SlideShare a Scribd company logo
20 May 2015
Business proposals
in view of a 2015 international climate change agreement at COP 21 in Paris
*
1
By May 20th
2015, Chairmen / Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of 59 international companies and 7 organizations already
support the “Business proposals for COP 21”. In order to ensure worldwide awareness of the Business community before
COP 21, they call on their counterparts to join them in the coming weeks before the September Climate Week in New
York (contact: Business@COP-21.org jointly managed by French Business Associations: MEDEF, Afep and Cercle de
l’Industrie).
7 supporting organizations:
UN GLOBAL
COMPACT
President of
WBCSD
Peter BAKKER
Business Europe
Emma
MARCEGAGLIA
President
Afep
Pierre PRINGUET
President
Cercle de l’Industrie
Philippe VARIN
President
MEDEF
Pierre GATTAZ
President
SYNTEC INGENIERIE
Nicolas JACHIET
President
59 supporting Chairmen / CEOs from international companies:
AIRBUS GROUPE
Denis RANQUE
Chairman
AIR LIQUIDE
Benoît POTIER
Chairman & CEO
ALSTOM
Patrick KRON
Chairman & CEO
AREVA
Philippe VARIN
Chairman
ARKEMA
Thierry le HENAFF
Chairman & CEO
AVIVA France
Nicolas SCHIMEL
CEO
AXA
Henri de CASTRIES
Chairman & CEO
BASF
Kurt BOCK
Chairman & CEO
BNP PARIBAS
Jean LEMIERRE
Chairman
BOUYGUES
Martin BOUYGUES
Chairman & CEO
BPCE
François PEROL
Chairman
COMPAGNIE DE SAINT
GOBAIN
Pierre-André de
CHALENDAR
Chairman & CEO
CREDIT AGRICOLE SA
Jean-Marie SANDER
Chairman & CEO
DCNS
Hervé GUILLOU
Chairman
DSM
Feike SIJBESMA
CEO
EDF
Jean-Bernard LEVY
Chairman & CEO
EGIS
Nicolas JACHIET
Chairman & CEO
ENGIE
Gérard MESTRALLET
Chairman & CEO
ERAMET
Patrick BUFFET
Chairman & CEO
FFP
Robert PEUGEOT
Chairman & CEO
FONCIERE DES
REGIONS
Christophe KULLMANN
CEO
GALERIES LAFAYETTE
Philippe HOUZE
Chairman of the
Management Board
GROUPE SEB
Thierry de la Tour
d’Artaise
Chairman & CEO
IMERYS
Gilles MICHEL
Chairman & CEO
JC DECAUX
Jean-Charles DECAUX
Co-CEO
KERING
François-Henri
PINAULT
Chairman & CE
KINGFISHER France
Daniel BERNARD
Chairman & CEO
LAFARGE
Bruno LAFONT
Chairman & CEO
LEGRAND
Gilles SCHNEPP
Chairman & CEO
L’OREAL
Jean-Paul AGON
Chairman & CEO
LVMH
Antonio BELLONI
CEO
MICHELIN
Jean-Dominique
SENARD
CEO
NESTLE France
Richard GIRARDOT
Chairman & CEO
NEUFLIZE OBC
Philippe VAYSSETTES
Chairman of the
Management Board
NEXANS
Frédéric VINCENT
Chairman
20 May 2015
Business proposals
in view of a 2015 international climate change agreement at COP 21 in Paris
*
2
NEXITY
Alain DINNIN
Chairman
PERNOD RICARD
Alexandre RICARD
Chairman & CEO
PEUGEOT SA
Carlos TAVARES
Chairman of the
Management Board
ROYAL PHILIPS
Frans Van HOUTEN
Chief Executive Officer
PHILIPS LIGHTING
Eric RONDOLAT
CEO
PUBLICIS
Maurice LEVY
Chairman & CEO
RATP
Christian GALIVEL
Deputy CEO
REMY COINTREAU
Valérie CHAPOULAUD-
FLOQUET
CEO
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SA
Jean-Pascal TRICOIRE
Chairman & CEO
SNCF
Guillaume Pépy
Chairman & CEO
RENAULT
Carlos GHOSN
Chairman & CEO
REXEL
Rudy PROVOOST
Chairman & CEO
SEQUANA
Pascal LEBARD
Chairman & CEO
SIEMENS France SAS
Christophe de
MAISTRES
President
SOCIETE GENERALE
Frédéric OUDEA
Chairman & CEO
SOLVAY
Jean-Pierre
CLAMADIEU
Chairman of Executive
Committee
SUEZ
ENVIRONNEMENT
Jean-Louis
CHAUSSADE
CEO
THALES
Patrick CAINE
Chairman & CEO
TOTAL
Patrick POUYANNE
CEO
UNIBAIL-RODAMCO
Christophe CUVILLIER
Chairman of
Management Board
UNILEVER
Paul POLMAN
CEO
VALEO
Jacques
ASCHENBROICH
CEO
VALLOUREC
Philippe CROUZET
Chairman & CEO
VEOLIA
Antoine FREROT
Chairman & CEO
VINCI
Xavier HUILLARD
Chairman & CEO
20 May 2015
3
Business proposals
in view of a 2015 international climate change agreement at COP 21 in Paris
Climate scientists and experts are clear: there is an urgent need to address climate change through significant greenhouse
gas emissions reductions worldwide (see Annex 1).
Implementing such reductions raises substantial technological, economic, social, and institutional challenges. Business will
only thrive if sustainable growth is achieved, and thus strongly supports the adoption in 2015 of an ambitious agreement
which reflects the long-term objective of limiting global warming below 2°C. This agreement should enhance an
international level playing field and in particular:
 guarantee comparable efforts from all major emitting economies (see Annex 2), ensuring fair competition
between economic players;
 provide a long-term and predictable framework which encourages investments and scaling by business of
efficient carbon reduction and adaptation technologies, in a cost effective way;
 focus the future climate framework on the States’ Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDCs), which
should avoid competitive distortions, be coherent and detailed, in a five to ten-year term, and on fostering
international cooperation;
 establish a reliable monitoring, reporting and verification system.
Business is ready to contribute to the success of such an agreement, to efficiently achieve the low-carbon transition and to
bring solutions to the market. In this view, we business believe the following evolutions will be key and need to be
considered as a whole:
1. Launching a constructive and lasting Business Dialogue convened by the COP Presidency, between the business
community and governments
We welcome the launching of an open and flexible dialogue ahead of COP 21 and continuing afterwards, with the aim of
building a long-term institutional relationship, while implementing and improving the future agreement expected in
December 2015 (see Annex 3). This dialogue should aim at better understanding the economic and transversal
implications that might arise from the INDCs, discussing the enabling conditions for scaling up concrete solutions and
lifting the existing/potential barriers to effectively achieve the low-carbon transition. This should enable national
negotiators to be collectively aware of the issues at stake, and business to identify and implement appropriate carbon
intensity reduction strategies. This continuous dialogue will be complementary to the Business and Climate Summit,
gathering in Paris CEOs and Ministers worldwide, which takes place on May 20th
and 21st
as well as to the international
Climate Finance Day on May 22nd
.
2. Boosting investments in low-carbon business solutions and technologies
Investments required for a low-carbon transition are massive, although feasible, and often risky, especially when it comes
to bringing new technologies to market-deployment. Yet, there are critical gaps in the existing available funding sources
and methodologies, resulting in under-investment in such technologies.
We believe it is necessary to develop an appropriate framework in order to efficiently support and encourage
investments needed to achieve emission reductions and adaptation objectives, especially through:
 developed and reinforced carbon market tools, which will help stimulate investments in innovative technologies,
installations and products in a competitive way;
 climate funds, including the Green Climate Fund (GCF), which should act as catalyst for low carbon investments,
as well as financial tools designed to better share risks between private and public sectors, and thus leverage
private financing;
 generally, all measures and tools which aim at encouraging private investments, through incentives rather than
