even before the disaster strikes. It is a sub-set of the comprehensive plan.
  • 15. 10. “Covid-19”- an acute respiratory illness in humans caused by a coronavirus, capable of producing severe symptoms and in some cases death, especially in older people and those with underlying health conditions. It was originally identified in China in 2019 and became pandemic in 2020. It is an infectious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. 11. “Crisis”- from the Greek word krises, means “to separate.” It is turning point in progress of an affair or a series of events. A progressive sequence of events, build-up of instability and growth of tension. 12. “Critical Facilities”- the primary structures, technical facilities and systems which are socially, economically or operationally essential to the functioning of a society or community, both in routine circumstances and in the extreme circumstances of an emergency. They include such things as transport systems, air and sea ports, electricity, water and communications systems, hospitals and health clinics, and centers for fire, police, and public administration services (Terminology on DRR. UNISDR, 2009) 13. “Cultural Responsiveness”- the ability to learn from and relate respectfully with people of your own culture as well as those from other cultures. 14. “Damage Assessment and Needs Analysis”- Damage assessment is of the greatest importance in obtaining a rapid diagnosis of the remaining functions and operational capacity of the systems, the damage suffered its causes and required repairs and rehabilitation. Such an assessment will help to locate and quantify the needs that must be met in order to establish key services and to estimate the time needed until they can be back in operation. (PAHO/WHO) 15. “Disaster”- a serious disruption of the functioning of a community or a society involving widespread human, material, economic or environmental losses and impacts which exceeds the ability of the affected community or society to cope using its own resources. Disasters are often described as a result of the combination of: the4 exposure to a hazard; the conditions of vulnerability that are present; and insufficient capacity or measures to reduce or to cope with the potential negative consequences. Disaster impacts may include loss of life, injury, disease and other negative effects on human, physical, mental and social well-being, together with damage to property, destruction of assets, loss of services, social and economic disruption and environmental degradation. 16. “Disaster Mitigation” - the lessening or limitation of the adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. Mitigation measures include but not limited to the engineering techniques and hazard-resistant construction but includes as well as improved environmental policies and programs and public awareness. 17. “Disaster Preparedness”- the knowledge and capacities developed by governments, professional response and recovery organizations, communities and individuals to effectively anticipate, respond to, and recover from- the impacts of likely, imminent or current hazard events or conditions. Preparedness action is carried out within the context of disaster risk reduction and management and aims to build the capacities needed to efficiently manage all types of emergencies and achieve orderly transitions from response to
  • 16. 16 sustained recovery. Preparedness id based on a sound analysis of disaster-risk, and good linkages with early warning systems, and includes such activities as contingency planning, stockpiling of equipment and supplies, the development of arrangements for coordination, evacuation and public information, and associated training and exercises. These must be supported by formal institutional, legal and budgetary capacities. 18. “Disaster Prevention”- the outright avoidance of adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. It expresses the concept and intention to completely avoid potential adverse impacts through action taken in advance such as construction of dams or embankments that eliminate flood risks, land-use regulations that do not permit any settlement in high-risk zones, and seismic engineering designs that ensure the survival and function of a critical building in any likely earthquake. 19. “Disaster Response”- the provision of emergency services and public assistance during or immediately after a disaster in order to save lives, reduce health impacts, ensure public safety and meet the basic subsistence needs of the people affected. Disaster Response is predominantly focused on immediate and short-term needs and is sometimes called “disaster relief.” 20. “Disaster Risk”- the potential disaster losses in lives, health status, livelihood, assets and services, which could occur to a particular community or a society over some specified future time period. 21. “Disaster Risk Reduction”- the concept and practice of reducing disaster risks through systematic efforts to analyze and manage the causal factors of disasters, including through reduced exposures to hazards, lessened vulnerability of people and property, wise management of land and the environment, and improved preparedness for adverse events. 22. “Disaster Risk Reduction and Management”- the systematic process of using administrative directives, organizations, and operational skills and capacities to implement strategies, policies and improved coping capacities in order to lessen the adverse impacts of hazards and the possibility of disaster. Prospective disaster risk reduction and management refers to risk reduction and management activities that address and seek to avoid the development of new or increased disaster risks, especially if risk reduction policies are not in place. 23. “Early Recovery”- Multidimensional process of recovery that begins in a humanitarian setting. It is guided by development principles that seek to build on humanitarian programs and catalyze sustainable development opportunities. It aims to generate self- sustaining, nationally-owned, resilient processes for post-crisis recovery. It encompasses the restoration of basic services, livelihoods, shelter, governance, security and rule of law, environment and social dimensions, including reintegration of displaced populations. 24. “Early Warning System”- the set of capacities needed to generate and disseminate timely and meaningful warning information to enable individuals, communities and organizations threatened by a hazard to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to reduce the possibility of harm or loss. A people- centered early warning system necessarily comprises four (4) key elements: knowledge of the risks; monitoring, analysis and forecasting of the hazards; communication or dissemination of alerts and warnings; and local
  • 17. capabilities to respond to the warnings received. The expression “end-to-end warning system” is also used to emphasize that warning systems need to span all steps from hazard detection to community response. 25. “Emergency”- from the Latin word emergentia meaning a dipping or plunging. A sudden condition or state of affairs calling for immediate action. 26. “Emergency response equipment”- all equipment designed for or typically used in the course of performing the duties required of an emergency responder. (https://www.lawinsider.com › dictionary) 27. “Evacuation centers”- temporary shelter for persons displaced from their homes following a disaster. These facilities vary by location and by the extent of damage to the area. Office buildings, sports stadiums, churches, residential homes, dormitories and community centers may all serve as emergency shelters. 28. “Exposure”- the degree to which the elements at risk are likely to experience hazard events of different magnitudes. 29. “Gender Responsive”- outcomes that reflect an understanding of gender roles and inequalities and which make an effort to encourage equal participation and equal and fair distribution of benefits. Gender responsiveness is accomplished through gender analysis and gender inclusiveness. 30. “Hazard”- a dangerous phenomenon, substance, human activity or condition that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts property damage, loss of livelihood and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. 31. “Hazard Mapping”- process of establishing geography where and to what extent particular hazards/phenomena are likely to pose a threat to people, property, infrastructure and economic activities. 32. “Incident Command System”- systematic tool used for the command, control and coordination of emergency response. It is a set of personnel, policies, procedures, facilities and equipment, integrated into a common organizational structure designed to improve emergency response operations of all types and complexities. It is based upon a flexible, scalable response organization providing a common framework within which people can work together effectively. ICS has been summarized as a “first-on-scene” structure, where the first responder of a scene has charge of the scene until the incident has been declared resolved, a superior –ranking responder arrives on scene and receives command, or the Incident Commander appoints another Incident Commander. (US for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance) 33. “Internally Displaced Population/Person”- are those who have been forced or obliged to leave their homes behind, notably for reasons related to armed conflict or other violence, and who remain within the borders of their country.
  • 18. 18 34. “Insurgency”- historically restricted to rebellious acts that did not reach the proportions of an organized revolution. It has subsequently been applied to any such armed uprising, typically guerrilla in character, against the recognized government of a state or country. Unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government or its citizens to further certain political or social objectives. 35. “Post- Disaster Recovery”- the restoration and improvement where appropriate, of facilities, livelihood and living conditions of disaster-affected communities, including efforts to reduce disaster risk factors, in accordance with the principles of “build-back-better.” 36. “Preparedness Plans”- There are 2 types of preparedness plans. One is focused on the various activities that need to be done to ensure proper and timely disaster response operations. The other one is focused on the safety of the people and plans to increase their level of awareness and preparedness in case disasters happen. 37. “Quarantine”- to put or hold in isolation to prevent the spread of disease or pests 38. “Rescue Equipment”- an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service. Floatation device, life preserver, preserver-rescue equipment consisting of a buoyant belt or jacket to keep a person from dying. 39. “Resilience”- the ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures and functions. 40. “Risk Communication”- interactive exchange of information about risks among risk assessors, managers, news, media, interested groups and the general public (IPCS Risk Assessment Terminology. WHO, Geneva 2004) 41. “Risk Transfer”- the process of formally or informally shifting the financial consequences of particular risks from one party to another whereby a household, community, enterprise or state authority shall obtain resources from the other party after a disaster occurs, in exchange for ongoing or compensatory social or financial benefits provided to that other party. 42. “State of Calamity”- a condition involving mass casualty and/or major damages to property, disruption of means of livelihoods, roads and normal way of life of people in the affected areas as a result of the occurrence of natural or human-induced hazard. 43. “Vulnerability”- the characteristics and circumstances of a community, system or asset that make it susceptible to the damaging effects of a hazard. Vulnerability may arise from various physical, social, economic, and environmental factors such as poor design and construction of buildings, inadequate protection of assets, lack of public information and awareness, limited official recognition of risks and preparedness measures, and disregard for wise environmental management.
