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Spring 2010
“Of course, we came.
We could not think of missing it!”
Homecoming ’09
Celebrating the 100th Anniversary
Southwestern University’s Core Purpose
Fostering a liberal arts community whose values and actions encourage contributions
toward the well-being of humanity.
Southwestern University’s Core Values
Cultivating academic excellence. Promoting lifelong learning and a passion for intellectual
and personal growth. Fostering diverse perspectives. Being true to oneself and others.
Respecting the worth and dignity of persons. Encouraging activism in the pursuit of
justice and the common good.
Southwestern University’s recruiting of students, awarding of financial aid, and
operation of programs and facilities are without regard to sex, race, color, religion,
age, physical handicap, national or ethnic origin, or any other impermissible factor.
The University’s commitment to equal opportunity includes nondiscrimination on the
basis of sexual orientation.
Board of Trustees
*Ex-Officio
Southwestern is published semiannually
by the Office of Institutional Advancement.
Bulk rate postage paid at Austin, Texas.
Merriman Morton ’63, Austin, Chair
Helen E. Black McAllister ’49, San
Antonio, Co-Vice Chair
Larry J. Haynes ’72, Coppell, Co-Vice Chair
R. Griffin Lord, Belton, Secretary-Treasurer
Martin Aleman Jr. ’68, Austin
L. James Bankston ’70, Houston
Lisa Barrentine, Allen
Douglas M. Benold ’44, Georgetown
W. Earl Bledsoe*, Plano
Bobby Smith Cohn, Houston
W. Mark Craig, Dallas
Roy H. Cullen, Houston
John S. Curry ’70, Pampa
James E. Dorff*, San Antonio
Robert W. Dupuy ’69, Dallas
Thomas A. Forbes ’71, Austin
James W. Foster ’72, Houston
Jack Garey, Georgetown
Roberto L. Gómez ’69, Mission
Robert H. Graham, Houston
Kay Granger, Fort Worth
Ronald D. Henderson, Plano
C. Preston Hollis ’09, Austin
Janice Riggle Huie*, Houston
Robert W. Karr ’71, St. Louis, Mo.
Bart C. Koontz ’78, San Antonio
J. Michael Lowry*, Fort Worth
Red McCombs ’49, San Antonio
Michael McKee, Hurst
J. Eric McKinney ’72, Georgetown
David J. McNitzky ’77, San Antonio
Laura A. Merrill ’84, Wimberley
Charles R. Millikan ’68, Pearland
Barbara Prats Neely ’77, Fort Worth
Ernesto Nieto ’64, Kyle
Steven A. Raben ’63*, Houston
Robert T. Rork ’62, San Antonio
Jake B. Schrum ’68*, Georgetown
Robert C. Scott, San Antonio
Peter A. Sessions ’78, Dallas
Namiqa A. Shipman, Big Spring
H. Blake Stanford ’81, Austin
Stephen G. Tipps, Houston
Donald W. Underwood ’70, Plano
James V. Walzel, Houston
D. Max Whitfield*, Albuquerque, N.M.
Doak M. Worley IV ’08, Fort Worth
Robert D. Wunsch, Austin
 
Spring 2010
Creative services
Kristina Moore
Writer/Editor
Antonio Banda
Graphic Designer
Keely Doering
Creative Services Coordinator
magazine@southwestern.edu
Alumni & Parent Relations
Georgianne Hewett ’90
Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations
JoAnn Lucero
Associate Director of Alumni Relations
Grace Josey Pyka ’05
Assistant Director of Alumni and Parent Relations
Daniel Webb ’08
Assistant Director of Alumni Relations
alumni@southwestern.edu
parents@southwestern.edu
University Relations
Cindy Locke
Associate Vice President for University Relations
Ellen Davis
Director of Communications
John Kotarski ’93
Director of Web Development and Communication
Meredith Barnhill
Assistant Director of Web Development
and Communication
Chief Administrative Officers
Jake B. Schrum ’68, President
Richard L. Anderson, Vice President for Fiscal Affairs
Gerald Brody, Vice President for Student Life
James W. Hunt, Provost and Dean of the Faculty
Beverly Jones, University Chaplain
W. Joseph King ’93, Vice President for Innovation
C. Richard McKelvey, Vice President
for Institutional Advancement
Thomas J. Oliver ’89, Vice President
for Enrollment Services
Francie Schroeder, Executive Assistant to the President
Ronald L. Swain, Senior Advisor to the President for
Strategic Planning and Assessment
Telephone: (512) 863-6511
Alumni & Parent Relations: (800) 960-6363
Office of Admission: (800) 252-3166
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 3
Spring 2010
And the winner is…
The Fall 2009 issue of Southwestern (pictured left) recently
received a Grand Gold Award—the highest award possible—
from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education
(CASE) District IV. A big “Thank you!” to all contributors for
your help in achieving this honor.
