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Creative Bangkok 2014
Takeaway
www.creativebangkok.org
In partnership with:
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Content
Introduction 															3
Testimonials															10
Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES & CREATIVE ECONOMY								 14
	 Bridging the service gap: Thai hospitality and the knowledge economy					 17
Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT										18
	 The Behavioural DNA of Creativity: Insights from Creative Bangkok metaphor interaction 		 21
	 Random associations and the systematic exploration of novelty			 			 24
Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS & DESIGN											25
	 Design thinking is not design: design for non-designers							 29
Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE & TOURISM										30
	 Wanderlust: wandering to every corner of the earth is a way of life					 33
Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES & TECHNOLOGY										34
	     If you start something, finish it	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 38
Day #6 CREATIVITY and THE MIND & SOCIAL INNOVATION								 39
	 Learning in the age of authenticity											42
THANKS																45
Creative Bangkok 2016														48
INTRODUCTION
Flashback on
Creative Bangkok 2014
by Vincent Ribière
Founder of Creative Bangkok
Managing Director of the IKI-SEA
Bangkok University
From October 12th to October 17th 2014 was
held the first edition of Creative Bangkok,
an executive training program aimed at tea-
ching, sharing and enacting best practices on
creative techniques and innovation drawn
from years of research conducted at Bang-
kok University and its partner institutions.
The weeklong program gathered 80 partici-
pants and 50 world-class speakers from the
six continents.
It featured some of the world’s most
innovative organizations: Cirque du Soleil,
NASA, Google, Index Creative Village, Ubisoft,
as well as several internationally-acclaimed
experts from Thailand, such as the Chairman
of TBWA Thailand, Chaipranin Vidsuphol,
architects Duanrit Bunnag and Pitupong
Chaowakul, as Dr. Mechai Viravaidya
(Dr. Condom).
All along these 6 days of creative immersion,
diversity, in all its forms, was used to help
participants discover new disciplines, new
approaches, new people and new cultures.
From molecular cuisine (Le Cordon Bleu) to
space exploration (NASA), a wide range of
approaches to creativity where shared and
discussed.
The six senses of participants were activated
all along the week but particularly during the
half day WalkShop organized by Daniel
Fraser and his Smiling Albino team, where
participants explored, through a creativity
lens, some of the ancient neighborhoods of
Bangkok, surrounded by a colorful, flavored
and soundscape atmosphere.
The theme of this first edition was Traditions
and Modernity.
3
Thailand has a long and rich history,
traditions and culture. A city like Bangkok is a
concrete example that traditions and moder-
nity can cohabit in harmony or in a “Beauti-
ful Chaos” as Dr. Karndee Leopairote nicely
stated in her presentation on the Creative
Economy as the opening talk. Creativity and
innovation should not be a constant quest
to discover new valuable things ignoring or
forgetting the past. Traditions carry a lot of
value, uniqueness and lessons learned that
can be the source of novel ideas, products,
processes or new businesses. Talented Thai
artists and Designers, like Eggarat Wongcha-
rit (Craftactor), shared how he gets some of
his inspiration from closely looking at nature
and historical and cultural artefacts.
Various team challenges took place to put
participants in front of real creative chal-
lenges, under high constraints. The chal-
lenges were very diverse from creating a
new cocktail recipe using only Thai traditio-
nal herbs and spices, to developing a new
Doughnut concept, under the critical eye of
Nadim Salhani (CEO of Mudman Group (Dun-
kin’ Doughnuts)).
INTRODUCTION
4
What I presented above is just a small portion
of the richness that emerged from the
interactions, collaboration and friendship
developed between participants and
speakers during this week-long event.
A Creative Bangkok report will soon be
released, highlighting, in a more detailed
manner, all the takeaways of this first edition.
Based on the participants’ positive feedback,
we can confidently say that this first edition
of Creative Bangkok was a success.
This unforgettable creative experience will
help each of them to think outside the box
to overcome their challenges and it will also
help them look at their own box through a
completely different lenses.
Creative Bangkok was deemed «a break-
through» in terms of pedagogy and
experience, and is likely to become a yearly
feature of Bangkok’s creative scene. The next
edition of Creative Bangkok is scheduled on
February 21-26th, 2016, don’t miss it! Visit
creativebangkok.org to find out more about
this unique Creative Asia-Pacific program.
As a final note, I would like to thank our stra-
tegic partner, the MOSAIC team (HEC Mon-
treal), from which our CreaBKK inspiration
came from.
A special BIG THANK YOU to our sponsor
Advanced Information Service (AIS),
as well as to our Media partner, Bangkok 101
Magazine, and to all our other supporting
partners. I would also like to particularly
thank the various organizations which welco-
med us for Creative Bangkok;
Index Creative Village (an unforgettable
experience!), Bangkok Art and Culture
Center, Siam Museum, Dupont Innovation
Center, the Chakrawat temple and Bangkok
University.
I am also very thankful to all the speakers
who accepted to join us for this 1st Creative
Bangkok adventure, sometime flying from far
away to be with us. Thanks to our Master of
Ceremony, Francis Gosselin (f. & co) as well as
to Jeremy Joncheray (Studio 923a) for all the
great graphic design materials he developed
for us. Finally, I would like to express my
deepest appreciation to my IKI-SEA team
who put so much efforts and dedication to
make this first edition successfully happen.
MERCI!
INTRODUCTION
CREATIVE
BANGKOK
2014
5
PARTICIPANTS’WELCOMEGIFTS
6
CREATIVEBANGKOKTEAM
Vincent Ribière
Founder of Creative Bangkok
Managing Director of the IKI-SEA
Naphunsakorn (Ronnie)
Waiyawuththanapoom
Open Innovation Strategist
iKI-SEA
Laddawan Leesakun
Client Services Manager
IKI-SEA
Francis Gosselin
Founding partner
f. & Co.
Kudaboon Kirtiputra
Digital Content Manager
IKI-SEA
Jeremy Joncheray
Graphic designer
Founder
Signes du quotidien
Valaiporn Isan
Coordinator
IKI-SEA
7
PARTICIPANTS’FEEDBACK
50
SPEAKERS
10
WORKSHOPS
6
SOCIAL
ACTIVITIES
6
TEAM
CHALLENGES
11
NATIONALITIES
77
PARTICIPANTS
Key facts about
CreaBKK 2014
Participants’ overall
satisfaction with CreaBkk
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
5.6
8
CERTIFICATE
Vincent Ribière
Managing Director of IKI-SEA
Patrick Cohendet
Co-Director Mosaic
THIS CERTIFICATE IS AWARDED TO
Creative Bangkok 2014
organized by the Institute for Knowledge and Innovation
Southeast Asia (IKI-SEA) - Bangkok University
in partnership with Mosaic - HEC Montreal
Bangkok, October 12th-17th, 2014
On having participated to
a Wold-class Innovative Management Workshop
XXXX XXXX
9
PARTICIPANTS’TESTIMONIALS
Dr. Juan Roman
NASA
USA
Brigitte Carbonneau
Cirque du Soleil
Canada
Francis Gosselin
f. & Co.
Canada
Arthur Shelley
Organizational Zoo
Australia
’’ ’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’
’’
’’
	 Creative Bangkok
was an extraordinary event
that helped me think about
Creativity and Innovation in a
complete different way. It is a
great learning and networking
opportunity with distinguished
thought leaders and practitio-
ners in different relevant busi-
ness areas.
A must attend event!
	 Creative Bangkok was
a success in term of networking,
content presented, internatio-
nal speakers, rich exchanges in
between participants. Creative
Bangkok is for sure the not-
to-miss event in creativity and
innovation in the Asia-Pacific
region.
	 Creative BAngkok was
an amazing participatory expe-
rience. It gave us a fantastic
opportunity to learn about crea-
tivity and to discover Bangkok
and new Cultures. It was a truly
International experience.
	 Participating in Creative
Bangkok was literally a mindset
altering experience. The people
involved extended the scope
and reach of my network and
stimulated me
confidence to express my
creativity more confidently. I am
certain this will enable me
to perform at a higher level.
TESTIMONIALTESTIMONIAL TESTIMONIALTESTIMONIAL
10
Marjan Modara
Kingdom of Bahrain
Alexandra Lederer
Genea
Australia
Paul Hector
UNESCO
France
Preecha Chaochotechuang
Double P Marketing
Communications
Thailand
’’ ’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’
’’
’’
	 I was really impressed
and very thankful that
I made the decision of joining
Creative Bangkok and experien-
cing this highly
professional event and
meeting and building a network
of a high caliber
standard.
	 Creative Bangkok was
the best business event I have ever
attended. These few days
were a storm of innovative practice
sharing, an immense opportunity
to meet and network with the
most innovative minds from across
the world. Each morning
I thought ‘this is it, they can’t do
better than yesterday’ and yet,
they did! Day after day,
presentation after presentation,
my mind filled with enriching sha-
ring of experiences
and discussions, whilst
discovering an ‘other’ Bangkok. If
there’s one event to attend
in the next year, it’s that one.
	 Creative Bangkok was a
conference like none other! The
sessions, the atmosphere,
generous presenters, brilliant
and knowledgeable partici-
pants, team puzzles and
more.... got me excited, enga-
ged. I really feel empowered
with knowledge, resources
and a renewed outlook to take
on challenges I wouldn’t have
considered before.
	 I learned a great deal
from Creative Bangkok.
It opened up new horizons.
PARTICIPANTS’TESTIMONIALS
TESTIMONIAL TESTIMONIAL
11
Alex Suesserott
Thailand
Patrick Cohendet
Mosaic, HEC Montreal
Canada
Lucy Stojak
Mosaic, HEC Montreal
Canada
Benjamaporn Boonsiriya
PTTEP
Thailand
’’ ’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’
’’
’’
	 CreaBKK was a smor-
gasbord of insights on how
creativity brings life to our
world, from the artistic to the
pragmatic, the mundane to the
visionary, the elemental to the
revolutionary. We had the pri-
vilege to learn from people who
made stuff happen and
enrich our world across disci-
plines and continents, indus-
tries and cultures, the altruistic
to the commercial. An event
that makes you feel glad to be
alive!
	 A unique experience, an
amazing journey in the heart of
creativity triggering all our
human senses, the encounter
with a community of captivated
and passionate people and the
wonderful experience of the Thai
hospitality. Creative Bangkok
contributed to change my
professional life, my research and
my teaching.
	 An inspiring program
that disconnects you from your
own reality, arouses your
senses, and enables you to
re-invent yourself & improve
your own creative capacity.
	 I had a wonderful expe-
rience being part of the Creative
Bangkok 2014. This is an excellent
event! This event gave me a chance
to learn from great speakers from
many countries who have wealth
of expertise and knowledge. It also
give me a chance to participate in
wonderful workshops ,meet and
interact with diverse group of
people. The creative team chal-
lenge was a wonderful learning
experience for me. This event
provides me new ideas and evolves
my creativity. The Creative Bang-
kok 2014 really was an incredible
experience.
TESTIMONIALS
TESTIMONIALTESTIMONIAL
12
Madan Rao
Asian Media Information
and Communication Centre
(AMIC) India
Nick Walter
One Pulse
United Kingdom
’’ ’’
’’
’’
	 This is an absolutely
certainly definitely
*MUST ATTEND* event for me
every year!
	 Creative Bangkok 2014
was one of the best business
events I have attended. Great
speakers, amazing energy, a lot of
fun and some interesting discovery
make this event a must for anyone
in a creative position that wants to
expand their mind. I can’t wait for
2016!
TESTIMONIALS
TESTIMONIAL
13
Day #1
CREATIVITY IN SERVICES
& CREATIVE ECONOMY
Creative lounge
Bangkok University
14
THE CREATIVE ECONOMY: CREATIVE
THAILAND
Dr. Karndee Leopairote
Thammasat Business School
Thailand
THE SERVICE INDUSTRY THE MOST
CREATIVE INDUSTRY THERE IS
Fredrik Härén
Author and speaker on Busi-
ness Creativity
Singapore
CHANGING THE HOSPITAL PATIENT
EXPERIENCE
Nutcharee Jungvanichar
Bumrungrad International
Hospital
Thailand
SOS CREATION! CONNECTING INNOVA-
TORS
Alexandra Lederer
Genea
Australia
Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES  CREATIVE ECONOMY
’’ ’’ ’’ ’’
’’ ’’ ’’
’’
	 My background is in
engineering where efficiency
comes first, arts come second
or perhaps last but now I have
changed. Now I feel arts and
cultures are no longer additio-
nal features or decoration but a
life commodity.
	 Great customer service
isn’t getting what you want.
The best customer service there
is is when you go in and you
don’t get what you ask for. You
get something that you didn’t
understand that you want. Asia
is the best place in the world to
be for creativity.
	 Patient experience
improves your practice.
Communication improves both
the patient and care provider
experience. At the end of the
day, improving patient expe-
rience and communication is
just the right thing to do.
	 Human nature is saying
that it should be easier for you
to say “I need help” and it is
hard to say “I can help”.
Sometimes you don’t know
what you know.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
15
’’
’’
’’ ’’
’’
’’
’’
’’ ’’
’’
FOOD OF THOUGHT
Dr. Helen Paige
The Paige Group
Autralia
INNOVATION  CREATIVITY IN THAI-
LAND’S, CULINARY LANDSCAPE
Chef Duangporn Songvisava
Bo.Lan Restaurant
Thailand
“CREATIVE EFFERVESCENCE” DECONS-
TRUCTION OF A MOSCATO ROSÉ WIN
Christophe Mercier 
Chef Willy Daurade
Le Cordon Bleu Dusit
Culinary School
Thailand
CREATIVE MIXOLOGY
Joseph Boroski 
Carson Kieffer
Sip Slowly
Thailand
Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES  CREATIVE ECONOMY
	 It doesn’t matter if
you’re in Innovation or any
other field but as long as you
talk about foods, people are
interested. Why not use food to
build a strong relationship in
teams.
	 Revolutions of
innovative technology
(Ingredients availability,
Seasonality, Endanger) affect
how we eat and cook in
Thailand and around the world.
From food producers to consu-
mers, from primary consumers
to ready-to-eat consumers, from
sophisticated consumers to
“yes” consumers.
(Price vs Value).
	 Food is about mood,
not just nutrition or filling your-
self up.
	 A good bartender even
designs good bartops!
	 We don’t sell drinks or
food; what we sell is guest expe-
rience.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
16
SpeakingatCreativeBangkok,professorKarndee
Leopairote asks that we focus not only on the
creative industries, but on the creative economy
as a whole. A policy expert, Dr. Karndee evokes
the «beautiful chaos» of Bangkok, and takes a
service approach to the smart city: «Bangkok is
a city of 12M that was planned for 5M», she says.
The notion of service thus becomes essential
to smoothing the relationships between indivi-
duals, institutions and infrastructure, in terms of
public policy in the field of urban design.
Very few countries can compare to Thailand
when it comes to service and hospitality.
Fredrik Haren is a world traveler that knows a
thing or two about service. He takes a few stabs
at the systems and cultures that seem unable
to take user experience to the next level. «For a
long time», he says, «Amsterdam’s Schiphol air-
port was one of the best in the world. The guys
from Changi airport came to observe, analyse
and brought back what would make for a 21st
century airport. Today, Singapore has overtaken
Schiphol by a landslide. And what are the Dutch
doing? Nothing.» When it comes to service, com-
placency, routine and optimization have taken
over the willingness for improvement. Managers
look at their biased dashboards and take pride in
«satisfaction rates» in the higher 90s. When 97%
of your customers say your service is
outstanding, they’re probably lying.
Or the question is not formulated correctly.
Or you’re in Cuba.
Caring and the culture of helping
A brief overview of the co-creation and service
design orientation at the Bumrungrad
international Hospital is revealing. Equipped
with a «cultural sensitivity office», Bumrungad
has referral offices in 16 countries. Operating at
approximately 1/10th of the cost of American
hospitals, it is with held to standards equivalent
or higher than its occidental counterparts. It is
interesting to note that, in parallel, some of the
work done in the «Fabrique de l’Hospitalité»
— a French living lab dedicated to the explora-
tion of hospitality in healthcare — is much in line
with Bumrungad Hospital’s thinking.
We are moving towards a knowledge economy,
that much we know. And while most are working
to move out from a culture of mass production,
top-down management and one-size-fits-all so-
lutions, emerging countries’ organizations are
finding creative solutions from the get go.
They embed service design and hospitality into
their organizational DNA.
The creative stage is set : more social, more
meetings, more humans, coming up with more
sophisticated concepts, to produce functional
solutions, in a context of beautiful chaos… in
that new theatre, one of empathy, service design
and hospitality, Thailand is set to take a bigger
role, fast.
Bridging the service gap: Thai
hospitality and the knowledge
economy
by Dr.Francis Gosselin
Dr.Francis Gosselin
Full article at:
ww.fandco.ca
17
Day #2
CREATIVITY IN MEDIA
 ENTERTAINMENT
Index Creative Village
18
’’’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’
’’ ’’
THE HISTORY AND FUNDAMENTAL
NOTIONS OF CREATIVITY
Patrick Cohendet
HEC Montreal
Co-Founder of MOSAIC
Canada
Kreingkrai Kanjanapokin
Co-CEO of
Index Creative Village
Thailand
JAZZ  CREATIVITY
Madanmohan Rao
Journalist, author, blogger
and consultant in media and
management
India
HOW DID UBISOFT SINGAPORE
FOSTER INNOVATION
Justin Farren
Ubisoft
SIngapore
Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA  ENTERTAINMENT
	 In the 21st century,
creativity becomes a way of
doing as a collective citizen with
the democratization of ideas
that support the creation of
wealth.
	 If you know Bangkok or
Thailand, you will know how
special and how unique it is.
Bangkok has been a creative
city for centuries. Today Bang-
kok is more than the center of
Thailand as it also became the
center of ASEAN.
	 The first thing music will
do to you is opening up your
ideas. It is not just getting an
idea butit is unlearn and
rejuvenate the ideas, that is the
hard one.
	 Collaboration at the
core and commitment
to creativity, we are planting
some seeds, and with luck we’ll
see some interesting “flowers”
come up.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
19
’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’ ’’
CREATIVE METAPHOR INTERACTIONS
TO UNDERSTAND
THE BEHAVIOUR OF INNOVATION
Arthur Shelley
Organazitional zoo
Australia
ADAPTING CREATIVITY TO REACH OUT
OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE
Brigitte Carbonneau
Director Business Strategy –
Cirque du Soleil
Canada
CREATIVITY AT TBWA
Chaipranin Visudhipol
Chairman and Chief Client
Service – TBWATHAILAND
Thailand
Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA  ENTERTAINMENT
	 Culture is an outcome of
the behavioral interactions in
your environment.
	 Managers need adapta-
bility, curiosity, courage
and transformational
leadership to succeed in the
global economy.
	 Creativity is not just a
skill but an attitude,
a rebellious desire to be
different.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
20
Participants of Creative Bangkok 2014 engaged in a
creative metaphor interaction to assess the impact of
behaviour on creativity. Each metaphorical character
from The Organizational Zoo represents a behaviour
and collectively these can be used to profile what the
“behavioural DNA of creativity” looks like. Partici-
pants engaged in a fun atmosphere through stimu-
lating constructive conversations about the impact of
behaviour on creativity.
The metaphor enabled participants to discuss the
behaviours separately and without reference to spe-
cific people (making it a safe way to discuss beha-
viour). Limited exposure to the characters before the
intervention enables participants to intuitively make
sense of the behaviour and engage with others about
how that behaviour impacts for the specific context
of creativity.
This approach involves minimal preconception and
opens the interaction for maximal challenges to pro-
duce a genuine collective set of data. It can be seen
that there is a variety in what behaviours people
like, and don’t like, when creatively interacting. The
metaphor character cards enabled people to engage
in constructive conversations about the impact of
behaviour. The key point is it not the actual cards
selected, it is the insights and understanding of what
others appreciate or dislike, gained though these ex-
changes that enable better relationships. Armed with
these insights, you can be more creative together.
Context: Creative people exchanging perspectives
on the impacts of behaviour on creativity.
Creative Bangkok in October 2014 was the first im-
mersive experience in Asia inspired by the Mosaic
Creativity Summer School. From the beginning it was
an emergent, interactive and participative
experiment. Deliberately people from a range of disci-
plines were invited to come together and
explore what creativity is and how they could do this
more effectively by collaborating and challenging
each other.
Approach
The participants of Creative Bangkok 2014 engaged in
assessing what “animals” (Organizational Zoo
metaphor characters representing behaviours) sti-
mulated creativity and which were detrimental to
it. The Organizational Zoo (Shelley 2007) character
cards were used as the 26 metaphor characters
collectively represent the most common behaviours
observed in organisations, thereby providing a
useful intervention that is both intuitive and fun
(Shelley 2011). The tool has been effectively used to
stimulate constructive conversations about the im-
pact of behaviour on outcomes in a range of
contexts including leadership, collaboration and
conflict. The metaphor enables participants to
discuss the behaviours separately and in isolation to
reference to specific people. Limited exposure
to the characters before the intervention enables par-
ticipants to intuitively make sense of the
behaviour and engage with others about how that
behaviour impacts for the specific context of
creativity. This approach involves minimal pre-
conception and opens the interaction for maximal
challenges to produce a genuine collective set of
data. A very quick quiz was used to highlight just how
easily recognised some of the behavioural
stereotypes can be recognised. A cartoon image of a
Lion in a personified scene is displayed and the
facilitator asks the audience what behaviours they
think this represents in single words and short
phrases. Very quickly they responded with words
including “Leader”, “Command”, “Control”, Fierce”,
Territorial”, Egotistical” and phrases like “King of the
jungle”. Other figures are similarly shown (including
a Bee - collaborative team work and Owl, suppor-
tive knowledgeable mentor, etc) to build confidence
that their immediate intuition about the behaviours
represented were valid. That is, their initial emotive
reaction to the metaphor was real and able to be used
by them in the discussion about behavioural impacts
(despite them having different preferences for the
behaviours- see later).
After the introductory quiz, participants were asked
(in small groups) to allocate five character cards into
each of four categories, as they thought appropriate
for the context of being creative:
- Expected (behaviours required for creative out-
comes)
- Desired (behaviours not absolutely required, but
have positive influence on creativity)
The Behavioural DNA
of Creativity: Insights from
Creative Bangkok metaphor
interaction
Dr. Arthur Shelley
The Organizational Zoo
21
- Tolerated (behaviours not ideal or desirable, prefer
not to be displayed)
- Not Tolerated (behaviours which have a strong
disruptive impact on creativity)
After five characters were selected for each category,
six characters were left out (26 characters used in to-
tal). These are not considered better or worse that
those selected, just not as applicable to this context
or as being less relevant to the question.
The nine groups were given just 20 minutes to sort the
cards. Then participants walked around to
observe other groups’ outputs and discuss similari-
ties and differences. A high level analysis of the ove-
rall patterns of selection is in the table.
Selection	
  outcome	
   #	
  