  • 19. 44. “Weather”- refers to conditions of atmosphere over a short period of time, temperature, wind, humidity (rainfall) and cloudiness, among others experienced day to day. CHAPTER I: BACKGROUND A. BRIEF HISTORY AND ECOLOGICAL PROFILE OF BAGGAO 1. ETYMOLOGY AND CREATION
  • 20. 20 Long before the issuance of the Royal Decree which officially detaching BAGGAO as a barrio of Amulung on November 27, 1896, the place has already become famous as a hunting ground. Old folks recount that the IBANAGS who frequently hunted in the locale, used to wash their catch in a mud hole before taking them home which they called “ABBAGAOAN”. This “abbaggaoan” an Ibanag word, meaning a place to wash, became a noted landmark for hunters from which the name of the municipality was eventually derived. With the formal creation of Baggao as a separate municipality, Rev. Fr. Pedro Vicandi, O.P. who was then the Parish Priest of the area, was designated officer-in-charge of the town. His chapel, and at the same time, the town hall consisted of a shack made of bamboo and cogon built atop a hill one kilometer southeast of the old municipal building. However, the old municipal building was razed by fire by lawless elements in 1985. On April 18, 1899 Fr. Vicandi fled the area when Col. Daniel Tirona, under Gen. E. Aguinaldo, visited the Town and put to flame the friar’s shanty. However, in September 1899, when civil order was finally restored, Don Rafael Catolico took over as the first mayor of the New “Pueblo Civil”. For more than 85 years since it was separated from its mother town of Amulung, the seat of the Municipal Government of Baggao has been at Centro or Poblacion. In 1899, when Don Rafael Catolico took over as the first Mayor of the new “Pueblo Civil” there were 5,051 inhabitants living in sparse Built-up areas. The communities given the official status as a barrio were those immediately surrounding the Poblacion. Most of the barangays, now established upstream were merely patches of forest clearings barely making the requirements of becoming a full-fledge barrio. However, with the continuous influx of immigrants from other towns and provinces, new communities sprouted continuously moving further northeastward to the more fertile expanse of this municipality. As of today there are already 48 barangays settled by 85 percent of the more than 66,264 inhabitants along the north-eastern portion of Baggao. The Poblacion or Centro founded a century ago became snail-paced in terms of development. Basing on the context of “ripple effect” approach of development, the site of the municipal government of Baggao became misplaced and un-strategically located as its pivotal role of development. The town site, in fact, has caused an upsurge of factionalism and a desire of the people to split the municipality into two. In so doing, the Municipal Development Council arrived at a general consensus of selecting SAN JOSE, the most progressive barangay of the town, as the next seat of the municipal government of Baggao. Hence in 1985, public hearings led by the late Mayor Virgilio G. Herrero were conducted throughout the different barangays of Baggao where 85 percent of the population expressed their support to the move. So, in a session conducted by the Sangguniang Bayan of Baggao, the members passed a resolution transferring the site of the seat of municipal government of Baggao from the old Poblacion to Barangay San Jose.
  • 21. ROSTER OF LOCAL EXECUTIVES SINCE NOVEMBER 27, 1896 1. Fray Pedro Vicandi, O.P. 1896 -1899 2. Don Rafael Catolico 1899 -1904 3. Hon. Juan Canillas 1904 -1908 4. Hon. Benito Reboredo 1908 – 1912 5. Hon. Cipriano 1912 – 1916 6. Hon. Vicente Garcia 1916 – 1920 7. Hon. Jose Pallagao 1920 – 1921 8. Hon. Roman Canillas 1921 – 1924 9. Hon. Francisco Mendoza 1924 – 1928 10. Hon. Alejo Siazon 1928 – 1932 11. Hon. Isabelo Tobias 1932 – 1940 12. Hon. Domingo Herrero 1940 – 1944 13. Hon. Pastor Lorenzo 1944 – 1945 14. Hon. Walfrido Pallagao 1945 – 1946 15. Hon. Custavo Cruz Sr. 1946 – 1947 16. Hon. Angel Canillas 1947 – 1956 17. Hon. Felix Villanueva 1956 – 1960 18. Hon. Walfrido Pallagao 1960 – 1978 19. Hon. Virgilio G. Herrero 1978 - March 1987 20. Hon. Dante S. Ramirez, M.D. March 1987 to November 30, 1987 21. Hon. Virgilio H. Navarro December 01, 1987 to February 02, 1988 22. Hon. Virgilio G. Herrero February 03, 1988 to March 27, 1998 23. Hon. Emely D. Carmona, M.D. March 28, 1998 to June 30, 1998 24. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung, M.D. July 1, 1998 to June 30,2007 25. Hon. Rolando T. Uanang July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010 26. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung M. D July 1, 2010 to June 2013 27. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung M. D June 2013 to 2019 28. Hon. Joan C. Dunuan, LLB, MPA July 2019 to June 2022 29. Hon. Leonardo C. Pattung M. D July 2022 to present
  • 22. 22 A. INTRODUCTION Baggao is a coastal municipality in the province of Cagayan. The municipality has a land area of 995.49 square kilometers or 384.36 square miles which constitutes 10.59% of Cagayan's total area. Its population as determined by the 2020 Census was 87,753. This represented 6.92% of the total population of Cagayan province, or
  • 23. 2.38% of the overall population of the Cagayan Valley region. Based on these figures, the population density is computed at 88 inhabitants per square kilometer or 228 inhabitants per square mile. Baggao is an interior municipality located on the eastern part of Cagayan, traverses the Sierra Madre Mountain Range which extends to the Pacific Coast. It is gifted with clean lively rivers, falls, caves and beaches. It is surrounded by expansive hills and mountains clothed with old growth forest gradually rising along east south corridor which serves as a formidable wall to the Philippine Sea. It is likened to a scoop hand, its Inter-digital furrows and palm lines is the ramification of rivers, creeks and gullies, cascading into the three main rivers, the Taboan river drain into Philippine Sea whereas Paranan and Pared drain into a national landmark, the Cagayan River. The fertile plains and valleys along the water streams grow the bulk of the municipality’s agricultural products and house majority of the Baggaoeños. I. Basic Information LGU Type: Municipality Income Class: 1st Population (CY 2020-PSA): 87,753 No. of Households (CY 2021-RBI): 23, 029 Land Area (in hectares.): 99,548.5922 It is also bounded on the north by the municipality of Gattaran, on the east by the Philippine Sea, on the southeast by the municipality of Peñablanca; on the southwest by the municipality of Amulung and on the west by the municipality of Alcala, Cagayan. Based on the great-circle distance (the shortest distance between two points over the surface of the Earth), the cities closest to Baggao are Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Tabuk, Kalinga, Ilagan, Isabela, Cauayan, Isabela, Laoag, Ilocos Norte, and Batac, Ilocos Norte. The nearest municipalities are Amulung, Cagayan, Alcala, Cagayan, Gattaran, Cagayan, Iguig, Cagayan, Santo Niño, Cagayan, and Lasam, Cagayan. Its distance from the national capital is 379.67 kilometers (235.92 miles). The following list delineates such distance measurements. great-circle distance Nearest towns Amulung, Cagayan, 12.01 kilometers (7.46 miles) to the South Southwest (S25°W) Alcala, Cagayan, 12.72 kilometers (7.91 miles) to the West Southwest (S73°W) Gattaran, Cagayan, 19.50 kilometers (12.12 miles) to the Northwest (N44°W) Iguig, Cagayan, 20.54 kilometers (12.76 miles) to the South (S10°W) Santo Niño, Cagayan, 22.21 kilometers (13.80 miles) to the West Southwest (S75°W) Lasam, Cagayan, 23.02 kilometers (14.31 miles) to the Northwest (N51°W)
  • 24. 24 Nearest cities Tuguegarao, Cagayan, 35.96 kilometers (22.34 miles) to the South (S7°W) Tabuk, Kalinga, 60.57 kilometers (37.64 miles) to the South Southwest (S32°W) Ilagan, Isabela, 88.42 kilometers (54.94 miles) to the South (S8°E) Cauayan, Isabela, 110.78 kilometers (68.83 miles) to the South (S0°W) Laoag, Ilocos Norte, 128.07 kilometers (79.58 miles) to the West Northwest (N77°W) Batac, Ilocos Norte, 128.63 kilometers (79.93 miles) to the West (N84°W) Distance from Manila: 379.67 kilometers (235.92 miles) to the South Southwest (S13°W) Figure 1: Location Map