penalties, should be developed.
20 May 2015
4
3. Intensifying R&D, innovation and deployment of mature and breakthrough technologies
The international community should enforce mechanisms dedicated to the development and deployment of mature and
breakthrough technologies, and thus:
 pursue the development of supportive regulation and funding for market-introduction of promising
technologies;
 encourage international cooperation for the development and deployment of those breakthrough technologies
at worldwide scale;
 reinforce existing mechanisms, such as the UNFCCC Technology Mechanism, under the current framework, and
facilitate their inter-operability;
 promote the adoption of major proposals from the New Climate Economy report which aims at scaling-up low-
carbon innovation and moving towards connected and compact cities.
These mechanisms must respect the principles of technology neutrality and cost-effectiveness.
4. The need of carbon pricing
Carbon pricing is essential to guide business decisions and investments towards low-carbon technologies. In that respect,
it is supported by numerous businesses and countries through, for instance, the international coalition statement in favour
of carbon pricing adopted in September 2014 by the World Bank, the UN Global Compact, Caring for Climate and the
Carbon Disclosure Project, which has been supported by a significant number of nations and companies.
The agreement should lay the foundations for the integration of a carbon pricing system, in all major emitting countries,
which:
 is robust and predictable, thereby stimulating action on emissions and enabling investment decisions in low-
carbon technologies in the best cost-effective way;
 prevents from competitive distortions;
 is coordinated with a phasing-out of all existing carbon subsidies;
 relies on relevant tools such as emission trading schemes, or taxes/extensions of trading schemes/ shadow pricing
instruments, with a view to mobilizing economy-wide;
 can get along with other mechanisms such as standards, voluntary agreements, other regulatory instruments…
As it is expected that business as a whole will have to cope with the different systems implemented by countries/regions,
it is essential to work on the means by which carbon pricing can be introduced, such as:
 governance at domestic level (what are the different instruments at play, how do they interact ?);
 coordination and potential linking between different carbon pricing systems, in particular by embedding in the
agreement a mechanism for international transfers of emission units and a unified project-based crediting
mechanism built on best UNFCCC practices;
 impacts of different carbon pricing policies on competitiveness.
We are fully aware that the COP 21 and the 2015 agreement will be an important step towards the low-carbon economy
transition. Reaching this target will take time and requires continuous long-term efforts from the world community as a
whole, especially by using international forums. Business is conscious of being a driving force for scaling up solutions
and is ready to play major role.
20 May 2015
5
Annex 1
The challenges of climate change: facts and figures
This annex is mainly based on the IPCC report (Nov. 2014) and the New climate Economy report (Sept. 2014).
1. Businesses recognize there is an urgent need to address the climate change issue
According to the November 2014 IPCC Report:
 since 1950's, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia. For instance, each of the
past 3 decades has been successively warmer than the preceding decades since 1850s;
 climate change is directly linked to human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which have significantly increased since
the pre-industrial era, and are now higher than ever;
 without further GHG emissions reductions, global mean surface temperature should increase in 2100 from 3.7 to
4.8°C above the average for 1850-1900 for a median climate response, with irreversible impacts for people and
ecosystem (i.e. increasing risks on species extinction, food security, human health, urban systems, etc.).
2. They understand it implies huge environmental, economic and social challenges…
 According to the IPCC report, limiting global warming to 2°C relative to pre-industrial levels and reaching near zero net
human emissions of CO2 and other long-lived GHGs by the end of the century, would mean that :
o with 1900 GtCO2 having already been emitted between 1870 and 2011, no more than 1000 GtCO2 may still be
released in the atmosphere, corresponding to 20 years if the current annual rate (50 GtCO2) is maintained;
o it requires to reduce global GHG emission by 40-70% from 2010 to 2050;
o it requires to reduce emissions by around 80% by 2050 compared to 1990 for France and other developed
countries.
 According to the Commission 2050 roadmap, it means to reduce by 2050 CO2emissions in the EU by 80-95% compared
to 1990.
 Regarding the financial effort, following the New Climate Economy report, in order to reach the 2°C target, a large
share of investments in infrastructures will have to be reallocated. For instance, between 2015 and 2030:
o Additional US$8.8 trillion of incremental investment would be needed to improve the energy-efficiency of
buildings, industry and transport;
o Deploying low-carbon technologies including renewable, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS) could
require another US$4.7 trillion.
3. … But they consider that these challenges are not insurmountable
According to the “Better Growth, Better Climate” report:
 a low-carbon scenario could save money in some areas (e.g. US$5.7 trillion saved in fossil-fuelled power plants and
along the fossil fuel supply chain, and up to US$3.4 trillion from building more compact, connected cities and reducing
sprawl);
 actually, the net incremental infrastructure investment needs in the framework of a low carbon transition up to
2030 would only be 5% higher than those same needs in a business as usual scenario (where infrastructures
spending needs are projected to amount to almost US$ 90 trillion), provided the capital is appropriately allocated;
 recent modelling suggests economic costs of climate action for a 2°C path are likely to be limited, representing around
1.7% (median) of baseline GDP in 2030, although delayed action would increase that cost.
Business, which is at the core of the definition and implementation of low carbon solutions, strongly supports
policies and instruments aiming at reducing carbon emission in a cost-effective way while maintaining
competitiveness of our economies.
20 May 2015
6
Annex 2
Comparison of greenhouse gas reduction commitments notified by the Parties for COP 15 (Copenhaguen) – 1 April 2015
Parties
Years
1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 2050
EU
USA
Canada
Russia
Japan
Norway
South
Korea
-20 % (unilateral)
-17 %
-30 %
2025
-42 %
-83 %
-40%/-45% (intensity CO2)
-20% (unilateral)
-25 % (if ambitious commitment from major countries)
-30 % (unilateral)
Indonesia
-3,5 % (estimates not notified)
A
N
N
E
X
I
II
New-
Zealand
-10 % (unilateral)
Brazil
China
India -20%/-25% (intensity CO2)
Australia
-5 % (unilateral)
-26 % / -41% compared to business as usual level
-30% compared to business as usual level
-36,1 % / -38,9 % compared to business as usual levels