Char’s	
  
Names	
  of	
  characters	
  selected	
  
Likely	
  collective	
  impact	
  of	
  this	
  grouping	
  on	
  environment,	
  
based	
  characters’	
  salient	
  properties.	
  
All	
  groups	
  selected	
  as	
  
positive	
  
(Expected	
  or	
  Desired)	
  
4/26	
  
15%	
  
Bee,	
  Eagle,	
  Gibbon,	
  Quercus	
  
Collaborative	
  teamwork	
  with	
  inspirational	
  leadership	
  and	
  
a	
  fun,	
  trusted	
  and	
  philanthropic	
  environment.	
  
Most	
  groups	
  selected	
  as	
  
positive	
  (none	
  selected	
  
negative)	
  
3/26	
  
12%	
  
Insect	
  (beneficial),	
  Mouse,	
  Owl	
  
Cross-­‐pollinating	
  ideas	
  sharing,	
  with	
  mentoring/nurturing	
  
approach	
  and	
  productive	
  task	
  completion	
  orientation.	
  
Mainly	
  positive	
  
perceptions	
  	
  
with	
  some	
  negative	
  
3/26	
  
12%	
  
Ant,	
  Unicorn,	
  Whale	
  
Productivity	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  slightly	
  off	
  mainstream	
  or	
  
idealistic,	
  whilst	
  incorporating	
  intelligent	
  technology.	
  
Balance	
  of	
  positive	
  and	
  
negative	
  perceptions	
  
4/26	
  
15%	
  
Dog,	
  Kid,	
  Lion,	
  Yak	
  
Loyalty,	
  naivety	
  with	
  some	
  control	
  and	
  command/process	
  
with	
  enthusiasm	
  (even	
  if	
  a	
  little	
  prone	
  to	
  errors).	
  
Mainly	
  negative	
  
perceptions	
  	
  
with	
  some	
  positive	
  	
  
2/26	
  
12%	
  
Vulture,	
  Xbreed	
  
Propensity	
  to	
  criticise	
  others	
  and	
  some	
  arrogance	
  about	
  
cleverness	
  or	
  value	
  of	
  own	
  ideas.	
  
Most	
  groups	
  selected	
  as	
  
negative	
  (none	
  selected	
  
positive)	
  
10/26	
  
38%	
  
Chameleon,	
  Feline,	
  Hyena,	
  Insect	
  (pestiferous),	
  Jackal,	
  
Nematode,	
  Piranha,	
  Rattlesnake,	
  Sloth,	
  Triceratops.	
  
Predominated	
  by	
  political	
  and	
  silo-­‐group	
  interests	
  rather	
  
the	
  open	
  sharing	
  with	
  all.	
  High	
  level	
  of	
  aggression	
  and	
  
competition	
  or	
  change	
  resistant	
  disengagement.	
  