  • 25. II. Financial Summary CY 2021 LGU Income IRA Share: 385,236,552.00 Tax revenue: 12,965,147.95 Non-Tax revenue: 16,067,898.33 Total: 414,269,598.28 The determination of the extent of local municipal jurisdiction is at present an issue which is a cause of conflict between its neighboring municipalities, Peñablanca and Gattaran. Based from the Atlas map, the municipality has a total land area of 92,060 hectares which is the current basis of the National Government for the computation of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA). This total land area is divided among the 48 barangays and about 10.226 percent of the total 900,270 hectares’ total land area of the Province of Cagayan. Census date Population Growth rate 1903 Mar 2 3,857 – 1918 Dec 31 6,727 3.58% 1939 Jan 1 11,602 2.76% 1948 Oct 1 11,232 -0.33% 1960 Feb 15 21,597 5.92% 1970 May 6 36,471 5.26% 1975 May 1 41,011 2.38% 1980 May 1 44,081 1.45% 1990 May 1 55,264 2.29%
  • 26. 26 Census date Population Growth rate 1995 Sep 1 60,060 1.57% 2000 May 1 66,264 2.13% 2007 Aug 1 73,048 1.35% 2010 May 1 78,188 2.51% 2015 Aug 1 82,782 1.09% 2020 May 1 87,753 1.24% Based on the 2020 census, the most thickly populated barangays of the municipality are barangay Hacienda Intal with a population of 5, 802 and a population density of 0.84 persons per hectare followed by barangay Sta. Margarita with a population of 5, 006 and a population density of 1.30 persons per hectare and ranking third is barangay Imurung with a population of 3, 755 and population density of 2.03 persons per hectare. Ranking 4th is barangay Poblacion with a population of 3, 408 persons and a population density of 8.16 persons per hectare. Barangay Population Percentage (2020) Population 2020 Population 2015 Change (2015- 2020) Annual Population Growth Rate (2015-2020) Adaoag 1.34% 1,177 1,012 16.30% 3.23% Agaman 1.27% 1,117 957 16.72% 3.31% Agaman Norte 1.77% 1,551 1,610 -3.66% -0.78% Agaman Sur 1.18% 1,035 944 9.64% 1.96% Alba 1.97% 1,732 1,658 4.46% 0.92% Annayatan 1.30% 1,143 1,235 -7.45% -1.62% Asassi 2.93% 2,568 2,245 14.39% 2.87% Asinga-Via 2.93% 2,573 2,168 18.68% 3.67% Table 1: Population Growth Rate from 1903-2020 (source:www.philatlas.com)
  • 27. Awallan 2.94% 2,583 2,321 11.29% 2.28% Bacagan 1.57% 1,382 1,145 20.70% 4.04% Bagunot 1.54% 1,351 1,244 8.60% 1.75% Barsat East 1.57% 1,375 1,258 9.30% 1.89% Barsat West 1.21% 1,066 1,062 0.38% 0.08% Bitag Grande 3.83% 3,365 3,000 12.17% 2.45% Bitag Pequeño 2.05% 1,802 1,623 11.03% 2.23% Bunugan 1.56% 1,367 1,289 6.05% 1.24% C. Verzosa 0.85% 746 640 16.56% 3.28% Canagatan 0.57% 500 484 3.31% 0.69% Carupian 1.55% 1,360 1,353 0.52% 0.11% Catugay 0.96% 846 877 -3.53% -0.75% Dabbac Grande 0.90% 789 718 9.89% 2.00% Dalin 1.35% 1,186 1,165 1.80% 0.38% Dalla 1.91% 1,673 1,602 4.43% 0.92% Hacienda Intal 6.61% 5,802 5,661 2.49% 0.52% Ibulo 0.35% 306 304 0.66% 0.14% Imurong 4.28% 3,755 3,824 -1.80% -0.38% J. Pallagao 1.02% 891 879 1.37% 0.29% Lasilat 1.37% 1,204 1,287 -6.45% -1.39% Mabini 1.35% 1,182 1,100 7.45% 1.52% Masical 1.68% 1,477 1,408 4.90% 1.01% Mocag 3.57% 3,135 2,870 9.23% 1.88% Nangalinan 1.71% 1,499 1,612 -7.01% -1.52% Poblacion 3.88% 3,408 3,296 3.40% 0.71% Remus 3.41% 2,992 2,671 12.02% 2.42% San Antonio 0.70% 612 442 38.46% 7.09% San Francisco 2.71% 2,377 2,241 6.07% 1.25% San Isidro 1.25% 1,097 937 17.08% 3.37% San Jose 5.17% 4,535 4,375 3.66% 0.76% San Miguel 1.87% 1,641 1,602 2.43% 0.51% San Vicente 0.72% 636 503 26.44% 5.06% Santa Margarita 5.70% 5,006 4,862 2.96% 0.62% Santor 1.30% 1,140 1,140 0.00% 0.00%
  • 28. 28 Taguing 2.63% 2,312 2,190 5.57% 1.15% Taguntungan 1.99% 1,746 1,458 19.75% 3.87% Tallang 3.44% 3,015 3,113 -3.15% -0.67% Taytay 1.65% 1,449 1,400 3.50% 0.73% Temblique 1.15% 1,006 893 12.65% 2.54% Tungel 1.42% 1,243 1,104 12.59% 2.53% Baggao Total 87,753 82,782 6.00% 1.24% There are 48 barangays of the municipality, three (3) barangays are classified as urban (Tallang, San Jose, Poblacion) and forty-five (45) are rural. III. Economy Source of livelihood and income in the municipality Primary: Agriculture (crop production and fishery) Secondary: Commerce and trade Farming NSO 12,662 Corn Farmers MAO 8,635 Rice Farmers MAO 6,254 Livestock/poultry NSO 6,287 Fishing NSO 344 Forestry NSO 275 Bakery (2019)BPLO 27 Parlor/Barber Shop/Spa (2019)BPLO 23 Tailoring (2019)BPLO 6 Cooperatives (2019)BPLO 9 Farm and Poultry Supplies (2019)BPLO 59 Financial Institutions (2019)BPLO 29 Food Products (2019)BPLO 2 Table 2: Population Growth Rate from 2015-2020 (source:www.philatlas.com)
  • 29. Funerals (2019)BPLO 2 Gasoline Stations (2019)BPLO 13 Grains Trading (2019)BPLO 44 Metal Works/ Glass and Aluminum Supply/Welding Shops (2019)BPLO 24 Vulcanizing Shops (2019)BPLO 6 Gravel and Sand/ Hollow Blocks/ Constructions (2019)BPLO 12 Wonder saw/Auto Repair Shop (2019)BPLO 14 Furniture Shops (2019)BPLO 24 Fruits/Vegetables/Fish/Meat (2019)BPLO 139 Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories/ Appliances, MRT Gas Supplies (2019)BPLO 44 Law and Notarial Office (2019)BPLO 2 Pharmacy (2019)BPLO 18 Service activities/Photo/Photo Frame/Internet Services (2019)BPLO 18 Amusement and Recreation Activities, n.e.c. (2019)BPLO 1 Office Supplies/Gen. Mdse/Dry Goods/Variety/Electrical Supply/Cellphones & Accessories (2019)BPLO 138 Store/ Retailer (2019)BPLO 910 Travel and Tours (2019)BPLO 2 Water Refilling (2019)BPLO 20 Transportation (2018)Franchising Board 642 Construction 695 Mining and Quarrying 28 Hospital 1 Bank Primary Source 1 Medical Clinic (2019)BPLO 4 Dental Clinic (2019)BPLO 2 Tertiary School Primary Source 1
  • 30. 30 Secondary School Primary Source 8 Elementary School Primary Source 65* Hotel/Restaurant/Eatery/Panciteria/Refreshment Stand (2019)BPLO 127 Cell Sites Primary Source 5 Market Center Primary Source 4 Figure 2: School Map Table 3: Source of Livelihood and Income (source: MPDO)
  • 31. A. EMPLOYMENT The total population of 15 years old and over as per CBMS 2012 data is 53,984 of which 30,720 belongs to the labor force. The total households engaged in the different entrepreneurial activities in the municipality are the following: engaged in crop farming and gardening, 12,662 or 54.52%; engaged in livestock/poultry 6,287 or 27.07%; engaged in fishing 344 or 1.48%, engaged in forestry 275 or 1.11%, engaged in wholesale/ retail 1,294 or 5.57%, engaged in manufacturing are 209 or 0.90%; engaged in community, social & personal service 162 or 0.70%; engaged in transportation, storage & communication 944 or 4.06%; engaged in construction 695 or 2.99%;engaged in mining and quarrying 28 or 0.12% and others nec. 344 or 1.48%. B. AVERAGE FAMILY INCOME AND EXPENDITURES VIS-À-VIS POVERTY LEVEL Baggao is a first class municipality in the province of Cagayan. It is composed of 48 barangays. Based from the National Statistics Coordination Board (NSCB), the municipality has a population of 78,188 as of May 1, 2010. The National House Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) is an information management system which identifies who and where the poor are. Proxy Means Test (PMT) is a statistical model that estimates household income using proxy variables or income predictors. The assessment was supported by two major activities- the On-Demand Application and Validation. These activities are the check and balance to the issues of exclusion of poor and inclusion of non-poor household. The household assessments showed that among the 11,095 household subjected to Proxy Mean Test, 3,059 or 27.6 percent were identified as poor in Baggao, Cagayan. This means that more than one (1) out of every four (4) households subjected to PMT is poor. C. POVERTY LEVEL OF THE MUNICIPALITY CITY/MUNICIPALITY POOR %SHARE OF POOR HH’S SOLANA 3,069 8.02% BAGGAO 3,059 7.99% APPARI 2,467 6.45% TUAO 2,245 5.87% AMULUNG 1,976 5.16% GATTARAN 1,654 4.32% PEÑABLANCA 1,556 4.07% SANTO NIÑO (FAIRE) 1,508 3.94% ALCALA 1,478 3.86% CALAYAN 1,329 3.47%