1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 20502025
-15 % (conditional**)
-25 % (conditional ***)
)
** In case of global agreement (stabilization at 450 ppm for eCO2)
+ commitments from developing countries to restrict their emissions
+ comparable commitments from industrialised countries
*** In case of ambitious global agreement (objective  450 ppm eq CO2)
* In case of comparable commitments from develped countries and
adequate contributions from developing-30 % (conditional*)
-17 %
-25 % (if investment of forestry and global agreement)
-40 % (in case of global agreement)
-20 % (in case of global agreeement)
N
O
N
A
N
N
E
X
South
Africa -34 % in 2020 compared to business as usual level
-42 % in 2025 compared to business as usual level
Annex 2
Comparison of greenhouse gas reduction commitments from the Parties in view of COP 21 (Paris) – 1 April 2015
Parties
Years
1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 2050
EU
USA
2025
China
1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 20502025
-40 % (unilateral and domestic)
-26 à -28 %
-80 % (unilateral and domestic)
-13,9 to -16,2 % (after EPA data)
-33 % (if linear reduction)
-31 % (if linear reduction)
+ 569 % (if 3 % growth/year)
+ 478 % (if 3 % growth/year)
+ 148 % (if 3 % growth/year)
CH -50 % (among which 30% domestically)
Russia
Mexico
Norway
- 25 to - 30 %
- 40 % emissions / GDP from 2013
- 22 % emission / Business As Usual
- 51 % black carbon / Business As Usual
- 40 %
2026
Peak
Peak
20 May 2015
7
Annex 3
Proposals for an efficient and constructive Business Dialogue
between the business community and governments
in the framework of the preparation for COP 21 and beyond
1. Context and objectives
 The Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC decided to reach an international agreement in 2015 in Paris (COP
21). Above and beyond the actual commitments made by governments, a new climate regime requires to
address the involvement level from various actors in society. This particularly impacts companies that have
already incorporated climate change into their strategies.
 In that respect, we welcome the launch, by the French and Peruvian governments, of an open and flexible high-
level dialogue between public authorities and business, ahead of COP 21.Beyond that, it is essential that this
dialogue continues afterwards, with the aim of subsequently building a long-term relationship, while
implementing the future agreement which is due to be adopted in December 2015.
 This international dialogue should aim at discussing concrete solutions and lifting the existing/potential barriers
to effectively achieve the low-carbon transition. This would enable national negotiators to be collectively
aware of the issues at stake, and give business the visibility required to determine and implement appropriate
carbon intensity reduction strategies.
2. Our proposals
On May 20th
, this “Business dialogue”, which should mobilize both high-level government representatives and CEOs,
should be structured in two phases:
 an initial phase supporting the preparation of the agreement to be negotiated by the Parties to the UNFCCC;
 an implementation phase after COP 21.
In that respect, it must be supported by the successive Presidencies of the Conference of Parties and involve high level
policy-makers and negotiators and the global business community. CEOs will support it and take an effective part in it.
a) Objectives:
The objectives of this dialogue will be to:
 help public authorities identify business expectations in view of an ambitious global climate agreement and
determine concrete proposals helping to achieve this agreement and its implementation;
 identify:(i) the most cost-effective mature high potential technologies that can help to reduce the carbon
intensity of our economies; (ii) the breakthrough technologies requiring research and development programs to
fulfill their potential;
 provide information that would help to choose appropriate policies for the deployment of low carbon solutions
and technologies;
 better understand the economic and sectoral implications that might arise from the Intended National
Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted by the major emitting countries in the first half of 2015.
20 May 2015
8
b) Content:
This dialogue would be based on two phases:
i. The first phase of the dialogue could address priority topics, in the framework of dedicated meetings, in view of
reaching a global agreement in December 2015; those would be the following:
 On May 20st:sharing the overall expectations for the future agreement, but also a common
understanding of the main issues at stakes, and of the Intended National Determined Contributions and
of their impacts on business;
 End of September:market mechanisms and carbon pricing (including the potential links between
national/regional schemes);
 October: fostering deployment in key low-carbon business solutions and derisking of investments.
The conclusions based upon the discussions could be presented at the Conference of the Parties in December
2015.
ii. The second phase (following COP 21, i.e. from January 2016 onwards) would aim to pursue the dialogue towards
an effective low-carbon transition, through a medium and long-term work programme, jointly built by the
business community and governments.
c) Method:
 The dialogue should involve all international business organisations working on climate issues (WBCSD, Global
Compact, BizMEF, B20 Coalition, B7, ICC, ERT, Business Europe, IETA, WEF, etc.) and be coordinated with the
activities and initiatives of other institutions (IEA, OECD, World Bank, BIAC, TEC, etc.) and relevant actors (think
tanks, observatories, local authorities, etc.).
 The dialogue might take the form of thematic international roundtables located in the major emitting regions
(e.g. Europe, East Asia, Southern Asia, Africa, the Americas), led by business and public authorities, both through
technical (experts) and general high level (CEOs and governments’ top representatives such as Ministers)
meetings.
Being held under Chatham House rules, this dialogue should be complementary to already planned international
events, such as:
- the Business Climate Summit, supported by the most prominent international business organisations,
on 20-21 May 2015: it should be a key milestone for shedding light on business’ positions on the
international climate agreement;
- the “International Finance Day on the road to COP 21”, sponsored by the Caisse des dépôts group and
the European Investment Bank, on 22 May 2015;
- The 70th
general assembly of the UN on September 15-22 in New York;
- the forthcoming Low Carbon Technology Partnership Initiative (LCTPi) in Paris in May, in September in
South Africa, India and Brazil, and in October in Japan and China;
- The Innovation for Cool Earth Forum, held in Tokyo on October 7-8.
 In order to ensure wide and effective involvement of companies and their representatives, two high level
personalities, recognized both by the global business community and public authorities, will, as “leaders” of the
Business Dialogue mobilize all existing international political and economic networks, such as the network of
French and foreign ambassadors and the networks that supported the coalition statement in favour of carbon
pricing.