All	
  groups	
  selected	
  as	
  
negative	
  
(Tolerated	
  or	
  Not	
  
Tolerated)	
  
0/26	
  
	
  
None	
  
	
  
Insights
It is clear there are definite patterns in what people
DO like for creativity, with Bee, Eagle, Gibbon and
Quercus being selected buy every group and Bene-
ficial Insect, Mouse and Owl being perceived as po-
sitive when selected (though not selected at all by
some groups). There is slightly greater diversity in
what people tolerate or find disruptive (12), compa-
red with what is chosen as positive (10) in the creative
context with some being spread across both positive
and negative.
No two groups generated the same output and yet
participants’ could see the logic of each answer in
facilitated conversations about the selections. The
fact that some groups put some characters in positive
and others put it in as a negative generated some rich
exchanges between groups. However, similar discus-
sions occurred earlier within groups as individuals
highlighted why they prefer or found this behaviour
disruptive (for this context). This highlights the in-
herent diversity of perspectives on what behaviour is
helpful and what is not, amongst the individuals and
groups and the value in exchanging these views. The
discussions in selecting which character belonged
to which category were lively and engaging at all
tables, despite differences of opinion. This interac-
tion supports earlier research, in which the metaphor
approach was the was found to enable an engaging
atmosphere of fun and helped to de-politicise the ex-
change of views (Shelley 2012). More vibrant and in-
clusive exchange helps to include more perspectives
and therefore more options to potentially develop.
A useful insight is that three of the four characters se-
lected by ALL groups, were also selected (in another
activity with different people in a different country)
by all groups when asked to characterise optimal lea-
dership (Eagle, Bee and Quercus). It is not surprising
that in this environment and the creative way the
whole conference was led, that Gibbon also emerged
as essential for creativity (thanks largely to Vincent
Ribiere!). Interestingly, in that other activity, there
was also more diversity of opinion around disruptors
than for stimulants of the right environment. Howe-
ver, it is critical to note that many of the behaviours
considered disruptors for leadership and creativity
will be stimulants of other contexts such as prioritisa-
tion (where critique and finding weaknesses in para-
mount to success).
Figure 1 (next page) shows the patterns of similarity
and difference across the selections made by each
group. This is just a short interpretation of the results
(although based on the collective results across 45
participants), so not all aspects of this are able to be
discussed here in depth. However there are some
pointsworthdebatingwithyourfriends. Forexample,
why has the Lion been selected in all four categories
by different groups and not selected at all by half the
groups. Clearly the impact of control and command
behaviour is perceived very differently by different
people. Alternatively, they were reading the context
in a slightly different way (a common challenge in
all organisations). Awareness of these differences of
perception that can stimulate sparks of creativity and
lack of awareness of them can cause conflict. When
leading a creative environment, increasing the awa-
reness of the impact of behaviours in the team and
aligning that through conscious choice with the desi-
red context, enables team to collaborate more pro-
ductively. That is, make conscious choices about how
we behave and interact to secure improved perfor-
mance (in whatever we are trying to achieve). Some-
times critical behaviours are the optimal behaviour.
So it is not “right” or “wrong” behaviour per se - it is
alignment to context that counts most.
Many insights were drawn by the participants in the
conversations at the time and no doubt other insights
can be drawn from this data and nuisances it pres-
22
 