  • 32. 32 LASAM 1,267 3.31% ABULUG 1,191 3.11% BUGUEY 1,187 3.10% SANTA ANA 1,186 3.10% BALLESTEROS 1,142 2.98% GONZAGA 1,118 2.92% ALLACAPAN 1,082 2.83% LAL-LO 1,072 2.80% ENRILE 1,051 2.75% RIZAL 1,032 2.70% PAMPLONA 1,017 2.66% TUGUEGARAO CITY 1,007 2.63% SANCHEZ MIRA 892 2.33% IGUIG 762 1.99% PIAT 737 1.93% CALAMANIUGAN 702 1.83% CLAVERIA 698 1.82% SANTA TERESITA 668 1.75% SANTA PRAXEDES 118 .31% PROVINCE OF CAGAYAN 38,270 100% The highest magnitude of poor household is found in barangay Hacienda-Intal (200), followed by Santa Margarita (141) and Bitag Pequeño (134). Of the 3,059 poor household, 58.6% have an estimated average income that falls in decile 2, annual range per capita income from P10, 060.00-P13, 363.00 while 41.4% of the poor households earn estimated income in decile 1, annual per capita income below P10, 060.00. An individual member of a household in the municipality should earn at least P12, 928.00 annually or P35.42 per day to be out of poverty. IV. Transportation Means (2022) LGU-Owned Units Service Vehicles 6 Heavy Equipment 15 Ambulance 6 Rescue Vehicles 3 Garbage truck 2 Table 4: Poverty Level of Baggao/ Source: NHTS-PR 2010
  • 33. BFP-owned Fire truck 2 PNP owned Patrol Car 5 PNP owned Motorcycle 4 CAFGU Service 1 Land transportation within the municipality is served by public utility buses, jeepneys and motorized tricycles. There are regular buses routes and public utility vans originating from the municipality, the San Jose –Tuguegarao and Tallang – Tuguegarao route. Baggao is likewise served by inter-provincial carrier, Air-conditioned Buses of Florida Transport Incorporated and Everlasting Guardian Bus Inc. traversing regularly the San Jose-Manila route. Public utility jeepneys and tricycles traverse the San Jose-Tallang route and other barangays in the municipality. Likewise, privately-owned cars, vans, mini trucks, jeepneys, motorcycles bound in the place. A total of 1016 tricycles with duly approved franchise, 18 buses, and 85 public utility vans are operating in the municipality. RISK ASSESSMENT BY TYPE OF HAZARD Looking at the predictions of the changes of climate for 2020 and 2050 the overall slight increase in temperature and precipitation is eminent. However, this does not tell the whole story. What cannot be measured or predicted is how the weather will be more extreme. Larger and more frequent storm events and longer and more common drought events can be expected. The manifestations of climate change in the form of, drought, flooding, stronger and intensified typhoons, sea level rise, storm surge and climate change related outbreaks have impacts on the municipality’s economy, environment, and infrastructure and on the municipality’s 48 barangays. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS Using historical trends, past accounts, and development patterns, the exposure of Baggao, to climate change was analyzed. During the conduct of exposure analysis conducted by the LCCAP Core Teams and Stakeholders, they identified four (4) major climate-related hazards based on the municipalities past experiences and taking into consideration the climate change projection of the DOST-PAGASA. The Municipality of Baggao and its populace are exposed to exposed to, namely: a) Flooding b) Rain-induced landslides, c) Tropical Cyclone, d) Drought, e) Vehicular Accidents and f) Fire Incidence TWO TYPES OF HAZARD IN THE MUNICIPALITY 1. Natural-Induced Hazard A widely accepted definition characterizes natural hazards as "those elements of the physical environment, harmful to man and caused by forces extraneous to him. More specifically, in this document, the term "natural hazard" refers to all atmospheric, Table 5: Means of Transportation (Source: MPDO)
  • 34. 34 hydrologic, geologic (especially seismic and volcanic), and wildfire phenomena that, because of their location, severity, and frequency, have the potential to affect humans, their structures, or their activities adversely. 2. Man-Induced Hazard Human-induced hazards are those resulting from modifications of natural processes in the Earth's system caused by human activities that accelerate/aggravate the damage potential (e.g., land degradation, landslides, and forest fires). Human-made hazards originate from technological or industrial accidents, dangerous procedures, infrastructure failures, or certain human activities or human negligence, which may cause the loss of life or injury, property damage, social and economic disruption, or environmental degradation (e.g., industrial pollution, nuclear activities and radioactivity, toxic wastes, dam failures, and transport, industrial, or technological accidents such as explosions, fires, and oil spills). NATURE-INDUCED HAZARD FLOODING Flooding is being triggered by heavy continuous rainfall which is being aggravated by reduced soil absorptive capacity in the upstream. Flooding is identified as a result of both the change in the average in precipitation and an extreme event during occurrence of strong tropical cyclones. There are two types of flood occurrence in Baggao. One is the River flooding, triggered by intense rainfall, overcharging the existing drainage system which mainly cause flooding in poorly drained areas and overflowing of water along river banks and flood plains. Another type of flood occurrence in the municipality is flashfloods coming the mountains due to continues rainfall and drain to the low lying areas of the municipality Result of the Vulnerability and Risk Assessment (VRA) conducted by the Geologists of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) on Year 2021 shows that Barangays within the low-lying and flat floodplain of the Pared River are Barsat East, West, Nangalinan, San Isidro, Catugay, Taytay, San Miguel, Bacagan, Imurong, San Francisco, Dabbac Grande, Tungal, San Jose, Annatayan, Tallang, Remus, Dalin, J. Pallagao and Agaman Sur. Since most of the households in the aforementioned barangays are located along the banks, scouring is progressive. These household will be relocated unless, otherwise mitigated with engineering measures since the erosion will continue to erode the banks. Population exposed to flooding According to the 2015 Census of the PSA, a total of about 82,782 people are residing in the Municipality of Baggao. Data treatment for the exposure of the population will be relative to the location and size of the built-up area since the spatial referencing of these people will be tied to the said other element at risk which are the residential areas. About 34.53% of the population are at critical areas to flooding while about 33.79% are in moderately susceptible areas. On the other hand, 31.59% of the total population are not exposed to flood hazard.
  • 35. ANATOMY OF DISASTER ON FLOODING (based on CP on Flooding) Root Causes Triggering Factors Early Warning Signs Scope of Impact DRR Measures River Siltation a. Narrow waterways b. Log jam c. Improper disposal of garbage that clogs the waterways d. Excessive use of herbicides PAGASA forecast, info text, water level gauge, public address, water color in the streams that changes to brown 34 barangays that are high risk to flooding All houses located near the riverbanks in the municipality -Sustainable reforestation - Sustainable upland farming technique -Strict implementation of environmental laws -Enact ordinance regulating the entry of illegal settlers -Strict implementation of RA 9003 -Regulate the use of herbicide through legislation -Pre-emptive evacuation Forest Denudation Kaingin Illegal Settlers Improper farming practices/management In Baggao, flooding usually occurs to low-lying and relatively flat areas. as per MGB Assessment, the barangays of Barsat East, Barsat West, Nangalinan, San Isidro, Catugay, Taytay, San Miguel, Bacagan, Imurung, San Francisco, Dabbac Grande, Tungal, San Jose, Annayatan, Tallang, Remus, Dalin, Pallagao, and Agaman Sur. most of the households of the aforementioned barangays are located along banks where scouring is progressive. it is recommended that these households should be relocated, unless, otherwise mitigated with engineering measures since the erosion will continue to erode the banks.