More Related Content

Similar to Business proposals for cop 21 supports by 20 may 2015

EESC position paper on the international climate negotiations
EESC position paper on the international climate negotiationsEESC position paper on the international climate negotiations
EESC position paper on the international climate negotiations
Nuno Quental
 
Yale Climate Change Dialogue Working Paper
Yale Climate Change Dialogue Working PaperYale Climate Change Dialogue Working Paper
Yale Climate Change Dialogue Working Paper
Mohammad Aatish Khan
 
Unveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in Indonesia
Unveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in IndonesiaUnveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in Indonesia
Unveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in Indonesia
Dicky Edwin Hindarto
 
Oil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 report
Oil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 reportOil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 report
Oil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 report
Total
 
G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance
G20/OECD Principles of Corporate GovernanceG20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance
G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance
surrenderyourthrone
 
Corporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdf
Corporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdfCorporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdf
Corporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdf
JasonCama1
 
A digital transformation of the sustainability information flows (
A digital transformation  of  the sustainability information flows  (A digital transformation  of  the sustainability information flows  (
A digital transformation of the sustainability information flows (
Workiva
 
Forward-looking companies set science-based targets
Forward-looking companies set science-based targetsForward-looking companies set science-based targets
Forward-looking companies set science-based targets
Sitra / Ekologinen kestävyys
 
ESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdf
ESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdfESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdf
ESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdf
Marianna Sorrente
 
Carbon finance
Carbon financeCarbon finance
Carbon finance
Ricardo Scacchetti
 
BASD comments on zero draft
BASD comments on zero draftBASD comments on zero draft
BASD comments on zero draft
uncsd2012
 
The Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services Sector
The Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services SectorThe Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services Sector
The Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services Sector
BOHR International Journal of Business Ethics and Corporate Governance
 
UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016
UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016
UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016
UNFCCC
 
Curb it balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)
Curb it   balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)Curb it   balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)
Curb it balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)
Prakash Wagh
 
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011
Global Utmaning
 
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011
Global Utmaning
 
Come Clean Report from Weber Shandwick
Come Clean Report from Weber ShandwickCome Clean Report from Weber Shandwick
Come Clean Report from Weber Shandwick
Jonny rosemont
 
Cleantech Report June2009
Cleantech Report June2009Cleantech Report June2009
Cleantech Report June2009
PARIS
 
BASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation Document
BASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation DocumentBASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation Document
BASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation Document
uncsd2012
 
CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACH
CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACHCORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACH
CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACH
ijmvsc
 

Similar to Business proposals for cop 21 supports by 20 may 2015 (20)

EESC position paper on the international climate negotiations
EESC position paper on the international climate negotiationsEESC position paper on the international climate negotiations
EESC position paper on the international climate negotiations
 
Yale Climate Change Dialogue Working Paper
Yale Climate Change Dialogue Working PaperYale Climate Change Dialogue Working Paper
Yale Climate Change Dialogue Working Paper
 
Unveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in Indonesia
Unveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in IndonesiaUnveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in Indonesia
Unveiling the Potential of Market Based Mechanism Implementation in Indonesia
 
Oil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 report
Oil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 reportOil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 report
Oil and Gas Climate Initiative 2016 report
 
G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance
G20/OECD Principles of Corporate GovernanceG20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance
G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance
 
Corporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdf
Corporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdfCorporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdf
Corporate-Governance-Principles-ENG.pdf
 
A digital transformation of the sustainability information flows (
A digital transformation  of  the sustainability information flows  (A digital transformation  of  the sustainability information flows  (
A digital transformation of the sustainability information flows (
 
Forward-looking companies set science-based targets
Forward-looking companies set science-based targetsForward-looking companies set science-based targets
Forward-looking companies set science-based targets
 
ESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdf
ESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdfESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdf
ESG The European Union's Action Plan.pdf
 
Carbon finance
Carbon financeCarbon finance
Carbon finance
 
BASD comments on zero draft
BASD comments on zero draftBASD comments on zero draft
BASD comments on zero draft
 
The Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services Sector
The Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services SectorThe Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services Sector
The Ripple Effect of EU Disclosures Regulation in Financial Services Sector
 
UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016
UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016
UNFCCC Executive Secretary Budget presentation October 2016
 
Curb it balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)
Curb it   balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)Curb it   balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)
Curb it balance it emission management &cc using sap (2)
 
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid March 16th 2011
 
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011
An International Climate Investment Community - Madrid, March 16th, 2011
 
Come Clean Report from Weber Shandwick
Come Clean Report from Weber ShandwickCome Clean Report from Weber Shandwick
Come Clean Report from Weber Shandwick
 
Cleantech Report June2009
Cleantech Report June2009Cleantech Report June2009
Cleantech Report June2009
 
BASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation Document
BASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation DocumentBASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation Document
BASD Contribution to the Rio+20 Compilation Document
 
CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACH
CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACHCORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACH
CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY – A KEY FIGURE-BASED APPROACH
 

More from MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France

Projet retraite Medef
Projet retraite MedefProjet retraite Medef
Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...
Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...
Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017
Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017
Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Tech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissance
Tech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissanceTech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissance
Tech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissance
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Rapport de gestion 2016
Rapport de gestion 2016Rapport de gestion 2016
Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016
Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016
Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016
Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016
Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...
Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...
Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Les infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissance
Les infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissanceLes infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissance
Les infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissance
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21
L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21
L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Barometre medef fiscalite locale
Barometre medef fiscalite localeBarometre medef fiscalite locale
Barometre medef fiscalite locale
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015
Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015
Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Medef reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...
Medef   reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...Medef   reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...
Medef reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Comment éviter les tensions de trésorerie
Comment éviter les tensions de trésorerieComment éviter les tensions de trésorerie
Comment éviter les tensions de trésorerie
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Créer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le font
Créer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le fontCréer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le font
Créer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le font
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
conf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medef
conf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medefconf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medef
conf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medef
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014
MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014
MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014
MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014
MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Medef propositions réforme apprentissage
Medef propositions réforme apprentissageMedef propositions réforme apprentissage
Medef propositions réforme apprentissage
MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France
 
Medef manifeste cop21
Medef manifeste cop21Medef manifeste cop21

More from MEDEF - Mouvement des Entreprises de France (20)

Projet retraite Medef
Projet retraite MedefProjet retraite Medef
Projet retraite Medef
 
Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...
Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...
Etude sur l'impact des transitions verte et numérique sur l'emploi, les besoi...
 
Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017
Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017
Livre blanc biz hackathon-2017
 
Tech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissance
Tech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissanceTech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissance
Tech Afrique-Tech France lien de croissance
 
Rapport de gestion 2016
Rapport de gestion 2016Rapport de gestion 2016
Rapport de gestion 2016
 
Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016
Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016
Baromètre national de percetion de l'égalité des chances - édition 2016
 
Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016
Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016
Programme de l'Université du Numérique 2016
 
Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...
Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...
Déclaration commune du Sommet mondial des entreprises sur l’énergie et le cha...
 
Les infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissance
Les infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissanceLes infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissance
Les infrastructures de réseaux au service de la croissance
 
L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21
L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21
L’engagement du MEDEF pour la COP 21
 
Barometre medef fiscalite locale
Barometre medef fiscalite localeBarometre medef fiscalite locale
Barometre medef fiscalite locale
 
Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015
Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015
Livret synthese barometre diversite 2015
 
Medef reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...
Medef   reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...Medef   reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...
Medef reduire la depense publique pour permettre une refondation fiscale en...
 
Comment éviter les tensions de trésorerie
Comment éviter les tensions de trésorerieComment éviter les tensions de trésorerie
Comment éviter les tensions de trésorerie
 
Créer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le font
Créer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le fontCréer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le font
Créer 1 million d’emplois en 5 ans ? La France l’a fait, d’autres pays le font
 
conf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medef
conf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medefconf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medef
conf sociale et eco tpe pme juin 2015 - Les Propositions du Medef
 
MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014
MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014
MEDEF - Rapport de gestion 2014
 
MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014
MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014
MEDEF - Rapport d'activité 2014
 
Medef propositions réforme apprentissage
Medef propositions réforme apprentissageMedef propositions réforme apprentissage
Medef propositions réforme apprentissage
 
Medef manifeste cop21
Medef manifeste cop21Medef manifeste cop21
Medef manifeste cop21
 

Recently uploaded

Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?
Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?
Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?
reema kushawaha
 
NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...
NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...
NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...
Amil Baba Dawood bangali
 
Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...
Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...
Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...
Godwin Emmanuel Oyedokun MBA MSc PhD FCA FCTI FCNA CFE FFAR
 
HibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality
HibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air QualityHibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality
HibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality
Sha Alam
 
PDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptx
PDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptxPDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptx
PDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptx
Paul Zakkour
 
Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...
Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...
Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...
Open Access Research Paper
 
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete GuideBest Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Jakariya sarkar
 
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdfGUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdf
ProexportColombia1
 
University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
etwvyv
 
Soil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdf
Soil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdfSoil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdf
Soil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdf
Envirotac Inc.
 
2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen
2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen
2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen
santhoshguggilla1
 
Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.
Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.
Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.
Mohammed Nizam
 
total suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatment
total suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatmenttotal suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatment
total suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatment
jyotisharma201910
 
Sustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity framework
Sustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity frameworkSustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity framework
Sustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity framework
IIED
 
FOREST OUT LIFETIME Blue Illustrated Modern ...
FOREST OUT LIFETIME                                  Blue Illustrated Modern ...FOREST OUT LIFETIME                                  Blue Illustrated Modern ...
FOREST OUT LIFETIME Blue Illustrated Modern ...
AKSHARA ANKIT KUMAR
 
WEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptx
WEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptxWEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptx
WEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptx
Maechancanono
 
Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...
Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...
Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...
Open Access Research Paper
 
Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro
Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 proIphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro
Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro
gocorog793
 
Abortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get Cytotec
Abortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get CytotecAbortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get Cytotec
Abortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get Cytotec
Abortion pills in Riyadh +966572737505 get cytotec
 
SAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT d
SAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT dSAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT d
SAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT d
crispyanoop1
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?
Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?
Is it safe to keep money in Punjab National Bank?
 
NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...
NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...
NO1 Qualified Black Magic Expert Specialist In UK Black Magic Expert Speciali...
 
Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...
Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...
Tax Audit and Investigation in Poor Documentation Environment - Prof Oyedokun...
 
HibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality
HibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air QualityHibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality
HibouAir IAQ: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality
 
PDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptx
PDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptxPDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptx
PDZ CDR MRV Net Zero Summit 19_06_2024 vPRINT.pptx
 
Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...
Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...
Profitability and efficiency analyses of organic temperate vegetable producti...
 
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete GuideBest Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
Best Soil For Vertical Garden: A Complete Guide
 
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdfGUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdf
GUIA_LEGAL_CHAPTER-8_COLOMBIAN ENVIROMENTAL REGIME.pdf
 
University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma TranscriptUniversity of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
University of Miami degree offer diploma Transcript
 
Soil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdf
Soil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdfSoil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdf
Soil Stabilization Techniques for Improved Road Construction (2).pdf
 
2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen
2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen
2nd English book kvs , it's for kvs studen
 
Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.
Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.
Emergency response preparedness for Monsoon in humanitarian response.
 
total suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatment
total suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatmenttotal suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatment
total suspended solids, very important topic from wastewatr treatment
 
Sustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity framework
Sustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity frameworkSustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity framework
Sustainable use of wild species: Target 5 of the global biodiversity framework
 
FOREST OUT LIFETIME Blue Illustrated Modern ...
FOREST OUT LIFETIME                                  Blue Illustrated Modern ...FOREST OUT LIFETIME                                  Blue Illustrated Modern ...
FOREST OUT LIFETIME Blue Illustrated Modern ...
 
WEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptx
WEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptxWEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptx
WEEK-1 Ethicali-SUMMER-2020-UPDATED.pptx
 
Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...
Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...
Novel biosynthesized nanosilver impregnated heat modified montmorillonite cla...
 
Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro
Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 proIphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro
Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro Iphone 15 pro
 
Abortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get Cytotec
Abortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get CytotecAbortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get Cytotec
Abortion pills in Jeddah (+966572737505 ) Get Cytotec
 
SAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT d
SAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT dSAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT d
SAP EHS Course PPT demo SAP EHS Course PPT d
 

Business proposals for cop 21 supports by 20 may 2015

  • 1. 20 May 2015 Business proposals in view of a 2015 international climate change agreement at COP 21 in Paris * 1 By May 20th 2015, Chairmen / Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of 59 international companies and 7 organizations already support the “Business proposals for COP 21”. In order to ensure worldwide awareness of the Business community before COP 21, they call on their counterparts to join them in the coming weeks before the September Climate Week in New York (contact: Business@COP-21.org jointly managed by French Business Associations: MEDEF, Afep and Cercle de l’Industrie). 7 supporting organizations: UN GLOBAL COMPACT President of WBCSD Peter BAKKER Business Europe Emma MARCEGAGLIA President Afep Pierre PRINGUET President Cercle de l’Industrie Philippe VARIN President MEDEF Pierre GATTAZ President SYNTEC INGENIERIE Nicolas JACHIET President 59 supporting Chairmen / CEOs from international companies: AIRBUS GROUPE Denis RANQUE Chairman AIR LIQUIDE Benoît POTIER Chairman & CEO ALSTOM Patrick KRON Chairman & CEO AREVA Philippe VARIN Chairman ARKEMA Thierry le HENAFF Chairman & CEO AVIVA France Nicolas SCHIMEL CEO AXA Henri de CASTRIES Chairman & CEO BASF Kurt BOCK Chairman & CEO BNP PARIBAS Jean LEMIERRE Chairman BOUYGUES Martin BOUYGUES Chairman & CEO BPCE François PEROL Chairman COMPAGNIE DE SAINT GOBAIN Pierre-André de CHALENDAR Chairman & CEO CREDIT AGRICOLE SA Jean-Marie SANDER Chairman & CEO DCNS Hervé GUILLOU Chairman DSM Feike SIJBESMA CEO EDF Jean-Bernard LEVY Chairman & CEO EGIS Nicolas JACHIET Chairman & CEO ENGIE Gérard MESTRALLET Chairman & CEO ERAMET Patrick BUFFET Chairman & CEO FFP Robert PEUGEOT Chairman & CEO FONCIERE DES REGIONS Christophe KULLMANN CEO GALERIES LAFAYETTE Philippe HOUZE Chairman of the Management Board GROUPE SEB Thierry de la Tour d’Artaise Chairman & CEO IMERYS Gilles MICHEL Chairman & CEO JC DECAUX Jean-Charles DECAUX Co-CEO KERING François-Henri PINAULT Chairman & CE KINGFISHER France Daniel BERNARD Chairman & CEO LAFARGE Bruno LAFONT Chairman & CEO LEGRAND Gilles SCHNEPP Chairman & CEO L’OREAL Jean-Paul AGON Chairman & CEO LVMH Antonio BELLONI CEO MICHELIN Jean-Dominique SENARD CEO NESTLE France Richard GIRARDOT Chairman & CEO NEUFLIZE OBC Philippe VAYSSETTES Chairman of the Management Board NEXANS Frédéric VINCENT Chairman
  • 2. 20 May 2015 Business proposals in view of a 2015 international climate change agreement at COP 21 in Paris * 2 NEXITY Alain DINNIN Chairman PERNOD RICARD Alexandre RICARD Chairman & CEO PEUGEOT SA Carlos TAVARES Chairman of the Management Board ROYAL PHILIPS Frans Van HOUTEN Chief Executive Officer PHILIPS LIGHTING Eric RONDOLAT CEO PUBLICIS Maurice LEVY Chairman & CEO RATP Christian GALIVEL Deputy CEO REMY COINTREAU Valérie CHAPOULAUD- FLOQUET CEO SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC SA Jean-Pascal TRICOIRE Chairman & CEO SNCF Guillaume Pépy Chairman & CEO RENAULT Carlos GHOSN Chairman & CEO REXEL Rudy PROVOOST Chairman & CEO SEQUANA Pascal LEBARD Chairman & CEO SIEMENS France SAS Christophe de MAISTRES President SOCIETE GENERALE Frédéric OUDEA Chairman & CEO SOLVAY Jean-Pierre CLAMADIEU Chairman of Executive Committee SUEZ ENVIRONNEMENT Jean-Louis CHAUSSADE CEO THALES Patrick CAINE Chairman & CEO TOTAL Patrick POUYANNE CEO UNIBAIL-RODAMCO Christophe CUVILLIER Chairman of Management Board UNILEVER Paul POLMAN CEO VALEO Jacques ASCHENBROICH CEO VALLOUREC Philippe CROUZET Chairman & CEO VEOLIA Antoine FREROT Chairman & CEO VINCI Xavier HUILLARD Chairman & CEO
  • 3. 20 May 2015 3 Business proposals in view of a 2015 international climate change agreement at COP 21 in Paris Climate scientists and experts are clear: there is an urgent need to address climate change through significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions worldwide (see Annex 1). Implementing such reductions raises substantial technological, economic, social, and institutional challenges. Business will only thrive if sustainable growth is achieved, and thus strongly supports the adoption in 2015 of an ambitious agreement which reflects the long-term objective of limiting global warming below 2°C. This agreement should enhance an international level playing field and in particular:  guarantee comparable efforts from all major emitting economies (see Annex 2), ensuring fair competition between economic players;  provide a long-term and predictable framework which encourages investments and scaling by business of efficient carbon reduction and adaptation technologies, in a cost effective way;  focus the future climate framework on the States’ Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDCs), which should avoid competitive distortions, be coherent and detailed, in a five to ten-year term, and on fostering international cooperation;  establish a reliable monitoring, reporting and verification system. Business is ready to contribute to the success of such an agreement, to efficiently achieve the low-carbon transition and to bring solutions to the market. In this view, we business believe the following evolutions will be key and need to be considered as a whole: 1. Launching a constructive and lasting Business Dialogue convened by the COP Presidency, between the business community and governments We welcome the launching of an open and flexible dialogue ahead of COP 21 and continuing afterwards, with the aim of building a long-term institutional relationship, while implementing and improving the future agreement expected in December 2015 (see Annex 3). This dialogue should aim at better understanding the economic and transversal implications that might arise from the INDCs, discussing the enabling conditions for scaling up concrete solutions and lifting the existing/potential barriers to effectively achieve the low-carbon transition. This should enable national negotiators to be collectively aware of the issues at stake, and business to identify and implement appropriate carbon intensity reduction strategies. This continuous dialogue will be complementary to the Business and Climate Summit, gathering in Paris CEOs and Ministers worldwide, which takes place on May 20th and 21st as well as to the international Climate Finance Day on May 22nd . 2. Boosting investments in low-carbon business solutions and technologies Investments required for a low-carbon transition are massive, although feasible, and often risky, especially when it comes to bringing new technologies to market-deployment. Yet, there are critical gaps in the existing available funding sources and methodologies, resulting in under-investment in such technologies. We believe it is necessary to develop an appropriate framework in order to efficiently support and encourage investments needed to achieve emission reductions and adaptation objectives, especially through:  developed and reinforced carbon market tools, which will help stimulate investments in innovative technologies, installations and products in a competitive way;  climate funds, including the Green Climate Fund (GCF), which should act as catalyst for low carbon investments, as well as financial tools designed to better share risks between private and public sectors, and thus leverage private financing;  generally, all measures and tools which aim at encouraging private investments, through incentives rather than penalties, should be developed.