In every issue
	 5	 |	 President’s Message
13		 |	 Kiosk
14		 |	 On Campus
20	 |	 Athletics
21	 |	 Engaging Finds
30	 |	 Academics in Focus
33	 |	 Alumni News
35	 |	 Class Notes
	42	 |	 Last Word
Note:	 Content pertains to the
2009/2010 academic year.
Features	
	 6 	 |	 The S Factor:
Entrepreneurship
in the Liberal Arts
Nine alumni share their
entrepreneurial stories.
22	 |	 There’s No Business Like
Business for Don Parks
Associate Professor of Business;
Paideia®
Professor; holder
of the John Shearn Chair in
Business Administration
25	 |	 2009 Homecoming Awards
The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni honors five.
Fall 2009
In this issue:
SENIOR STORIES P.13
“Live the life you want to live on your terms
and with a good heart and clear conscience.”
Commencement 2009 P.24
Fall preview: TOBIAS WOLFF P.26 + 35
22
With your help
we can bridge the gap.
Your gifts enhance our ability to attract and retain students, as well
as provide an exceptional undergraduate learning experience—a
Southwestern Experience. Private philanthropy is as important to
the University’s growth, improvement and competitiveness as capital
investments are to any business venture. Thank you!
Average Gifts per Enrolled Student*
Fiscal Years 2004–2008
$6,570
$11,054Centre College
Sewanee
DePauw University
Birmingham-Southern College
Austin College
Hendrix College
Rhodes College
Trinity University
Southwestern
Millsaps College
Colorado College
Oglethorpe University
Every gift matters.
Make a gift at www.southwestern.edu/makeagift or call 800-960-6363.
*Calculated over a five-year period beginning in the 2003–2004 fiscal year by dividing the average
annual total gifts received by the fall student enrollment headcount. Data was taken from the
VSE reports published by The Council for Aid to Education. The schools included in the chart
are members of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC).
Entrepreneurship:
Alive and Well at Southwestern
In this issue of Southwestern, you will read examples
of Southwestern University alumni who have become
successful entrepreneurs.
Entrepreneurship is thriving on campus as well.
Southwestern’s small size makes it easy for students to start
new organizations, and faculty members are more than
happy to support them in these ventures.
For example, as a junior, Sarah Gould ’10 started an
organization called the Society of Young Women Leaders
(SYWL) under the guidance of Suzy Pukys, Southwestern’s
director of civic engagement. Gould wanted to do something
to help young women in high school focus on their career
goals and develop their leadership potential. The ultimate
goal of the program is to make sure women have a presence
as leaders, both in business and the community.
Members of SYWL began by mentoring five students from
Georgetown High School. The following academic year,
they continued working with those students and added
another six. In all, nearly 30 students are now involved in
the program.
SYWL isn’t the only group Gould has started at
Southwestern. She also formed a Mock Trial Team (which
made it to a national tournament in its second year), and
helped revive the Brooks Prize Debate.
Other students have been just as successful in launching
new ventures that include everything from a dance team to
a steel drum band to a Model UN program. The experience
students gain by starting such initiatives on campus gives
them the confidence they need to start new ventures after
graduation. Although she came to Southwestern planning
to attend law school, Gould now thinks she wants to start
her own business.
