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Social business – a new
private sector contribution
to development?
Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks
OECD DAC Development Debate (DDD)
Paris, March 13, 2014
1
General introduction
2
Against this background, a growing
number of economists is calling for a
more inclusive capitalism
At its root, social business is about
making the economy work for
everyone, including the poor people
at the bottom of the pyramid who
are usually left out
Muhammad Yunus
Towards new solutions
▪ Yunus promotes social
business as a third way
to complement profit-
maximizing
business and donation-
based charity
▪ Increasingly global
search for creative
business solutions to
overcome social and
ecological challenges
SOURCE: Own draft
Despite 60 years of global economic growth and massive financial development
aid, we see little progress in global poverty reduction
From Basic Needs to Millennium
Development Goals: four decades of
poverty reduction in science and
praxis, but no progress
Theo Rauch
3
Yunus defines social business according to a number of certain principles
Source: Yunus 2010 – Building Social Business
 The business objective is social –
not to maximize profit
 Financial and economic
sustainability
 No dividend beyond the return of
original investment
 Profits stay with the company for
expansion and improvement
 Environmental consciousness
 Market wages with better-than-
standard working conditions
4
These principles distinguish this social business approach
from other organizational forms
Demarcation line between non-
dividend and dividend business
Loosely defined playing ground of
social enterprises
Yunus‘ social
business
(Type 1)
Yunus‘ social
business
(Type 2)
Traditional
non-profit
organization
Non-profit
with income-
generating
activities
Traditional
profit-
maximizing
business
Socially
responsible
business
Corporation
practicing
strategic CSR1
▪ Non-loss, non-dividend
company with a primary
social purpose
▪ Social benefits through
offering and/or operating
model
▪ Profit-maximizing
company owned by its
poor/disadvantaged
target beneficiaries
▪ Benefits through
ownership structure
and/or offering
Secure both social and
economic sustainability
Secure self-
sustainability
Social programs to
achieve profit objectives
Economic
value creation2Social value creation
Commercial methods to
support social purpose
Reason for dual value
creation strategy
Sustainability
strategy
Primary purpose1
2
3
SOURCE: Own draft from 2011 based on Alter 2007 and Yunus 2010
1 Corporate Social Responsibility
2 profit/shareholder return
Hybrid spectrum
▪ New hybrid organizational form that combines
elements of traditional non-profits and business
▪ Profit just as a means to an end
5
However, in contrast to Yunus’, we recommend a more context specific and impact
focused definition of the general social business term
Source: Sen 1999 – Development as Freedom; Yunus 2010 – Building Social Business
Proposed definition
A social business is a business that
contributes to human development
by enlarging people’s choice in an
economically, environmentally, and
socially sustainable way.
Respective norms and standards are
context-specific and due to societal
negotiation.
Rationale
▪ Social intent plus investors’
abdication from dividends
are no guarantee for net
positive outcomes
▪ What to consider as
"social" is highly context-
specific
6
Share lessons learnt from our own
social business field research
Highlight social business oppor-
tunities, limitations, and risks
Discuss conclusions and potential
policy implications
Objectives of today’s presentation
7
Dr. Linda Kleemann
How our work relates to social business
▪ Evaluates entrepreneurs and businesses
with respect to their economic, social and
environmental impact in developing
countries
▪ Educates students on social
entrepreneurship
▪ Consults social business start-ups
Dr. Kerstin Humberg
▪ Investigated Yunus’ first two multinational
social business joint ventures in
Bangladesh
▪ Gives social business lectures at various
business schools
▪ Supports non-profit and for-profit clients
in developing social business solutions
Source: Own draft
8
Case 1 – Lessons learnt from Grameen Danone Foods Ltd.