  • 36. 36 FLOOD ASESSMENT PER BARANGAY BASED ON 2019 MGB ASSESSMENT Three largest population count at risk for critical cases of flooding or those with high to very high susceptibility to flooding are in Brgys. San Jose (4370 which is about 100% of the barangay’s number of persons), Imurong (3450 or about 90% of their barangay population) and Poblacion (2600 equivalent to about 79% of their barangay population). Said barangays were also those with largest built-up areas that are susceptible to the same rating of the same geohazard. There are barangays that don’t have any population estimated to be residing in areas with high to very high susceptibility to flooding: Adaoag, J. Pallagao, Mabini and San Antonio. For those areas with population with moderate susceptibility to flooding are Brgy. Remus (2,501 which is about 94% of the total barangay population), Tallang (2,297 or 74%) and Hacienda Intal (1,867 or about 33%) with average of 583. There are also barangays with no significant number of population exposed to the said rating: Brgys. Adaoag, Asinga- Via, Bacagan, Bagunot, Bunugan, Carupian, Dabbac Grande, Ibulo, San Jose, San Vicente, Santor and Taguing. Figure 3: Percentage of Population per Flood Susceptibility Figure 4: Population Exposed to Flood per Susceptibility
  • 37. Kaingin, illegal logging, excessive use of herbicides and clogged waterways also causes the yearly occurrence of flood in the municipality. It can also be increased due to tropical cyclones with heavy rains that strike the locality. The increase of water in Abusag Bridge, Bagunot Bridge and other small bridges that connect to the interior barangays causes disaster to the people especially their basic commodities. Flooding usually occurs in the months of July-December. During these months, the municipality experiences heavy rains that cause flooding. It is also the months that agricultural products are being planted up to the time of harvesting and if flood will occur, these crops are at risk and farmers will be adversely affected. LANDSLIDES Landslides can be started by storms, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, fires and human modification of land. In a landslide, masses of rock, earth, or debris move down a slope. Landslides may be small or large, slow or rapid. Debris and mud flows are rivers of rock, earth and other debris saturated with water. They develop when water rapidly accumulates in the ground, during heavy rainfall or rapid snowmelt, changing the earth into a flowing river of mud or “slurry.” They flow can rapidly, striking with little or no warning at avalanche speeds. They also can travel several miles from their source, growing in size as they pick up trees, boulders, cars, and other materials. Although landslides are highly localized, they can be particularly hazardous due to their frequency of occurrence. Classes of landslide include: 1. Rock falls, which are characterized by free-falling rocks from overlying cliffs. These often collect at the cliff base in the form of talus slopes which may pose an additional risk. 2. Slides and avalanches, a displacement of overburden due to shear failure along a structural feature. If the displacement occurs in surface material without total deformation it is called a slump. 3. Flows and lateral spreads, which occur in recent unconsolidated material associated with a shallow water table. Although associated with gentle topography, these liquefaction phenomena can travel significant distances from their origin. The impact of these events depends on the specific nature of the landslide. Rockfalls are obvious dangers to life and property but, in general, they pose only a localized threat due to their limited areal influence. In contrast, slides, avalanches, flows, and lateral spreads, often having great areal extent, can result in massive loss of lives and property. Mudflows, associated with volcanic eruptions, can travel at great speed from their point of origin and are one of the most destructive volcanic hazards. Rain Induced Landslides (RIL) are downward and outward movement of materials caused by floods and excessive rain. It is a geological phenomenon which includes a wide range of ground movement, such as rockfalls, deep failure of slopes and shallow debris flows, which can occur in offshore, coastal and onshore environments.
  • 38. 38 Although the action of gravity is the primary driving force for a landslide to occur, there are other contributing factors affecting the original slope stability The Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) provided for the rating parameters on landslide susceptibility as follows: HIGH: ● Presence of active and/or recent landslides ● Presence of numerous and large tension cracks that could directly affect the community ● Areas with drainages that are prone to landslide damming ● Steep slopes MODERATE: ● Areas with indicative and/or old landslides ● Presence of small tension cracks and are located away from the community ● Moderates slopes LOW: ● Low and gently slope ● No presence of tension cracks In terms of landslide susceptibility, thirty-eight (38) out of forty-eight (48) barangays in Baggao include areas that are located on and/or near slopes and have the potential for landslide occurrence. These barangays were also presented with Landslide Threat Advisory that informs the barangays of their susceptibility to landslides and includes corresponding recommendations particular to the barangay. There are 15 barangays with high landslide susceptibility namely: Alba, Barsat West, Bitag Grande, Bitag Pequeno, Bunugan, C. Versoza, Canagatan, Carupian, Mabini, Mocag, Nangalinan, Pallagao, Sta. Margarita, Taytay, and San Miguel. These barangays are assessed by the MGB with almost the same characteristics which includes mass movement (landslide, tension cracks) which triggers by the rapid increase/decrease in creek/river water levels accompanied by increase turbidity.
  • 39. Landslides in the Municipality of Baggao, are mainly attributed to the instability of the steep slopes triggered by the oversaturation especially during rainy season manifested by seepages and presence of springs. Barangays with reported embankment erosion are in Poblacion, San Vicente, Tungel, Dabbac Grande, Bitag Grande, San Miguel and Annayatan due to the action of the Pared River; Hacienda Intal due to the scouring of the waters from the Asinga River; Dalla, Barsat East and West, Nangalinan and San Isidro due to the fluvial action of Paranan River; Asinga-Via along the bank of Asinga or Hot Spring River; Taguntungan due to scouring by the Pulay River; Agaman Proper due to Malunlun & Paranan Rivers; and Remus beside the Pulakay River. Other mass movement cases involve reactivation of old landslides such as in Brgys. Bunugan, Bacagan, Mocag, Bitag Grande and Mabini while others have been noted with steep slopes, seepages, presence of springs and/or tension cracks in Brgys. Asassi, Taytay, Hacienda Intal, Tallang, San Miguel, Temblique, C. Versoza, J. Pallagao, Sta. Margarita and Asinga-Via. BUILT-UP AREA EXPOSED TO LANDSLIDE For the whole built-up area (5.91km2) of the Municipality of Baggao, about 27.34% (1.62km2) are located in critical areas to landslide while 1.78% (0.11 km2) are in moderately susceptible areas (Figure 23). Majority of the landslide-prone areas of the municipality is identified as high in rating due to its steepness in slopes. Some are even rated higher due to records of historical and active sliding.
  • 40. 40 Out of the 82,782 count, about 29.69% (24,578) are in critical areas for landslide while about 1.89% (1,565.71) are in moderately susceptible areas. Figure 5: Total Percentage of Built-up Area Exposed per Landslide Susceptibility Rating
  • 41. Highest number of people exposed to critical conditions for mass movement are found in Brgys. Sta. Margarita, Bitag Grande, Taytay and Taguing. Just like in the data treatment for the built-up areas, there are seven (7) barangays with no significant number of population under critical zones for landslide: Barsat East, Catugay, Dabbac Grande, San Isidro, San Jose, Santor and Tungel. For the moderately susceptible to landslide areas, top three largest number for exposed people are in Brgys. Catugay (476, 54%), Agaman Norte (326, 20%) and Dalin (199, 17%) with an average of 33 and a total of eleven (11) barangays quantified. Such discrepancy in the comparison of the built-up areas and population exposure is attributed to the spread and spatial distribution of the said elements. During the occurrence of Typhoon Ulyssess with International Name “Vamco”, the municipality, Cagayan were not included to any Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals (TCWS) but was affected by massive amount of rainfall due to the effect of typhoon Ulysses. Typhoon water coming from upper Cagayan river basin and continuous rain the area that causes flooding in the lower basin with occurrence of landslide that causes the death of four (4) residents of Sitio Tueg, Bitag Grande, Baggao, Cagayan on November 15, 2020. In the event that Typhoon Ulysses brought mega flood cause by continuous heavy rains, landslide in various barangay is imminent, especially for Taytay who has recorded with 136 houses from Zone 4 to Zone 7, to be at risk of soil erosion. LOW MODERATE HIGH Adaoag Asassi Catugay Imurung Lasilat Poblacion San Francisco Tallang Temblique Agaman Proper Agaman Norte Agaman Sur Asinga Via Awallan Bacagan Bagunot Dalin Hacienda Intal Masical Remus Alba Barsat West Bitag Grande Bitag Pequeno Buugan C Versoza Canagatan Carupian Mabini Mocag Nangalinan Figure 6: Risk and Vulnerability Map on Landslide
