SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1
PANAMA UNIVERSITY
VICE-RECTOR OF RESEARCH AND POSTGRADUATE
FACULTY OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ACCOUNTING
MASTER'S DEGREE IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT IN THE
MARITIME INDUSTRY
TITLE OF THE INTERVENTION PROJECT II
ACADEMIC GUIDANCE OF FIRST ENTRY CADETS AT THE
INTERNATIONAL MARITIME UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA
VIP CODE
CE-PI-327-01-05-23-59
PRODUCED BY
CARLOS C. CAMPOS C.
8 – 388 – 223
ADVISER
DIÓGENES MORENO
JANUARY 2024
2
GRATITUDE
To God, for giving me health and the opportunity to fulfill my dreams and become the
professional I am today. Thank you for guiding me and blessing me in every step I have taken.
To my parents, Professor Mirtha Esther Castillo de Campos and Mr. Carlos Cesar Campos
Morales, for being my light and my example. Thank you for your love, support, advice and
sacrifice. They are my greatest inspiration and my pride. To my teachers and classmates, for
sharing their knowledge and experiences with me. Thank you for your patience, your
collaboration, your friendship and your trust. They have been a fundamental part of my training
and my growth. This work is the result of my effort and dedication, but also of the help and
support of all these people. Therefore, I dedicate this work to you with all my love and gratitude.
3
DEDICATION
To my parents and sisters, thank you for being my support, my example and my
motivation. Without you, this work would not have been possible. They are my family, my team
and I admire them deeply. On every page of this work, there is a little of you. They have shared
with me their knowledge, their experiences and their advice. They have been my teachers, my
friends and my accomplices. They have made me the professional I am today. This work is the
result of our effort and dedication, and I dedicate it to you with all my love and gratitude. I hope
it serves as inspiration and guidance, in case you want to follow in my professional footsteps.
SUMMARY
The objective of this research work is to analyze the relationship between university
training and the professional skills of students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at
4
the International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP), as well as evaluate their work
performance. To do this, we start from the review of some studies carried out in other areas that
allow us to assess the impact of this study, such as the case of the Medical Technology degree
at the University of Panama.
The research problem is raised about how the academic training of future nautical engineers is
linked to social reality and the labor market, and how they should be productively inserted by
applying their academic preparation. It is considered that higher education should promote
dynamic, participatory and critical learning, as well as provide students with the professional
skills necessary for successful work performance.
A brief account is made of the history of the UMIP, as a specialized training center that gave
continuity to the Nautical School of Panama, founded in 1972, and that has trained many multi-
purpose sailors, deck and engine officers, and pilots. of the Panama Canal. The report of the
2014 UMIP High Evaluation Commission is mentioned, which points out some strengths and
weaknesses of the institution, as well as some recommendations to improve the quality of
training and job placement of graduates.
Finally, the general and specific objectives of the study are presented, as well as the research
questions that will guide its development . It is expected that this study will contribute to
improving the university training and professional skills of Nautical Engineering in Naval
Machinery students at UMIP, as well as generating knowledge about the reality of the maritime
and port sector in Panama.
5
ABSTRACT
The present research work aims to analyze the relationship between university
education and professional competencies of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval
Machinery of the International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP), as well as to evaluate
their work performance. To do this, it starts from the review of some studies carried out in other
areas that allow to assess the impact of the present study, such as the case of the Medical
Technology career of the University of Panama.
6
The research problem is posed on how the academic training of future nautical engineers is
linked to the social reality and the labor market, and how they should productively insert
themselves applying their academic preparation. It is considered that higher education should
foster dynamic, participatory and critical learning, as well as provide students with the
professional competencies necessary for a successful work performance. A brief account of the
history of the UMIP is made, as a specialized training center that gave continuity to the Nautical
School of Panama, founded in 1972, and that has trained many versatile sailors, deck and
machine officers, and pilots of the Panama Canal.
The report of the High Commission of Evaluation of the UMIP of 2014 is mentioned, which
indicates some strengths and weaknesses of the institution, as well as some recommendations
to improve the quality of the training and the labor insertion of the graduates. Finally, the general
and specific objectives of the study are proposed, as well as the research questions that will
guide the development of the same. It is expected that this study will contribute to improve the
university education and the professional competencies of the students of Nautical Engineering
in Naval Machinery of the UMIP, as well as to generate knowledge about the reality of the
maritime and port sector in Panama.
7
Contenido
AGRADECIMIENTO ....................................................................................................2
DEDICATORIA ............................................................................................................3
RESUMEN...................................................................................................................3
ABSTRACT .................................................................................................................5
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................9
STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM ............................................................................10
BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................ 11
3.0 JUSTIFICATION .................................................................................................12
Maritime Safety ....................................................................................................12
Regulatory ...........................................................................................................13
Reputation of Educational Institutions ..............................................................13
Job performance .................................................................................................13
Competitiveness of the Maritime Sector ...........................................................13
4.0 PROJECT ...........................................................................................................14
4.1 General ...........................................................................................................14
4.2 Specific ..........................................................................................................14
5.0 THEORETICAL ...................................................................................................15
8
6.0 METHODOLOGY ................................................................................................16
METHOD ..............................................................................................................16
7.0 SWOT ANALYSIS ...............................................................................................17
GLOSSARY ..............................................................................................................21
Conclusion ................................................................................................................24
Bibliographies ...........................................................................................................26
ANNEX 1 ..................................................................................................................28
The Maritime Language Center (MLC), which operates at the International Maritime
University of Panama, is the training entity responsible for its greatest use in classes taught to
future naval machinery engineers. ........................................................................................31
ANNEX 2 ..................................................................................................................35
ANNEX 3 ..................................................................................................................37
9
INTRODUCTION
University training is a process that seeks to develop students' professional
competencies, that is, the set of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that allow them to
perform effectively in the workplace. However, there is not always an adequate relationship
between the training offered by universities and the demands of the labor market, which can
generate difficulties for the insertion and professional development of graduates.
This is the case of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at the International
Maritime University of Panama (UMIP), a career that aims to train engine officers capable of
operating and maintaining the propulsion and auxiliary systems of merchant ships. Despite the
strategic importance of this profession for the country, due to its geographical position and the
Panama Canal, no systematic evaluation has been carried out of the relationship between
university training and the professional skills of these students, nor of their performance.
employment once graduated.
For this reason, the objective of this research is to analyze the relationship between university
training and the professional skills of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery
at the UMIP, as well as evaluate their work performance in the maritime sector. To do this, a
descriptive-correlational study will be carried out, with a non-experimental and cross-sectional
design, using techniques and instruments such as documentary review, survey, interview and
statistical analysis.
The work is structured in five chapters: the first presents the introduction, the second presents
the theoretical framework, the third describes the methodology, the fourth shows the results
and the fifth offers the conclusions and recommendations.
10
PROBLEM STATEMENT
In Panama, the quality of the university education that our seafarers receive is reflected
in their employability one year after graduating. However, many of them have difficulties
entering and staying in the labor market, because they did not develop the necessary
professional skills during their studies.
11
This negatively affects graduates, who do not achieve stability or satisfaction in their jobs, and
who usually change shipping companies shortly after. It also harms shipping companies, which
invest in seafarers expecting them to embark for several years. In addition, it compromises
compliance with maritime regulations, the reputation of our educational institutions and the
competitiveness of our country in the maritime sector. Therefore, it is urgent to implement
strategies that improve the skills and responsibilities of our maritime school graduates, so that
can be performed successfully both on board ships and in other activities related to navigation.
BACKGROUND
Panama aspires to be a maritime cluster and a world-renowned logistics and port
platform. However, there is little information on the performance of graduates from maritime
universities in the private sector. Among the factors that can affect the skills of graduates are
sex, age and level of education. The government and maritime universities are committed to
providing their graduates with the skills that the labor market demands. An example of this is
the "Learning by Doing" initiative, promoted by President Laurentino Cortizo Cohen and the
Ministry of Labor and Labor Development ( Mitradel ) in 2022. The Panama Maritime Authority
12
(AMP) was the first entity to adopt it and adapt it to the maritime field, thus complying with the
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 4, 5 and 8 of the United Nations.
3.0 JUSTIFICATION
Shipping companies do not see the country only as a registry of ships, but as a quarry
to hire their crew. The Panamanian sailor has some academic deficiencies.1 This is reflected
in the low percentage of those who join the labor market during the first year after completing
their university studies. Only 10% achieve it. Some of these deficiencies may be significant that
may affect the following areas:
Maritime Safety
Deficiencies in professional skills can affect safety at sea, as graduates may not be fully
prepared to deal with emergency situations or to safely operate and maintain maritime
equipment.
13
Normative compliance
There may be problems related to compliance with maritime regulations and standards if
graduates do not have the necessary skills to understand and properly apply these regulations.
Reputation of Educational Institutions
Deficiencies in graduate skills can affect the reputation of maritime universities, as businesses
and industry may question the quality of training provided.
Job performance
Graduates with deficiencies in skills may experience difficulties such as greater knowledge of
the English language in their work performance, which may affect their professional progress
and career opportunities.
Competitiveness of the Maritime Sector
At a broader level, deficiencies in the skills of maritime professionals can affect the
competitiveness of the sector in the global market, as other countries or regions with better
trained professionals can surpass us in performance and efficiency.
The shipping industry depends on the competence and good training of seafarers to ensure the
safety of life at sea, maritime security, the efficiency of navigation and the protection and
conservation of the marine environment. Therefore, it is defined that: Maritime, port and logistics
personnel must have the knowledge, skills, abilities and aptitudes required for their
performance in the workplace. Our graduates must have the following competencies,
knowledge, abilities, skills, attitudes and values
14
The lack of knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes of maritime, port and logistics personnel
persists in all countries of the world for their performance in the workplace, due to not having
institutions that guarantee the acquisition of the skills required to carry out the tasks and
committed according to the level of responsibility in the job.
4.0 PROJECT OBJECTIVES
4.1 General
With this work we want to draw the attention of the educational authorities that train our
maritime officers, both in the public and private sectors, to the deficiencies that affect their
professional performance.
Our goal is for Panama to become a global benchmark for maritime excellence and for our
graduates to be competent and versatile professionals, capable of assuming operational and
administrative responsibilities on ships and ports. Thus, we will be able to increase job
opportunities for our young seafarers.
4.2 Specific