Over the past 10 years, students have had the opportunity
to foster their entrepreneurial spirit with assistance from the
King Creativity Fund, which was endowed and established in
2000 by a gift from W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93, to support
the “innovative and visionary projects” of Southwestern
students. Less interested in outcomes and artifacts than
in the process, the program emphasizes that the joy is in
the journey! While supporting one of Southwestern’s core
values—fostering diverse perspectives—the Fund encour-
ages students to take risks and ask questions.
Southwestern faculty members are just as entrepreneurial,
as evidenced by First-Year Seminars, which are designed to
be engaging, while at the same time exposing students to
important skills such as reading, writing, critical thinking,
discussion and creativity.
Each year, faculty members come up with interesting new
seminars to engage students. This past fall, for example,
Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, taught a
seminar titled “Wheels and Deals” that explored the world
of television game shows. Marr, a long-time fan of game
shows, says the idea for the class came from a famous math
problem known as “The Monty Hall Problem,” based on the
television game show “Let’s Make a Deal.” Elizabeth Green
Musselman, associate professor and chair of the History
Department, taught a seminar titled “Knitting: It’s Not Just
for Grannies,” in which she combined her personal passion
for knitting with a serious discussion of topics such as the
history of women in the labor force and how mathemati-
cians have used crochet to understand the geometry of
hyperbolic planes.
Faculty members are entrepreneurial off campus as well.
Economics Professor Mary Young runs a ranch in Lexington,
Texas, where she raises a rare breed of grass-fed cattle known
as Irish Dexters. She says the experience of being a business
owner has made her a much better professor of economics
because she deals firsthand with topics such as supply and
demand and profits and losses.
Perhaps the best example of entrepreneurship at
Southwestern is the Paideia®
Program, which started as an
idea from Provost Jim Hunt, and has since developed into
a program that is unique among liberal arts colleges. Sarah
Gould credits Paideia with giving her a passion for entre-
preneurship because it showed her how to articulate ideas
and passions into tangible programs.
The bottom line is that the liberal arts environment is
perfect preparation for entrepreneurship. After all, you
don’t need to be a business major to become an entrepre-
neur. You just need to have a good idea and the courage to
pursue it.
Jake B. Schrum ’68
President, Southwestern University
President’s message
Illustrations by Duncan Alexander ’09
acrylic on canvas
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 7
Merriam-Webster defines “entrepreneur” as a noun, from
the French word “entreprendre,” meaning “to undertake.”
More specifically, “One who organizes, manages and assumes
the risks of a business or enterprise.”
But how does one explain “entrepreneurial spirit?” One
possible definition comes from Steve Jobs, co-founder and
CEO of Apple Inc., who has been noted to say, “I’m convinced
that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs
from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.”
You may immediately think of one of Southwestern’s most
recognizable alumni entrepreneurs, Red McCombs ’49,
founder of the Red McCombs Automotive Group, co-founder
of Clear Channel Communications, former owner of
the San Antonio Spurs, Denver Nuggets and Minnesota
Vikings, member and former Chair of the Southwestern
University Board of Trustees and the recipient of the 1990
Distinguished Alumnus Award, presented by The Association
of Southwestern University Alumni.
Southwestern would like to introduce you to some more
entrepreneurs Southwestern University has helped to produce
over the years—alumni who exemplify the entrepreneurial
spirit that continues to thrive in the Southwestern commu-
nity. Perhaps in reading their profiles, the entrepreneurial
voice in your head will ask, “Why not?”
The S Factor:
Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts
8 Southwestern Magazine
Counting Street Lights
Joe Seeber ’63
	 Following the motto, “Work hard and you will get lucky,”
Joe Seeber ’63 has done both. He started TriStem Ltd. to sell
and service energy management systems for large buildings.