ents. Visualising the data is different ways (photos of
outputs, summary tables and graphic “DNA” image)
provide further stimulants for creative conversations
with others. A key to learning and professional deve-
lopment is to challenge oneself with new ideas and
others’ perspectives and explore the possibilities and
options that emerge. Although you may not agree
with everything you exchange, you get more possibi-
lities to reflect upon and this helps you to see outside
“your box”. That is, challenge your own entrenched
patterns of thought and decision-making to evolve
your capabilities, by adopting or adapting things you
did not know about.
As Theodore Zeldin stated: “The kind of conversation
I like is one in which you are prepared to emerge a
slightly different person.” Are you inclined to act in
lion mode and tell, or open yourself to seek the ideas
of others through gibbon, owl, eagle and bee?
What is worth highli-
ghting is that the interac-
tions in the room were
vibrant and constructive.
The Organizational Zoo
metaphor cards are a fun
and creative way to sti-
mulate dialogue around
the impacts of behaviour
on creativity amongst a
diverse and international
group. When conversa-
tions about behaviour are
actively facilitated in an
open and trusted environ-
ment, they generate posi-
tive outcomes. If the envi-
ronment is not conducive
to inclusive engagement
of different perspectives,
the outcomes are limited
(or even disengaging for those involved and undermi-
ning trust and or intended outcomes).
There is no doubt that this interaction brought
about insights for those involved and helped to build
connections and stronger relationships. Continuing
to stimulate conversations like this amongst your
teams and stakeholders over time, will assist you to
achieve a creative environment and deliver higher
performance. This approach can also be used to faci-
litate in difficult conversations. That is, enable chal-
lenging behavioural aspects of a situation that would
otherwise not be openly talked about! This repre-
sents a real benefit, as being able to proactively and
constructively discuss such matters, is far better than
leaving them to the corrosive corridor conversations
that ultimately damage everyone.
Conclusion
It is important to acknowledge that the final outputs
(tangible results) of such activities are less important
than the outcomes and interactions between the
people involved. It can be seen that there is a variety
in what behaviours people like, and don’t like, when
creatively interacting. Using The Organizational Zoo
metaphor enables people to engage in constructive
conversations about the impact of behaviour and
better align how they interact. The key point is not
theactualcardsselected,itistheinsightsandunders-
tanding of what others appreciate or dislike gained
though these exchanges that enable better relation-
ships. Armed with these insights, you can be more
creative together. Assume what they like, or that they
are just like you, is less effective than engaging in a
quick fun activity that brings you closer to understan-
ding each other. It can highlight differences in pers-
pective that you can each leverage value from. This in
itself can be a source for creativity, if you engage with
open minds around the differences.
Better we understand and leverage these differences
than go into conflict over them.
Dr. Arthur Shelley
www.organizationalzoo.com
23
There are many ways to go about creative
exploration. For centuries, the Western world
evolved under the cult of the One — one God,
one leader, one truth— and became obsessed
with the figure of the lone genius. The Creator. It
does seem logical, then, that the current inte-
rest in the virtues of collective creation would
come as a sort of
intellectual liberation in the West. It brings us
back to notions of community, universality, and
joint accomplishment, ideas that have been
somewhat artificially removed from our cultural
dynamics by two-hundred years of individualis-
tic christianism. Whether or not the collectivist
heritage of Northeastern Asian countries can
benefit from this sudden epiphany is unsure.
Boxing and unboxing creativity
On Creative Bangkok’s second day, speakers co-
vered a variety of ideas relative to the infamous
box of creativity and innovation. A central notion
in the economics of creativity, Arthur Koestler’s
notion of bissociation was introduced by HEC
Montreal’s Prof. Patrick Cohendet as a central
tenet of the deboxing of standard procedures.
Bissociation is the systematic parent of ideation
and serendipity: it is an act of conscious combi-
nation where two (or more) solutions, ideas or
universes collide and form an entirely new third
space.
In the words of TBWA Thailand’s chairman,
Chaipranin Visudhipol, the box is actually situa-
ted very clearly at the bottom of Maslow’s hie-
rarchy of needs. Chaipranin defines the box as a
playground where actors compete on the basis
of physiological and safety needs: most often
physical products, whose main differentiation is
price, and the focus is on tangible results.
Outside the box, companies have an opportu-
nity to explore love  belonging, self-esteem and
the realization of self. In this space, creatives
and their communications partners are explo-
ring feeling and identity, enlarging significance
to the community, the tribe, or the world in its
entirety.
Metaphors
Further along, expanding our horizons can also
be a matter of finding new cognitive spaces
where ideas, words and concepts can collide.
Out of Australia, Arthur Shelley uses a set of
animal cards to facilitate what he calls the
«Organizational Zoo». In a very intuitive manner,
participants are brought to classify typical beha-
viours into categories, so that they can interpret
whether their current structure permits out-of-
box thinking.
Both Ubisoft’s Justin Farren and Cirque du So-
leil’s Brigitte Carbonneau hinted to the power of
considering an object, a subject or a concept as
asserting it is the same as another’s attributes.
From the Canadian multimedia multinational’s
perspective, this is especially true in the pro-
cessing of «transforming» olympic athletes into
artists.
Perhaps the best way to think about boxes
and their constraining power is to wish for new
beginnings. A tabula rasa, indeed, may be the
best context from which to build the greatest
dreams; such was Joseph Schumpeter’s idea
when he wrote of creative destruction.
Only in this context can we rebuild the collective
dynamics that open up new fields of creativity,
by promoting simultaneously the virtues of
random association as well as the systematic
exploration of novelty.
Random associations and the sys-
tematic exploration of novelty
By Dr Francis Gosselin
Full article at:
www.fandco.ca
24
Day #3
CREATIVITY IN ARTS
 DESIGN
Bangkok Art  Culture Center
(BACC)
25
’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’ ’’
WELCOME ADDRESS
Dr. Luckana
Kunavichayanont
Director of BACC
Thailand
THE LANGUAGE OF CREATIVITY
Duangrit Bunnag
Founder – DUANGRIT BUN-
NAG ARCHITECT LIMITED
Thailand
IN SEARCH OF THAI CRAFTOLOGY
Eggarat Wongcharit
CEO/Creative Director at Craft
Factor Co., Ltd.
Thailand
Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS  DESIGN
	 BACC is truly the place
for art lovers. The keywords are
openness and co-construction,
we have been doing that since
the campaign has started, to
get as many people involved in
the process including artists,
stakeholders, public
and politicians.
	 The past and the future
are shaped by us.
Keep yourself open for the
power of possibility.
	 Visualization, testing
and prototyping help transfer
patterns across categories of
domains.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
26
’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’
’’
CREATIVITY AT COTTO
Anuvat Chalermchai
Brand Director of Tra Chang
and COTTO
Thailand
IS CREATIVITY AN INBORN TALENT?
Amornrat Pratoomma
Dermatoglyphicist – Panya-
tara Potential Analysis Centre
(P-PAC)
Thailand
THE ART OF DESIGN THINKING
Cees de Bont
Dean of School of Design
Hong-Kong Polytechnic Uni-
versity
Hong-Kong
Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS  DESIGN
	 Effective design is a
combination of innovation,
integrity, co-creation and hassle
free offerings for
customers.
	 Creativity involves two
processes: thinking, then produ-
cing. If you have ideas, but don’t
act on them, you are imagina-
tive but not creative. Being ima-
ginative is having ideas; being
creative is converting ideas into
production.
	 You contribute to the
world by making meaningful
things, not just new things.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
27
’’ ’’ ’’ ’’
’’ ’’
’’
DESIGNING CREATIVE SPACES
Pitupong Chaowakul
Founder, Supermachine Stu-
dio, Bangkok
Thailand
INNOVATIVE INSIGHTING  IDEATING
Aaron “A” Palileo
Co-Founder of Bootleg
Innovation Design
Philippines
THINKING IN PICTURES;
A RAPID VISUALIZATION WORKSHOP
Jeff Hamilton
Creo-modo
Thailand
CREATIVITY  CONDOMS
Mechai Viravaidya
Mechai Viravaidya Foundation
Thailand
Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS  DESIGN
	 Playground is always for
kids, what about adults? When
you think of several types of
playground, they always look
small and very colorful. They’ve
never thought about adults that
used to be kids and want to play
as well.
	 Creativity =
Differ + Deliver + Delight
Creativity needs to be different.
It’s not enough to be different,
it has to deliver[...]. So, it has to
be different but it has to work.
Those two things are classic
definitions of creativity.
	 How to make people
understand there’s a problem
and a solution needs to be crea-
ted. One of the way that we do it
is by drawing.
	 Take NO as a question.
Never take NO as an answer.
’’
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
28
There are 1.5M being trained in design in China
right now». Dean at the Hong Kong Polytechnic
University, Cees de Bont holds a Ph.D. in indus-
trial design. «We are teaching these students
design, but its not clear what they’ll do later.
Design has become a pervasive skill. Indeed,
the pervasiveness of design processes is making
its way in all fields and may have a durable
influence in how companies are managed, pro-
ducts are conceived, and what workplaces look
like.
The inclusion of design in traditional work prac-
tices makes a strong statement. It is pervasive in
the commercialisation of art, as well as archi-
tecture, engineering, social science and finance.
Consulting firms like my own include it as part of
their service offerings, deploying design thin-
king methodologies that can generate business
results.
Design is changing
Through interaction with other disciplines, a
process of mutual enrichment has started occur-
ring: design practices themselves have changed.
In design schools all over the world, the rigour
of design training has taken to new heights,
encompassing elements that relate to context
(knowledge intensive), purpose (social innova-
tion) and nature (designers as facilitators).
In this last instance, I wrote in Metamorphosis
and People of the valley, how biomimicry is in-
creasing in popularity and applicability, thanks
to advances in the fields of scientific research
and computing science. The invention of the
Japanese Shinkansen bullet trains sets the bar
high in these terms.
The ROI of design
In October 2014, De Bont spoke in Creative
Bangkok of the new Hong Kong Poly Design
School building. Designed and built by Iranian
architect Zaha Hadid, the building cost five
times more than a regular building would have
in similar conditions. But it was, says its Dean,
worth every penny.
We are starting to see clear results of how
investments in design can yield real dollar
results down the road; through talent attraction
certainly, but also via increased productivity
through ergonomy, physical efficiency of circula-
tion as well as inspiration through beauty.
Integrating design in new fields promises to
yield results that are zeroing in on the idea of
interaction, a notion central to every contempo-
rary product, service and experience.
It will make our private and public endeavours
both more useful, but also more pleasant and
humane. And like many other surprising com-
binations, it will yield things that we do not
expect, nor can even imagine.
And if the increasing popularity of this new
nomadism is any indication of things to come,
we better start developing the reflexes to engage
with them.
Design thinking is not design:
design for non-designers
Dr Francis Gosselin
Full article at:
www.fandco.ca
29
Day #4
CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE
 TOURISM
Bangkok Old City
Museum Siam
30
’’
’’
’’
’’
’’
’’6 SENSES OF SIMPLE LUXURIES
WALKSHOP IN OLD CITY BANGKOK
Daniel Fraser
Founder  Director
Smiling Albino
Thailand
WELCOME ADDRESS AND TOUR OF
MUSEUM SIAM
Sukumal Phadungsilp
Museum Siam
Thailand
VERY THAI
Philip Cornwel-Smith
Author, Very Thai: Everyday
Popular Culture
Thailand
Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE and TOURISM
	 To make it more
efficient, from time to time we
actually hire Bangkok Mass
Transportation to take us
around. That is kind of our way
trying to be as eco-friendly as
much as possible while still
trying to be practical.
	 Now you can use
technology to turn
back time.
	 Thai street food - How
Thai street culture might be
able to tell us something about
creativity, how they manage to
move a kitchen and a restau-
rant to around the streets on
three wheels and how they fit
all those tools, the chairs and
the gas tank and the foods and
everything into it.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
31
’’ ’’
’’
’’
BLOGGER OUTREACH
AND ENGAGEMENT
Olivier Dombey
Managing Director of Digital
Innovation Asia (DIA)
Thailand
CREATIVITY SCHOOL:
FROM BANGKOK TO MONTREAL
Lucy Stojak
Director, Summer School on
Management of Creativity in
an Innovation Society
Canada
Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE and TOURISM
	 To measure success,
look at metrics beyond just
online traffic.
Working with bloggers before
cooperation. Make clear your
goals for the project. Ask for
input, work together - blogger
knows audiences. Build the
relationship, develop trust.
	 Creativity is a crossroad
of Arts, Science, Technology and
Business.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
32
While worldwide mobility has increased ma-
nyfold over the last century, frequent travellers
remains somewhat of a social oddity that pro-
duces amazement and envy. No matter how
many copies of National Geographic you own, or
how often you search for the seven wonders of
the world on Google Images, long-distance, tran-
satlantic travel has remained the exception,
not the rule.
Rotting in your office
It wasn’t until very recently though that I realized
that, while it is very fun to travel to somewhere
for work, some people have actually turned this
into a lifestyle. But between these highly creative
people — whom Richard Florida would call