Learn to use what you know in your field professionally and know how to defend your ideas and
solve problems. They are able to analyze and interpret relevant data and take into account the
social, scientific and ethical aspects of their work.
Know how to communicate clearly and effectively with both experts and the general public.
15
1. Master oral and written English, which is the universal language of the sea.
2. Use the ICT tools that facilitate your professional work.
3. Respect and care for the marine environment, which is our most precious asset.
4. They adapt to new or unknown situations related to their area of study.
5. Continue to learn on your own and stay up to date.
5.0 THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
How prepared are the maritime engineers who graduate from our universities to face
the challenges of the labor market? This is the question we ask ourselves in this work, where
we seek to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the professional competencies of these
professionals.
To do this, we have interviewed representatives of maritime universities, the Panama
Canal Authority, the Maritime Authority of Panama and some graduates of the degree. Our
objective is to offer a diagnosis that serves to improve the quality of academic training and job
placement of maritime engineers in Panama, a topic little studied until now.
16
6.0 M ETHODOLOGY
For our graduates to have more opportunities and success in the maritime and port
sector, it is necessary to improve the areas that present deficiencies in their training. This way
they will be able to adapt to the technological changes that occur in this field, such as
automation, robotization, artificial intelligence and environmental conservation.
These topics must be incorporated into the study plans of maritime careers, so that our
young people develop the professional skills demanded by the current market.
METHOD
To be a successful maritime officer, you need to master four areas of knowledge:
How to position and navigate the vessel, and how to carry out loading and unloading
operations efficiently and safely.
How to plan the route, take care of the marine environment, and protect the lives of
those on board.
17
How to manage and organize the maintenance, human resources and operation of the
ship, and how to participate in repair, inspection and construction projects for ships and marine
platforms of all types.
These skills will give graduates a competitive advantage to continue studying or working
in the maritime sector.
7.0 SWOT ANALYSIS
If we applied the SWOT analysis to the professional skills of the graduates of our
maritime universities, it would show us the following:
STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES
"Learning by Doing" Initiative: Academic deficiencies:
The government and maritime
universities are committed to providing their
graduates with the skills demanded by the
labor market, as exemplified by the "Learning
by Doing" initiative promoted by President
Laurentino Cortizo Cohen and the Ministry of
Labor and Workforce Development ( Mitradel
) in the year 2022.
Graduates of maritime universities
have some academic deficiencies, which may
affect their performance in the labor market.
18
2. Commitment to training: 2. Low percentage of job placement:
Maritime universities are committed
to the training of their students, and are
willing to adapt their study plans and
development strategies to fit the needs of the
labor market.
Only 20% of graduates enter the labor
market in the first year after graduating.
3. Maritime security: 3. Lack of practical experience:
Safety at sea is a priority, and
maritime universities work to ensure that
graduates are prepared to deal with
emergency situations and safely operate and
maintain maritime equipment.
Graduates may lack practical
experience in the maritime sector, which may
affect their ability to perform in the labor
market.
4. Regulatory compliance: 4. Limitations in training:
Maritime universities work to ensure
that graduates are prepared to comply with
maritime rules and regulations.
Maritime universities may have
limitations in the training they provide to their
students, which may affect the quality of
training and preparation of graduates.
5. Reputation of educational
institutions:
5. Disconnection between training
and the labor market:
19
Maritime universities work to
maintain a good reputation, and the quality of
training provided is essential to achieving
this.
The training provided by maritime
universities may not be aligned with the
needs of the labor market, which may affect
the ability of graduates to find employment.
6. Job performance: 6. Lack of support for job placement:
Maritime universities work to ensure
that graduates are prepared to perform
successfully in the labor market, both on
board ships and in other activities related to
navigation.
Maritime universities may not provide
enough support to graduates to enable them
to enter the labor market. This may include a
lack of guidance and advice in the job search
process, as well as a lack of contacts and
networks that can help graduates find
employment opportunities.
7. Competitiveness of the maritime
sector:
7. Limitations on the diversity of
training:
Maritime universities work to ensure
that graduates are prepared to compete in
the global market, and ensure that Panama's
maritime sector is competitive.
7. Limitations in the diversity of
training: Maritime universities may have
limitations in the diversity of training they
provide, which may affect the ability of
20
graduates to adapt to different roles and
responsibilities in the maritime sector.
8. Lack of updating skills and
knowledge:
Maritime universities may not be
sufficiently updating the skills and knowledge
of graduates, which may affect their ability to
stay current and competitive in the labor
market.
9. Disconnection between training
and the needs of the sector:
The training provided by maritime
universities may not be aligned with the
needs of the maritime sector, which may
affect the ability of graduates to find
employment and perform effectively in the
labor market.
10. Lack of support for the continuity
of training:
Maritime universities may not provide
enough support for graduates to continue
21
their training and develop professionally in
the maritime sector. This may include a lack
of graduate programs, continuing training,
and support in obtaining professional
certifications and licenses.
GLOSSARY
University training : It is the educational process carried out in higher education
institutions, in order to grant an academic degree and develop the professional skills of
students.
Professional skills : They are the set of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that allow a
person to effectively carry out a work activity, adapting to the demands of the market and the
needs of society.
22
Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery : It is the career that trains engine officers, who are
responsible for operating and maintaining the propulsion and auxiliary systems of merchant
ships, as well as supervising their safety and energy efficiency.
International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP) : It is a higher education institution
specialized in the training of professionals in the maritime and port sector, which has the support
of the Maritime Authority of Panama and the International Maritime Organization.
Nautical School of Panama : It was the first institution that offered the training of deck and
engine officers in Panama, founded in 1972. In 2005, it became the UMIP, expanding its
academic offering and its infrastructure.
Panama Canal Pilots : They are the professionals who advise and direct the captains of the
ships that transit through the Panama Canal, guaranteeing the safety and efficiency of the
operation. To be practical, you must have experience as a deck or engine officer, and pass a
rigorous training and evaluation program.
UMIP High Evaluation Commission : It was an organization created in 2014, in order to carry
out a diagnosis of the academic, administrative and financial situation of the UMIP, and to
propose measures to improve its quality and competitiveness.
Maritime and port sector : It is the set of economic, social and environmental activities related
to maritime transport, international trade, the exploitation of marine resources, security and
protection of the marine environment.
Length : It is the maximum length of a ship, measured from the bow to the stern.
Bow: It is the front part of a ship, which cuts through the water as it moves forward.
Stern : It is the rear part of a ship, where the rudder and propeller are located.
Rudder: It is a device that serves to direct the course of a ship, by rotating about a vertical axis.
23
Propeller : It is a device that is used to propel a ship by rotating about a horizontal axis and
generating a reaction force in the water.
English language: It is the most used language in the international maritime field, both for
communication between ships and port authorities, as well as for documentation and
regulations. It is recommended that graduates of the maritime university have a sufficient level
of English to function in their profession.
Main engine: It is the engine or set of engines that provide the power necessary for the
propulsion of the ship.
Auxiliary equipment: These are the systems and devices that complement the operation of
the main machine, such as electrical generators, pumps, compressors, purifiers, heaters,
refrigerators, etc.
Machine room: It is the space where the main machine and auxiliary equipment are located,
as well as the control panels, measuring instruments and security systems.
Machine Officer: This is the professional in charge of operating, repairing and maintaining the
main machine and auxiliary equipment, as well as supervising the machine personnel and
complying with safety and environmental protection standards.
STCW Convention: It is the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification
and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, adopted by the International Maritime Organization in 1978
and amended on several occasions. It establishes the minimum competency, certification and
watchkeeping requirements for maritime personnel, as well as the responsibilities of flag,
training and port States.
24
Maritime cluster: It is the set of economic, social, cultural and environmental activities that are
related to the sea and its resources, such as maritime transport, international trade, fishing,
tourism, shipbuilding, research, education, safety and security.
Conclusion
The university training of Nautical Engineering students in Naval Machinery at UMIP is
a key aspect for their professional performance in the maritime sector, which has great
relevance for the economic and social development of Panama. However, this research has
revealed that there is a gap between the training that students receive and the skills demanded
by the labor market, which makes their insertion and stability in employment difficult.
The university training of Nautical Engineering students in Naval Machinery at the Marist
University of Panama (UMIP) is essential for their professional performance in the maritime
sector, since it plays a crucial role in the economic and social development of Panama.
However, as mentioned above, this research has shown that there are significant discrepancies
between the education students receive and the skills necessary to meet the demands of the
labor market. These findings can be attributed to several factors, including the lack of alignment
between academic education and the needs of the maritime sector, as well as the absence of
specific training programs to address these differences. The importance of overcoming this gap
lies in two fundamental aspects. On the one hand, it will allow UMIP Nautical Engineering in
Naval Machinery students to obtain better results in their professional careers, increasing their
productivity and contribution to the economic and social growth of Panama. Furthermore,
resolving this situation could improve the quality of life of graduates, reducing the
25
unemployment rate and providing stronger opportunities in the workplace. To achieve these
objectives, it is necessary to implement joint actions between educational institutions,
businessmen and government. Some recommendations to address this gap include:
Align academic education with the needs of the maritime sector: A detailed analysis of the
competencies and skills necessary to meet the demands of the labor market is required, and
adapt the curriculum to reflect these changes.
Develop targeted training programs: Online and in-person training programs can help
students acquire practical skills and continually update their knowledge.
Promote collaboration between educational institutions and companies: This cooperation
can facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge, as well as the integration of students in
real projects and work experiences.
To reduce this gap, it is recommended that the UMIP review and update its study plan,
incorporating content and methodologies that favor the development of technical, personal and
social competencies of students, as well as establishing mechanisms for monitoring and
evaluating the quality of the training and performance of graduates. Likewise, it is suggested
that the link between the university and the productive sector be strengthened, through
cooperation agreements, professional practices, job boards and continuous training programs.
These future research could focus on various aspects related to the training and employability
of Panamanian seafarers. For example, they could analyze in greater depth the reasons behind
the gap between training and labor market skills, identify effective strategies to address this gap
and evaluate its impact on the insertion and job performance of students and graduates.
Additionally, they could examine how other countries have addressed similar problems and
what lessons could be drawn from these success stories.
26
Another potential focus for future research could be the analysis of employers' perceptions
regarding the preparation of Nautical Engineering students in Naval Machinery at UMIP. This
type of research could provide valuable insights into how employers value the competencies
and skills of new entrants to the labor market, and how these perceptions can influence the
selection and hiring of personnel. Finally, future research could also focus on the evaluation of
specific policies and programs designed to improve the training and employability of
Panamanian seafarers. This could include the analysis of the effectiveness of these programs
in terms of their impact on the job insertion and performance of students and graduates, as well
as on their satisfaction and general well-being.
In conclusion, although this research has provided an initial vision of the situation of the
students and graduates of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at the UMIP, as well as the
factors that influence their insertion and job performance, there is still much to explore. Future
research could contribute to improving the training and employability of Panamanian seafarers
by analyzing effective strategies to address the gap between training and labor market skills,
evaluating specific policies and programs, and understanding perceptions of employers
regarding the preparation of students.
Bibliographies
1. Alberti, Giorgio, and Villena, José Luis. Challenges and opportunities for the employability of
university graduates in the international context. Madrid, ES: McGraw-Hill Spain, 2013.
27