Over time, the business evolved into an organization that
audits electric bills for clients including school systems,
cities, states and the federal government. Sometimes calling
himself a “street light counter,” Seeber says his type of busi-
ness is one of the few that prospers during a down economy
because people are looking to save every nickel they find.
On advice from mom: Something my mother always
taught me was, “All you can do is all you can do.” Business
ventures have ups and downs. Sometimes one does not know
if it will work. Sometimes one doesn’t quite know the right
thing to do. Mom’s advice has served me well.
On his Southwestern story: I came to Southwestern
behind the curve, so to speak. The kind of teaching and
instruction I received was essential to earning my bachelor’s
degree in business administration and to becoming the
person I am today. Just as important to me, though, was the
social aspect. The friends that “adopted” me then are still
my best friends today—50 years later.
On what inspires his work: To be successful, one must
maintain a broad view of the world. To do that, one must go
out and experience it. Travel teaches us how small we are,
and how much we can become.
To learn more about Seeber’s company, TriStem Ltd., visit
www.tristem.com.
An Uncluttered Life
Lorie Kling Marrero ’90
	 As a sociology major at Southwestern, Lorie Kling
Marrero ’90 didn’t know what she wanted to do when she
grew up. But, she says her education gave her a breadth of
understanding and knowledge that has come together in
serendipitous ways. Having a liberal arts education, she says,
has been an “incredible and unforeseen gift.”
On what she did when she grew up: I became a profes-
sional organizer; I took what I knew and put it online. My
program, The Clutter Diet®
, has helped thousands of people
in nine countries organize their homes and their lives.
On what entrepreneurs need to know: Believe in
yourself and your ideas. If you’re not doing something that
scares you, you’re probably not challenging yourself enough.
Also, think big! As the famous quote by Marianne Williamson,
author, activist and founder of The Peace Alliance, says,
“Your playing small does not serve the world.”
On what has influenced her thinking: Books. The
Big Leap by Gay Hendricks helps you manage the fears
and beliefs that hold you back—one of an entrepreneur’s
greatest challenges. (See Page 21 for additional “summer
reading” suggestions.)
On an inspirational quote: A quote that inspires me
(a la Bill Gates’ favorite Gatsby quote; Business Week, June
13, 2000), is by Dorothea Brande—“Act boldly and unseen
forces will come to your aid.”
Want to organize your home, office or life in general?
Visit www.clutterdiet.com or pick up Marrero’s book, The
Clutter Diet: The Skinny on Organizing Your Home and
Taking Control of Your Life.
Jack-of-All-Trades
Derek Christian ’96
	 As an international studies and business major at
Southwestern, Derek Christian ’96, learned to come out
of his shell, thanks to his resident assistant, Jon Porter ’93,
whose advice was, “there’s more to college than sitting in
class.” Christian also learned that the love of learning would
be important to his career. “An entrepreneur must be a
jack-of-all-trades,” he says, “especially in the early years.”
On his current business venture: I bought My Maid
Service a couple of years ago when I left my sales and
marketing job at Proctor & Gamble. We’ve since tripled our
business in Cincinnati and have opened offices in Dayton,
Ohio, and Dallas. I like service businesses because of the
low capital requirements (the amount of money a business
needs for normal operations) and because service businesses
are a growing part of the economy.
On if he had it to do over: I owned another business
while at P&G—a dog daycare/boarding company—but
decided I didn’t want to work nights, weekends and holidays
anymore. I sold that business for the capital to acquire my
current company. If I had it to do over again, I would have
started My Maid Service sooner!
On what entrepreneurs need to know: First, you have
to be brutally honest about your strengths and weaknesses.
Second, you must have an understanding of money and
basic accounting—this is not an area you want to leave to
someone else.
To learn why Christian calls My Maid Service “the best
residential and commercial cleaning service in town,” visit
www.mymaidservice.net and click on “About Us.”
Serial Entrepreneur
W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93
	 Joey King ’93 has often been called a “serial entrepre-
neur.” Having started no less than six companies, it’s a
description that fits. Currently Vice President for Innovation
at Southwestern and Executive Director of the National
Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE),
King is well-equipped to offer advice to new and future
entrepreneurs.