bohemians — and myself, a striking difference:
the place where they are does not affect their
ability to do the work.
They are, in other words, nomads. Digital no-
mads.
One of them is my friend Daniel Mireault, with
whom I had the chance to connect while in
Chiang Mai, in the north of Thailand. Daniel is
a Montreal-based designer who spends several
months a year in Southeast Asia. He prefers the
weather, certainly, but also the lifestyle; it is laid
back, but also more fluid. The city of Chiang Mai
boasts several coworking spaces like the two
Punspace installations, as well as the Transfor-
mative Learning Technologies Lab, in partner-
ship with Stanford University.
In other words, to paraphrase Mashable’s re-
cent piece on the topic, these people travel the
world while you rot in your office. Are they sin-
gularly different from others? Perhaps. The Elite
Daily wrote recently that it may have to do with
people’s DNA… but let’s leave it at that.
Post-modern eugenics isn’t my cup of tea.
Engaging the nomads
A former hotel executive now Managing director
at Digital Innovation Asia, Olivier Dombey knows
a thing or two about engaging with this new ge-
neration of uprooted creatives.
While we may feel admirative and chose to cele-
brate the freedom inherent to the nomad lifes-
tyle, some brands are hoping to take advantage
of these well traveled individuals. As they wander
around the world, these bohemians are ideally
positioned to produce extraordinary content for
travel blogs, are sufficiently influential to provide
credible hotel reviews, and can act as sources of
observations, ideas, and innovations
opportunities.
Wanderlust: wandering to every
corner of the earth is a way of life.
Dr Francis Gosselin
Full article at:
www.fandco.ca
33
Day #5
CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES
 TECHNOLOGY
Dupont Innovation Center
34
’’ ’’ ’’
’’ ’’
’’DESIGNING INNOVATION: CREATIVE
STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS DESIGN
AND INNOVATION
Keith T.E. Tan
Founder and Principal
Consultant of Creative
Nexus Group
Singapore
CREATIVITY IN A DONUT WORLD
Nadim Salhani
Group CEO MUDMAN
Thailand
OPEN INNOVATION
Naphunsakorn (Ronnie)
Waiyawuththanapoom
IKI-SEA
Thailand
Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES  TECHNOLOGY
	 Stories curate expe-
riences. Design is about infinite
possibilities. Design is a mindset
of looking at the world with an
eye to improve the things we do
and the way we do them.
	 Deep down inside I think
there’s an entrepreneurship in
each one of us and everyday it’s
becoming a lifestyle.
	 70%-90% of innovations
fail. Open innovation is the use
of purposive inflows and
outflows of knowledge to
accelerate internal innovation,
and expand the markets for
external use of innovation,
respectively.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
35
’’ ’’ ’’
’’ ’’
’’YOUR IDEA IS MY IDEA
Vincent Ribière
Managing Director of the
Institute for Knowledge and
Innovation SouthEast Asia
(IKI-SEA)
Thailand
INNOVATION PLATFORMS
Thierry Isckia
Professor of Strategic
Management and Innovation
Telecom Business School
France
Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES  TECHNOLOGY
	 Companies need to
connect their Operational Cycle
to their Innovation Cycle. The
basics elements of creativity are
copy, transform and combine
past knowledge.
	 We believe science and
technology are global but inno-
vation is local. That’s why many
countries globally now have
innovation center to work with
customers.
	 Platform thinking =
Software design + Market
design + Agility. Becoming a
platform leader is a very tricky
business. Platform has always
been there. Today everyone is
networked with everything. Just
think about M2M, Machine to
Machine, this will be the value
deposit for the next 10 to 20
years.
MARKET-DRIVEN SCIENCE
AND INNOVATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY
Somchai Laohverapanich
Managing Director,
DuPont Thailand
Thailand
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
’’
’’
THE HISTORY AND FUNDAMENTAL
NOTIONS OF CREATIVITY
Patrick Cohendet
HEC Montreal
Co-Founder of MOSAIC
Canada
	 Ideas are at the core of
the modern economy.
We are not just in the creative
economy, but in the re-creative
economy. Are you a creator or a
re-creator?
36
’’ ’’ ’’
’’ ’’
’’
LEGO SERIOUS PLAY WORKSHOP
FORGING STRATEGY VIA THE POWER OF
METAPHOR
Francis Gosselin
Founding partner of f.  Co.
Canada
INNOVATION at NASA
Juan Roman
NASA
USA
HOW THE SWATCH WAS
DESIGNED  CONCEIVED
Gilles Garel
Professor of innovation
Management at Cnam
France
Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES  TECHNOLOGY
	 We are entering into an
era of a storytelling, urging us
to build narrative, to build a
story around what we do. What
is great about LEGO is that you
can build something that is
already there into a platform,
into a story.
	 Innovation =
Inspiration + Perspiration +
Perseverance. Our mission is to
innovate, to explore, to discover
and to inspire the next genera-
tion of scientists and engineers
and explorers and we take that
challenge and mission very
seriously.
	 All human societies
design. The notion of design is
rooted in different traditions;
art, architecture, engineering,
decision. There is no unified
representation of the design.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
37
Portfolios
Burgeoning enterprises and the entrepreneurs
behind them are in fact acting more and more
like brand portfolio managers; whether develo-
ping horizontally like we have been, or vertically
by adding new products and services with self-
standing identities.
Moreover, products and services are increasingly
internationalized from the get-go, meaning that
entrepreneurs and managers must not only dis-
tinguish between several brands, but must consi-
der how these brands will be constructed in the
minds of various nationalities, ethnic groups and
cultural geographies.
Such is the case of Nadim Salhani, a serial entre-
preneur who spoke at Creative Bangkok 2014.
After spending several years as General Mana-
gers for Starbucks in Thailand, Salhani became
CEO of Mudman, an holding that operates seve-
ral international brands from exclusive licenses:
Dunkin Donuts, Au Bon Pain and Baskin Robbins
among others. Many cities around the world are
populated by such activators.
Questions for wandering minds
Examples such as Salhani’s beg the question:
how do you know when to stop lateral expan-
sion, horizontal exploration, diversification into
new fields, new projects, new possibilities?
Thesedays,asIweightthepossibilityofinvesting
some time and energy in new business opportu-
nities as diverse as an international speakers’ bu-
reau or an e-commerce initiative, I wonder; why
do these things even appear feasible? And where
does it stop?
Another stream of questions concerns the effi-
ciency of a portfolio approach to entrepreneur-
ship ; what if your brands are market rivals to one
or another. Or more probable yet, what if they
rival for your attention? How do you between
chose then? Do you pick the most profitable? The
most amusing? The most promising?
In a VC-backed setting, profit certainly isn’t a cri-
teria you’ll want to aim for, as most firms are in
fact losing money — and lots of it — on a monthly
basis. In this universe, being cashflow positive
signals early death. But amusement isn’t much
better. And promise? Too speculative for some.
With all the noise around VCs, incubators and ac-
celerators, one thing seems certain: brands can-
not live on their own, and no matter the size of
your portfolio, you’ll always need great people to
feed them. Projects, communities, products and
services are no longer conceived at the top and
trickled down to those who benefit from them.
Rather, those are build from the ground up.
A portfolio is only as strong as the ecosystem in
which it exists. And for that purpose, proper rela-
tional curation is probably more important than
any other set of resources; material, financial or
technological.
You can read the full article at:
www.fandco.caIf you start something, finish it.
Dr. Francis Gosselin
38
Day #6
CREATIVITY AND THE MIND
 SOCIAL INNOVATION
Chakrawat Temple
39
’’ ’’ ’’
’’
’’ ’’CREATIVITY  MEDITATION
WORKSHOP
Phramaha Dr. Vichien
Vachirawongso
Thailand - India
MINDFULNESS AT GOOGLE
Johan Segergren
Google
Thailand
THE CREATIVE YOU: ACHIEVING A
WHOLE BRAIN STATE.
Dr Alex Bennet
Bangkok University 
Mountain Quest Institute
USA
Day #6 CREATIVITY AND THE MIND AND SOCIAL INNOVATION
	 Many things in this world
are necessary to know and
unnecessary to know but we
must know and after we know
we can protect ourselves.
	 Search inside yourself!
Employees started to meditate
and reflect on their thinking,
understanding what drives
them to do different things or
why they are acting in a specific
way [...] and describe medita-
tion in the context of coding for
new ages to understand how
the mind works.
	 Shift your frame of
reference. Realize that all you
see around you, the reality we
perceive is a small stage upon
which you act, and within it is
an inner spaciousness that is
infinite. Let’s now explore the
infinite.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
40
’’ ’’ ’’
’’ ’’
’’
PIONEERS OF THE NEW WORLD
Catherine Berthillier
Shamengo.com
France
SOCIAL INNOVATION CANVAS
WORKSHOP
Christian Walter
IKI-SEA
Thailand
ARE YOUR TEAMS FINDING CREATIVE
SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS?
Peter Cauweiler
ASIO Consulting
Thailand
Day #6 CREATIVITY AND THE MIND AND SOCIAL INNOVATION
	 We offer a collaborative
platform where people can
gather and work with a pioneer
to develop their social
innovation.
	 In order to have an
enterprise that can sustain
itself, it should generate reve-
nues but it should also be able
to draw finances and funds from
different sources.
	 Questions are both the
most powerful and most under-
utilized tools for creativity and
intellectual activity.
SPEAKERS’QUOTES
41
As I uncovered various creative perspectives on Bang-
kok this last week, I was treated to a tour organized
by Bangkok’s funkiest travel agency, Smiling Albino.
The company was founded in 1999 by two crazy Ca-
nadians, Scott Coates and Daniel Fraser, to «bring a
unique travel experience […] the result of continuous
travel, innovation and refinement».
Unique, here, is the keyword. As we strolled through
the streets of the City of Angels for a few hours (we
actually loved it so much we called for a second pri-
vate tour a few days later), it truly felt like we were
on an adventure worthy of a Casey Neistat stunt. Yet
it became clear that everyone we met, including our
tour guide, were for real.
The new luxury
Our friend and cllbr Paris correspondent Gregory
Casper likes to think and write about how Gen Y’s
relationship to luxury is very different from that
of previous generations. In Casper’s words, luxury
items have become dissociated from extraordinary
circumstance and are increasingly embedded in our
daily lives. For several individuals, luxurious products
are considered durable investments in their identity;
something they can display, wear, inhabit and pro-
mote as an extension of their public persona.
If luxury as a concept is losing its power as an element
of superficial prestige, it is gaining in other attributes.
The new luxury — from fashion, to travel, to educa-
tion — consists of custom-made, experiential, rela-
tional and narratable experiences. It is the product of
on-going self-appraisal, of learning about oneself and
the world.
Custom-made, experiential, relational and narra-
table
Several luxury brands today have understood the
necessity to exit the system of «quality mass produc-
tion» to enter a new era of specificity where every
item and every experience is unique (or at least, feels
that way). Long gone are the days where, for instance,
luxury travel consisted of 5-star hotels and private dri-
vers to take tourists from their resorts to air-conditio-
ned shopping malls. Today, high end travellers want
to experience something they feel was designed for
them, not for the greater masses: they want to be roc-
ked, sit close to the water, get their shoes and hands
dirty, surrounded by local smells, tastes, sights and
people.
What sets Smiling Albino’s value proposal aside from
other experiential learning programs is their ability to
invent such experiences through continuous interac-
tion with select hosts and service providers.
The same can be said of Creative Bangkok — by all
means, a breakthrough in terms of creative pedagogy
—, sketching a relatable thread between individuals,
venues and activities.
Its guides do so by building sustained relationships
with hosts as well as with adventurers. Rates may be
higher, guests pay willingly, and return in vast num-
bers. In the case of the travel agency, this has led the
company to expand to Nepal, Cambodia, Myanmar
and Vietnam. For Creative Bangkok, this may mean
sustainable leadership in its ability to serve as a
worldwide hub for such further initiatives.
As it looks further to its second edition, Creative
Bangkok has also inspired individuals with an intent
to produce programs in the Philippines, Bahreïn, and
maybe elsewhere. We will be very interested to find
out how Bangkok can play a defining role in the co-
ming of age of Middle Eastern and Asian creativity.
This new type of learning experience promises to de-
liver more in the years to come, with a view towards
genuine and authentic jumps into local realities. In
this new luxury of travel and education, your tour
guide is actually part of the group, hands dirty, eyes
shinny, and fully involved in the action.
We look forward to more. And so should you!
Learning in the age of
authenticity.
Dr Francis Gosselin
Full article at:
www.fandco.ca
42
The non-profit Khlong Toey Music Program
(KTMP) makes it possible for underprivile-
ged kids in Bangkok to learn a life-changing
art, make positive connections with others,
dream big, and have lots of fun in the
process. Through music, kids can open doors
to new opportunities while inwardly building
calmness,presence,joyandadrivetoexpress
themselves.
As part of its contribution to local communi-
ties, Creative Bangkok invited a kid’s band of
the Khlong Toey Music Program to play du-
ring the event. Creative Bangkok was happy
to offer to the kids some new drums as well
as a check to buy some other Music school
necessities.
If you also want to learn more about KTMP
and help this program, please visit:
http://khlongtoeymusicprogram.com
Donation to the Klong Toey Music Program
43
Siam Niramit Bo.Lan River Cruise
Cabbages  Condoms Calypso Cabaret
S O C I A L E V E N T S
44
Creative Bangkok would like to thank its lovely sponsor:
45
A BIG thank you
to all our great
speakers
46
Thank you to all
the participating companies
47
21 26
February
2016
BANGKOK
ASIAN
SYMPOSIUM ON
CREATIVITY  INNOVATION
MANAGEMENT
WWW.CREATIVEBANGKOK.ORG
Unleash your creative potential and its value for your organization
Join us for the next edition of Creative Bangkok
48