9
Yunus’ social business ideas received international attention when the first
multinational social business joint venture started production in Bangladesh
Grameen Danone Foods Ltd. in Bangladesh
Reduce poverty by a
unique proximity
business model which
brings daily healthy
nutrition to the poor
Source: Grameen Danone Mission Statement
10
Two men, one idea – addressing malnutrition
 Social mission: Poverty reduction through local employment,
income creation and improved nutrition
 Business model: Local production and distribution of
fortified yogurt for poor children at an affordable price
 Social business principles: Viable business model ("no loss"),
no shareholder dividends, payback of initial investment
11
Text
Shokti Doi consists of pure, full
cream cow milk, live
fermenting cultures, data
molasses, and sugar
Fortified with a high dose of
micronutrients, a 60 gram cup
covers 30% of children’s daily
needs of vitamin A, zinc, iron,
and iodine
12
Business analysis pointing to many start-up related, but
also structural challenges
▪ Low performance against business objectives due to internal and external
factors (e.g., unrealistic business plan, governance issues, external shock)
▪ Challenges in rural marketing and sales (e.g., lack of retail infrastructure,
socio-cultural challenges, lack of purchasing power)
▪ However, impressive learning curve and few social/business trade-offs
13
How to ensure the distribution of fresh yoghurt
products in rural Bangladesh?
 Creating own sales force was significantly more complicated
and time consuming than expected
 Various retention issues – sales ladies confronted with various
socio-cultural challenges
 Distribution costs versus reach
14
How to foster regular consumption in the absence of
nutritional awareness and sufficient purchasing power?
 Educating poor women and children about nutrition – that‘s the
objective of Grameen Danone‘s mini events
 However, their behavioral change in nutrition require awareness, cash
and time
15
…
Even urban expansion proved to
be challenging for Grameen
Danone
 Additional transportation cost
 Lack of fridges
 Low margins
 Illegal sales
 Sales of expired products
16
Despite various challenges in business operation,
Grameen Danone contributes to poverty reduction
 Access to beneficial products at an affordable price
 Access to economic resources (e.g., yogurt stock, rickshaw van)
and new social capital
 Significant increase in income and food security
 Gain in human capital (e.g., computer and accounting skills)
17
Generally, customers and sales ladies show positive
reactions to Grameen Danone‘s entrepreneurial effort
 Customers acknowledge access to affordable micronutrients for their kids
 GAIN study pointing to positive health impact. However, extremely poor
consumers left out and major difficulties in customer retention
 Sales Ladies value income and food security plus personal empowerment
18
Unit of measure
Text
Residents benefiting from new customers and income
potential as well as infrastructure improvements
 Improvement of local infrastructure (e.g., streets, energy, shops)
 Rather few negative effects (e.g., health and security issues for sales
ladies, production helpers, and customers)
19
Selected takeaways – lessons learnt from field research in Bangladesh (1/2)
Source: Own draft
2
3
1
Multinational corporations tend to underestimate the
extra commitment and market intelligence needed to
overcome BOP market constraints. Major challenges in
operation, thus, relate to market development and
setting up sales and distribution channels
Additional obstacles are found in target beneficiaries’
livelihood context and strategies. Both cases studied
exemplify how socio-cultural norms/traditions
undermine sales and distribution strategies
Social businesses are exposed to the same liability of
newness as profit maximizing start-ups. Initial losses
are a matter of course, but in JVs with multinational
corporations, additional start-up challenges arise from
quick top-down approaches and governance issues
20
Selected takeaways – lessons learnt from field research in Bangladesh (2/2)
Source: Own draft
5
4
Pricing is crucial, but not everything. Customer demand is
what finally makes or breaks a business. Poor people’s
need for basic goods don’t necessarily constitute a
market. As consumers they need to have the financial
ability and the willingness to pay for an offering
Most promising are value propositions that enhance poor
people’s purchasing power (e.g., through paid
employment or increased productivity) or reduce their
cost of living (e.g., by means of reduced transaction costs)
A primary social objective determines a company’s
operational framework and restricts executives’ strategic
options (e.g., re customer segmentation and pricing. But
while a primary social mission does not necessarily
involve trade-offs, multiple secondary social objectives
tend to be counterproductive
21
Case 2 – Lessons learnt from the Green Belt Movement
22
The Green Belt Movement at a glance
SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
▪ Non-profit grassroots organization
headquartered in Kenya
▪ Founded by Wangari Maathai in 1977 in
response to the needs of rural Kenyan
women (streams drying up; unsecure
food, firewood, and fuel supply)
▪ Created momentum around environ-
mental management, women empower-
ment, and livelihood improvement
– > 51 million trees planted
– > 30,000 women trained in forestry,
food processing, and trades that help
them earn income while preserving
their lands and resources
▪ In 2004 Prof. Maathai was awarded the
Nobel Peace Prize for her contribution to
development, democracy, and peace
23
Green Belt’s mission is to strive for better environmental management, community
empowerment, and livelihood improvements
We strive for better environmental
management, community
empowerment, and livelihood
improvement using tree-planting as
an entry point
Mission
Values
▪ Love for environment conservation
▪ Self and community empowerment
▪ Volunteerism
▪ Accountability, transparency
and honesty
SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
24
Today, the Green Belt Movement finds itself at a crossroads
Challenges
 Confronted with ongoing environmental
degradation and a growing threat of
global climate change, Green Belt
aspires to expand its reach and
relevance
− To further leverage its community-
based approach to afforestation, and
− Share its vast experience in
environmental management
 In the aftermath of Wangari Maathai’s
death in 2011, Green Belt is forced to
− Cope with the emotional and man-
agement gap she has left
− Master the transition into a new (less
donor dependant) era
SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
25
▪ How can Green Belt maintain its socio-economic and
environmental impact, given a scarcity of resources?