  • 42. 42 San Antonio San Vicente Taguntungan Pallagao Sta. Margarita Taytay San Miguel As per damage data gathered from the barangays and data from their Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plans (BDRRMPs), below is the breakdown of families and individuals likely to be affected by landslide: FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS SUSCEPTIBLE TO LANDSLIDE BARANGAY Landslide Susceptibility Total Population Total Families Affected Population Affected Families ADAOAG Low 1,170 287 69 15 Moderate 1,170 287 0 0 High 1,170 287 0 0 AGAMAN NORTE Low 1,805 393 229 59 Moderate 1,805 393 0 0 High 1,805 393 230 54 AGAMAN PROPER Low 1,200 280 0 0 Moderate 1,200 280 0 0 High 1,200 280 0 0 AGAMAN SUR Low 1,081 255 0 0 Moderate 1,081 255 0 0 High 1,081 255 7 2 ALBA Low 1,791 492 139 27 Moderate 1,791 492 138 23 High 1,791 492 200 60 ANNAYATAN Low 1,315 306 754 186 Moderate 1,315 306 0 0 Table 6: Landslide Susceptibility Matrix based from MGB Survey 2006
  • 43. High 1,315 306 647 194 ASASSI Low 2,728 685 0 0 Moderate 2,728 685 0 0 High 2,728 685 100 23 ASINGA VIA Low 2,755 668 676 156 Moderate 2,755 668 610 153 High 2,755 668 1282 420 AWALLAN Low 2,790 659 0 0 Moderate 2,790 659 0 0 High 2,790 659 26 7 BACAGAN Low 1,419 334 53 10 Moderate 1,419 334 0 0 High 1,419 334 0 0 BAGUNOT Low 1,436 342 788 225 Moderate 1,436 342 301 81 High 1,436 342 202 55 BARSAT EAST Low 1,353 338 218 56 Moderate 1,353 338 197 71 High 1,353 338 617 160 BARSAT WEST Low 1,140 265 94 23 Moderate 1,140 265 760 219 High 1,140 265 287 74 BITAG GRANDE Low 3,556 894 261 89 Moderate 3,556 894 818 204 High 3,556 894 144 61 BITAG PEQUENO Low 1,809 433 363 95 Moderate 1,809 433 547 125
  • 44. 44 High 1,809 433 899 279 BUNUGAN Low 1,430 342 244 61 Moderate 1,430 342 0 0 High 1,430 342 0 0 C. VERSOZA Low 772 192 90 22 Moderate 772 192 0 0 High 772 192 0 0 CANAGATAN Low 532 145 24 2 Moderate 532 145 36 9 High 532 145 8 6 CARUPIAN Low 1,600 380 168 43 Moderate 1,600 380 138 41 High 1,600 380 24 10 CATUGAY Low 901 215 0 0 Moderate 901 215 0 0 High 901 215 0 0 DABBAC GRANDE Low 832 215 211 55 Moderate 832 215 0 0 High 832 215 0 0 DALIN Low 1,234 295 0 0 Moderate 1,234 295 0 0 High 1,234 295 14 4 DALLA Low 1,327 430 10 3 Moderate 1,327 430 0 0 High 1,327 430 111 27 HACIENDA INTAL Low 6,569 1,486 1662 472 Moderate 6,569 1,486 102 25 High 6,569 1,486 2152 527
  • 45. IBULO Low 353 78 207 61 Moderate 353 78 0 0 High 353 78 0 0 IMURUNG Low 4,284 1,027 19 6 Moderate 4,284 1,027 0 0 High 4,284 1,027 0 0 LASILAT Low 1,327 300 248 62 Moderate 1,327 300 328 102 High 1,327 300 20 6 MABINI Low 1,269 304 636 159 Moderate 1,269 304 168 42 High 1,269 304 532 133 MASICAL Low 1,580 446 0 0 Moderate 1,580 446 0 0 High 1,580 446 452 129 MOCAG Low 3,168 831 452 113 Moderate 3,168 831 412 103 High 3,168 831 684 171 NANGALINAN Low 1,751 412 16 5 Moderate 1,751 412 23 8 High 1,751 412 247 63 PALLAGAO Low 962 255 33 8 Moderate 962 255 14 2 High 962 255 55 13 POBLACION Low 3,500 860 0 0 Moderate 3,500 860 0 0 High 3,500 860 0 0
  • 46. 46 REMUS Low 2,974 796 67 17 Moderate 2,974 796 256 52 High 2,974 796 0 0 SAN ANTONIO Low 594 159 0 0 Moderate 594 159 0 0 High 594 159 0 0 SAN FRANCISCO Low 2,382 618 557 175 Moderate 2,382 618 117 30 High 2,382 618 19 6 SAN ISDRO Low 1,212 297 0 0 Moderate 1,212 297 0 0 High 1,212 297 0 0 SAN JOSE Low 4,836 1,104 0 0 Moderate 4,836 1,104 0 0 High 4,836 1,104 0 0 SAN MIGUEL Low 1,715 383 0 0 Moderate 1,715 383 1060 279 High 1,715 383 0 0 SAN VICENTE Low 690 182 400 118 Moderate 690 182 129 37 High 690 182 101 33 SANTOR Low 1,260 302 0 0 Moderate 1,260 302 0 0 High 1,260 302 0 0 STA. MARGARITA Low 5,307 1,257 0 0 Moderate 5,307 1,257 0 0 High 5,307 1,257 282 95 TAGUING Low 2,419 609 789 215
  • 47. Moderate 2,419 609 197 55 High 2,419 609 616 155 TAGUNTUNGAN Low 1,748 450 6 2 Moderate 1,748 450 68 20 High 1,748 450 622 146 TALLANG Low 3,457 988 482 139 Moderate 3,457 988 0 0 High 3,457 988 23 4 TAYTAY Low 1,512 386 133 62 Moderate 1,512 386 81 49 High 1,512 386 460 135 TEMBLIQUE Low 1,108 258 0 0 Moderate 1,108 258 271 88 High 1,108 258 0 0 TUNGEL Low 1,307 317 0 0 Moderate 1,307 317 0 0 High 1,307 317 272 93 TOTALS 28,204 7,704 With the total 82,782, 34.00% of it are landslide susceptible in low, moderate and high. 10, 098 or 12.19% in low susceptibility, 6771 or 8.17% are classified in moderate susceptibility, 11, 335 or 13.69% are under high susceptibility. Table 7: Families and Individual Susceptible to Landslide (Source: Barangay Reports)
  • 48. 48 Figure 7: Landslide Map of Baggao (excerpt from NOAH)
  • 49. Barangays within the low-lying and flat floodplain of the Pared River are Barsat East, Barsat West, Nangalinan, San Isidro, Catugay, Taytay, san Miguel, Bacagan, Imurung. San Francisco, Dabbac Grande, Tungal, San Jose, Annayatan, Tallang, Remus, Dalin, J. Pallagao and Agaman Sur. Since most of the households in the aforementioned barangays are located along the banks, scouring is progressive. These households will be relocated unless, otherwise mitigated with engineering measures since the erosion will continue to erode the banks. Barangays with landslide- prone identified areas are Taytay, Hacienda Intal, Barsat West, San Antonio, Bitag Grande, Asassi, Temblique, Alba Sta. Margarita, J. Pallagao, C. Versoza, Agaman Norte, Agaman Sur and Adaoag. TROPICAL CYCLONES Climate change manifested through water level rise and more frequent and intense tropical cyclones will pose danger to the municipality of Baggao. Having agriculture as its major source of income, crops, livestock and fish production will be greatly affected. Coastal flooding will likewise have an adverse effect to fish-stocks in the area of Sta. Margarita, specifically at Sitio Valley Cove and Linawan. Tropical cyclones could also affect to things and properties being blown away, plants and trees being blown down and uprooted, branches of flowering and fruit-bearing trees fell off and broken, fishing vessels in some sitios of Sta. Margarita cannot go out fishing, transport are threatened and hindered from its operations greatly affecting peoples’ mobility. Over-all impacts from these incidents are indicated in the loss of economic values and opportunities and increased overhead costs for repairs, rehabilitation and reconstruction. As a result, production and productivity as well as revenues and income are significantly reduced. Super Typhoon Lawin and Ompong that hit the municipality, all of the barangays are were severely affected that resulted to the in five (5) deaths, thirty seven (37) injuries, eighteen thousand eight hundred sixty eight (18,868) partially damaged houses and two thousand nine hundred thirty seven (2,937) totally blown down houses, eight hundred nine million forty seven thousand and 500 pesos (809,047,500) damages in agriculture and one hundred thirty one million, eight hundred eleven thousand two and 60/100 Pesos (131,811,002.6) damages on Infrastructure. During the occurrence of Typhoon Ulysses on November 2020, there are about 4, 562 families with 15, 324 individuals who evacuated in the different evacuation centers in the municipality. There are five (5) casualties from Barangay Bitag Grande (4) and one (1) from Barangay C. Versoza, Baggao, Cagayan. There are 15 partially blown down houses and 21 totally blown down houses. For agriculture damages, the Municipal Agriculture Office assessed the amount of P7, 500, 000.00 cost of damages in corn, P42, 875, 000.00 for rice, P281, 250.00 for vegetables, P100, 000.00 for fisheries and P948, 000.00 for livestock and