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Creative Bangkok 2014 Takeway

  • 2. 2 Content Introduction 3 Testimonials 10 Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES & CREATIVE ECONOMY 14 Bridging the service gap: Thai hospitality and the knowledge economy 17 Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT 18 The Behavioural DNA of Creativity: Insights from Creative Bangkok metaphor interaction 21 Random associations and the systematic exploration of novelty 24 Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS & DESIGN 25 Design thinking is not design: design for non-designers 29 Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE & TOURISM 30 Wanderlust: wandering to every corner of the earth is a way of life 33 Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES & TECHNOLOGY 34 If you start something, finish it 38 Day #6 CREATIVITY and THE MIND & SOCIAL INNOVATION 39 Learning in the age of authenticity 42 THANKS 45 Creative Bangkok 2016 48
  • 3. INTRODUCTION Flashback on Creative Bangkok 2014 by Vincent Ribière Founder of Creative Bangkok Managing Director of the IKI-SEA Bangkok University From October 12th to October 17th 2014 was held the first edition of Creative Bangkok, an executive training program aimed at tea- ching, sharing and enacting best practices on creative techniques and innovation drawn from years of research conducted at Bang- kok University and its partner institutions. The weeklong program gathered 80 partici- pants and 50 world-class speakers from the six continents. It featured some of the world’s most innovative organizations: Cirque du Soleil, NASA, Google, Index Creative Village, Ubisoft, as well as several internationally-acclaimed experts from Thailand, such as the Chairman of TBWA Thailand, Chaipranin Vidsuphol, architects Duanrit Bunnag and Pitupong Chaowakul, as Dr. Mechai Viravaidya (Dr. Condom). All along these 6 days of creative immersion, diversity, in all its forms, was used to help participants discover new disciplines, new approaches, new people and new cultures. From molecular cuisine (Le Cordon Bleu) to space exploration (NASA), a wide range of approaches to creativity where shared and discussed. The six senses of participants were activated all along the week but particularly during the half day WalkShop organized by Daniel Fraser and his Smiling Albino team, where participants explored, through a creativity lens, some of the ancient neighborhoods of Bangkok, surrounded by a colorful, flavored and soundscape atmosphere. The theme of this first edition was Traditions and Modernity. 3
  • 4. Thailand has a long and rich history, traditions and culture. A city like Bangkok is a concrete example that traditions and moder- nity can cohabit in harmony or in a “Beauti- ful Chaos” as Dr. Karndee Leopairote nicely stated in her presentation on the Creative Economy as the opening talk. Creativity and innovation should not be a constant quest to discover new valuable things ignoring or forgetting the past. Traditions carry a lot of value, uniqueness and lessons learned that can be the source of novel ideas, products, processes or new businesses. Talented Thai artists and Designers, like Eggarat Wongcha- rit (Craftactor), shared how he gets some of his inspiration from closely looking at nature and historical and cultural artefacts. Various team challenges took place to put participants in front of real creative chal- lenges, under high constraints. The chal- lenges were very diverse from creating a new cocktail recipe using only Thai traditio- nal herbs and spices, to developing a new Doughnut concept, under the critical eye of Nadim Salhani (CEO of Mudman Group (Dun- kin’ Doughnuts)). INTRODUCTION 4
  • 5. What I presented above is just a small portion of the richness that emerged from the interactions, collaboration and friendship developed between participants and speakers during this week-long event. A Creative Bangkok report will soon be released, highlighting, in a more detailed manner, all the takeaways of this first edition. Based on the participants’ positive feedback, we can confidently say that this first edition of Creative Bangkok was a success. This unforgettable creative experience will help each of them to think outside the box to overcome their challenges and it will also help them look at their own box through a completely different lenses. Creative Bangkok was deemed «a break- through» in terms of pedagogy and experience, and is likely to become a yearly feature of Bangkok’s creative scene. The next edition of Creative Bangkok is scheduled on February 21-26th, 2016, don’t miss it! Visit creativebangkok.org to find out more about this unique Creative Asia-Pacific program. As a final note, I would like to thank our stra- tegic partner, the MOSAIC team (HEC Mon- treal), from which our CreaBKK inspiration came from. A special BIG THANK YOU to our sponsor Advanced Information Service (AIS), as well as to our Media partner, Bangkok 101 Magazine, and to all our other supporting partners. I would also like to particularly thank the various organizations which welco- med us for Creative Bangkok; Index Creative Village (an unforgettable experience!), Bangkok Art and Culture Center, Siam Museum, Dupont Innovation Center, the Chakrawat temple and Bangkok University. I am also very thankful to all the speakers who accepted to join us for this 1st Creative Bangkok adventure, sometime flying from far away to be with us. Thanks to our Master of Ceremony, Francis Gosselin (f. & co) as well as to Jeremy Joncheray (Studio 923a) for all the great graphic design materials he developed for us. Finally, I would like to express my deepest appreciation to my IKI-SEA team who put so much efforts and dedication to make this first edition successfully happen. MERCI! INTRODUCTION CREATIVE BANGKOK 2014 5
  • 7. CREATIVEBANGKOKTEAM Vincent Ribière Founder of Creative Bangkok Managing Director of the IKI-SEA Naphunsakorn (Ronnie) Waiyawuththanapoom Open Innovation Strategist iKI-SEA Laddawan Leesakun Client Services Manager IKI-SEA Francis Gosselin Founding partner f. & Co. Kudaboon Kirtiputra Digital Content Manager IKI-SEA Jeremy Joncheray Graphic designer Founder Signes du quotidien Valaiporn Isan Coordinator IKI-SEA 7
  • 9. CERTIFICATE Vincent Ribière Managing Director of IKI-SEA Patrick Cohendet Co-Director Mosaic THIS CERTIFICATE IS AWARDED TO Creative Bangkok 2014 organized by the Institute for Knowledge and Innovation Southeast Asia (IKI-SEA) - Bangkok University in partnership with Mosaic - HEC Montreal Bangkok, October 12th-17th, 2014 On having participated to a Wold-class Innovative Management Workshop XXXX XXXX 9
  • 10. PARTICIPANTS’TESTIMONIALS Dr. Juan Roman NASA USA Brigitte Carbonneau Cirque du Soleil Canada Francis Gosselin f. & Co. Canada Arthur Shelley Organizational Zoo Australia ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ Creative Bangkok was an extraordinary event that helped me think about Creativity and Innovation in a complete different way. It is a great learning and networking opportunity with distinguished thought leaders and practitio- ners in different relevant busi- ness areas. A must attend event! Creative Bangkok was a success in term of networking, content presented, internatio- nal speakers, rich exchanges in between participants. Creative Bangkok is for sure the not- to-miss event in creativity and innovation in the Asia-Pacific region. Creative BAngkok was an amazing participatory expe- rience. It gave us a fantastic opportunity to learn about crea- tivity and to discover Bangkok and new Cultures. It was a truly International experience. Participating in Creative Bangkok was literally a mindset altering experience. The people involved extended the scope and reach of my network and stimulated me confidence to express my creativity more confidently. I am certain this will enable me to perform at a higher level. TESTIMONIALTESTIMONIAL TESTIMONIALTESTIMONIAL 10
  • 11. Marjan Modara Kingdom of Bahrain Alexandra Lederer Genea Australia Paul Hector UNESCO France Preecha Chaochotechuang Double P Marketing Communications Thailand ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ I was really impressed and very thankful that I made the decision of joining Creative Bangkok and experien- cing this highly professional event and meeting and building a network of a high caliber standard. Creative Bangkok was the best business event I have ever attended. These few days were a storm of innovative practice sharing, an immense opportunity to meet and network with the most innovative minds from across the world. Each morning I thought ‘this is it, they can’t do better than yesterday’ and yet, they did! Day after day, presentation after presentation, my mind filled with enriching sha- ring of experiences and discussions, whilst discovering an ‘other’ Bangkok. If there’s one event to attend in the next year, it’s that one. Creative Bangkok was a conference like none other! The sessions, the atmosphere, generous presenters, brilliant and knowledgeable partici- pants, team puzzles and more.... got me excited, enga- ged. I really feel empowered with knowledge, resources and a renewed outlook to take on challenges I wouldn’t have considered before. I learned a great deal from Creative Bangkok. It opened up new horizons. PARTICIPANTS’TESTIMONIALS TESTIMONIAL TESTIMONIAL 11
  • 12. Alex Suesserott Thailand Patrick Cohendet Mosaic, HEC Montreal Canada Lucy Stojak Mosaic, HEC Montreal Canada Benjamaporn Boonsiriya PTTEP Thailand ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ CreaBKK was a smor- gasbord of insights on how creativity brings life to our world, from the artistic to the pragmatic, the mundane to the visionary, the elemental to the revolutionary. We had the pri- vilege to learn from people who made stuff happen and enrich our world across disci- plines and continents, indus- tries and cultures, the altruistic to the commercial. An event that makes you feel glad to be alive! A unique experience, an amazing journey in the heart of creativity triggering all our human senses, the encounter with a community of captivated and passionate people and the wonderful experience of the Thai hospitality. Creative Bangkok contributed to change my professional life, my research and my teaching. An inspiring program that disconnects you from your own reality, arouses your senses, and enables you to re-invent yourself & improve your own creative capacity. I had a wonderful expe- rience being part of the Creative Bangkok 2014. This is an excellent event! This event gave me a chance to learn from great speakers from many countries who have wealth of expertise and knowledge. It also give me a chance to participate in wonderful workshops ,meet and interact with diverse group of people. The creative team chal- lenge was a wonderful learning experience for me. This event provides me new ideas and evolves my creativity. The Creative Bang- kok 2014 really was an incredible experience. TESTIMONIALS TESTIMONIALTESTIMONIAL 12
  • 13. Madan Rao Asian Media Information and Communication Centre (AMIC) India Nick Walter One Pulse United Kingdom ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ This is an absolutely certainly definitely *MUST ATTEND* event for me every year! Creative Bangkok 2014 was one of the best business events I have attended. Great speakers, amazing energy, a lot of fun and some interesting discovery make this event a must for anyone in a creative position that wants to expand their mind. I can’t wait for 2016! TESTIMONIALS TESTIMONIAL 13
  • 14. Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES & CREATIVE ECONOMY Creative lounge Bangkok University 14
  • 15. THE CREATIVE ECONOMY: CREATIVE THAILAND Dr. Karndee Leopairote Thammasat Business School Thailand THE SERVICE INDUSTRY THE MOST CREATIVE INDUSTRY THERE IS Fredrik Härén Author and speaker on Busi- ness Creativity Singapore CHANGING THE HOSPITAL PATIENT EXPERIENCE Nutcharee Jungvanichar Bumrungrad International Hospital Thailand SOS CREATION! CONNECTING INNOVA- TORS Alexandra Lederer Genea Australia Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES CREATIVE ECONOMY ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ My background is in engineering where efficiency comes first, arts come second or perhaps last but now I have changed. Now I feel arts and cultures are no longer additio- nal features or decoration but a life commodity. Great customer service isn’t getting what you want. The best customer service there is is when you go in and you don’t get what you ask for. You get something that you didn’t understand that you want. Asia is the best place in the world to be for creativity. Patient experience improves your practice. Communication improves both the patient and care provider experience. At the end of the day, improving patient expe- rience and communication is just the right thing to do. Human nature is saying that it should be easier for you to say “I need help” and it is hard to say “I can help”. Sometimes you don’t know what you know. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 15
  • 16. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ FOOD OF THOUGHT Dr. Helen Paige The Paige Group Autralia INNOVATION CREATIVITY IN THAI- LAND’S, CULINARY LANDSCAPE Chef Duangporn Songvisava Bo.Lan Restaurant Thailand “CREATIVE EFFERVESCENCE” DECONS- TRUCTION OF A MOSCATO ROSÉ WIN Christophe Mercier Chef Willy Daurade Le Cordon Bleu Dusit Culinary School Thailand CREATIVE MIXOLOGY Joseph Boroski Carson Kieffer Sip Slowly Thailand Day #1 CREATIVITY IN SERVICES CREATIVE ECONOMY It doesn’t matter if you’re in Innovation or any other field but as long as you talk about foods, people are interested. Why not use food to build a strong relationship in teams. Revolutions of innovative technology (Ingredients availability, Seasonality, Endanger) affect how we eat and cook in Thailand and around the world. From food producers to consu- mers, from primary consumers to ready-to-eat consumers, from sophisticated consumers to “yes” consumers. (Price vs Value). Food is about mood, not just nutrition or filling your- self up. A good bartender even designs good bartops! We don’t sell drinks or food; what we sell is guest expe- rience. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 16
  • 17. SpeakingatCreativeBangkok,professorKarndee Leopairote asks that we focus not only on the creative industries, but on the creative economy as a whole. A policy expert, Dr. Karndee evokes the «beautiful chaos» of Bangkok, and takes a service approach to the smart city: «Bangkok is a city of 12M that was planned for 5M», she says. The notion of service thus becomes essential to smoothing the relationships between indivi- duals, institutions and infrastructure, in terms of public policy in the field of urban design. Very few countries can compare to Thailand when it comes to service and hospitality. Fredrik Haren is a world traveler that knows a thing or two about service. He takes a few stabs at the systems and cultures that seem unable to take user experience to the next level. «For a long time», he says, «Amsterdam’s Schiphol air- port was one of the best in the world. The guys from Changi airport came to observe, analyse and brought back what would make for a 21st century airport. Today, Singapore has overtaken Schiphol by a landslide. And what are the Dutch doing? Nothing.» When it comes to service, com- placency, routine and optimization have taken over the willingness for improvement. Managers look at their biased dashboards and take pride in «satisfaction rates» in the higher 90s. When 97% of your customers say your service is outstanding, they’re probably lying. Or the question is not formulated correctly. Or you’re in Cuba. Caring and the culture of helping A brief overview of the co-creation and service design orientation at the Bumrungrad international Hospital is revealing. Equipped with a «cultural sensitivity office», Bumrungad has referral offices in 16 countries. Operating at approximately 1/10th of the cost of American hospitals, it is with held to standards equivalent or higher than its occidental counterparts. It is interesting to note that, in parallel, some of the work done in the «Fabrique de l’Hospitalité» — a French living lab dedicated to the explora- tion of hospitality in healthcare — is much in line with Bumrungad Hospital’s thinking. We are moving towards a knowledge economy, that much we know. And while most are working to move out from a culture of mass production, top-down management and one-size-fits-all so- lutions, emerging countries’ organizations are finding creative solutions from the get go. They embed service design and hospitality into their organizational DNA. The creative stage is set : more social, more meetings, more humans, coming up with more sophisticated concepts, to produce functional solutions, in a context of beautiful chaos… in that new theatre, one of empathy, service design and hospitality, Thailand is set to take a bigger role, fast. Bridging the service gap: Thai hospitality and the knowledge economy by Dr.Francis Gosselin Dr.Francis Gosselin Full article at: ww.fandco.ca 17
  • 18. Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT Index Creative Village 18
  • 19. ’’’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ THE HISTORY AND FUNDAMENTAL NOTIONS OF CREATIVITY Patrick Cohendet HEC Montreal Co-Founder of MOSAIC Canada Kreingkrai Kanjanapokin Co-CEO of Index Creative Village Thailand JAZZ CREATIVITY Madanmohan Rao Journalist, author, blogger and consultant in media and management India HOW DID UBISOFT SINGAPORE FOSTER INNOVATION Justin Farren Ubisoft SIngapore Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT In the 21st century, creativity becomes a way of doing as a collective citizen with the democratization of ideas that support the creation of wealth. If you know Bangkok or Thailand, you will know how special and how unique it is. Bangkok has been a creative city for centuries. Today Bang- kok is more than the center of Thailand as it also became the center of ASEAN. The first thing music will do to you is opening up your ideas. It is not just getting an idea butit is unlearn and rejuvenate the ideas, that is the hard one. Collaboration at the core and commitment to creativity, we are planting some seeds, and with luck we’ll see some interesting “flowers” come up. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 19
  • 20. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ CREATIVE METAPHOR INTERACTIONS TO UNDERSTAND THE BEHAVIOUR OF INNOVATION Arthur Shelley Organazitional zoo Australia ADAPTING CREATIVITY TO REACH OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE Brigitte Carbonneau Director Business Strategy – Cirque du Soleil Canada CREATIVITY AT TBWA Chaipranin Visudhipol Chairman and Chief Client Service – TBWATHAILAND Thailand Day #2 CREATIVITY IN MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT Culture is an outcome of the behavioral interactions in your environment. Managers need adapta- bility, curiosity, courage and transformational leadership to succeed in the global economy. Creativity is not just a skill but an attitude, a rebellious desire to be different. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 20