▪ How can Green Belt use its assets and build on own
strengths to become less donor dependent?
▪ Given Green Belt’s mission and strategic priorities –
what could viable social business solutions look
like?
Social business – a way out of donor dependency?
SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
26
Over the course of one year, we developed a promising social business solution
with the Green Belt Movement
SOURCE: Venture Africa Team
Objective: Explore and prioritize 5 potential
social business options
Objective: Flesh out most promising social
business option and prepare for implementation
Turn GBM-owned facilities to
training center for external users
Professionalize Green Belt Safaris
Foster integrated clean tech
distribution and services business
Establish carbon trading
Establish Green Belt brand as a
label for green products and
services
Prioritization
Exploration
workshop in Hamburg
Implementation
workshop in Nairobi
Option Y
Option X
27SOURCE: Own draft
Professionalize
Green Belt
Safaris
Professionalize
operations
Dedicated and professional administration
with entrepreneurial mindset
Qualification motivation of guides
Access to local communities
Access to finance
Access to initial finance
Potential conflict with traditional donors
Guard the GBM
spirit and reputation
Sustainability and adherence to GBM
standards
Net impact on communities
Green Belt Safaris – issue tree
Scalability
Resilience to business risk
28
Social business model canvas for Green Belt Safaris
▪ GBM
▪ Government
agencies
▪ Communities
▪ Base camp
Key activities
▪ Strategic and operational
management
▪ Prepare communities to
host
▪ Handle visitor experience
before and throughout
tour
▪ Langata
▪ Train guides
Key resources
▪ Vehicles
▪ Guide/human resources
▪ Office space
▪ Communities willing and
able to host
▪ Materials for activities
▪ Fully equipped Langata
centre
Key partners Value proposition
▪ Make your journey to
Kenya matter
▪ Experience of legacy of
Wangari Maathai and
GBM
▪ Deeper understanding and
authentic involvement in
everyday life of
communities
Customer
relationships
▪ Customer satisfaction
survey
▪ Communication via
Facebook
▪ Regular newsletter
Channels
▪ GBS on Facebook
▪ Online directories/
platform
▪ GBS Web site
▪ Guide books
▪ Personal contact and
referral
Customer
segments
▪ Individual tourists
eco-value seeker
and friends
▪ Educational
organizations
▪ Corporates
Cost structure
▪ Community contribution ~ USD 250,000 (aggregated
until 2020)
▪ Key costs
– Community contribution (15% of revenues)
– COGS – 30%
– Personnel – ~25%
– Depreciation vehicles
Revenue streams
Price (recharge)
Day Override
1styear 175 295
After-
wards
255 375
No. of trips (6 pax)
2014 –
8
2020 –
300
▪ Revenue in 2020
USD 600,000
▪ Income in 2020
USD 200,000
SOURCE: Venture Africa Team; Nairobi workshop
29
Green Belt Safaris – key facts and figures
SOURCE: Green Belt Safaris Concept Paper
▪ Green Belt Safaris (GBS) is an eco-tourism company
▪ Developed in response to the need to have long-
term sustainable source of income for Green Belt
Movement in order to enhance financial
independence
▪ Geared towards conservation of local bio-diversity
and community empowerment to improve their
livelihoods
▪ Unique value proposition: individual, hand-made
safaris that take into account the preferences of the
visitor and provide authentic community-based
experience through established relationships at a
grassroots level
GBS – a community based enterprise
30
Selected takeaways – lessons learnt from Kenya
Source: Own draft
2
3
1
GBM turned their fears of commercialization into excitement
when open-minded people started with enthusiasm and
respect to develop tailor-made social business solutions to
increase GBM’s commercial viability. This source of talent and
know-how for the social sector should be invested in by
development organizations
Assisting a non-profit organization to create a promising social
business plan may seem an easy task for business consultants
or entrepreneurs. The real challenge emerges when it comes to
implementation. There is a great need for capability building
in business operation within long-term partnerships
Non-profit organizations like the Green Belt Movement