On his first start-up: I was in grad school when a friend
and I developed “F-5”—a load balancer that managed virtual
traffic at half the cost of super computers that were being
used at that time. We had clients the likes of Tower Records,
Time Warner, Mapquest and Yahoo. The company went
public in June 1999. F5 Networks, Inc. (NASDAQ: FFIV)
has since become the industry leader in network traffic
management.
On what makes an entrepreneur successful: Half
do the same thing as someone else, but they do it better
or cheaper or faster. The other half identify a need, license
a product to meet that need and take it to market. Three
important things to remember: don’t think you can’t, be
willing to make sacrifices and keep in mind that many
successful entrepreneurs have failed many times.
On his vision for NITLE: Our goal is to grow our member-
ship, fund new initiatives and make the organization fully
sustainable within five years. Having our offices located on
the Southwestern campus keeps us engaged with our clients,
rather than theorizing about what they want or need.
To learn more about King and about NITLE, visit
www.nitle.org.
10 Southwestern Magazine
Helping Houston Go Green
Jeffrey Acker Kaplan ’01
	 Having been an entrepreneur since the age of eight—he
had a chain of lemonade stands in southwest Houston—Jeff
(Acker) Kaplan ’01 decided in 2008 that his goal was to
start a socially responsible business, which led to the birth
of his most recent venture. New Living, located in Houston,
sells locally made products, non-toxic paint, sustainable
flooring, carpet, countertops and custom cabinets, as well
as organic mattresses and bedding, and non-toxic cleaning
and baby products to home owners and professionals.
On making it happen: I helped start three different
businesses after graduating from Southwestern, but New
Living is the first one that’s been my full-time job. I managed
to get started on an incredibly tight budget. It’s amazing
what you can get done when you have no other options. At
the end of the day, I feel like I’ve gone from being 30 years
old to 18 again; I’ve never been happier.
On going green: Without any hesitation, I will tell you
that Southwestern gave me a much stronger conscience
for how I want to conduct business. New Living is a green
building and home supply business. Our mission is to
make the green building and green living movement more
accessible and affordable. We measure our success on the
social, environmental and economic impact we have on
our community.
Thinking of going green? Find out how to begin at
www.newliving.net.
Help a Child, Help a Family
Eliette Cohen ’97
	 A double major in biology and kinesiology, Eliette
Cohen ’97, is the founder of KidTherapy, a pediatric reha-
bilitation center in South Austin, specializing in integrated
therapeutic services for children and teenagers. A first
generation American, Cohen says her parents, who moved
to the U.S. from Argentina, always stressed the importance of
education. “Like my parents, I learned to value the opportuni-
ties that came my way, and I developed strength and courage
by taking advantage of them,” she explains.
On becoming an entrepreneur: I had never started a
business before, but I learned about serving the community
as a Southwestern student and member of APO (Alpha Phi
Omega). I went into business blind, learning step by step
as I went along. I’m still learning.
On her mission: My mission, and that of KidTherapy, is
to provide the highest quality integrated therapeutic services
through individualized, compassionate and professional treat-
ment. I work with 23 employees and independent contractors
who agree that when we help a child, we help a family.
On her inspiration: Outside the business world, children
are what inspire me. They have a unique way of bringing
light to those who surround them. I am so proud that
I have created something that allows talented people to
come together to help the children and families of Austin
achieve their goals.
For more information about KidTherapy, call
512-916-1511, e-mail info@kidtherapyaustin.com or visit
www.kidtherapyaustin.com.
Dill Pickle Popcorn?
Nikki Dugas ’06
	 Nikki Dugas ’06 owns Cornucopia Popcorn Creations, a
gourmet popcorn shop in Austin, with her best friend and
business partner, Nadia Elhaj. Customers choose from 45
different flavored popcorns, including the best-selling dill
pickle flavor. The duo recently added a biscuits and gravy
flavor that Dugas says is “to die for!”