  • 50. 50 poultry. For Infrastructure, P364,770,000.00 cost of damages were recorded from the Municipal Engineering Office composed of roads, bridges, schools and slope protection. BIOPHYSICAL EFFECTS OF TYPHOON The observed and projected changes in the climatic conditions have posed threats as well as new opportunities. The tables below show the climate change drivers and its manifestations to the municipality. INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: IN “KROSA” TROPICAL STORM “VINTA” Date: October 31, 2013 Typho on Catego ry Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 120 kph near the center, and gustiness of up to 150 kph Movement: Moving West Northwest at 26 k/h Rainfall: 5-15mm/h within its 500 km dia TCWS: 3 Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indiv l Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 12,381 47,248 School, brgy. Hall , private houses Flood/ landslide 1 1 3443 478 49,963,000 5,383,000 55,348,000 INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TYPHOON “INENG” Date: August 19, 2015 Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum Sustained Winds of 180 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 215 kph Movement: Moving west towards extreme Northern Luzon Effects: INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TROPICAL STORM “LUIS” Date: September 17, 2014, 1:40AM Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 120 kph near the center, and gustiness of up to 150 kph Movement: Moving West Northwest at 30 kph Rainfall: 13.7mm (Baggao EOC) TCWS: 2 Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 4,350 26,000 7 1 28,891,000.00 2,000,000.00
  • 51. Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 1,100 6,600 School, brgy. Hall , private houses Flood/ landslide 1 2,880,000 INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TROPICAL STORM “LANDO” Date: October 18, 2015 Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum sustained winds of 175 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 210 kph Movement: Moving West Northwest Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Patially Totally Temblique, San Miguel, Santor, San Isidro, Hacienda Intal, Barsat East, Masical, Sta Margarita and Taytay 351 2106 School, brgy. Hall , private houses Flood/ landslide 2 22,123,800.00 955,000.00 INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: SUPER TYPHOON “LAWIN” Date: October 20, 2016 Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 225 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 315 kph Movement: Moving West North West at 26kph Rainfall: 450mm for 24 hrs near the center TCWS: 5 Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 3774 16,605 School, brgy. Hall , private houses Flood/ landslide 3 23 5385 888 202,245,000.00 18,222,000.00
  • 52. 52 INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: IN “MANGKHUT) SUPER TYPHOON “OMPONG” Date: September 15, 2018, 1:40AM Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 205kph near the center and gustiness of up to255 kph Movement: Moving West Northwest at 30 kph Rainfall: TCWS: 4 Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 10,332 40,732 School, brgy. Hall , private houses Flood/ landslide 2 14 13,483 2,049 606,802,500.00 113,589,002.5 INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: SEVERE TROPICAL STORM “ULYSSES” Date: November 11, 2020 Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 150 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 205 kph Movement: Moving West Northwest at 15 kph Rainfall: 356.2 millimeters TCWS: Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 7602 26,079 School, brgy. Hall , private houses Flood/ landslide 5 21 15 51,704,000.00 364,770,000.00 INTERNATIONAL NAME/COMMON NAME: TROPICAL STORM “MARING” Date: October 11, 2021 Typhoon Category Strength : Maximum sustained winds up to 55kph near the center Movement: Moving West Northwest at 30 kph Rainfall: 5-10 millimeters per hour TCWS: Effects: Affected Barangays Summary of Affected Population Profile of Evacuation Center Summary of Casualties DAMAGES Houses Agri Infra Total Fam Indivl Fam Indivl Evac Area Reason Death Cause Injured Missing Partially Totally All Barangays 150,482,600.00 Table __: Effects of TS Maring Table 8: Biophysical Effects of Typhoon 2013-2021
  • 53. DROUGHT According to PAGASA, droughts in the Philippines are usually influenced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation or ENSO, a phenomenon associated with an increased chance of drier conditions, in contrast to the La Niña event which is associated with an increased chance of wetter conditions. Aside from the observed rainfall changes, the increasing trend in the frequency of occurrence of extreme events, including the episodes of El Nino and La Nina phenomenon, poses threat in the municipality. PAGASA projections revealed that the number of days with maximum temperature greater than 35 °C will increase to 1276 days and 2403 days in 2020 and 2050, respectively. Further, the current observation of dry days for the same time period has reached 8156 while the projected figure is 6498 days in 2020 and 6770 days in 2050. Further, the projected number of days that will pour a rainfall amounting to more than 200 mm will be 33 days in 2020 and 24 days in 2050. Drought in Baggao, Cagayan will have an adverse effect on agriculture, livestock, fishing industry and the wellbeing of the people. This will lead to lesser productivity and will affect the total development system of the municipality. This will likewise result in higher production costs but lesser agricultural yield thus affects supply chain. Aside from the four major hazards identified in the municipality, the Municipal Risk Reduction and Management Office also identified other hazards that the municipality is exposed to, as follows: Vehicular Accidents and Fire Incidence. EARTHQUAKES Earthquakes are caused by the sudden release of slowly accumulated strain energy along a fault in the earth's crust. Earthquakes and volcanoes occur most commonly at the collision zone between tectonic plates. Earthquakes represent a particularly severe threat due to the irregular time intervals between events, lack of adequate forecasting, and the hazards associated with these: 1. Ground shaking is a direct hazard to any structure located near the earthquake's center. Structural failure takes many human lives in densely populated areas. 2. Faulting, or breaches of the surface material, occurs as the separation of bedrock along lines of weakness. 3. Landslides occur because of ground shaking in areas having relatively steep topography and poor slope stability. 4. Liquefaction of gently sloping unconsolidated material can be triggered by ground shaking. Flows and lateral spreads (liquefaction phenomena) are among the most destructive geologic hazards.
  • 54. 54 5. Subsidence or surface depressions result from the settling of loose or unconsolidated sediment. Subsidence occurs in waterlogged soils, fill, alluvium, and other materials that are prone to settle. 6. Tsunamis or seismic sea waves, usually generated by seismic activity under the ocean floor, cause flooding in coastal areas and can affect areas thousands of kilometers from the earthquake center. DROUGHT Drought can be defined in several ways, though it is commonly described as "a long period with no rain, especially during a planting season." Another definition of drought is a deficiency in surface and sub-surface water supplies, and is typically measured in terms of water availability in a defined geographical area. In socioeconomic terms, drought occurs when a physical water shortage begins to affect people, individually and collectively and the area’s economy. Drought is not uncommon in the State of Oregon, and can occur in all parts of the state, in both summer and winter. The environmental consequences also are far-reaching, particularly here in Clatsop County, where it can produce insect infestations in our forests and a reduction in the stream flows that support endangered fish species. In addition, many of our local water supplies are very local, and drought conditions can greatly affect the supply of water we use every day. VOLCANOES Volcanoes are perforations in the earth's crust through which molten rock and gases escape to the surface. Volcanic hazards stem from two classes of eruptions: 1. Explosive eruptions which originate in the rapid dissolution and expansion of gas from the molten rock as it nears the earth's surface. Explosions pose a risk by scattering rock blocks, fragments, and lava at varying distances from the source. 2. Effusive eruptions where material flow rather than explosions is the major hazard. Flows vary in nature (mud, ash, lava) and quantity and may originate from multiple sources. Flows are governed by gravity, surrounding topography, and material viscosity. Hazards associated with volcanic eruptions include lava flows, falling ash and projectiles, mudflows, and toxic gases. Volcanic activity may also trigger other natural hazardous events including local tsunamis, deformation of the landscape, floods when lakes are breached or when streams and rivers are dammed, and tremor-provoked landslides.