dispose of various assets and strengths that prepare the
ground for creative and viable social business solutions (e.g.,
land properties, community access, brand name/credibility)
31
Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks
32
Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks from
a sustainable development perspective – people
People
Planet Profit
Source: Own draft
RisksLimitationsOpportunities
▪ Mobilization of private sector
knowhow/technology transfer
▪ Improving poor people’s access
to basic products, services, and
market information/markets
▪ Employment creation/income
generation
▪ Changing mindset within private
sector and donor agencies
▪ Lack of social entrepreneurs
with access to capital
▪ Not reaching extreme poor
consumers due to their limited
purchasing power
▪ Limited income potential for the
poor (at least in Type 1 social
businesses)
▪ Behavioral barriers in terms
of required awareness and
acceptance
▪ Creation of unintended side
effects, e.g., generation of new
social or economic threats for
poor stakeholders or suppres-
sion of local competitors,
resulting in destruction of local
market structures
▪ Abuse of concept for marketing
purposes or cost-effective R&D in
light of lacking transparency
▪ Commercialization of formerly
free goods and services
33
Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks from
a sustainable development perspective – planet
Source: Own draft
People
Planet Profit
RisksLimitationsOpportunities
▪ Propagation of environmentally
friendly and resource efficient
business solutions to global
challenges
▪ Instant application in case of
unexpected natural calamities
(disaster relief)
▪ Environmental pollution and
degradation (e.g., through
increase in plastic packaging and
waste)
34
Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks – profit
Source: Own draft
People
Planet Profit
RisksLimitationsOpportunities
▪ Mobilization of private sector
capital directed to the poor
▪ Capital accumulation (due to
non-dividend policy)
▪ Contribution to market
creation/development
▪ Generation of self-sustainable
(rather than donor-dependent)
solutions
▪ Grass root innovation
▪ Still limited number of scalable
and replicable social business
prototypes
▪ Lack of capital/funds for private
social (business) entrepreneurs
▪ Complexity/resource-intensity
of (social) impact assessment
▪ Little impact on global poverty
root causes (e.g., world trade
system)
▪ High failure rate (e.g., due to top-
down approaches)
▪ Abetting exploitative business
practices for the sake of
commercial viability
▪ Mission drift within a profitable
social business or through profit-
maximizing replication
▪ Increasing commercialization
within the social/development
sector
35
Conclusion
36
Conclusion
2
4
Primarily a plea for social entrepreneurship in the third
sector (i.e., more efficient use of philanthropic
resources, competition, innovation, and scale)
5
3
1
No panacea, but complementary approach with specific
opportunities, limitations, and risks (e.g., trade-offs between
commercial success and social impact)
Integration of the poor into business cycles as active market
participants (inclusive business) and transformation of time-bound
development projects into viable business solutions
Mobilization of additional private sector resources that remain in the
country
Social business – a new private sector contribution to development?
Not that new, but reflecting the evolution of an old idea – using
the power of business and entrepreneurship to overcome social
and environmental challenges
37
Selected policy recommendations
Source: Own draft
2
5
Invest in cross-sector collaborations – innovative
solutions can come from all spheres
6
4
1
Focus on value propositions that enhance poor people’s
purchasing power or reduce their cost of living
Promote scalable and/or replicable social business
models to allow for systemic change
Foster an enabling environment for social business
entrepreneurs
Ensure clear definition and joint understanding of the
social business approach
Ensure proper social impact measurement to validate
desired outcomes and identify negative side effects
3
38
Discussion
39
▪ What are your key takeaways from the case studies?