On her top three pieces of advice: (1) Even if everyone
thinks you’re crazy, you have to trust yourself. (2) You can
do anything you want in this life, you just have to make it
happen. (3) Don’t let your business run you. Most people start
businesses in order to have the life they want—no boss, flex-
ible schedule, etc.—always remember your original goal.
On business and the economy: Previously, I owned a
business called “Barbecuties,” selling brisket sandwiches out
of a cart near UT in Austin. After a couple of years, I decided
I needed to look for something different. Nadia was tired of
the corporate world…so here we are. Did you know popcorn
became popular during the Great Depression? Our business
is thriving in this economy!
On what inspires her: Psychology…that makes sense,
right? (Dugas was a psychology major at Southwestern.) Two
of my favorite books, The Medici Effect by Frans Johansson
and The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, use a lot of
psychological experiments to illustrate their points.
How about a snack? To discover your favorite flavor, start
by visiting www.austincornucopia.com.
Finding Her Voice
Yesenia Garcia ’03
	 After graduating from Southwestern with a degree in
theatre and communication studies, Yesenia Garcia ’03
went on to earn a Master of Fine Arts degree in acting from
The University of Texas at Austin. While spending the past
eight years on the stage and in front of the camera (you
may have seen her in episodes of “Friday Night Lights” or
“Prison Break”), Garcia developed a growing interest in the
production and marketing world behind the camera.
On creating opportunities for herself: The decision to
create my company, Echo Earth Media—a creative agency
specializing in multi-media, high definition video production,
Web design, image branding and marketing strategies—
came after working for a film production company in New
York. I realized that instead of waiting for others to give me
opportunities to work, I could create them for myself.
On Southwestern’s influence: At Southwestern, I learned
how to present and defend my creative choices and to
articulate myself in a professional, creative way. When I was
awarded a theatre scholarship in 1999, it changed the course
of my life! SU helped me to grow confident in creating my
own work and allowing my passions to influence my path.
On what entrepreneurs need to know: First, network!
Business is built on relationships. Next, focus on what gives
your company an edge—find a niche and go for it. And finally,
never give up! Persistence is key. For me, these first few
years in business have been about making mistakes and
learning from them.
For more information about Echo Earth Media, go to
www.echoearthmedia.com. For Garcia’s acting resume and
photos, see www.yesenia-garcia.com.
12 Southwestern Magazine
Striving to Find Solutions
Michael Maine ’07
Michael Maine ’07 began his entrepreneurial career as
a high school student. As a business major at Southwestern,
and after receiving the Wright Entrepreneurship Scholarship,
he became a Mobile Electronics Certified Professional. He
is currently a new business coordinator at Interlex, USA, a
cause-related marketing/advertising firm. He is also working
on more than one entrepreneurial venture, including Global
Mind Frame, a global communication Web site.
On the future of business: I think the future of busi-
ness is knowledge-based. I learned through my courses at
Southwestern that business doesn’t have to be only about the
bottom line. There are real issues—and real solutions—out
there. I want to find a way to harness the power of mass
communication, new media and positive initiatives to foster
positive change.
On how Southwestern shaped him: I think everyone at
Southwestern played a role in shaping who I am today—from
my friends to the administration to Ms. Ella (a beloved Sodexo
employee). Academically, Don Parks, associate professor
of business, encouraged me to push myself and follow my
heart, and Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, helped me
step out of my comfort zone.
On research and inspiration: I don’t really have a “go-to-
guide,” but I am an avid reader and most everything I read
gives me some sort of information or insight or inspiration.
From technology blogs to science fiction novels that play
into socioeconomic strata, I learn from all of it.
See Page 21 for a “summer reading list” of your own.
Creating…
Duncan Alexander ’09
The challenge?
Create painted
portraits of the SU
alumni featured
in this issue of
Southwestern.