  • 21. Participants of Creative Bangkok 2014 engaged in a creative metaphor interaction to assess the impact of behaviour on creativity. Each metaphorical character from The Organizational Zoo represents a behaviour and collectively these can be used to profile what the “behavioural DNA of creativity” looks like. Partici- pants engaged in a fun atmosphere through stimu- lating constructive conversations about the impact of behaviour on creativity. The metaphor enabled participants to discuss the behaviours separately and without reference to spe- cific people (making it a safe way to discuss beha- viour). Limited exposure to the characters before the intervention enables participants to intuitively make sense of the behaviour and engage with others about how that behaviour impacts for the specific context of creativity. This approach involves minimal preconception and opens the interaction for maximal challenges to pro- duce a genuine collective set of data. It can be seen that there is a variety in what behaviours people like, and don’t like, when creatively interacting. The metaphor character cards enabled people to engage in constructive conversations about the impact of behaviour. The key point is it not the actual cards selected, it is the insights and understanding of what others appreciate or dislike, gained though these ex- changes that enable better relationships. Armed with these insights, you can be more creative together. Context: Creative people exchanging perspectives on the impacts of behaviour on creativity. Creative Bangkok in October 2014 was the first im- mersive experience in Asia inspired by the Mosaic Creativity Summer School. From the beginning it was an emergent, interactive and participative experiment. Deliberately people from a range of disci- plines were invited to come together and explore what creativity is and how they could do this more effectively by collaborating and challenging each other. Approach The participants of Creative Bangkok 2014 engaged in assessing what “animals” (Organizational Zoo metaphor characters representing behaviours) sti- mulated creativity and which were detrimental to it. The Organizational Zoo (Shelley 2007) character cards were used as the 26 metaphor characters collectively represent the most common behaviours observed in organisations, thereby providing a useful intervention that is both intuitive and fun (Shelley 2011). The tool has been effectively used to stimulate constructive conversations about the im- pact of behaviour on outcomes in a range of contexts including leadership, collaboration and conflict. The metaphor enables participants to discuss the behaviours separately and in isolation to reference to specific people. Limited exposure to the characters before the intervention enables par- ticipants to intuitively make sense of the behaviour and engage with others about how that behaviour impacts for the specific context of creativity. This approach involves minimal pre- conception and opens the interaction for maximal challenges to produce a genuine collective set of data. A very quick quiz was used to highlight just how easily recognised some of the behavioural stereotypes can be recognised. A cartoon image of a Lion in a personified scene is displayed and the facilitator asks the audience what behaviours they think this represents in single words and short phrases. Very quickly they responded with words including “Leader”, “Command”, “Control”, Fierce”, Territorial”, Egotistical” and phrases like “King of the jungle”. Other figures are similarly shown (including a Bee - collaborative team work and Owl, suppor- tive knowledgeable mentor, etc) to build confidence that their immediate intuition about the behaviours represented were valid. That is, their initial emotive reaction to the metaphor was real and able to be used by them in the discussion about behavioural impacts (despite them having different preferences for the behaviours- see later). After the introductory quiz, participants were asked (in small groups) to allocate five character cards into each of four categories, as they thought appropriate for the context of being creative: - Expected (behaviours required for creative out- comes) - Desired (behaviours not absolutely required, but have positive influence on creativity) The Behavioural DNA of Creativity: Insights from Creative Bangkok metaphor interaction Dr. Arthur Shelley The Organizational Zoo 21
  • 22. - Tolerated (behaviours not ideal or desirable, prefer not to be displayed) - Not Tolerated (behaviours which have a strong disruptive impact on creativity) After five characters were selected for each category, six characters were left out (26 characters used in to- tal). These are not considered better or worse that those selected, just not as applicable to this context or as being less relevant to the question. The nine groups were given just 20 minutes to sort the cards. Then participants walked around to observe other groups’ outputs and discuss similari- ties and differences. A high level analysis of the ove- rall patterns of selection is in the table. Selection  outcome   #   Char’s   Names  of  characters  selected   Likely  collective  impact  of  this  grouping  on  environment,   based  characters’  salient  properties.   All  groups  selected  as   positive   (Expected  or  Desired)   4/26   15%   Bee,  Eagle,  Gibbon,  Quercus   Collaborative  teamwork  with  inspirational  leadership  and   a  fun,  trusted  and  philanthropic  environment.   Most  groups  selected  as   positive  (none  selected   negative)   3/26   12%   Insect  (beneficial),  Mouse,  Owl   Cross-­‐pollinating  ideas  sharing,  with  mentoring/nurturing   approach  and  productive  task  completion  orientation.   Mainly  positive   perceptions     with  some  negative   3/26   12%   Ant,  Unicorn,  Whale   Productivity  that  can  be  slightly  off  mainstream  or   idealistic,  whilst  incorporating  intelligent  technology.   Balance  of  positive  and   negative  perceptions   4/26   15%   Dog,  Kid,  Lion,  Yak   Loyalty,  naivety  with  some  control  and  command/process   with  enthusiasm  (even  if  a  little  prone  to  errors).   Mainly  negative   perceptions     with  some  positive     2/26   12%   Vulture,  Xbreed   Propensity  to  criticise  others  and  some  arrogance  about   cleverness  or  value  of  own  ideas.   Most  groups  selected  as   negative  (none  selected   positive)   10/26   38%   Chameleon,  Feline,  Hyena,  Insect  (pestiferous),  Jackal,   Nematode,  Piranha,  Rattlesnake,  Sloth,  Triceratops.   Predominated  by  political  and  silo-­‐group  interests  rather   the  open  sharing  with  all.  High  level  of  aggression  and   competition  or  change  resistant  disengagement.   All  groups  selected  as   negative   (Tolerated  or  Not   Tolerated)   0/26     None     Insights It is clear there are definite patterns in what people DO like for creativity, with Bee, Eagle, Gibbon and Quercus being selected buy every group and Bene- ficial Insect, Mouse and Owl being perceived as po- sitive when selected (though not selected at all by some groups). There is slightly greater diversity in what people tolerate or find disruptive (12), compa- red with what is chosen as positive (10) in the creative context with some being spread across both positive and negative. No two groups generated the same output and yet participants’ could see the logic of each answer in facilitated conversations about the selections. The fact that some groups put some characters in positive and others put it in as a negative generated some rich exchanges between groups. However, similar discus- sions occurred earlier within groups as individuals highlighted why they prefer or found this behaviour disruptive (for this context). This highlights the in- herent diversity of perspectives on what behaviour is helpful and what is not, amongst the individuals and groups and the value in exchanging these views. The discussions in selecting which character belonged to which category were lively and engaging at all tables, despite differences of opinion. This interac- tion supports earlier research, in which the metaphor approach was the was found to enable an engaging atmosphere of fun and helped to de-politicise the ex- change of views (Shelley 2012). More vibrant and in- clusive exchange helps to include more perspectives and therefore more options to potentially develop. A useful insight is that three of the four characters se- lected by ALL groups, were also selected (in another activity with different people in a different country) by all groups when asked to characterise optimal lea- dership (Eagle, Bee and Quercus). It is not surprising that in this environment and the creative way the whole conference was led, that Gibbon also emerged as essential for creativity (thanks largely to Vincent Ribiere!). Interestingly, in that other activity, there was also more diversity of opinion around disruptors than for stimulants of the right environment. Howe- ver, it is critical to note that many of the behaviours considered disruptors for leadership and creativity will be stimulants of other contexts such as prioritisa- tion (where critique and finding weaknesses in para- mount to success). Figure 1 (next page) shows the patterns of similarity and difference across the selections made by each group. This is just a short interpretation of the results (although based on the collective results across 45 participants), so not all aspects of this are able to be discussed here in depth. However there are some pointsworthdebatingwithyourfriends. Forexample, why has the Lion been selected in all four categories by different groups and not selected at all by half the groups. Clearly the impact of control and command behaviour is perceived very differently by different people. Alternatively, they were reading the context in a slightly different way (a common challenge in all organisations). Awareness of these differences of perception that can stimulate sparks of creativity and lack of awareness of them can cause conflict. When leading a creative environment, increasing the awa- reness of the impact of behaviours in the team and aligning that through conscious choice with the desi- red context, enables team to collaborate more pro- ductively. That is, make conscious choices about how we behave and interact to secure improved perfor- mance (in whatever we are trying to achieve). Some- times critical behaviours are the optimal behaviour. So it is not “right” or “wrong” behaviour per se - it is alignment to context that counts most. Many insights were drawn by the participants in the conversations at the time and no doubt other insights can be drawn from this data and nuisances it pres- 22
  • 23.   ents. Visualising the data is different ways (photos of outputs, summary tables and graphic “DNA” image) provide further stimulants for creative conversations with others. A key to learning and professional deve- lopment is to challenge oneself with new ideas and others’ perspectives and explore the possibilities and options that emerge. Although you may not agree with everything you exchange, you get more possibi- lities to reflect upon and this helps you to see outside “your box”. That is, challenge your own entrenched patterns of thought and decision-making to evolve your capabilities, by adopting or adapting things you did not know about. As Theodore Zeldin stated: “The kind of conversation I like is one in which you are prepared to emerge a slightly different person.” Are you inclined to act in lion mode and tell, or open yourself to seek the ideas of others through gibbon, owl, eagle and bee? What is worth highli- ghting is that the interac- tions in the room were vibrant and constructive. The Organizational Zoo metaphor cards are a fun and creative way to sti- mulate dialogue around the impacts of behaviour on creativity amongst a diverse and international group. When conversa- tions about behaviour are actively facilitated in an open and trusted environ- ment, they generate posi- tive outcomes. If the envi- ronment is not conducive to inclusive engagement of different perspectives, the outcomes are limited (or even disengaging for those involved and undermi- ning trust and or intended outcomes). There is no doubt that this interaction brought about insights for those involved and helped to build connections and stronger relationships. Continuing to stimulate conversations like this amongst your teams and stakeholders over time, will assist you to achieve a creative environment and deliver higher performance. This approach can also be used to faci- litate in difficult conversations. That is, enable chal- lenging behavioural aspects of a situation that would otherwise not be openly talked about! This repre- sents a real benefit, as being able to proactively and constructively discuss such matters, is far better than leaving them to the corrosive corridor conversations that ultimately damage everyone. Conclusion It is important to acknowledge that the final outputs (tangible results) of such activities are less important than the outcomes and interactions between the people involved. It can be seen that there is a variety in what behaviours people like, and don’t like, when creatively interacting. Using The Organizational Zoo metaphor enables people to engage in constructive conversations about the impact of behaviour and better align how they interact. The key point is not theactualcardsselected,itistheinsightsandunders- tanding of what others appreciate or dislike gained though these exchanges that enable better relation- ships. Armed with these insights, you can be more creative together. Assume what they like, or that they are just like you, is less effective than engaging in a quick fun activity that brings you closer to understan- ding each other. It can highlight differences in pers- pective that you can each leverage value from. This in itself can be a source for creativity, if you engage with open minds around the differences. Better we understand and leverage these differences than go into conflict over them. Dr. Arthur Shelley www.organizationalzoo.com 23
  • 24. There are many ways to go about creative exploration. For centuries, the Western world evolved under the cult of the One — one God, one leader, one truth— and became obsessed with the figure of the lone genius. The Creator. It does seem logical, then, that the current inte- rest in the virtues of collective creation would come as a sort of intellectual liberation in the West. It brings us back to notions of community, universality, and joint accomplishment, ideas that have been somewhat artificially removed from our cultural dynamics by two-hundred years of individualis- tic christianism. Whether or not the collectivist heritage of Northeastern Asian countries can benefit from this sudden epiphany is unsure. Boxing and unboxing creativity On Creative Bangkok’s second day, speakers co- vered a variety of ideas relative to the infamous box of creativity and innovation. A central notion in the economics of creativity, Arthur Koestler’s notion of bissociation was introduced by HEC Montreal’s Prof. Patrick Cohendet as a central tenet of the deboxing of standard procedures. Bissociation is the systematic parent of ideation and serendipity: it is an act of conscious combi- nation where two (or more) solutions, ideas or universes collide and form an entirely new third space. In the words of TBWA Thailand’s chairman, Chaipranin Visudhipol, the box is actually situa- ted very clearly at the bottom of Maslow’s hie- rarchy of needs. Chaipranin defines the box as a playground where actors compete on the basis of physiological and safety needs: most often physical products, whose main differentiation is price, and the focus is on tangible results. Outside the box, companies have an opportu- nity to explore love belonging, self-esteem and the realization of self. In this space, creatives and their communications partners are explo- ring feeling and identity, enlarging significance to the community, the tribe, or the world in its entirety. Metaphors Further along, expanding our horizons can also be a matter of finding new cognitive spaces where ideas, words and concepts can collide. Out of Australia, Arthur Shelley uses a set of animal cards to facilitate what he calls the «Organizational Zoo». In a very intuitive manner, participants are brought to classify typical beha- viours into categories, so that they can interpret whether their current structure permits out-of- box thinking. Both Ubisoft’s Justin Farren and Cirque du So- leil’s Brigitte Carbonneau hinted to the power of considering an object, a subject or a concept as asserting it is the same as another’s attributes. From the Canadian multimedia multinational’s perspective, this is especially true in the pro- cessing of «transforming» olympic athletes into artists. Perhaps the best way to think about boxes and their constraining power is to wish for new beginnings. A tabula rasa, indeed, may be the best context from which to build the greatest dreams; such was Joseph Schumpeter’s idea when he wrote of creative destruction. Only in this context can we rebuild the collective dynamics that open up new fields of creativity, by promoting simultaneously the virtues of random association as well as the systematic exploration of novelty. Random associations and the sys- tematic exploration of novelty By Dr Francis Gosselin Full article at: www.fandco.ca 24
  • 25. Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS DESIGN Bangkok Art Culture Center (BACC) 25
  • 26. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ WELCOME ADDRESS Dr. Luckana Kunavichayanont Director of BACC Thailand THE LANGUAGE OF CREATIVITY Duangrit Bunnag Founder – DUANGRIT BUN- NAG ARCHITECT LIMITED Thailand IN SEARCH OF THAI CRAFTOLOGY Eggarat Wongcharit CEO/Creative Director at Craft Factor Co., Ltd. Thailand Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS DESIGN BACC is truly the place for art lovers. The keywords are openness and co-construction, we have been doing that since the campaign has started, to get as many people involved in the process including artists, stakeholders, public and politicians. The past and the future are shaped by us. Keep yourself open for the power of possibility. Visualization, testing and prototyping help transfer patterns across categories of domains. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 26
  • 27. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ CREATIVITY AT COTTO Anuvat Chalermchai Brand Director of Tra Chang and COTTO Thailand IS CREATIVITY AN INBORN TALENT? Amornrat Pratoomma Dermatoglyphicist – Panya- tara Potential Analysis Centre (P-PAC) Thailand THE ART OF DESIGN THINKING Cees de Bont Dean of School of Design Hong-Kong Polytechnic Uni- versity Hong-Kong Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS DESIGN Effective design is a combination of innovation, integrity, co-creation and hassle free offerings for customers. Creativity involves two processes: thinking, then produ- cing. If you have ideas, but don’t act on them, you are imagina- tive but not creative. Being ima- ginative is having ideas; being creative is converting ideas into production. You contribute to the world by making meaningful things, not just new things. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 27
  • 28. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ DESIGNING CREATIVE SPACES Pitupong Chaowakul Founder, Supermachine Stu- dio, Bangkok Thailand INNOVATIVE INSIGHTING IDEATING Aaron “A” Palileo Co-Founder of Bootleg Innovation Design Philippines THINKING IN PICTURES; A RAPID VISUALIZATION WORKSHOP Jeff Hamilton Creo-modo Thailand CREATIVITY CONDOMS Mechai Viravaidya Mechai Viravaidya Foundation Thailand Day #3 CREATIVITY IN ARTS DESIGN Playground is always for kids, what about adults? When you think of several types of playground, they always look small and very colorful. They’ve never thought about adults that used to be kids and want to play as well. Creativity = Differ + Deliver + Delight Creativity needs to be different. It’s not enough to be different, it has to deliver[...]. So, it has to be different but it has to work. Those two things are classic definitions of creativity. How to make people understand there’s a problem and a solution needs to be crea- ted. One of the way that we do it is by drawing. Take NO as a question. Never take NO as an answer. ’’ SPEAKERS’QUOTES 28