▪ How can the OECD foster social business in
developing countries?
▪ How to build on the social business concept’s
opportunities, while mitigating risks involved?
Social business – a new private sector
contribution to development?
For discussion

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Social business – a new private sector contribution to development?

  • 1. Social business – a new private sector contribution to development? Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks OECD DAC Development Debate (DDD) Paris, March 13, 2014
  • 3. 2 Against this background, a growing number of economists is calling for a more inclusive capitalism At its root, social business is about making the economy work for everyone, including the poor people at the bottom of the pyramid who are usually left out Muhammad Yunus Towards new solutions ▪ Yunus promotes social business as a third way to complement profit- maximizing business and donation- based charity ▪ Increasingly global search for creative business solutions to overcome social and ecological challenges SOURCE: Own draft Despite 60 years of global economic growth and massive financial development aid, we see little progress in global poverty reduction From Basic Needs to Millennium Development Goals: four decades of poverty reduction in science and praxis, but no progress Theo Rauch
  • 4. 3 Yunus defines social business according to a number of certain principles Source: Yunus 2010 – Building Social Business  The business objective is social – not to maximize profit  Financial and economic sustainability  No dividend beyond the return of original investment  Profits stay with the company for expansion and improvement  Environmental consciousness  Market wages with better-than- standard working conditions
  • 5. 4 These principles distinguish this social business approach from other organizational forms Demarcation line between non- dividend and dividend business Loosely defined playing ground of social enterprises Yunus‘ social business (Type 1) Yunus‘ social business (Type 2) Traditional non-profit organization Non-profit with income- generating activities Traditional profit- maximizing business Socially responsible business Corporation practicing strategic CSR1 ▪ Non-loss, non-dividend company with a primary social purpose ▪ Social benefits through offering and/or operating model ▪ Profit-maximizing company owned by its poor/disadvantaged target beneficiaries ▪ Benefits through ownership structure and/or offering Secure both social and economic sustainability Secure self- sustainability Social programs to achieve profit objectives Economic value creation2Social value creation Commercial methods to support social purpose Reason for dual value creation strategy Sustainability strategy Primary purpose1 2 3 SOURCE: Own draft from 2011 based on Alter 2007 and Yunus 2010 1 Corporate Social Responsibility 2 profit/shareholder return Hybrid spectrum ▪ New hybrid organizational form that combines elements of traditional non-profits and business ▪ Profit just as a means to an end
  • 6. 5 However, in contrast to Yunus’, we recommend a more context specific and impact focused definition of the general social business term Source: Sen 1999 – Development as Freedom; Yunus 2010 – Building Social Business Proposed definition A social business is a business that contributes to human development by enlarging people’s choice in an economically, environmentally, and socially sustainable way. Respective norms and standards are context-specific and due to societal negotiation. Rationale ▪ Social intent plus investors’ abdication from dividends are no guarantee for net positive outcomes ▪ What to consider as "social" is highly context- specific
  • 7. 6 Share lessons learnt from our own social business field research Highlight social business oppor- tunities, limitations, and risks Discuss conclusions and potential policy implications Objectives of today’s presentation
  • 8. 7 Dr. Linda Kleemann How our work relates to social business ▪ Evaluates entrepreneurs and businesses with respect to their economic, social and environmental impact in developing countries ▪ Educates students on social entrepreneurship ▪ Consults social business start-ups Dr. Kerstin Humberg ▪ Investigated Yunus’ first two multinational social business joint ventures in Bangladesh ▪ Gives social business lectures at various business schools ▪ Supports non-profit and for-profit clients in developing social business solutions Source: Own draft
  • 9. 8 Case 1 – Lessons learnt from Grameen Danone Foods Ltd.