2. Argote, Luz Ángela, Duque, Ángela María, and González, Laura. Graduates and their
performance in the environment: a challenge for the institutions that train human resources in
health. Bogotá, CO: Red Colombia Médica, 2006
3. Arnau Grass, Jaime. Experimental designs in psychology and education. Volume 1. 2nd.
Edition. Edit Thresholds. 1990
4. Panama Canal. Panama Canal Annual Reports , Years 2005 – 2015
5. CINDA. Quality of university education Information for decision making. 2016. Chile.
6. Comptroller General of the Republic of Panama. Labor Statistics – Household Survey
7. Comptroller General of the Republic of Panama. Labor Statistics – Volume II – Employment
in the Public and Private Sectors
8. Comptroller General of the Republic of Panama. National Institute of Statistics and Census,
Social Situation
9. Comptroller General of the Republic, INEC, (2010), Manual of the XI Population Census and
VII Housing Census.
10. Córdova Duarte, Gabriel, and Barbosa Jaramillo, Elba Rosa. The graduation profile of the
agricultural engineer. A discussion group experience with graduates. México, DF, MX: Red Acta
Universitaria, 2006.
11 García Ascolani , Jimena University education and professional field. What professionals are
we training? - An academic proposal. Community University. Paraguay. 2008.
12. González, González, M. and Ramírez Ramírez , I. (2011). The formation of professional
skills: a challenge in university curricular projects. Odysseus, electronic journal of pedagogy, 8
(16) . : http://www.odiseo.com.mx/2011/8-16/gonzalez-ramirez-formacion-competencias.html
28
13. GONZÁLEZ M, V. (2002) What does it mean to be a competent professional? Reflections
from a psychological perspective. Cuban Magazine of Higher Education. Vol. XXII No.1. pp. 45-
53
14. Hernández Sampieri and Others. Investigation methodology. 6th. Edition. McGraw-Hill.
pp. 600. Mexico. 2014.
APPENDIX 1
PROPOSAL TO PREPARE THE TEACHING BODY FOR
THAT THEY TEACH THE CLASSES IN ENGLISH TO THE STUDENTS
OF THE DEGREE OF NAUTIC ENGINEERING IN
NAVAL MACHINERY
29
A. PROPOSAL
Strengthen the training offered by the International Maritime University of Panama
to raise the current level of 30% to a minimum of 60% of classes taught in English
in the specialized subjects of the Bachelor of Nautical Engineering in Naval
Machinery. These subjects are:
1 Introducción a las Ciencias Náuticas 14 Seguridad Marítima
2 Introducción a las Máquinas Navales 15 Metalurgia y Máquinas Herramientas
3 Seminario Marítimo 16 Mantenimiento
4 Construcción Naval 17 Higiene Naval
5 Derecho Marítimo 18 Principio de Guardia de Puente
6 Electrónica y Tecnología 19 Oficina Técnica
7 Mecánica y Resistencia de Materiales 20 Materia Optativa
8 Seguridad Industrial 21 Taller
9 Electrónica,y Tecnología Electrónica 22 Calderas y Turbinas de Vapor
10 Termodinámica y Mecánica deFluídos 23 Automatismo
30
B. DESCRIPTION
This project is focused on increasing oral skill in English within the classroom
because interaction with both the teacher and classmates is of vital importance
to develop a better understanding and expression of the English language.
C. JUSTIFICATION
Panama is a leading country in merchant marine registration worldwide, as well
as the country with the flag under which the largest number of ships in the world
are registered. Consequently, there is a potential job market for young graduates
of the Naval Machinery Degree, where knowledge of English is essential.
Given the importance of the English language, Panama created Law No.2 of
January 14, 2003, which establishes the mandatory teaching of the English
31
language in official and private educational centers at the first and second level
of education.
However, English in the current study plan of the Bachelor of Naval Machinery
does not grant credits. It is optional, without being mandatory. Only maritime
technical English in the last year of study provides the student with credits in this
career .
Good English teachers are increasingly scarce. Ideally, the English center of the
Maritime University provides each classroom and each teacher with a computer
with speakers to show their students videos of conversations, movie segments,
series, the entire presentation of their class in English.
D. GOALS
The Maritime Language Center ( MLC), which operates at the International
Maritime University of Panama, is the training entity responsible for its greatest
use in classes taught to future naval machinery engineers.
to. General
 Increase to at least 60% the classes taught in English in specialized subjects
for students pursuing the Nautical Bachelor's Degree in Naval Machinery.
b. Specific
 Offer the maritime industry a workforce with the appropriate skills and
competent in the English language so that the graduate can function
adequately in the labor market .
 Increase, over a three-year period, the ability to master English in teachers
who teach special subjects in this Bachelor's Degree.
32
E. ANALYTICAL PROGRAMMING
The Maritime Language Center ( MLC) is the entity responsible for the greatest
communicative and practical use of this language for teachers and students. It is
expected that they will use English instead of knowing and memorizing rules and
semantic structures. This objective will be achieved gradually over a maximum
period of five years, first training subject teachers
less complex. The following is illustrated, as an example, with the following
programming aimed at teaching staff for a period of five years .
I
SEM
II
SEM
I
SEM
II
SEM
I
SEM
II
SEM
1 Introducción a las Ciencias Náuticas
2 Introducción a las Maquinas Navales
3 Seminario Marítimo
4 Construcción Naval
5 Derecho Marítimo
6 Electrotecnia y Tecnología Electrónica
7 Mecánica y Resistencia de Materiales
8 Seguridad Industrial
9 Termodinámica y Mecánica de Fluídos
10 Motores de Combustión Interna
11 Mantenimiento
12 Teoría del Buque
13 Seguridad Marítima
14 Metalurgia y Máquinas Herramientas
15 Higiene Naval
DURACIÓN DEL PROYECTO
ASIGNATURA
PROGRAMACIÓN DEL REFORZAMIENTO EN INGLÉS
AL CUERPO DOCENTE POR ASIGNATURA
AÑO 1 AÑO 2 AÑO 3
33
ESTIMATE BUDGET
The total estimated annual budget for operating and investment expenses of this
project is approximately B/.300,000, of which B/.228,000 is allocated to paying
teachers' salaries.
s in training.
I
SEMESTRE
II
SEMESTRE
I
SEMESTRE
II
SEMESTRE
I
SEMESTRE
II
SEMESTRE
1 Introducción a las Ciencias Náuticas 12.000 12.000
2 Introducción a las Maquinas Navales 12.000 12.000
3 Seminario Marítimo 12.000 12.000
4 Construcción Naval 12.000 12.000
5 Derecho Marítimo 12.000 12.000
6 Electrotecnia y Tecnología Electrónica 12.000 12.000
7 Mecánica y Resistencia de Materiales 12.000 12.000
8 Seguridad Industrial 12.000 12.000
9 Termoninámica y Mecánica de Fluídos 12.000 12.000
ESTIMACIÓN DEL COSTO DE LA PLANILLA DE PROFESORES EN ADIESTRAMIENTO
PARA DICTAR CLASES EN INGLÉS EN LAS ASIGNATURAS ESPECIALES
DE LA LICENCIATURA NÁUTICA EN MAQUINARIA NAVAL
Cuadro No. 73
COSTO
TOTAL
B/.
( En Balboas )
ASIGNATURA
AÑO 1 AÑO 2 AÑO 3
34
A salary of B/.2,000 per month per teacher is estimated in the 6 months that their
reinforcement in the English language requires, which will require hiring another in
their absence with remuneration under the current conditions of the UMIP.
The financing of this project must be negotiated with IFARHU or with some
international organization .
35
APPENDIX 2
ANALYSIS OF THE STUDY PLAN OF THE CAREER OF NAUTICAL
ENGINEERING IN NAVAL MACHINERY
ANALYSIS OF THE CURRICULUM OF THE TEACHING OF
NAUTICAL ENGINEERING IN NAVAL MACHINERY
The study plans and programs have as reference what is stipulated by the
International Maritime Organization ( IMO). This organization governs the
demands of the maritime sector worldwide contained in a manual known as
OFFICER IN CHARGE OF ENGINEERING WATCH.
SEGURIDAD
INDUSTRIAL
MANTENIMIENTO
36
its requirements , the Professor must prepare an Analytical Plan of the content of
each subject that makes up the Course Plan in the semester to be covered and
have this manual as a source. This Analytical Plan is subject to review by the
coordinator of the Naval Machinery School and any modification is coordinated
with the Professor who teaches the subject, before its execution.
This study plan at the bachelor's level prepares students as Engineer Officers on
board merchant ships and, in order to be able to hold positions as naval
engineers, they must comply with the International Convention STCW (
International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch
for Seafars ) on training, certification and guard standards for seafarers, with the
requirements of the National Council for University Evaluation and
Accreditation of Panama CONEAUPA, which regulates the quality of academic
offers at a higher level. They also receive training on complying with international
safety standards.
to safeguard human life at sea, protect the marine environment and prevent its
pollution.
Obtaining the Bachelor of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery requires 271
hours, distributed in five subjects to be taught in 8 semesters and 3 summers; of
37
which 141 are theoretical classes and 130 are practical. In a period of 5 years of
study, giving a total of 206 credits in the five training fields, distributed as follows:
ANNEX 3
INSTRUMENT
PANAMA UNIVERSITY
Faculty of Education Sciences
Instrument N° 1 FOR STUDENTS
The purpose of this instrument is to obtain information about the University Training and its
correspondence with the Professional Competencies of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval
Machinery at the International Maritime University of Panama. The information obtained will be
confidential and will be used for academic purposes .
I. Part. General data:
1. Sex: Male: 🖵 Feminine: 🖵
2. Age: 18 or younger 🖵 19-21 🖵 22-24 🖵 25-27 🖵
28-30 🖵 31-34 🖵 More than 35 🖵
3. Year of study 1st. Year 🖵 2nd. year 🖵 3rd. year 🖵 4th. year 🖵 5th year 🖵
4. Academic index Less than 1. 🖵 1 to 1.50 🖵 1.51 to 2.0 🖵 2.01 to 2.50 🖵 2.51 to 2.70 🖵
2.71 to 2.90 🖵 2.91 to 3.00 🖵
38
II part Assessment of the aspects of the Competencies
Instructions: rate the following aspects using a scale from 1 to 4 and mark the evaluated criterion
with an X, where each score corresponds to the following:
1. Completely disagree. 2 Disagree . 3 Okay . 4 Completely agree
Criterion 1 2 3 4
1. I know what the race is about
2. I have the ability to concentrate (for studying, attending and concentrating in classes...)
3. I have the capacity for innovation in practices or jobs
4. I adapt to new situations: new course, new teachers, schedule changes...
5. I have the ability to forecast and plan
6. I organize myself (ability to structure, organize and distribute the resources available to
achieve objectives) in my study and work time
7. Ability to organize work teams
8. Ability to make optimal use of one's own resources
9. Capacity for optimal use of University resources
10. Negotiation capacity (in class matters, seeking your best achievement)
11. Problem solving (ability to analyze situations and make decisions, putting them into practice
effectively), in class subjects, in practices...
12. Synthesis capacity (from some data, being able to project the most important ones, the
conclusions)
13. I have competitiveness (achievement of a goal with better results than others)
14. Maintaining my usual performance (in adverse or conflictive situations)
15. You act with ease and firmness in tense situations
16. Capacity for teamwork
39
17. Coordination (ability to ensure the fulfillment of tasks effectively, within the defined period
and with the planned resources) in internships or jobs
18. Voluntariness in teamwork, in practices (personal power that motivates to carry out or not
carry out a task)
19. Ease of relating to your colleagues
20. Communication (ability to relate, making yourself understood and listening to others)
21. Skills in interpersonal relationships (empathy, tact and listening as abilities to relate to
others)
22. Ease of relating to your teachers
23. I am an entrepreneur
24. Ability to get other colleagues to accept your ideas and proposals
25. You inspire confidence (ability to inspire a spirit of trust, cooperation and support in your
colleagues)
26. You usually persuade and obtain advantages without provoking hostilities
27. Ability to easily accept new responsibilities, or new positions (delegate, student
representation...)
28. Ability to relate to other colleagues (empathy, tact, sympathy...)
29. You get great satisfaction from the ability to manage people and resources.
30. You generate a good image of the University before others and outside of it
31. Ability to know your own personal and professional characteristics
32. I am capable of operating, repairing and maintaining in perfect working order all the
machinery necessary for ship propulsion, loading and unloading operations.
Criterion 1 2 3 4
40
33. I am capable of providing general services on board, in order to navigate from production
ports to consumption ports.
34. I can perform all operating operations of the main machine and auxiliary equipment.
35. I master international safety standards to safeguard human life at sea, protect the marine
environment and prevent pollution.
36. I master the theoretical and practical aspects that include internal and external combustion
engines, electricity, electronics, auxiliary machines.
37. I can organize and operate in a machine room and automatic controls systems.
38. I have mastery in machine simulators.
Instructions: rate the following aspects using a scale from 1 to 4 and mark the evaluated criterion
with an X, where each score corresponds to the following:
2. Completely disagree. 2 Disagree . 3 Okay . 4 Completely agree
1. Organization of the courses 1 2 3 4
1.1 The courses have been well organized in relation to content, schedules, assignment delivery and
dates.
1.2 The number of students in the group has been adequate for their development
2. Course contents 1 2 3 4
2.1 The contents of the courses have responded to my training expectations
2.2 There has been an adequate combination between theory and practice
3. Duration and schedules 1 2 3 4
their objectives and contents
3.2 The schedules have favored attendance at the courses
4. Teachers 1 2 3 4
4.1 The way the courses are taught has facilitated learning
41
4.2 Teachers know the topics taught in depth
5. Didactic materials 1 2 3 4
5.1 The documents, copies and materials delivered are understandable and adequate
5.2 The resources and means used were updated
6. Resources and facilities 1 2 3 4
6.1 The facilities, classroom, laboratories and workshops have been appropriate for the
development of the courses
6.2 The technological and computer resources have been adequate and used when required in the
development of the course contents
6.3 Platform, applications or emails are used to support the development of the courses
7. Learning evaluation 1 2 3 4
7.1 The evaluation instruments are relevant to the objectives and contents of the courses
7.2 Self-assessment and co-assessment are used in each of the courses
7.3 Recovery and remedial strategies are allowed in each course for students with deficiency to
failure.
7.4 A correspondence is achieved between performance and the final evaluation of the courses
8. Learning experiences 1 2 3 4
8.1 There is a correspondence between the activities of the courses and the learning achieved in
them
8.2 learning activities linked to the work scenario are promoted
8.3 Field practices and links with the work environment are favored
9. Final evaluation of the courses 1 2 3 4
9.1 The development of the courses allows me to perform well at work
9.2 I have incorporated new abilities, skills and abilities that I can apply to my work performance
42
9.3 I have expanded my knowledge