The artist for the
job? Duncan
Alexander ’09, a
freelance designer
and artist living
in Austin. With a
bachelor’s degree in studio art and an internship with
Southwestern’s Creative Services Department under
his belt, Alexander plans to apply to graduate schools
in the fall. His hope is to become a self-employed artist
(a.k.a. entrepreneur), following in the footsteps of his
artistic heroes, Andy Warhol and Barbara Kruger.
On creating the alumni portraits: I combined a
portrait of the entrepreneur with elements repre-
sentative of his or her business, drawing inspiration
from painter Eric Fischl. Bringing all of it together on
canvas was an exciting challenge, and I’m pleased
with the results. (So are we!)
On his artistic inspiration: Most of my inspiration
comes from a fascination with technology, culture
and nature. In my work, I try to find both the obvious
and hidden variables in order to improve the impact
of the message.
To see more of Alexander’s original artwork, visit
www.hypothete.blogspot.com.
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 13
Kiosk
Recent & Upcoming Events
February
11–12The 32nd Brown Symposium “Imperium: The Art of
Empire in Rome and America.”
26 Large Act Concert, featuring rapper and two-time Grammy
award winner Common.
March
3–7Urinetown, The Musical performed by Southwestern
theatre students.
11Dedication of the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for
Lifelong Learning and 11th annual Shilling Lecture, featuring
internationally known epidemiologist Bill Foege.
April
15King Creativity Fund 10th annual symposium
and anniversary celebration.
16Steve Byrne—Comedian featured on NBC’s “The Tonight
Show” and Comedy Central’s “Premium Blend.”
May
8Southwestern University’s 166th Commencement ceremony.
August
23First day of classes for all students.
Visit www.southwestern.edu and click on the calendar link
for a schedule of upcoming events.
This new Kiosk, located near the entrance of the recently
dedicated Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for
Lifelong Learning (See Page 14.), displays posters and
announcements for campus and local area events.
PaigeCurtis
14 Southwestern Magazine	
Shaping Our Future: Approved
Jake B. Schrum ’68, Southwestern
President and Chair of the Commission
on Strategic Planning and Action, is
pleased to announce that the faculty,
staff, University Council, Student
Congress and Board of Trustees
have approved “Shaping Our Future:
The Strategic Plan for Southwestern
University 2010–2020.” Specifics of
the Plan will be featured in the Fall
2010 issue of Southwestern. The Plan
can be found at www.southwestern.
edu/offices/planning/planning.php.
Share your ideas at shareyourideas@
southwestern.edu.
CarlosBarron’10
Decomposition is Exciting!
Students for Environmental Activism
and Knowledge (SEAK) is harnessing
the power of nature and bringing it
to campus in the form of compost-
ing. Four self-aerating compost bins
have been placed in several conve-
nient locations around campus. To
encourage involvement of the campus
community, SEAK enlisted the SU Art
Association to paint the containers.
Pictured: Senior Tami Warner.
2,000 New Library Books
Two noted historians and former
Georgetown residents have donated
more than 2,000 books on topics
such as American history and the
American West; the Civil War and
Reconstruction; Texas; and environ-
mental and historic preservation to
Southwestern’s A. Frank Smith, Jr.
Library Center.
Robert Utley is the former chief
historian for the National Park
Service and has written 16 books on
the American West. His wife, Melody
Webb, is a former regional historian
for the National Park Service.
Utley used the Southwestern library
extensively to do research for his
book on the Texas Rangers, Lone Star
Justice: The First Century of the Texas
Rangers, published in 2002.
Six New to Board of Trustees
Six new members have joined the
Southwestern Board of Trustees,
including Rev. Jim Bankston ’70, Lisa
Barrentine, Rev. David McNitzky ’77,
H. Blake Stanford ’81 and Stephen
Tipps, each nominated to four-year
terms. Preston Hollis ’09 will serve
a two-year term as a recent graduate
selected by the student body.
Bankston is the senior pastor at St.