  • 10. 9 Yunus’ social business ideas received international attention when the first multinational social business joint venture started production in Bangladesh Grameen Danone Foods Ltd. in Bangladesh Reduce poverty by a unique proximity business model which brings daily healthy nutrition to the poor Source: Grameen Danone Mission Statement
  • 11. 10 Two men, one idea – addressing malnutrition  Social mission: Poverty reduction through local employment, income creation and improved nutrition  Business model: Local production and distribution of fortified yogurt for poor children at an affordable price  Social business principles: Viable business model ("no loss"), no shareholder dividends, payback of initial investment
  • 12. 11 Text Shokti Doi consists of pure, full cream cow milk, live fermenting cultures, data molasses, and sugar Fortified with a high dose of micronutrients, a 60 gram cup covers 30% of children’s daily needs of vitamin A, zinc, iron, and iodine
  • 13. 12 Business analysis pointing to many start-up related, but also structural challenges ▪ Low performance against business objectives due to internal and external factors (e.g., unrealistic business plan, governance issues, external shock) ▪ Challenges in rural marketing and sales (e.g., lack of retail infrastructure, socio-cultural challenges, lack of purchasing power) ▪ However, impressive learning curve and few social/business trade-offs
  • 14. 13 How to ensure the distribution of fresh yoghurt products in rural Bangladesh?  Creating own sales force was significantly more complicated and time consuming than expected  Various retention issues – sales ladies confronted with various socio-cultural challenges  Distribution costs versus reach
  • 15. 14 How to foster regular consumption in the absence of nutritional awareness and sufficient purchasing power?  Educating poor women and children about nutrition – that‘s the objective of Grameen Danone‘s mini events  However, their behavioral change in nutrition require awareness, cash and time
  • 16. 15 … Even urban expansion proved to be challenging for Grameen Danone  Additional transportation cost  Lack of fridges  Low margins  Illegal sales  Sales of expired products
  • 17. 16 Despite various challenges in business operation, Grameen Danone contributes to poverty reduction  Access to beneficial products at an affordable price  Access to economic resources (e.g., yogurt stock, rickshaw van) and new social capital  Significant increase in income and food security  Gain in human capital (e.g., computer and accounting skills)
  • 18. 17 Generally, customers and sales ladies show positive reactions to Grameen Danone‘s entrepreneurial effort  Customers acknowledge access to affordable micronutrients for their kids  GAIN study pointing to positive health impact. However, extremely poor consumers left out and major difficulties in customer retention  Sales Ladies value income and food security plus personal empowerment
  • 19. 18 Unit of measure Text Residents benefiting from new customers and income potential as well as infrastructure improvements  Improvement of local infrastructure (e.g., streets, energy, shops)  Rather few negative effects (e.g., health and security issues for sales ladies, production helpers, and customers)
  • 20. 19 Selected takeaways – lessons learnt from field research in Bangladesh (1/2) Source: Own draft 2 3 1 Multinational corporations tend to underestimate the extra commitment and market intelligence needed to overcome BOP market constraints. Major challenges in operation, thus, relate to market development and setting up sales and distribution channels Additional obstacles are found in target beneficiaries’ livelihood context and strategies. Both cases studied exemplify how socio-cultural norms/traditions undermine sales and distribution strategies Social businesses are exposed to the same liability of newness as profit maximizing start-ups. Initial losses are a matter of course, but in JVs with multinational corporations, additional start-up challenges arise from quick top-down approaches and governance issues
  • 21. 20 Selected takeaways – lessons learnt from field research in Bangladesh (2/2) Source: Own draft 5 4 Pricing is crucial, but not everything. Customer demand is what finally makes or breaks a business. Poor people’s need for basic goods don’t necessarily constitute a market. As consumers they need to have the financial ability and the willingness to pay for an offering Most promising are value propositions that enhance poor people’s purchasing power (e.g., through paid employment or increased productivity) or reduce their cost of living (e.g., by means of reduced transaction costs) A primary social objective determines a company’s operational framework and restricts executives’ strategic options (e.g., re customer segmentation and pricing. But while a primary social mission does not necessarily involve trade-offs, multiple secondary social objectives tend to be counterproductive
  • 22. 21 Case 2 – Lessons learnt from the Green Belt Movement