  • 4. 20 May 2015 4 3. Intensifying R&D, innovation and deployment of mature and breakthrough technologies The international community should enforce mechanisms dedicated to the development and deployment of mature and breakthrough technologies, and thus:  pursue the development of supportive regulation and funding for market-introduction of promising technologies;  encourage international cooperation for the development and deployment of those breakthrough technologies at worldwide scale;  reinforce existing mechanisms, such as the UNFCCC Technology Mechanism, under the current framework, and facilitate their inter-operability;  promote the adoption of major proposals from the New Climate Economy report which aims at scaling-up low- carbon innovation and moving towards connected and compact cities. These mechanisms must respect the principles of technology neutrality and cost-effectiveness. 4. The need of carbon pricing Carbon pricing is essential to guide business decisions and investments towards low-carbon technologies. In that respect, it is supported by numerous businesses and countries through, for instance, the international coalition statement in favour of carbon pricing adopted in September 2014 by the World Bank, the UN Global Compact, Caring for Climate and the Carbon Disclosure Project, which has been supported by a significant number of nations and companies. The agreement should lay the foundations for the integration of a carbon pricing system, in all major emitting countries, which:  is robust and predictable, thereby stimulating action on emissions and enabling investment decisions in low- carbon technologies in the best cost-effective way;  prevents from competitive distortions;  is coordinated with a phasing-out of all existing carbon subsidies;  relies on relevant tools such as emission trading schemes, or taxes/extensions of trading schemes/ shadow pricing instruments, with a view to mobilizing economy-wide;  can get along with other mechanisms such as standards, voluntary agreements, other regulatory instruments… As it is expected that business as a whole will have to cope with the different systems implemented by countries/regions, it is essential to work on the means by which carbon pricing can be introduced, such as:  governance at domestic level (what are the different instruments at play, how do they interact ?);  coordination and potential linking between different carbon pricing systems, in particular by embedding in the agreement a mechanism for international transfers of emission units and a unified project-based crediting mechanism built on best UNFCCC practices;  impacts of different carbon pricing policies on competitiveness. We are fully aware that the COP 21 and the 2015 agreement will be an important step towards the low-carbon economy transition. Reaching this target will take time and requires continuous long-term efforts from the world community as a whole, especially by using international forums. Business is conscious of being a driving force for scaling up solutions and is ready to play major role.
  • 5. 20 May 2015 5 Annex 1 The challenges of climate change: facts and figures This annex is mainly based on the IPCC report (Nov. 2014) and the New climate Economy report (Sept. 2014). 1. Businesses recognize there is an urgent need to address the climate change issue According to the November 2014 IPCC Report:  since 1950's, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia. For instance, each of the past 3 decades has been successively warmer than the preceding decades since 1850s;  climate change is directly linked to human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which have significantly increased since the pre-industrial era, and are now higher than ever;  without further GHG emissions reductions, global mean surface temperature should increase in 2100 from 3.7 to 4.8°C above the average for 1850-1900 for a median climate response, with irreversible impacts for people and ecosystem (i.e. increasing risks on species extinction, food security, human health, urban systems, etc.). 2. They understand it implies huge environmental, economic and social challenges…  According to the IPCC report, limiting global warming to 2°C relative to pre-industrial levels and reaching near zero net human emissions of CO2 and other long-lived GHGs by the end of the century, would mean that : o with 1900 GtCO2 having already been emitted between 1870 and 2011, no more than 1000 GtCO2 may still be released in the atmosphere, corresponding to 20 years if the current annual rate (50 GtCO2) is maintained; o it requires to reduce global GHG emission by 40-70% from 2010 to 2050; o it requires to reduce emissions by around 80% by 2050 compared to 1990 for France and other developed countries.  According to the Commission 2050 roadmap, it means to reduce by 2050 CO2emissions in the EU by 80-95% compared to 1990.  Regarding the financial effort, following the New Climate Economy report, in order to reach the 2°C target, a large share of investments in infrastructures will have to be reallocated. For instance, between 2015 and 2030: o Additional US$8.8 trillion of incremental investment would be needed to improve the energy-efficiency of buildings, industry and transport; o Deploying low-carbon technologies including renewable, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS) could require another US$4.7 trillion. 3. … But they consider that these challenges are not insurmountable According to the “Better Growth, Better Climate” report:  a low-carbon scenario could save money in some areas (e.g. US$5.7 trillion saved in fossil-fuelled power plants and along the fossil fuel supply chain, and up to US$3.4 trillion from building more compact, connected cities and reducing sprawl);  actually, the net incremental infrastructure investment needs in the framework of a low carbon transition up to 2030 would only be 5% higher than those same needs in a business as usual scenario (where infrastructures spending needs are projected to amount to almost US$ 90 trillion), provided the capital is appropriately allocated;  recent modelling suggests economic costs of climate action for a 2°C path are likely to be limited, representing around 1.7% (median) of baseline GDP in 2030, although delayed action would increase that cost. Business, which is at the core of the definition and implementation of low carbon solutions, strongly supports policies and instruments aiming at reducing carbon emission in a cost-effective way while maintaining competitiveness of our economies.