  • 29. There are 1.5M being trained in design in China right now». Dean at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Cees de Bont holds a Ph.D. in indus- trial design. «We are teaching these students design, but its not clear what they’ll do later. Design has become a pervasive skill. Indeed, the pervasiveness of design processes is making its way in all fields and may have a durable influence in how companies are managed, pro- ducts are conceived, and what workplaces look like. The inclusion of design in traditional work prac- tices makes a strong statement. It is pervasive in the commercialisation of art, as well as archi- tecture, engineering, social science and finance. Consulting firms like my own include it as part of their service offerings, deploying design thin- king methodologies that can generate business results. Design is changing Through interaction with other disciplines, a process of mutual enrichment has started occur- ring: design practices themselves have changed. In design schools all over the world, the rigour of design training has taken to new heights, encompassing elements that relate to context (knowledge intensive), purpose (social innova- tion) and nature (designers as facilitators). In this last instance, I wrote in Metamorphosis and People of the valley, how biomimicry is in- creasing in popularity and applicability, thanks to advances in the fields of scientific research and computing science. The invention of the Japanese Shinkansen bullet trains sets the bar high in these terms. The ROI of design In October 2014, De Bont spoke in Creative Bangkok of the new Hong Kong Poly Design School building. Designed and built by Iranian architect Zaha Hadid, the building cost five times more than a regular building would have in similar conditions. But it was, says its Dean, worth every penny. We are starting to see clear results of how investments in design can yield real dollar results down the road; through talent attraction certainly, but also via increased productivity through ergonomy, physical efficiency of circula- tion as well as inspiration through beauty. Integrating design in new fields promises to yield results that are zeroing in on the idea of interaction, a notion central to every contempo- rary product, service and experience. It will make our private and public endeavours both more useful, but also more pleasant and humane. And like many other surprising com- binations, it will yield things that we do not expect, nor can even imagine. And if the increasing popularity of this new nomadism is any indication of things to come, we better start developing the reflexes to engage with them. Design thinking is not design: design for non-designers Dr Francis Gosselin Full article at: www.fandco.ca 29
  • 30. Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE TOURISM Bangkok Old City Museum Siam 30
  • 31. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’6 SENSES OF SIMPLE LUXURIES WALKSHOP IN OLD CITY BANGKOK Daniel Fraser Founder Director Smiling Albino Thailand WELCOME ADDRESS AND TOUR OF MUSEUM SIAM Sukumal Phadungsilp Museum Siam Thailand VERY THAI Philip Cornwel-Smith Author, Very Thai: Everyday Popular Culture Thailand Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE and TOURISM To make it more efficient, from time to time we actually hire Bangkok Mass Transportation to take us around. That is kind of our way trying to be as eco-friendly as much as possible while still trying to be practical. Now you can use technology to turn back time. Thai street food - How Thai street culture might be able to tell us something about creativity, how they manage to move a kitchen and a restau- rant to around the streets on three wheels and how they fit all those tools, the chairs and the gas tank and the foods and everything into it. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 31
  • 32. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ BLOGGER OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT Olivier Dombey Managing Director of Digital Innovation Asia (DIA) Thailand CREATIVITY SCHOOL: FROM BANGKOK TO MONTREAL Lucy Stojak Director, Summer School on Management of Creativity in an Innovation Society Canada Day #4 CREATIVITY IN HERITAGE and TOURISM To measure success, look at metrics beyond just online traffic. Working with bloggers before cooperation. Make clear your goals for the project. Ask for input, work together - blogger knows audiences. Build the relationship, develop trust. Creativity is a crossroad of Arts, Science, Technology and Business. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 32
  • 33. While worldwide mobility has increased ma- nyfold over the last century, frequent travellers remains somewhat of a social oddity that pro- duces amazement and envy. No matter how many copies of National Geographic you own, or how often you search for the seven wonders of the world on Google Images, long-distance, tran- satlantic travel has remained the exception, not the rule. Rotting in your office It wasn’t until very recently though that I realized that, while it is very fun to travel to somewhere for work, some people have actually turned this into a lifestyle. But between these highly creative people — whom Richard Florida would call bohemians — and myself, a striking difference: the place where they are does not affect their ability to do the work. They are, in other words, nomads. Digital no- mads. One of them is my friend Daniel Mireault, with whom I had the chance to connect while in Chiang Mai, in the north of Thailand. Daniel is a Montreal-based designer who spends several months a year in Southeast Asia. He prefers the weather, certainly, but also the lifestyle; it is laid back, but also more fluid. The city of Chiang Mai boasts several coworking spaces like the two Punspace installations, as well as the Transfor- mative Learning Technologies Lab, in partner- ship with Stanford University. In other words, to paraphrase Mashable’s re- cent piece on the topic, these people travel the world while you rot in your office. Are they sin- gularly different from others? Perhaps. The Elite Daily wrote recently that it may have to do with people’s DNA… but let’s leave it at that. Post-modern eugenics isn’t my cup of tea. Engaging the nomads A former hotel executive now Managing director at Digital Innovation Asia, Olivier Dombey knows a thing or two about engaging with this new ge- neration of uprooted creatives. While we may feel admirative and chose to cele- brate the freedom inherent to the nomad lifes- tyle, some brands are hoping to take advantage of these well traveled individuals. As they wander around the world, these bohemians are ideally positioned to produce extraordinary content for travel blogs, are sufficiently influential to provide credible hotel reviews, and can act as sources of observations, ideas, and innovations opportunities. Wanderlust: wandering to every corner of the earth is a way of life. Dr Francis Gosselin Full article at: www.fandco.ca 33
  • 34. Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES TECHNOLOGY Dupont Innovation Center 34
  • 35. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’DESIGNING INNOVATION: CREATIVE STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS DESIGN AND INNOVATION Keith T.E. Tan Founder and Principal Consultant of Creative Nexus Group Singapore CREATIVITY IN A DONUT WORLD Nadim Salhani Group CEO MUDMAN Thailand OPEN INNOVATION Naphunsakorn (Ronnie) Waiyawuththanapoom IKI-SEA Thailand Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES TECHNOLOGY Stories curate expe- riences. Design is about infinite possibilities. Design is a mindset of looking at the world with an eye to improve the things we do and the way we do them. Deep down inside I think there’s an entrepreneurship in each one of us and everyday it’s becoming a lifestyle. 70%-90% of innovations fail. Open innovation is the use of purposive inflows and outflows of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation, and expand the markets for external use of innovation, respectively. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 35
  • 36. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’YOUR IDEA IS MY IDEA Vincent Ribière Managing Director of the Institute for Knowledge and Innovation SouthEast Asia (IKI-SEA) Thailand INNOVATION PLATFORMS Thierry Isckia Professor of Strategic Management and Innovation Telecom Business School France Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES TECHNOLOGY Companies need to connect their Operational Cycle to their Innovation Cycle. The basics elements of creativity are copy, transform and combine past knowledge. We believe science and technology are global but inno- vation is local. That’s why many countries globally now have innovation center to work with customers. Platform thinking = Software design + Market design + Agility. Becoming a platform leader is a very tricky business. Platform has always been there. Today everyone is networked with everything. Just think about M2M, Machine to Machine, this will be the value deposit for the next 10 to 20 years. MARKET-DRIVEN SCIENCE AND INNOVATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY Somchai Laohverapanich Managing Director, DuPont Thailand Thailand SPEAKERS’QUOTES ’’ ’’ THE HISTORY AND FUNDAMENTAL NOTIONS OF CREATIVITY Patrick Cohendet HEC Montreal Co-Founder of MOSAIC Canada Ideas are at the core of the modern economy. We are not just in the creative economy, but in the re-creative economy. Are you a creator or a re-creator? 36
  • 37. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ LEGO SERIOUS PLAY WORKSHOP FORGING STRATEGY VIA THE POWER OF METAPHOR Francis Gosselin Founding partner of f. Co. Canada INNOVATION at NASA Juan Roman NASA USA HOW THE SWATCH WAS DESIGNED CONCEIVED Gilles Garel Professor of innovation Management at Cnam France Day #5 CREATIVITY IN SCIENCES TECHNOLOGY We are entering into an era of a storytelling, urging us to build narrative, to build a story around what we do. What is great about LEGO is that you can build something that is already there into a platform, into a story. Innovation = Inspiration + Perspiration + Perseverance. Our mission is to innovate, to explore, to discover and to inspire the next genera- tion of scientists and engineers and explorers and we take that challenge and mission very seriously. All human societies design. The notion of design is rooted in different traditions; art, architecture, engineering, decision. There is no unified representation of the design. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 37
  • 38. Portfolios Burgeoning enterprises and the entrepreneurs behind them are in fact acting more and more like brand portfolio managers; whether develo- ping horizontally like we have been, or vertically by adding new products and services with self- standing identities. Moreover, products and services are increasingly internationalized from the get-go, meaning that entrepreneurs and managers must not only dis- tinguish between several brands, but must consi- der how these brands will be constructed in the minds of various nationalities, ethnic groups and cultural geographies. Such is the case of Nadim Salhani, a serial entre- preneur who spoke at Creative Bangkok 2014. After spending several years as General Mana- gers for Starbucks in Thailand, Salhani became CEO of Mudman, an holding that operates seve- ral international brands from exclusive licenses: Dunkin Donuts, Au Bon Pain and Baskin Robbins among others. Many cities around the world are populated by such activators. Questions for wandering minds Examples such as Salhani’s beg the question: how do you know when to stop lateral expan- sion, horizontal exploration, diversification into new fields, new projects, new possibilities? Thesedays,asIweightthepossibilityofinvesting some time and energy in new business opportu- nities as diverse as an international speakers’ bu- reau or an e-commerce initiative, I wonder; why do these things even appear feasible? And where does it stop? Another stream of questions concerns the effi- ciency of a portfolio approach to entrepreneur- ship ; what if your brands are market rivals to one or another. Or more probable yet, what if they rival for your attention? How do you between chose then? Do you pick the most profitable? The most amusing? The most promising? In a VC-backed setting, profit certainly isn’t a cri- teria you’ll want to aim for, as most firms are in fact losing money — and lots of it — on a monthly basis. In this universe, being cashflow positive signals early death. But amusement isn’t much better. And promise? Too speculative for some. With all the noise around VCs, incubators and ac- celerators, one thing seems certain: brands can- not live on their own, and no matter the size of your portfolio, you’ll always need great people to feed them. Projects, communities, products and services are no longer conceived at the top and trickled down to those who benefit from them. Rather, those are build from the ground up. A portfolio is only as strong as the ecosystem in which it exists. And for that purpose, proper rela- tional curation is probably more important than any other set of resources; material, financial or technological. You can read the full article at: www.fandco.caIf you start something, finish it. Dr. Francis Gosselin 38
  • 39. Day #6 CREATIVITY AND THE MIND SOCIAL INNOVATION Chakrawat Temple 39
  • 40. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’CREATIVITY MEDITATION WORKSHOP Phramaha Dr. Vichien Vachirawongso Thailand - India MINDFULNESS AT GOOGLE Johan Segergren Google Thailand THE CREATIVE YOU: ACHIEVING A WHOLE BRAIN STATE. Dr Alex Bennet Bangkok University Mountain Quest Institute USA Day #6 CREATIVITY AND THE MIND AND SOCIAL INNOVATION Many things in this world are necessary to know and unnecessary to know but we must know and after we know we can protect ourselves. Search inside yourself! Employees started to meditate and reflect on their thinking, understanding what drives them to do different things or why they are acting in a specific way [...] and describe medita- tion in the context of coding for new ages to understand how the mind works. Shift your frame of reference. Realize that all you see around you, the reality we perceive is a small stage upon which you act, and within it is an inner spaciousness that is infinite. Let’s now explore the infinite. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 40
  • 41. ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ ’’ PIONEERS OF THE NEW WORLD Catherine Berthillier Shamengo.com France SOCIAL INNOVATION CANVAS WORKSHOP Christian Walter IKI-SEA Thailand ARE YOUR TEAMS FINDING CREATIVE SOLUTIONS TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS? Peter Cauweiler ASIO Consulting Thailand Day #6 CREATIVITY AND THE MIND AND SOCIAL INNOVATION We offer a collaborative platform where people can gather and work with a pioneer to develop their social innovation. In order to have an enterprise that can sustain itself, it should generate reve- nues but it should also be able to draw finances and funds from different sources. Questions are both the most powerful and most under- utilized tools for creativity and intellectual activity. SPEAKERS’QUOTES 41
  • 42. As I uncovered various creative perspectives on Bang- kok this last week, I was treated to a tour organized by Bangkok’s funkiest travel agency, Smiling Albino. The company was founded in 1999 by two crazy Ca- nadians, Scott Coates and Daniel Fraser, to «bring a unique travel experience […] the result of continuous travel, innovation and refinement». Unique, here, is the keyword. As we strolled through the streets of the City of Angels for a few hours (we actually loved it so much we called for a second pri- vate tour a few days later), it truly felt like we were on an adventure worthy of a Casey Neistat stunt. Yet it became clear that everyone we met, including our tour guide, were for real. The new luxury Our friend and cllbr Paris correspondent Gregory Casper likes to think and write about how Gen Y’s relationship to luxury is very different from that of previous generations. In Casper’s words, luxury items have become dissociated from extraordinary circumstance and are increasingly embedded in our daily lives. For several individuals, luxurious products are considered durable investments in their identity; something they can display, wear, inhabit and pro- mote as an extension of their public persona. If luxury as a concept is losing its power as an element of superficial prestige, it is gaining in other attributes. The new luxury — from fashion, to travel, to educa- tion — consists of custom-made, experiential, rela- tional and narratable experiences. It is the product of on-going self-appraisal, of learning about oneself and the world. Custom-made, experiential, relational and narra- table Several luxury brands today have understood the necessity to exit the system of «quality mass produc- tion» to enter a new era of specificity where every item and every experience is unique (or at least, feels that way). Long gone are the days where, for instance, luxury travel consisted of 5-star hotels and private dri- vers to take tourists from their resorts to air-conditio- ned shopping malls. Today, high end travellers want to experience something they feel was designed for them, not for the greater masses: they want to be roc- ked, sit close to the water, get their shoes and hands dirty, surrounded by local smells, tastes, sights and people. What sets Smiling Albino’s value proposal aside from other experiential learning programs is their ability to invent such experiences through continuous interac- tion with select hosts and service providers. The same can be said of Creative Bangkok — by all means, a breakthrough in terms of creative pedagogy —, sketching a relatable thread between individuals, venues and activities. Its guides do so by building sustained relationships with hosts as well as with adventurers. Rates may be higher, guests pay willingly, and return in vast num- bers. In the case of the travel agency, this has led the company to expand to Nepal, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam. For Creative Bangkok, this may mean sustainable leadership in its ability to serve as a worldwide hub for such further initiatives. As it looks further to its second edition, Creative Bangkok has also inspired individuals with an intent to produce programs in the Philippines, Bahreïn, and maybe elsewhere. We will be very interested to find out how Bangkok can play a defining role in the co- ming of age of Middle Eastern and Asian creativity. This new type of learning experience promises to de- liver more in the years to come, with a view towards genuine and authentic jumps into local realities. In this new luxury of travel and education, your tour guide is actually part of the group, hands dirty, eyes shinny, and fully involved in the action. We look forward to more. And so should you! Learning in the age of authenticity. Dr Francis Gosselin Full article at: www.fandco.ca 42
  • 43. The non-profit Khlong Toey Music Program (KTMP) makes it possible for underprivile- ged kids in Bangkok to learn a life-changing art, make positive connections with others, dream big, and have lots of fun in the process. Through music, kids can open doors to new opportunities while inwardly building calmness,presence,joyandadrivetoexpress themselves. As part of its contribution to local communi- ties, Creative Bangkok invited a kid’s band of the Khlong Toey Music Program to play du- ring the event. Creative Bangkok was happy to offer to the kids some new drums as well as a check to buy some other Music school necessities. If you also want to learn more about KTMP and help this program, please visit: http://khlongtoeymusicprogram.com Donation to the Klong Toey Music Program 43
  • 44. Siam Niramit Bo.Lan River Cruise Cabbages Condoms Calypso Cabaret S O C I A L E V E N T S 44
  • 45. Creative Bangkok would like to thank its lovely sponsor: 45
  • 46. A BIG thank you to all our great speakers 46
  • 47. Thank you to all the participating companies 47
  • 48. 21 26 February 2016 BANGKOK ASIAN SYMPOSIUM ON CREATIVITY INNOVATION MANAGEMENT WWW.CREATIVEBANGKOK.ORG Unleash your creative potential and its value for your organization Join us for the next edition of Creative Bangkok 48