  • 23. 22 The Green Belt Movement at a glance SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website ▪ Non-profit grassroots organization headquartered in Kenya ▪ Founded by Wangari Maathai in 1977 in response to the needs of rural Kenyan women (streams drying up; unsecure food, firewood, and fuel supply) ▪ Created momentum around environ- mental management, women empower- ment, and livelihood improvement – > 51 million trees planted – > 30,000 women trained in forestry, food processing, and trades that help them earn income while preserving their lands and resources ▪ In 2004 Prof. Maathai was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her contribution to development, democracy, and peace
  • 24. 23 Green Belt’s mission is to strive for better environmental management, community empowerment, and livelihood improvements We strive for better environmental management, community empowerment, and livelihood improvement using tree-planting as an entry point Mission Values ▪ Love for environment conservation ▪ Self and community empowerment ▪ Volunteerism ▪ Accountability, transparency and honesty SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
  • 25. 24 Today, the Green Belt Movement finds itself at a crossroads Challenges  Confronted with ongoing environmental degradation and a growing threat of global climate change, Green Belt aspires to expand its reach and relevance − To further leverage its community- based approach to afforestation, and − Share its vast experience in environmental management  In the aftermath of Wangari Maathai’s death in 2011, Green Belt is forced to − Cope with the emotional and man- agement gap she has left − Master the transition into a new (less donor dependant) era SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
  • 26. 25 ▪ How can Green Belt maintain its socio-economic and environmental impact, given a scarcity of resources? ▪ How can Green Belt use its assets and build on own strengths to become less donor dependent? ▪ Given Green Belt’s mission and strategic priorities – what could viable social business solutions look like? Social business – a way out of donor dependency? SOURCE: Green Belt Movement website
  • 27. 26 Over the course of one year, we developed a promising social business solution with the Green Belt Movement SOURCE: Venture Africa Team Objective: Explore and prioritize 5 potential social business options Objective: Flesh out most promising social business option and prepare for implementation Turn GBM-owned facilities to training center for external users Professionalize Green Belt Safaris Foster integrated clean tech distribution and services business Establish carbon trading Establish Green Belt brand as a label for green products and services Prioritization Exploration workshop in Hamburg Implementation workshop in Nairobi Option Y Option X
  • 28. 27SOURCE: Own draft Professionalize Green Belt Safaris Professionalize operations Dedicated and professional administration with entrepreneurial mindset Qualification motivation of guides Access to local communities Access to finance Access to initial finance Potential conflict with traditional donors Guard the GBM spirit and reputation Sustainability and adherence to GBM standards Net impact on communities Green Belt Safaris – issue tree Scalability Resilience to business risk
  • 29. 28 Social business model canvas for Green Belt Safaris ▪ GBM ▪ Government agencies ▪ Communities ▪ Base camp Key activities ▪ Strategic and operational management ▪ Prepare communities to host ▪ Handle visitor experience before and throughout tour ▪ Langata ▪ Train guides Key resources ▪ Vehicles ▪ Guide/human resources ▪ Office space ▪ Communities willing and able to host ▪ Materials for activities ▪ Fully equipped Langata centre Key partners Value proposition ▪ Make your journey to Kenya matter ▪ Experience of legacy of Wangari Maathai and GBM ▪ Deeper understanding and authentic involvement in everyday life of communities Customer relationships ▪ Customer satisfaction survey ▪ Communication via Facebook ▪ Regular newsletter Channels ▪ GBS on Facebook ▪ Online directories/ platform ▪ GBS Web site ▪ Guide books ▪ Personal contact and referral Customer segments ▪ Individual tourists eco-value seeker and friends ▪ Educational organizations ▪ Corporates Cost structure ▪ Community contribution ~ USD 250,000 (aggregated until 2020) ▪ Key costs – Community contribution (15% of revenues) – COGS – 30% – Personnel – ~25% – Depreciation vehicles Revenue streams Price (recharge) Day Override 1styear 175 295 After- wards 255 375 No. of trips (6 pax) 2014 – 8 2020 – 300 ▪ Revenue in 2020 USD 600,000 ▪ Income in 2020 USD 200,000 SOURCE: Venture Africa Team; Nairobi workshop
  • 30. 29 Green Belt Safaris – key facts and figures SOURCE: Green Belt Safaris Concept Paper ▪ Green Belt Safaris (GBS) is an eco-tourism company ▪ Developed in response to the need to have long- term sustainable source of income for Green Belt Movement in order to enhance financial independence ▪ Geared towards conservation of local bio-diversity and community empowerment to improve their livelihoods ▪ Unique value proposition: individual, hand-made safaris that take into account the preferences of the visitor and provide authentic community-based experience through established relationships at a grassroots level GBS – a community based enterprise