More Related Content

Similar to ACADEMIC GUIDANCE OF FIRST ENTRY CADETS AT THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA

Sri Lanka Lorts Authority
Sri Lanka Lorts AuthoritySri Lanka Lorts Authority
Sri Lanka Lorts Authority
RifDhy RM
 
The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...
The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...
The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...
Prof. Angelica M. Baylon,AFNI, LCDR(Res) (PhD,MSBM,MBA,MS)
 
SPT Mirror- May 2016
SPT Mirror- May 2016SPT Mirror- May 2016
SPT Mirror- May 2016
DAXIT AKBARI 🇮🇳
 
Nellywizzoo report(TRA)
Nellywizzoo report(TRA)Nellywizzoo report(TRA)
Nellywizzoo report(TRA)
Nelson Maimu
 
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-JuneMSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
Török Máté
 
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-JuneMSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
Török Máté
 
WMU EPDC Brochure
WMU EPDC BrochureWMU EPDC Brochure
WMU EPDC Brochure
Dr. Ilias Visvikis
 
Internship Report on ILM College Sargodha
Internship Report on ILM College SargodhaInternship Report on ILM College Sargodha
Internship Report on ILM College Sargodha
Usama Karim
 
Research_Symposium_2016_V1
Research_Symposium_2016_V1Research_Symposium_2016_V1
Research_Symposium_2016_V1
Shanika Ranathunga
 
Final project
Final projectFinal project
Final project
Malay Chaurey
 
INTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL Saransh
INTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL SaranshINTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL Saransh
INTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL Saransh
Saransh Tewari
 
CXC CSEC Syllabus for Economics
CXC CSEC Syllabus for EconomicsCXC CSEC Syllabus for Economics
CXC CSEC Syllabus for Economics
Shayne Gibbons
 
The graduate studies handbook
The graduate studies handbookThe graduate studies handbook
The graduate studies handbook
Christianne Lynnette Cabanban
 
Annex IX
Annex IXAnnex IX
Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016
Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016
Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016
Damaris Mwambu
 
Diploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVT
Diploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVTDiploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVT
Diploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVT
Nabin Bist
 
JEE Advanced 2014 Information Bulletin
JEE Advanced 2014 Information BulletinJEE Advanced 2014 Information Bulletin
JEE Advanced 2014 Information Bulletin
ALLEN CAREER INSTITUTE
 
CGS Handbook
CGS HandbookCGS Handbook
Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...
Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...
Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...
HanaTiti
 
jee-advanced
jee-advancedjee-advanced
jee-advanced
Raj Pancholi
 

Similar to ACADEMIC GUIDANCE OF FIRST ENTRY CADETS AT THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA (20)

Sri Lanka Lorts Authority
Sri Lanka Lorts AuthoritySri Lanka Lorts Authority
Sri Lanka Lorts Authority
 
The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...
The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...
The Need for TVET Quality Assurance System and Qualification Standards (Teach...
 
SPT Mirror- May 2016
SPT Mirror- May 2016SPT Mirror- May 2016
SPT Mirror- May 2016
 
Nellywizzoo report(TRA)
Nellywizzoo report(TRA)Nellywizzoo report(TRA)
Nellywizzoo report(TRA)
 
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-JuneMSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
 
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-JuneMSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
MSc_ Mate_Torok _2016-June
 
WMU EPDC Brochure
WMU EPDC BrochureWMU EPDC Brochure
WMU EPDC Brochure
 
Internship Report on ILM College Sargodha
Internship Report on ILM College SargodhaInternship Report on ILM College Sargodha
Internship Report on ILM College Sargodha
 
Research_Symposium_2016_V1
Research_Symposium_2016_V1Research_Symposium_2016_V1
Research_Symposium_2016_V1
 
Final project
Final projectFinal project
Final project
 
INTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL Saransh
INTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL SaranshINTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL Saransh
INTERNSHIP PROJECT REPORT FINAL Saransh
 
CXC CSEC Syllabus for Economics
CXC CSEC Syllabus for EconomicsCXC CSEC Syllabus for Economics
CXC CSEC Syllabus for Economics
 
The graduate studies handbook
The graduate studies handbookThe graduate studies handbook
The graduate studies handbook
 
Annex IX
Annex IXAnnex IX
Annex IX
 
Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016
Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016
Damaris Kambua Mwambu - MBA Thesis 2016
 
Diploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVT
Diploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVTDiploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVT
Diploma in pharmacy syllabus CTEVT
 
JEE Advanced 2014 Information Bulletin
JEE Advanced 2014 Information BulletinJEE Advanced 2014 Information Bulletin
JEE Advanced 2014 Information Bulletin
 
CGS Handbook
CGS HandbookCGS Handbook
CGS Handbook
 
Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...
Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...
Using competence-based approach in the development of a writing course for en...
 
jee-advanced
jee-advancedjee-advanced
jee-advanced
 

More from Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente

THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040
THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040
THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040
EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040
EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...
ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...
ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
УСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИ
УСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИУСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИ
УСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИ
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
RÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIME
RÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIMERÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIME
RÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIME
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
RESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMA
RESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMARESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMA
RESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMA
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
RESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKET
RESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKETRESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKET
RESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKET
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
RESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docx
RESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docxRESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docx
RESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docx
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
AUTOESTIMA
AUTOESTIMAAUTOESTIMA
LA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICA
LA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICALA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICA
LA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICA
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICS
TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICSTECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICS
TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICS
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...
THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...
THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
LA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docx
LA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docxLA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docx
LA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docx
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
LA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docx
LA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docxLA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docx
LA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docx
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
RELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docx
RELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docxRELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docx
RELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docx
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
PLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docx
PLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docxPLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docx
Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...
Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...
Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA: UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...
LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA:  UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA:  UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...
LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA: UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 
TECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docx
TECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docxTECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docx
ORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docx
ORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docxORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docx
ORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docx
Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente
 

More from Carlos Campos - Supervisor en Contenedores, Docente (20)

THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040
THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040
THE STRATEGIC MARITIME AND PORT DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF PANAMA 2040
 
EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040
EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040
EL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO DE DESARROLLO MARÍTIMO Y PORTUARIO DE PANAMÁ 2040
 
ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...
ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...
ORIENTACIÓN ACADÉMICA DE LOS CADETES DE PRIMER INGRESO EN LA UNIVERSIDAD MARÍ...
 
УСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИ
УСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИУСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИ
УСТОЙЧИВОСТЬ И КРИЗИСНОЕ УПРАВЛЕНИЕ НА РЫНКЕ МОРСКОЙ ЛОГИСТИКИ
 
RÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIME
RÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIMERÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIME
RÉSILENCE ET GESTION DE CRISE SUR LE MARCHÉ DE LA LOGISTIQUE MARITIME
 
RESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMA
RESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMARESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMA
RESILÊNCIA E GESTÃO DE CRISES NO MERCADO DE LOGÍSTICA MARÍTIMA
 
RESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKET
RESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKETRESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKET
RESILENCE AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME LOGISTICS MARKET
 
RESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docx
RESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docxRESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docx
RESILENCIA Y GESTIÓN DE CRISIS EN EL MERCADO.docx
 
AUTOESTIMA
AUTOESTIMAAUTOESTIMA
AUTOESTIMA
 
LA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICA
LA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICALA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICA
LA TECNOLOGIA Y LA RESPONSABILIDAD AMBIENTAL EN LA LOGISTICA
 
TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICS
TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICSTECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICS
TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY IN LOGISTICS
 
THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...
THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...
THE SITUATION OF PANAMA SHIP REGISTRATION IN THE FACE OF PRESSURE FROM THE UN...
 
LA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docx
LA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docxLA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docx
LA SITUACIÓN DEL REGISTRO DE BUQUES DE PANAMÁ.docx
 
LA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docx
LA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docxLA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docx
LA IMPORTANCIA DE LA RELACIÓN HUMANA EN LA GESTIÓN DE EMPRESA.docx
 
RELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docx
RELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docxRELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docx
RELACIONES HUMANAS EN EL AMBITO LABORAL.docx
 
PLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docx
PLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docxPLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docx
PLAN MARITIMO 2040 (1).docx
 
Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...
Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...
Las Bahamas te ponen a prueba: ¿Estás listo para la inspección anual de tu ba...
 
LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA: UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...
LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA:  UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA:  UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...
LA REMOCIÓN DE BUQUES ABANDONADOS EN LA COSTA PANAMEÑA: UNA LUCHA POR PROTEG...
 
TECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docx
TECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docxTECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docx
TECNOLOGIA Y MODERNIZACION.docx
 
ORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docx
ORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docxORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docx
ORGANIZACIÓN Y GESTION EN LAS OPERACIONES PORTUARIAS.docx
 

Recently uploaded

Accounting for Restricted Grants When and How To Record Properly
Accounting for Restricted Grants  When and How To Record ProperlyAccounting for Restricted Grants  When and How To Record Properly
Accounting for Restricted Grants When and How To Record Properly
TechSoup
 
CIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdf
CIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdfCIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdf
CIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdf
blueshagoo1
 
The basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptx
The basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptxThe basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptx
The basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptx
heathfieldcps1
 
Electric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger Hunt
Electric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger HuntElectric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger Hunt
Electric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger Hunt
RamseyBerglund
 
SWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptx
SWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptxSWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptx
SWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptx
zuzanka
 
Leveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit Innovation
Leveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit InnovationLeveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit Innovation
Leveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit Innovation
TechSoup
 
CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...
CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...
CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
Temple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation results
Temple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation resultsTemple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation results
Temple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation results
Krassimira Luka
 
Educational Technology in the Health Sciences
Educational Technology in the Health SciencesEducational Technology in the Health Sciences
Educational Technology in the Health Sciences
Iris Thiele Isip-Tan
 
Philippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Curriculum
Philippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) CurriculumPhilippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Curriculum
Philippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Curriculum
MJDuyan
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...
Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...
Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...
ImMuslim
 
How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17
How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17
How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17
Celine George
 
Data Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsx
Data Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsxData Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsx
Data Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsx
Prof. Dr. K. Adisesha
 
Standardized tool for Intelligence test.
Standardized tool for Intelligence test.Standardized tool for Intelligence test.
Standardized tool for Intelligence test.
deepaannamalai16
 
Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.
Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.
Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.
IsmaelVazquez38
 
Level 3 NCEA - NZ: A Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.ppt
Level 3 NCEA - NZ: A  Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.pptLevel 3 NCEA - NZ: A  Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.ppt
Level 3 NCEA - NZ: A Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.ppt
Henry Hollis
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17
How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17
How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17
Celine George
 
HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.
HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.
HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.
deepaannamalai16
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Accounting for Restricted Grants When and How To Record Properly
Accounting for Restricted Grants  When and How To Record ProperlyAccounting for Restricted Grants  When and How To Record Properly
Accounting for Restricted Grants When and How To Record Properly
 
CIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdf
CIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdfCIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdf
CIS 4200-02 Group 1 Final Project Report (1).pdf
 
The basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptx
The basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptxThe basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptx
The basics of sentences session 7pptx.pptx
 
Electric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger Hunt
Electric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger HuntElectric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger Hunt
Electric Fetus - Record Store Scavenger Hunt
 
SWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptx
SWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptxSWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptx
SWOT analysis in the project Keeping the Memory @live.pptx
 
Leveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit Innovation
Leveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit InnovationLeveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit Innovation
Leveraging Generative AI to Drive Nonprofit Innovation
 
CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...
CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...
CHUYÊN ĐỀ ÔN TẬP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN CÂU HỎI TRONG ĐỀ MINH HỌA THI TỐT NGHIỆP THPT ...
 
Temple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation results
Temple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation resultsTemple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation results
Temple of Asclepius in Thrace. Excavation results
 
Educational Technology in the Health Sciences
Educational Technology in the Health SciencesEducational Technology in the Health Sciences
Educational Technology in the Health Sciences
 
Philippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Curriculum
Philippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) CurriculumPhilippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Curriculum
Philippine Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Curriculum
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 CẢ NĂM - GLOBAL SUCCESS - NĂM HỌC 2024-2025 - ...
 
Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...
Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...
Geography as a Discipline Chapter 1 __ Class 11 Geography NCERT _ Class Notes...
 
How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17
How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17
How to Download & Install Module From the Odoo App Store in Odoo 17
 
Data Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsx
Data Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsxData Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsx
Data Structure using C by Dr. K Adisesha .ppsx
 
Standardized tool for Intelligence test.
Standardized tool for Intelligence test.Standardized tool for Intelligence test.
Standardized tool for Intelligence test.
 
Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.
Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.
Bossa N’ Roll Records by Ismael Vazquez.
 
Level 3 NCEA - NZ: A Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.ppt
Level 3 NCEA - NZ: A  Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.pptLevel 3 NCEA - NZ: A  Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.ppt
Level 3 NCEA - NZ: A Nation In the Making 1872 - 1900 SML.ppt
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ TIẾNG ANH LỚP 8 - CẢ NĂM - FRIENDS PLUS - NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (B...
 
How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17
How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17
How to Predict Vendor Bill Product in Odoo 17
 
HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.
HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.
HYPERTENSION - SLIDE SHARE PRESENTATION.
 