  • 55. HUMAN-INDUCED HAZARD PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCIES Public health emergencies are situations where health or medical circumstances exists that can affect an entire population usually through shared interactions, or community spaces. They can be defined as much by their health consequences as by their causes and precipitating events. These emergencies are situations whose scale, timing, or unpredictability threatens to overwhelm routine capabilities, and require additional or extraordinary measure to contain or eliminate to ensure the safety of the public. The severity of a public health emergency is often measured by the number of people affected by its geographical extent, or the disease or death of the pathogenic process which it originates. Communicable disease is perhaps the most common form of public health emergency. These diseases are those conditions that can be spread to others through air, touch, or contact with contaminated body fluids. Some of the most common communicable diseases are chlamydia, hepatitis A, B and C, giardia, salmonella, pertussis and campylobacter. 1. EPIDEMIC/PANDEMIC a. Dengue The Municipal Health Office (MHO) of LGU Baggao, under the Municipal Epidemiological Surveillance Unit (MESU), has recorded all dengue cases occurred in the municipality. The table below shows the year where most number of dengue cases happened from 2017 to 2021. No Barangay 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 1 Adaoag 2 Agaman Norte 2 2 3 3 Agaman Proper 4 Agaman Sur 1 5 Alba 1 13 6 Annayatan 3 7 Asassi 10 8 Asinga Via 2 1 22 9 Awallan 2 8 10 Bacagan 4
  • 56. 56 11 Bagunot 12 Barsat East 1 7 13 Barsat West 5 14 Bitag Grande 16 15 Bitag Pequeno 2 16 Bunugan 1 1 17 C.Versoza 18 Canagatan 19 Carupian 5 20 Catugay 21 Dabbac Grande 3 2 1 22 Dalin 3 23 Dalla 1 24 Hacienda Intal 14 21 25 Ibulo 26 Imurung 3 27 J. Pallagao 3 28 Lasilat 1 12 24 29 Mabini 1 1 30 Masical 31 Mocag 8 32 Nangalinan 3 33 Poblacion 1 1 34 Remus 1 1 7 35 San Antonio 36 San Francisco 1 1 37 San Isidro 1 1 38 San Jose 1 14 1 39 San Miguel 1 1 1 40 San Vicente 41 Sta. Margarita 2 10 42 Santor 3 43 Taguing 10 3 1
  • 57. 44 Taguntungan 3 45 Tallang 5 1 46 Taytay 1 3 1 47 Temblique 48 Tungel Total 21 175 91 4 8 Among the two hundred ninety-nine, the total death case recorded is six (6) from the following barangays: Asassi-1, Bitag Grande- 1, hacienda Intal-1, Imurung-1 and Taguing-1. b. Novel Corona Virus 2019 In the case of Corona Virus 2019 Pandemic, the MESU has recorded three thousand five hundred seventy-eight (3, 578) recovered/treated cases from 2020 until September 2022. There are two hundred eight (208) recorded deaths from various barangays. Table below shows the distribution of alive and deaths of CoVid-19 of Baggao. No Barangay Alive Death Total Case 2020 2021 2022 2021 2022 1 Adaoag 15 7 1 23 2 Agaman Norte 23 2 2 27 3 Agaman Proper 1 20 5 1 27 4 Agaman Sur 32 3 2 37 5 Alba 1 44 4 3 1 50 6 Annayatan 60 8 3 71 7 Asassi 1 57 7 3 1 69 8 Asinga Via 1 67 5 5 1 79 9 Awallan 3 90 8 2 2 105 10 Bacagan 13 6 3 1 23 11 Bagunot 6 1 1 8 12 Barsat East 67 13 1 81 13 Barsat West 40 5 2 47 14 Bitag Grande 2 113 16 9 2 142 Table 9: Number of Dengue Cases from 2017-2021 (Source: MHO)
  • 58. 58 15 Bitag Pequeno 53 6 4 63 16 Bunugan 32 1 2 35 17 C.Versoza 8 5 13 18 Canagatan 12 1 1 14 19 Carupian 8 2 10 20 Catugay 12 3 15 21 Dabbac Grande 36 1 2 1 40 22 Dalin 1 41 5 2 1 50 23 Dalla 2 76 4 3 85 24 Hacienda Intal 4 139 32 5 2 182 25 Ibulo 1 11 1 13 26 Imurung 1 93 12 8 1 115 27 J Pallagao 18 7 3 28 28 Lasilat 1 83 3 6 93 29 Mabini 21 7 1 29 30 Masical 28 10 2 1 41 31 Mocag 123 25 8 2 158 32 Nangalinan 47 4 51 33 Poblacion 3 211 26 9 2 251 34 Remus 2 149 12 6 1 170 35 San Antonio 1 1 36 San Francisco 79 17 6 1 103 37 San Isidro 58 5 5 1 69 38 San Jose 17 485 50 24 2 278 39 San Miguel 1 20 8 3 1 33 40 San Vicente 9 4 1 14 41 Sta. Margarita 48 12 3 63 42 Santor 1 59 4 3 67 43 Taguing 1 23 7 2 33 44 Taguntungan 1 44 6 3 2 56 45 Tallang 2 225 10 16 253 46 Taytay 5 64 12 5 86 47 Temblique 4 44 3 3 54
  • 59. 48 Tungel 1 113 8 6 128 Total 57 3119 402 177 31 3,786 Most cases were recorded from the three urban barangays lead by Barangay San Jose, followed by Tallang and Poblacion. Greatest number of death is from Barangay san Jose with a total of twenty-six (26) deaths. In the case of animal bites, the total recorded vaccinated patients of the MHO are three thousand three hundred eight (3, 738) from 2019 to October 2022. AFRICAN SWINE FEVER (ASF) VIRUS The African Swine Fever (ASF) Virus occurred in the municipality simultaneously with the occurrence of the CoVid 19 that contributed to the life difficulties of the people of Baggao, both to producers and consumers. Year Barangays Affected Number of Cases 2020 Alba 1 2021 Tembleque Unprocessed Masical 46 hog growers/150 heads Poblacion 2 hog growers/5 heads Bunugan 4 hog growers/10 heads Carupian 55 hog growers/123 heads Bagunot 6 hog growers/12 heads San Vicente 5 hog growers/12 heads August 2022 Taytay 3 VEHICULAR ACCIDENTS Record taken from the Municipal Rescue Team from January 2021 to December 31, 2022, hereunder are the consolidated run for the Calendar Year 2021. There are One Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty (1,960) which are unevenly happened to forty-eight (48) barangays in the municipality. Records show that highest response within the year is vehicular accident which totaled to Table 10: Number of Corona Virus Victims from 2020-2022 (Source: MHO) Table 11: Number of ASF Cases from 2020-2022 (Source: MAO)
  • 60. 60 ninety-three (93); followed by obstetrician case with eighty-seven (87); fall with twelve (12); mauling with eleven (11); stoning with six (6); hacking, with three (3); drowning, burns and stabbing with two (2) cases each; animal bite, goring, strangulation with one (1) each. Out of the total number of road accidents, hereunder is the distribution of occurrences: BARANGAY NO. OF CASES San Isidro 8 San Isidro 6 Poblacion 5 Sta. Margarita 5 Taguntungan 5 Bitag Pequeño 4 Masical 4 Temblique 4 Remus 3 Mocag 3 Bagunot 2 Bitag Grande 2 C. Versoza 2 Dalin 2 Dalla 2 Hacienda Intal 2 FIRE INCIDENCE As per record from the Bureau of Fire Protection of this municipality, fire incidence from Calendar Year (CY) 2019 to June 2021 is fifteen (15) unevenly happened in the different barangays of the municipality as presented in the table below: BARANGAY 2019 2020 2021 2022 (JAN-JUN) San Jose 1 1 1 1 Agaman Proper 1 Hacienda Intal 1 Table 12: Number of Road Accidents from 2021-2022 (Source: MDRRMO)
  • 61. Bitag Grande 1 Poblacion 1 Catugay 1 Agaman Norte 1 Sta. Margarita 1 Mocag 1 Asassi 1 San Francisco (dumpsite) 1 Tallang 1 Remus 1 San Isidro 1 Dabbac Grande 1 TOTAL 5 7 2 4 Origin of the fire are faulty electrical wirings and accidental. Records also shows that the incidents happened during the following months from 2019 to June 2021: MONTH NUMBER OF INCIDENTS January 2 March 1 June 1 August 2 September 4 October 2 November 1 December 2 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Table 13: Number of Fire Incidents per Barangay from 2019-2022 (Source: BFP) Table 14: Fire Distribution per Month from 2019-2021 (Source: BFP)
  • 62. 62 Chemicals are found everywhere. They purify drinking water, increase crop production, and simplify household chores. But chemicals also can be hazardous to humans or the environment if used or released improperly. Hazards can occur during production, storage, transportation, use or disposal. You and your community are at risk if a chemical is used unsafely or released in harmful amounts into the environment where you live, work or play. Hazardous materials in various forms can cause death, serious injury, long-lasting health effects, and damage to buildings, homes and other property. Many products containing hazardous chemicals are used and stored in homes routinely. These products are also shipped daily on the nation's highways, railroads, waterways, and pipelines. TERRORISM Terrorism is the use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of the criminal laws of the Philippines for purposes of intimidation, coercion or ransom. Terrorists bypass established institutions (such as courts), using violence against citizens to force changes in society and force governments to change policies toward their cause. Terrorists might use weapons of mass destruction, which include toxic or poisonous chemicals, disease organisms, dangerous radiation, explosive incendiary or poison gas bombs, grenades, rockets or missiles, mines or similar devices. Terrorists also use traditional weapons such as automatic guns or grenades in armed attacks on targets, but have also used non-conventional means to carry out attacks B. HAZARD ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION CP FORM 1: HAZARD ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION HAZARD PROBABILITY IMPACT AVERAGE PROBABILITY + IMPACT 2 RANK RATE REMARKS RATE REMARKS TYPHOON 5 ST and other weather disturbances frequently pass the municipality 5 Typhoon Ompong in 2018 brought heavy rains and wind speed ranging from 205km/h to 255km/h that caused infrastructure and agricultural damages and 5 1
  • 63. wide spread flooding in the municipality RAIN INDUCED FLOODINGS 5 Baggao is a Flood prone municipality caused by silted river Lying along the various barangays. Surface water flooding is the common scenario. Narrow watervways , accumulation of debries, improper disposal of garbage that clogs the waterways 5 Effects of typhoon ulysses and northeast monsoon caused almost all the barangays flooded from 0.5 to 3m height 5 1 EARTHQUAKE 3 5 Loss and damages to properties (school buildings) 4 3 SOIL EROSION / RAIN-INDUCED LANDSLIDE 4 15 of the 48 barangays are landslide prone due to forest denudation 5 Structural interventions to prevent soil erosion/ landslide 4.5 2 DROUGHT 3 As per report of the NIA and Barangays, several farmers with wide area of rice fields, especialy the non- irrigated are affected with drought 5 Great loss and damages to agriculture in the municipality 4 3