  • 31. 30 Selected takeaways – lessons learnt from Kenya Source: Own draft 2 3 1 GBM turned their fears of commercialization into excitement when open-minded people started with enthusiasm and respect to develop tailor-made social business solutions to increase GBM’s commercial viability. This source of talent and know-how for the social sector should be invested in by development organizations Assisting a non-profit organization to create a promising social business plan may seem an easy task for business consultants or entrepreneurs. The real challenge emerges when it comes to implementation. There is a great need for capability building in business operation within long-term partnerships Non-profit organizations like the Green Belt Movement dispose of various assets and strengths that prepare the ground for creative and viable social business solutions (e.g., land properties, community access, brand name/credibility)
  • 32. 31 Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks
  • 33. 32 Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks from a sustainable development perspective – people People Planet Profit Source: Own draft RisksLimitationsOpportunities ▪ Mobilization of private sector knowhow/technology transfer ▪ Improving poor people’s access to basic products, services, and market information/markets ▪ Employment creation/income generation ▪ Changing mindset within private sector and donor agencies ▪ Lack of social entrepreneurs with access to capital ▪ Not reaching extreme poor consumers due to their limited purchasing power ▪ Limited income potential for the poor (at least in Type 1 social businesses) ▪ Behavioral barriers in terms of required awareness and acceptance ▪ Creation of unintended side effects, e.g., generation of new social or economic threats for poor stakeholders or suppres- sion of local competitors, resulting in destruction of local market structures ▪ Abuse of concept for marketing purposes or cost-effective R&D in light of lacking transparency ▪ Commercialization of formerly free goods and services
  • 34. 33 Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks from a sustainable development perspective – planet Source: Own draft People Planet Profit RisksLimitationsOpportunities ▪ Propagation of environmentally friendly and resource efficient business solutions to global challenges ▪ Instant application in case of unexpected natural calamities (disaster relief) ▪ Environmental pollution and degradation (e.g., through increase in plastic packaging and waste)
  • 35. 34 Reflections on opportunities, limitations, and risks – profit Source: Own draft People Planet Profit RisksLimitationsOpportunities ▪ Mobilization of private sector capital directed to the poor ▪ Capital accumulation (due to non-dividend policy) ▪ Contribution to market creation/development ▪ Generation of self-sustainable (rather than donor-dependent) solutions ▪ Grass root innovation ▪ Still limited number of scalable and replicable social business prototypes ▪ Lack of capital/funds for private social (business) entrepreneurs ▪ Complexity/resource-intensity of (social) impact assessment ▪ Little impact on global poverty root causes (e.g., world trade system) ▪ High failure rate (e.g., due to top- down approaches) ▪ Abetting exploitative business practices for the sake of commercial viability ▪ Mission drift within a profitable social business or through profit- maximizing replication ▪ Increasing commercialization within the social/development sector
  • 37. 36 Conclusion 2 4 Primarily a plea for social entrepreneurship in the third sector (i.e., more efficient use of philanthropic resources, competition, innovation, and scale) 5 3 1 No panacea, but complementary approach with specific opportunities, limitations, and risks (e.g., trade-offs between commercial success and social impact) Integration of the poor into business cycles as active market participants (inclusive business) and transformation of time-bound development projects into viable business solutions Mobilization of additional private sector resources that remain in the country Social business – a new private sector contribution to development? Not that new, but reflecting the evolution of an old idea – using the power of business and entrepreneurship to overcome social and environmental challenges
  • 38. 37 Selected policy recommendations Source: Own draft 2 5 Invest in cross-sector collaborations – innovative solutions can come from all spheres 6 4 1 Focus on value propositions that enhance poor people’s purchasing power or reduce their cost of living Promote scalable and/or replicable social business models to allow for systemic change Foster an enabling environment for social business entrepreneurs Ensure clear definition and joint understanding of the social business approach Ensure proper social impact measurement to validate desired outcomes and identify negative side effects 3
  • 40. 39 ▪ What are your key takeaways from the case studies? ▪ How can the OECD foster social business in developing countries? ▪ How to build on the social business concept’s opportunities, while mitigating risks involved? Social business – a new private sector contribution to development? For discussion