ACADEMIC GUIDANCE OF FIRST ENTRY CADETS AT THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA

  • 1. 1 PANAMA UNIVERSITY VICE-RECTOR OF RESEARCH AND POSTGRADUATE FACULTY OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ACCOUNTING MASTER'S DEGREE IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT IN THE MARITIME INDUSTRY TITLE OF THE INTERVENTION PROJECT II ACADEMIC GUIDANCE OF FIRST ENTRY CADETS AT THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA VIP CODE CE-PI-327-01-05-23-59 PRODUCED BY CARLOS C. CAMPOS C. 8 – 388 – 223 ADVISER DIÓGENES MORENO JANUARY 2024
  • 2. 2 GRATITUDE To God, for giving me health and the opportunity to fulfill my dreams and become the professional I am today. Thank you for guiding me and blessing me in every step I have taken. To my parents, Professor Mirtha Esther Castillo de Campos and Mr. Carlos Cesar Campos Morales, for being my light and my example. Thank you for your love, support, advice and sacrifice. They are my greatest inspiration and my pride. To my teachers and classmates, for sharing their knowledge and experiences with me. Thank you for your patience, your collaboration, your friendship and your trust. They have been a fundamental part of my training and my growth. This work is the result of my effort and dedication, but also of the help and support of all these people. Therefore, I dedicate this work to you with all my love and gratitude.
  • 3. 3 DEDICATION To my parents and sisters, thank you for being my support, my example and my motivation. Without you, this work would not have been possible. They are my family, my team and I admire them deeply. On every page of this work, there is a little of you. They have shared with me their knowledge, their experiences and their advice. They have been my teachers, my friends and my accomplices. They have made me the professional I am today. This work is the result of our effort and dedication, and I dedicate it to you with all my love and gratitude. I hope it serves as inspiration and guidance, in case you want to follow in my professional footsteps. SUMMARY The objective of this research work is to analyze the relationship between university training and the professional skills of students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at
  • 4. 4 the International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP), as well as evaluate their work performance. To do this, we start from the review of some studies carried out in other areas that allow us to assess the impact of this study, such as the case of the Medical Technology degree at the University of Panama. The research problem is raised about how the academic training of future nautical engineers is linked to social reality and the labor market, and how they should be productively inserted by applying their academic preparation. It is considered that higher education should promote dynamic, participatory and critical learning, as well as provide students with the professional skills necessary for successful work performance. A brief account is made of the history of the UMIP, as a specialized training center that gave continuity to the Nautical School of Panama, founded in 1972, and that has trained many multi- purpose sailors, deck and engine officers, and pilots. of the Panama Canal. The report of the 2014 UMIP High Evaluation Commission is mentioned, which points out some strengths and weaknesses of the institution, as well as some recommendations to improve the quality of training and job placement of graduates. Finally, the general and specific objectives of the study are presented, as well as the research questions that will guide its development . It is expected that this study will contribute to improving the university training and professional skills of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery students at UMIP, as well as generating knowledge about the reality of the maritime and port sector in Panama.
  • 5. 5 ABSTRACT The present research work aims to analyze the relationship between university education and professional competencies of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery of the International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP), as well as to evaluate their work performance. To do this, it starts from the review of some studies carried out in other areas that allow to assess the impact of the present study, such as the case of the Medical Technology career of the University of Panama.
  • 6. 6 The research problem is posed on how the academic training of future nautical engineers is linked to the social reality and the labor market, and how they should productively insert themselves applying their academic preparation. It is considered that higher education should foster dynamic, participatory and critical learning, as well as provide students with the professional competencies necessary for a successful work performance. A brief account of the history of the UMIP is made, as a specialized training center that gave continuity to the Nautical School of Panama, founded in 1972, and that has trained many versatile sailors, deck and machine officers, and pilots of the Panama Canal. The report of the High Commission of Evaluation of the UMIP of 2014 is mentioned, which indicates some strengths and weaknesses of the institution, as well as some recommendations to improve the quality of the training and the labor insertion of the graduates. Finally, the general and specific objectives of the study are proposed, as well as the research questions that will guide the development of the same. It is expected that this study will contribute to improve the university education and the professional competencies of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery of the UMIP, as well as to generate knowledge about the reality of the maritime and port sector in Panama.
  • 7. 7 Contenido AGRADECIMIENTO ....................................................................................................2 DEDICATORIA ............................................................................................................3 RESUMEN...................................................................................................................3 ABSTRACT .................................................................................................................5 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................9 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM ............................................................................10 BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................ 11 3.0 JUSTIFICATION .................................................................................................12 Maritime Safety ....................................................................................................12 Regulatory ...........................................................................................................13 Reputation of Educational Institutions ..............................................................13 Job performance .................................................................................................13 Competitiveness of the Maritime Sector ...........................................................13 4.0 PROJECT ...........................................................................................................14 4.1 General ...........................................................................................................14 4.2 Specific ..........................................................................................................14 5.0 THEORETICAL ...................................................................................................15
  • 8. 8 6.0 METHODOLOGY ................................................................................................16 METHOD ..............................................................................................................16 7.0 SWOT ANALYSIS ...............................................................................................17 GLOSSARY ..............................................................................................................21 Conclusion ................................................................................................................24 Bibliographies ...........................................................................................................26 ANNEX 1 ..................................................................................................................28 The Maritime Language Center (MLC), which operates at the International Maritime University of Panama, is the training entity responsible for its greatest use in classes taught to future naval machinery engineers. ........................................................................................31 ANNEX 2 ..................................................................................................................35 ANNEX 3 ..................................................................................................................37
  • 9. 9 INTRODUCTION University training is a process that seeks to develop students' professional competencies, that is, the set of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that allow them to perform effectively in the workplace. However, there is not always an adequate relationship between the training offered by universities and the demands of the labor market, which can generate difficulties for the insertion and professional development of graduates. This is the case of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at the International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP), a career that aims to train engine officers capable of operating and maintaining the propulsion and auxiliary systems of merchant ships. Despite the strategic importance of this profession for the country, due to its geographical position and the Panama Canal, no systematic evaluation has been carried out of the relationship between university training and the professional skills of these students, nor of their performance. employment once graduated. For this reason, the objective of this research is to analyze the relationship between university training and the professional skills of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at the UMIP, as well as evaluate their work performance in the maritime sector. To do this, a descriptive-correlational study will be carried out, with a non-experimental and cross-sectional design, using techniques and instruments such as documentary review, survey, interview and statistical analysis. The work is structured in five chapters: the first presents the introduction, the second presents the theoretical framework, the third describes the methodology, the fourth shows the results and the fifth offers the conclusions and recommendations.
  • 10. 10 PROBLEM STATEMENT In Panama, the quality of the university education that our seafarers receive is reflected in their employability one year after graduating. However, many of them have difficulties entering and staying in the labor market, because they did not develop the necessary professional skills during their studies.
  • 11. 11 This negatively affects graduates, who do not achieve stability or satisfaction in their jobs, and who usually change shipping companies shortly after. It also harms shipping companies, which invest in seafarers expecting them to embark for several years. In addition, it compromises compliance with maritime regulations, the reputation of our educational institutions and the competitiveness of our country in the maritime sector. Therefore, it is urgent to implement strategies that improve the skills and responsibilities of our maritime school graduates, so that can be performed successfully both on board ships and in other activities related to navigation. BACKGROUND Panama aspires to be a maritime cluster and a world-renowned logistics and port platform. However, there is little information on the performance of graduates from maritime universities in the private sector. Among the factors that can affect the skills of graduates are sex, age and level of education. The government and maritime universities are committed to providing their graduates with the skills that the labor market demands. An example of this is the "Learning by Doing" initiative, promoted by President Laurentino Cortizo Cohen and the Ministry of Labor and Labor Development ( Mitradel ) in 2022. The Panama Maritime Authority
  • 12. 12 (AMP) was the first entity to adopt it and adapt it to the maritime field, thus complying with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 4, 5 and 8 of the United Nations. 3.0 JUSTIFICATION Shipping companies do not see the country only as a registry of ships, but as a quarry to hire their crew. The Panamanian sailor has some academic deficiencies.1 This is reflected in the low percentage of those who join the labor market during the first year after completing their university studies. Only 10% achieve it. Some of these deficiencies may be significant that may affect the following areas: Maritime Safety Deficiencies in professional skills can affect safety at sea, as graduates may not be fully prepared to deal with emergency situations or to safely operate and maintain maritime equipment.
  • 13. 13 Normative compliance There may be problems related to compliance with maritime regulations and standards if graduates do not have the necessary skills to understand and properly apply these regulations. Reputation of Educational Institutions Deficiencies in graduate skills can affect the reputation of maritime universities, as businesses and industry may question the quality of training provided. Job performance Graduates with deficiencies in skills may experience difficulties such as greater knowledge of the English language in their work performance, which may affect their professional progress and career opportunities. Competitiveness of the Maritime Sector At a broader level, deficiencies in the skills of maritime professionals can affect the competitiveness of the sector in the global market, as other countries or regions with better trained professionals can surpass us in performance and efficiency. The shipping industry depends on the competence and good training of seafarers to ensure the safety of life at sea, maritime security, the efficiency of navigation and the protection and conservation of the marine environment. Therefore, it is defined that: Maritime, port and logistics personnel must have the knowledge, skills, abilities and aptitudes required for their performance in the workplace. Our graduates must have the following competencies, knowledge, abilities, skills, attitudes and values
  • 14. 14 The lack of knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes of maritime, port and logistics personnel persists in all countries of the world for their performance in the workplace, due to not having institutions that guarantee the acquisition of the skills required to carry out the tasks and committed according to the level of responsibility in the job. 4.0 PROJECT OBJECTIVES 4.1 General With this work we want to draw the attention of the educational authorities that train our maritime officers, both in the public and private sectors, to the deficiencies that affect their professional performance. Our goal is for Panama to become a global benchmark for maritime excellence and for our graduates to be competent and versatile professionals, capable of assuming operational and administrative responsibilities on ships and ports. Thus, we will be able to increase job opportunities for our young seafarers. 4.2 Specific Learn to use what you know in your field professionally and know how to defend your ideas and solve problems. They are able to analyze and interpret relevant data and take into account the social, scientific and ethical aspects of their work. Know how to communicate clearly and effectively with both experts and the general public.