  • 6. 20 May 2015 6 Annex 2 Comparison of greenhouse gas reduction commitments notified by the Parties for COP 15 (Copenhaguen) – 1 April 2015 Parties Years 1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 2050 EU USA Canada Russia Japan Norway South Korea -20 % (unilateral) -17 % -30 % 2025 -42 % -83 % -40%/-45% (intensity CO2) -20% (unilateral) -25 % (if ambitious commitment from major countries) -30 % (unilateral) Indonesia -3,5 % (estimates not notified) A N N E X I II New- Zealand -10 % (unilateral) Brazil China India -20%/-25% (intensity CO2) Australia -5 % (unilateral) -26 % / -41% compared to business as usual level -30% compared to business as usual level -36,1 % / -38,9 % compared to business as usual levels 1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 20502025 -15 % (conditional**) -25 % (conditional ***) ) ** In case of global agreement (stabilization at 450 ppm for eCO2) + commitments from developing countries to restrict their emissions + comparable commitments from industrialised countries *** In case of ambitious global agreement (objective  450 ppm eq CO2) * In case of comparable commitments from develped countries and adequate contributions from developing-30 % (conditional*) -17 % -25 % (if investment of forestry and global agreement) -40 % (in case of global agreement) -20 % (in case of global agreeement) N O N A N N E X South Africa -34 % in 2020 compared to business as usual level -42 % in 2025 compared to business as usual level Annex 2 Comparison of greenhouse gas reduction commitments from the Parties in view of COP 21 (Paris) – 1 April 2015 Parties Years 1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 2050 EU USA 2025 China 1990 2000 2005 2020 2030 20502025 -40 % (unilateral and domestic) -26 à -28 % -80 % (unilateral and domestic) -13,9 to -16,2 % (after EPA data) -33 % (if linear reduction) -31 % (if linear reduction) + 569 % (if 3 % growth/year) + 478 % (if 3 % growth/year) + 148 % (if 3 % growth/year) CH -50 % (among which 30% domestically) Russia Mexico Norway - 25 to - 30 % - 40 % emissions / GDP from 2013 - 22 % emission / Business As Usual - 51 % black carbon / Business As Usual - 40 % 2026 Peak Peak
  • 7. 20 May 2015 7 Annex 3 Proposals for an efficient and constructive Business Dialogue between the business community and governments in the framework of the preparation for COP 21 and beyond 1. Context and objectives  The Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC decided to reach an international agreement in 2015 in Paris (COP 21). Above and beyond the actual commitments made by governments, a new climate regime requires to address the involvement level from various actors in society. This particularly impacts companies that have already incorporated climate change into their strategies.  In that respect, we welcome the launch, by the French and Peruvian governments, of an open and flexible high- level dialogue between public authorities and business, ahead of COP 21.Beyond that, it is essential that this dialogue continues afterwards, with the aim of subsequently building a long-term relationship, while implementing the future agreement which is due to be adopted in December 2015.  This international dialogue should aim at discussing concrete solutions and lifting the existing/potential barriers to effectively achieve the low-carbon transition. This would enable national negotiators to be collectively aware of the issues at stake, and give business the visibility required to determine and implement appropriate carbon intensity reduction strategies. 2. Our proposals On May 20th , this “Business dialogue”, which should mobilize both high-level government representatives and CEOs, should be structured in two phases:  an initial phase supporting the preparation of the agreement to be negotiated by the Parties to the UNFCCC;  an implementation phase after COP 21. In that respect, it must be supported by the successive Presidencies of the Conference of Parties and involve high level policy-makers and negotiators and the global business community. CEOs will support it and take an effective part in it. a) Objectives: The objectives of this dialogue will be to:  help public authorities identify business expectations in view of an ambitious global climate agreement and determine concrete proposals helping to achieve this agreement and its implementation;  identify:(i) the most cost-effective mature high potential technologies that can help to reduce the carbon intensity of our economies; (ii) the breakthrough technologies requiring research and development programs to fulfill their potential;  provide information that would help to choose appropriate policies for the deployment of low carbon solutions and technologies;  better understand the economic and sectoral implications that might arise from the Intended National Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted by the major emitting countries in the first half of 2015.
  • 8. 20 May 2015 8 b) Content: This dialogue would be based on two phases: i. The first phase of the dialogue could address priority topics, in the framework of dedicated meetings, in view of reaching a global agreement in December 2015; those would be the following:  On May 20st:sharing the overall expectations for the future agreement, but also a common understanding of the main issues at stakes, and of the Intended National Determined Contributions and of their impacts on business;  End of September:market mechanisms and carbon pricing (including the potential links between national/regional schemes);  October: fostering deployment in key low-carbon business solutions and derisking of investments. The conclusions based upon the discussions could be presented at the Conference of the Parties in December 2015. ii. The second phase (following COP 21, i.e. from January 2016 onwards) would aim to pursue the dialogue towards an effective low-carbon transition, through a medium and long-term work programme, jointly built by the business community and governments. c) Method:  The dialogue should involve all international business organisations working on climate issues (WBCSD, Global Compact, BizMEF, B20 Coalition, B7, ICC, ERT, Business Europe, IETA, WEF, etc.) and be coordinated with the activities and initiatives of other institutions (IEA, OECD, World Bank, BIAC, TEC, etc.) and relevant actors (think tanks, observatories, local authorities, etc.).  The dialogue might take the form of thematic international roundtables located in the major emitting regions (e.g. Europe, East Asia, Southern Asia, Africa, the Americas), led by business and public authorities, both through technical (experts) and general high level (CEOs and governments’ top representatives such as Ministers) meetings. Being held under Chatham House rules, this dialogue should be complementary to already planned international events, such as: - the Business Climate Summit, supported by the most prominent international business organisations, on 20-21 May 2015: it should be a key milestone for shedding light on business’ positions on the international climate agreement; - the “International Finance Day on the road to COP 21”, sponsored by the Caisse des dépôts group and the European Investment Bank, on 22 May 2015; - The 70th general assembly of the UN on September 15-22 in New York; - the forthcoming Low Carbon Technology Partnership Initiative (LCTPi) in Paris in May, in September in South Africa, India and Brazil, and in October in Japan and China; - The Innovation for Cool Earth Forum, held in Tokyo on October 7-8.  In order to ensure wide and effective involvement of companies and their representatives, two high level personalities, recognized both by the global business community and public authorities, will, as “leaders” of the Business Dialogue mobilize all existing international political and economic networks, such as the network of French and foreign ambassadors and the networks that supported the coalition statement in favour of carbon pricing.