  • 15. 15 1. Master oral and written English, which is the universal language of the sea. 2. Use the ICT tools that facilitate your professional work. 3. Respect and care for the marine environment, which is our most precious asset. 4. They adapt to new or unknown situations related to their area of study. 5. Continue to learn on your own and stay up to date. 5.0 THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK How prepared are the maritime engineers who graduate from our universities to face the challenges of the labor market? This is the question we ask ourselves in this work, where we seek to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the professional competencies of these professionals. To do this, we have interviewed representatives of maritime universities, the Panama Canal Authority, the Maritime Authority of Panama and some graduates of the degree. Our objective is to offer a diagnosis that serves to improve the quality of academic training and job placement of maritime engineers in Panama, a topic little studied until now.
  • 16. 16 6.0 M ETHODOLOGY For our graduates to have more opportunities and success in the maritime and port sector, it is necessary to improve the areas that present deficiencies in their training. This way they will be able to adapt to the technological changes that occur in this field, such as automation, robotization, artificial intelligence and environmental conservation. These topics must be incorporated into the study plans of maritime careers, so that our young people develop the professional skills demanded by the current market. METHOD To be a successful maritime officer, you need to master four areas of knowledge: How to position and navigate the vessel, and how to carry out loading and unloading operations efficiently and safely. How to plan the route, take care of the marine environment, and protect the lives of those on board.
  • 17. 17 How to manage and organize the maintenance, human resources and operation of the ship, and how to participate in repair, inspection and construction projects for ships and marine platforms of all types. These skills will give graduates a competitive advantage to continue studying or working in the maritime sector. 7.0 SWOT ANALYSIS If we applied the SWOT analysis to the professional skills of the graduates of our maritime universities, it would show us the following: STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES "Learning by Doing" Initiative: Academic deficiencies: The government and maritime universities are committed to providing their graduates with the skills demanded by the labor market, as exemplified by the "Learning by Doing" initiative promoted by President Laurentino Cortizo Cohen and the Ministry of Labor and Workforce Development ( Mitradel ) in the year 2022. Graduates of maritime universities have some academic deficiencies, which may affect their performance in the labor market.
  • 18. 18 2. Commitment to training: 2. Low percentage of job placement: Maritime universities are committed to the training of their students, and are willing to adapt their study plans and development strategies to fit the needs of the labor market. Only 20% of graduates enter the labor market in the first year after graduating. 3. Maritime security: 3. Lack of practical experience: Safety at sea is a priority, and maritime universities work to ensure that graduates are prepared to deal with emergency situations and safely operate and maintain maritime equipment. Graduates may lack practical experience in the maritime sector, which may affect their ability to perform in the labor market. 4. Regulatory compliance: 4. Limitations in training: Maritime universities work to ensure that graduates are prepared to comply with maritime rules and regulations. Maritime universities may have limitations in the training they provide to their students, which may affect the quality of training and preparation of graduates. 5. Reputation of educational institutions: 5. Disconnection between training and the labor market:
  • 19. 19 Maritime universities work to maintain a good reputation, and the quality of training provided is essential to achieving this. The training provided by maritime universities may not be aligned with the needs of the labor market, which may affect the ability of graduates to find employment. 6. Job performance: 6. Lack of support for job placement: Maritime universities work to ensure that graduates are prepared to perform successfully in the labor market, both on board ships and in other activities related to navigation. Maritime universities may not provide enough support to graduates to enable them to enter the labor market. This may include a lack of guidance and advice in the job search process, as well as a lack of contacts and networks that can help graduates find employment opportunities. 7. Competitiveness of the maritime sector: 7. Limitations on the diversity of training: Maritime universities work to ensure that graduates are prepared to compete in the global market, and ensure that Panama's maritime sector is competitive. 7. Limitations in the diversity of training: Maritime universities may have limitations in the diversity of training they provide, which may affect the ability of
  • 20. 20 graduates to adapt to different roles and responsibilities in the maritime sector. 8. Lack of updating skills and knowledge: Maritime universities may not be sufficiently updating the skills and knowledge of graduates, which may affect their ability to stay current and competitive in the labor market. 9. Disconnection between training and the needs of the sector: The training provided by maritime universities may not be aligned with the needs of the maritime sector, which may affect the ability of graduates to find employment and perform effectively in the labor market. 10. Lack of support for the continuity of training: Maritime universities may not provide enough support for graduates to continue
  • 21. 21 their training and develop professionally in the maritime sector. This may include a lack of graduate programs, continuing training, and support in obtaining professional certifications and licenses. GLOSSARY University training : It is the educational process carried out in higher education institutions, in order to grant an academic degree and develop the professional skills of students. Professional skills : They are the set of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that allow a person to effectively carry out a work activity, adapting to the demands of the market and the needs of society.
  • 22. 22 Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery : It is the career that trains engine officers, who are responsible for operating and maintaining the propulsion and auxiliary systems of merchant ships, as well as supervising their safety and energy efficiency. International Maritime University of Panama (UMIP) : It is a higher education institution specialized in the training of professionals in the maritime and port sector, which has the support of the Maritime Authority of Panama and the International Maritime Organization. Nautical School of Panama : It was the first institution that offered the training of deck and engine officers in Panama, founded in 1972. In 2005, it became the UMIP, expanding its academic offering and its infrastructure. Panama Canal Pilots : They are the professionals who advise and direct the captains of the ships that transit through the Panama Canal, guaranteeing the safety and efficiency of the operation. To be practical, you must have experience as a deck or engine officer, and pass a rigorous training and evaluation program. UMIP High Evaluation Commission : It was an organization created in 2014, in order to carry out a diagnosis of the academic, administrative and financial situation of the UMIP, and to propose measures to improve its quality and competitiveness. Maritime and port sector : It is the set of economic, social and environmental activities related to maritime transport, international trade, the exploitation of marine resources, security and protection of the marine environment. Length : It is the maximum length of a ship, measured from the bow to the stern. Bow: It is the front part of a ship, which cuts through the water as it moves forward. Stern : It is the rear part of a ship, where the rudder and propeller are located. Rudder: It is a device that serves to direct the course of a ship, by rotating about a vertical axis.
  • 23. 23 Propeller : It is a device that is used to propel a ship by rotating about a horizontal axis and generating a reaction force in the water. English language: It is the most used language in the international maritime field, both for communication between ships and port authorities, as well as for documentation and regulations. It is recommended that graduates of the maritime university have a sufficient level of English to function in their profession. Main engine: It is the engine or set of engines that provide the power necessary for the propulsion of the ship. Auxiliary equipment: These are the systems and devices that complement the operation of the main machine, such as electrical generators, pumps, compressors, purifiers, heaters, refrigerators, etc. Machine room: It is the space where the main machine and auxiliary equipment are located, as well as the control panels, measuring instruments and security systems. Machine Officer: This is the professional in charge of operating, repairing and maintaining the main machine and auxiliary equipment, as well as supervising the machine personnel and complying with safety and environmental protection standards. STCW Convention: It is the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, adopted by the International Maritime Organization in 1978 and amended on several occasions. It establishes the minimum competency, certification and watchkeeping requirements for maritime personnel, as well as the responsibilities of flag, training and port States.
  • 24. 24 Maritime cluster: It is the set of economic, social, cultural and environmental activities that are related to the sea and its resources, such as maritime transport, international trade, fishing, tourism, shipbuilding, research, education, safety and security. Conclusion The university training of Nautical Engineering students in Naval Machinery at UMIP is a key aspect for their professional performance in the maritime sector, which has great relevance for the economic and social development of Panama. However, this research has revealed that there is a gap between the training that students receive and the skills demanded by the labor market, which makes their insertion and stability in employment difficult. The university training of Nautical Engineering students in Naval Machinery at the Marist University of Panama (UMIP) is essential for their professional performance in the maritime sector, since it plays a crucial role in the economic and social development of Panama. However, as mentioned above, this research has shown that there are significant discrepancies between the education students receive and the skills necessary to meet the demands of the labor market. These findings can be attributed to several factors, including the lack of alignment between academic education and the needs of the maritime sector, as well as the absence of specific training programs to address these differences. The importance of overcoming this gap lies in two fundamental aspects. On the one hand, it will allow UMIP Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery students to obtain better results in their professional careers, increasing their productivity and contribution to the economic and social growth of Panama. Furthermore, resolving this situation could improve the quality of life of graduates, reducing the
  • 25. 25 unemployment rate and providing stronger opportunities in the workplace. To achieve these objectives, it is necessary to implement joint actions between educational institutions, businessmen and government. Some recommendations to address this gap include: Align academic education with the needs of the maritime sector: A detailed analysis of the competencies and skills necessary to meet the demands of the labor market is required, and adapt the curriculum to reflect these changes. Develop targeted training programs: Online and in-person training programs can help students acquire practical skills and continually update their knowledge. Promote collaboration between educational institutions and companies: This cooperation can facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge, as well as the integration of students in real projects and work experiences. To reduce this gap, it is recommended that the UMIP review and update its study plan, incorporating content and methodologies that favor the development of technical, personal and social competencies of students, as well as establishing mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating the quality of the training and performance of graduates. Likewise, it is suggested that the link between the university and the productive sector be strengthened, through cooperation agreements, professional practices, job boards and continuous training programs. These future research could focus on various aspects related to the training and employability of Panamanian seafarers. For example, they could analyze in greater depth the reasons behind the gap between training and labor market skills, identify effective strategies to address this gap and evaluate its impact on the insertion and job performance of students and graduates. Additionally, they could examine how other countries have addressed similar problems and what lessons could be drawn from these success stories.
  • 26. 26 Another potential focus for future research could be the analysis of employers' perceptions regarding the preparation of Nautical Engineering students in Naval Machinery at UMIP. This type of research could provide valuable insights into how employers value the competencies and skills of new entrants to the labor market, and how these perceptions can influence the selection and hiring of personnel. Finally, future research could also focus on the evaluation of specific policies and programs designed to improve the training and employability of Panamanian seafarers. This could include the analysis of the effectiveness of these programs in terms of their impact on the job insertion and performance of students and graduates, as well as on their satisfaction and general well-being. In conclusion, although this research has provided an initial vision of the situation of the students and graduates of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at the UMIP, as well as the factors that influence their insertion and job performance, there is still much to explore. Future research could contribute to improving the training and employability of Panamanian seafarers by analyzing effective strategies to address the gap between training and labor market skills, evaluating specific policies and programs, and understanding perceptions of employers regarding the preparation of students. Bibliographies 1. Alberti, Giorgio, and Villena, José Luis. Challenges and opportunities for the employability of university graduates in the international context. Madrid, ES: McGraw-Hill Spain, 2013.
  • 27. 27 2. Argote, Luz Ángela, Duque, Ángela María, and González, Laura. Graduates and their performance in the environment: a challenge for the institutions that train human resources in health. Bogotá, CO: Red Colombia Médica, 2006 3. Arnau Grass, Jaime. Experimental designs in psychology and education. Volume 1. 2nd. Edition. Edit Thresholds. 1990 4. Panama Canal. Panama Canal Annual Reports , Years 2005 – 2015 5. CINDA. Quality of university education Information for decision making. 2016. Chile. 6. Comptroller General of the Republic of Panama. Labor Statistics – Household Survey 7. Comptroller General of the Republic of Panama. Labor Statistics – Volume II – Employment in the Public and Private Sectors 8. Comptroller General of the Republic of Panama. National Institute of Statistics and Census, Social Situation 9. Comptroller General of the Republic, INEC, (2010), Manual of the XI Population Census and VII Housing Census. 10. Córdova Duarte, Gabriel, and Barbosa Jaramillo, Elba Rosa. The graduation profile of the agricultural engineer. A discussion group experience with graduates. México, DF, MX: Red Acta Universitaria, 2006. 11 García Ascolani , Jimena University education and professional field. What professionals are we training? - An academic proposal. Community University. Paraguay. 2008. 12. González, González, M. and Ramírez Ramírez , I. (2011). The formation of professional skills: a challenge in university curricular projects. Odysseus, electronic journal of pedagogy, 8 (16) . : http://www.odiseo.com.mx/2011/8-16/gonzalez-ramirez-formacion-competencias.html
  • 28. 28 13. GONZÁLEZ M, V. (2002) What does it mean to be a competent professional? Reflections from a psychological perspective. Cuban Magazine of Higher Education. Vol. XXII No.1. pp. 45- 53 14. Hernández Sampieri and Others. Investigation methodology. 6th. Edition. McGraw-Hill. pp. 600. Mexico. 2014. APPENDIX 1 PROPOSAL TO PREPARE THE TEACHING BODY FOR THAT THEY TEACH THE CLASSES IN ENGLISH TO THE STUDENTS OF THE DEGREE OF NAUTIC ENGINEERING IN NAVAL MACHINERY
  • 29. 29 A. PROPOSAL Strengthen the training offered by the International Maritime University of Panama to raise the current level of 30% to a minimum of 60% of classes taught in English in the specialized subjects of the Bachelor of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery. These subjects are: 1 Introducción a las Ciencias Náuticas 14 Seguridad Marítima 2 Introducción a las Máquinas Navales 15 Metalurgia y Máquinas Herramientas 3 Seminario Marítimo 16 Mantenimiento 4 Construcción Naval 17 Higiene Naval 5 Derecho Marítimo 18 Principio de Guardia de Puente 6 Electrónica y Tecnología 19 Oficina Técnica 7 Mecánica y Resistencia de Materiales 20 Materia Optativa 8 Seguridad Industrial 21 Taller 9 Electrónica,y Tecnología Electrónica 22 Calderas y Turbinas de Vapor 10 Termodinámica y Mecánica deFluídos 23 Automatismo
  • 30. 30 B. DESCRIPTION This project is focused on increasing oral skill in English within the classroom because interaction with both the teacher and classmates is of vital importance to develop a better understanding and expression of the English language. C. JUSTIFICATION Panama is a leading country in merchant marine registration worldwide, as well as the country with the flag under which the largest number of ships in the world are registered. Consequently, there is a potential job market for young graduates of the Naval Machinery Degree, where knowledge of English is essential. Given the importance of the English language, Panama created Law No.2 of January 14, 2003, which establishes the mandatory teaching of the English
  • 31. 31 language in official and private educational centers at the first and second level of education. However, English in the current study plan of the Bachelor of Naval Machinery does not grant credits. It is optional, without being mandatory. Only maritime technical English in the last year of study provides the student with credits in this career . Good English teachers are increasingly scarce. Ideally, the English center of the Maritime University provides each classroom and each teacher with a computer with speakers to show their students videos of conversations, movie segments, series, the entire presentation of their class in English. D. GOALS The Maritime Language Center ( MLC), which operates at the International Maritime University of Panama, is the training entity responsible for its greatest use in classes taught to future naval machinery engineers. to. General  Increase to at least 60% the classes taught in English in specialized subjects for students pursuing the Nautical Bachelor's Degree in Naval Machinery. b. Specific  Offer the maritime industry a workforce with the appropriate skills and competent in the English language so that the graduate can function adequately in the labor market .  Increase, over a three-year period, the ability to master English in teachers who teach special subjects in this Bachelor's Degree.
  • 32. 32 E. ANALYTICAL PROGRAMMING The Maritime Language Center ( MLC) is the entity responsible for the greatest communicative and practical use of this language for teachers and students. It is expected that they will use English instead of knowing and memorizing rules and semantic structures. This objective will be achieved gradually over a maximum period of five years, first training subject teachers less complex. The following is illustrated, as an example, with the following programming aimed at teaching staff for a period of five years . I SEM II SEM I SEM II SEM I SEM II SEM 1 Introducción a las Ciencias Náuticas 2 Introducción a las Maquinas Navales 3 Seminario Marítimo 4 Construcción Naval 5 Derecho Marítimo 6 Electrotecnia y Tecnología Electrónica 7 Mecánica y Resistencia de Materiales 8 Seguridad Industrial 9 Termodinámica y Mecánica de Fluídos 10 Motores de Combustión Interna 11 Mantenimiento 12 Teoría del Buque 13 Seguridad Marítima 14 Metalurgia y Máquinas Herramientas 15 Higiene Naval DURACIÓN DEL PROYECTO ASIGNATURA PROGRAMACIÓN DEL REFORZAMIENTO EN INGLÉS AL CUERPO DOCENTE POR ASIGNATURA AÑO 1 AÑO 2 AÑO 3
  • 33. 33 ESTIMATE BUDGET The total estimated annual budget for operating and investment expenses of this project is approximately B/.300,000, of which B/.228,000 is allocated to paying teachers' salaries. s in training. I SEMESTRE II SEMESTRE I SEMESTRE II SEMESTRE I SEMESTRE II SEMESTRE 1 Introducción a las Ciencias Náuticas 12.000 12.000 2 Introducción a las Maquinas Navales 12.000 12.000 3 Seminario Marítimo 12.000 12.000 4 Construcción Naval 12.000 12.000 5 Derecho Marítimo 12.000 12.000 6 Electrotecnia y Tecnología Electrónica 12.000 12.000 7 Mecánica y Resistencia de Materiales 12.000 12.000 8 Seguridad Industrial 12.000 12.000 9 Termoninámica y Mecánica de Fluídos 12.000 12.000 ESTIMACIÓN DEL COSTO DE LA PLANILLA DE PROFESORES EN ADIESTRAMIENTO PARA DICTAR CLASES EN INGLÉS EN LAS ASIGNATURAS ESPECIALES DE LA LICENCIATURA NÁUTICA EN MAQUINARIA NAVAL Cuadro No. 73 COSTO TOTAL B/. ( En Balboas ) ASIGNATURA AÑO 1 AÑO 2 AÑO 3
  • 34. 34 A salary of B/.2,000 per month per teacher is estimated in the 6 months that their reinforcement in the English language requires, which will require hiring another in their absence with remuneration under the current conditions of the UMIP. The financing of this project must be negotiated with IFARHU or with some international organization .
  • 35. 35 APPENDIX 2 ANALYSIS OF THE STUDY PLAN OF THE CAREER OF NAUTICAL ENGINEERING IN NAVAL MACHINERY ANALYSIS OF THE CURRICULUM OF THE TEACHING OF NAUTICAL ENGINEERING IN NAVAL MACHINERY The study plans and programs have as reference what is stipulated by the International Maritime Organization ( IMO). This organization governs the demands of the maritime sector worldwide contained in a manual known as OFFICER IN CHARGE OF ENGINEERING WATCH. SEGURIDAD INDUSTRIAL MANTENIMIENTO
  • 36. 36 its requirements , the Professor must prepare an Analytical Plan of the content of each subject that makes up the Course Plan in the semester to be covered and have this manual as a source. This Analytical Plan is subject to review by the coordinator of the Naval Machinery School and any modification is coordinated with the Professor who teaches the subject, before its execution. This study plan at the bachelor's level prepares students as Engineer Officers on board merchant ships and, in order to be able to hold positions as naval engineers, they must comply with the International Convention STCW ( International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch for Seafars ) on training, certification and guard standards for seafarers, with the requirements of the National Council for University Evaluation and Accreditation of Panama CONEAUPA, which regulates the quality of academic offers at a higher level. They also receive training on complying with international safety standards. to safeguard human life at sea, protect the marine environment and prevent its pollution. Obtaining the Bachelor of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery requires 271 hours, distributed in five subjects to be taught in 8 semesters and 3 summers; of
  • 37. 37 which 141 are theoretical classes and 130 are practical. In a period of 5 years of study, giving a total of 206 credits in the five training fields, distributed as follows: ANNEX 3 INSTRUMENT PANAMA UNIVERSITY Faculty of Education Sciences Instrument N° 1 FOR STUDENTS The purpose of this instrument is to obtain information about the University Training and its correspondence with the Professional Competencies of the students of Nautical Engineering in Naval Machinery at the International Maritime University of Panama. The information obtained will be confidential and will be used for academic purposes . I. Part. General data: 1. Sex: Male: 🖵 Feminine: 🖵 2. Age: 18 or younger 🖵 19-21 🖵 22-24 🖵 25-27 🖵 28-30 🖵 31-34 🖵 More than 35 🖵 3. Year of study 1st. Year 🖵 2nd. year 🖵 3rd. year 🖵 4th. year 🖵 5th year 🖵 4. Academic index Less than 1. 🖵 1 to 1.50 🖵 1.51 to 2.0 🖵 2.01 to 2.50 🖵 2.51 to 2.70 🖵 2.71 to 2.90 🖵 2.91 to 3.00 🖵
  • 38. 38 II part Assessment of the aspects of the Competencies Instructions: rate the following aspects using a scale from 1 to 4 and mark the evaluated criterion with an X, where each score corresponds to the following: 1. Completely disagree. 2 Disagree . 3 Okay . 4 Completely agree Criterion 1 2 3 4 1. I know what the race is about 2. I have the ability to concentrate (for studying, attending and concentrating in classes...) 3. I have the capacity for innovation in practices or jobs 4. I adapt to new situations: new course, new teachers, schedule changes... 5. I have the ability to forecast and plan 6. I organize myself (ability to structure, organize and distribute the resources available to achieve objectives) in my study and work time 7. Ability to organize work teams 8. Ability to make optimal use of one's own resources 9. Capacity for optimal use of University resources 10. Negotiation capacity (in class matters, seeking your best achievement) 11. Problem solving (ability to analyze situations and make decisions, putting them into practice effectively), in class subjects, in practices... 12. Synthesis capacity (from some data, being able to project the most important ones, the conclusions) 13. I have competitiveness (achievement of a goal with better results than others) 14. Maintaining my usual performance (in adverse or conflictive situations) 15. You act with ease and firmness in tense situations 16. Capacity for teamwork
  • 39. 39 17. Coordination (ability to ensure the fulfillment of tasks effectively, within the defined period and with the planned resources) in internships or jobs 18. Voluntariness in teamwork, in practices (personal power that motivates to carry out or not carry out a task) 19. Ease of relating to your colleagues 20. Communication (ability to relate, making yourself understood and listening to others) 21. Skills in interpersonal relationships (empathy, tact and listening as abilities to relate to others) 22. Ease of relating to your teachers 23. I am an entrepreneur 24. Ability to get other colleagues to accept your ideas and proposals 25. You inspire confidence (ability to inspire a spirit of trust, cooperation and support in your colleagues) 26. You usually persuade and obtain advantages without provoking hostilities 27. Ability to easily accept new responsibilities, or new positions (delegate, student representation...) 28. Ability to relate to other colleagues (empathy, tact, sympathy...) 29. You get great satisfaction from the ability to manage people and resources. 30. You generate a good image of the University before others and outside of it 31. Ability to know your own personal and professional characteristics 32. I am capable of operating, repairing and maintaining in perfect working order all the machinery necessary for ship propulsion, loading and unloading operations. Criterion 1 2 3 4
  • 40. 40 33. I am capable of providing general services on board, in order to navigate from production ports to consumption ports. 34. I can perform all operating operations of the main machine and auxiliary equipment. 35. I master international safety standards to safeguard human life at sea, protect the marine environment and prevent pollution. 36. I master the theoretical and practical aspects that include internal and external combustion engines, electricity, electronics, auxiliary machines. 37. I can organize and operate in a machine room and automatic controls systems. 38. I have mastery in machine simulators. Instructions: rate the following aspects using a scale from 1 to 4 and mark the evaluated criterion with an X, where each score corresponds to the following: 2. Completely disagree. 2 Disagree . 3 Okay . 4 Completely agree 1. Organization of the courses 1 2 3 4 1.1 The courses have been well organized in relation to content, schedules, assignment delivery and dates. 1.2 The number of students in the group has been adequate for their development 2. Course contents 1 2 3 4 2.1 The contents of the courses have responded to my training expectations 2.2 There has been an adequate combination between theory and practice 3. Duration and schedules 1 2 3 4 their objectives and contents 3.2 The schedules have favored attendance at the courses 4. Teachers 1 2 3 4 4.1 The way the courses are taught has facilitated learning
  • 41. 41 4.2 Teachers know the topics taught in depth 5. Didactic materials 1 2 3 4 5.1 The documents, copies and materials delivered are understandable and adequate 5.2 The resources and means used were updated 6. Resources and facilities 1 2 3 4 6.1 The facilities, classroom, laboratories and workshops have been appropriate for the development of the courses 6.2 The technological and computer resources have been adequate and used when required in the development of the course contents 6.3 Platform, applications or emails are used to support the development of the courses 7. Learning evaluation 1 2 3 4 7.1 The evaluation instruments are relevant to the objectives and contents of the courses 7.2 Self-assessment and co-assessment are used in each of the courses 7.3 Recovery and remedial strategies are allowed in each course for students with deficiency to failure. 7.4 A correspondence is achieved between performance and the final evaluation of the courses 8. Learning experiences 1 2 3 4 8.1 There is a correspondence between the activities of the courses and the learning achieved in them 8.2 learning activities linked to the work scenario are promoted 8.3 Field practices and links with the work environment are favored 9. Final evaluation of the courses 1 2 3 4 9.1 The development of the courses allows me to perform well at work 9.2 I have incorporated new abilities, skills and abilities that I can apply to my work performance
  • 42. 42 9.3 I have expanded my knowledge