Paul’s United Methodist Church in
Houston. Barrentine is the president
of First Preston Management, Inc. in
Addison. McNitzky is the senior pastor
at Alamo Heights United Methodist
Church in San Antonio. Stanford is
the founder and president/chairman
of the board of Southwest Human
Development Services, Inc. in Austin.
Tipps is a partner with Baker Botts
L.L.P. in Houston.
$100 Million Milestone
Thinking Ahead: The Southwestern
Campaign has received more than
$100 million in gifts and pledges.
Launched in 2002, the campaign’s goal
is $125 million to fund priorities in the
University’s 2010 Strategic Plan, includ-
ing four broad initiatives—support-
ing students, supporting faculty,
diversity enrichment and enhancing
the living-learning environment on
campus. This is the first time in the
University’s history that a campaign
has raised more than $100 million. “It
is a compliment to this University, our
faculty and students, that our alumni,
parents and friends would contribute
such resources to help us accomplish
our mission,” says President Jake B.
Schrum ’68. “Your generosity is espe-
cially meaningful when we consider
the economic challenges our nation
and the world experienced during the
past seven years.”
Funds raised to date have enabled
Southwestern to:
Add 18 tenure-track•	
faculty positions.
Launch the•	 Paideia®
Program,
which promotes connections
between academic courses,
offers intercultural and diversity
experiences, encourages civic
engagement, and supports
collaborative or guided
research and creative works.
Create the Office of•	
Civic Engagement.
Expand scholarship programs.•	
Construct several new buildings,•	
including the Dorothy Manning
Lord Student Residential
Center, the Wilhelmina Cullen
Admission Center and the
Charles and Elizabeth Prothro
Center for Lifelong Learning.
Renovate additional buildings: the•	
Fine Arts Center, Herman Brown
Hall and Moody-Shearn Hall.
Thinking Ahead: The Southwestern
Campaign was scheduled to end on
Dec. 31, 2010, but the University is
planning to launch Phase II of the
campaign this fall to cover additional
priorities that have been identified
through Shaping Our Future: The
Plan for Southwestern University
2010–2020. For more informa-
tion, visit www.southwestern.edu/
thinkingahead/campaign.php. To
learn more about the Strategic Plan,
visit www.southwestern.edu/offices/
planning/beyond2010.
On campus
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 15
Black and Gold Goes Green
Prompted by Southwestern students determined to set
an example of environmental responsibility, in January
of this year the University signed an agreement with the
City of Georgetown that will enable wind power to meet
Southwestern’s electric needs over the next 18 years.
The agreement makes Southwestern the first university in
Texas and one of fewer than 20 universities in the country—
according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency—to
have procured 100 percent “green” power for its electric
needs­. The initial contract is for five years and is renewable
through 2028.
President Jake B. Schrum ’68 said the agreement will help
Southwestern move toward its long-term goal of being carbon
neutral, which it agreed to strive toward when Schrum signed
the American College and University Presidents’ Climate
Commitment (ACUPCC) in February 2009. The ACUPCC
formally commits campuses to eliminating greenhouse
gas emissions over time and to educating students about
climate neutrality.
“Since Southwestern students visited with city representa-
tives about renewable energy last year, both the city and
Southwestern have worked diligently to bring this agreement
to reality,” Schrum says. “We hope Southwestern will be an
inspiration to other universities to advance sustainability.”
Fraternity Turns Up the Heat
The Phi Delta Theta fraternity has
installed an 8×10 solar panel on the
roof of its house as part of a system that
enables the house to use solar energy
to heat some of its water. The system
was installed by Jeff Bendall ’00,
a former Phi Delt active who now
works for a solar energy company in
Austin.
The system has three components.
The most obvious is the solar collector,
which consists of 30 tubes that heat
a combination of distilled water and
propylene glycol. The heated liquid
flows down to a solar storage tank
where heat exchange coils pre-heat
water, which is then delivered to a
120-gallon hot water heater.
Bendall estimates that the system
should reduce the amount of energy
required to heat water by an average
of 70 percent a year, and should pay
for itself in 12 years.
KCF10
2010 marks the 10th anniversary of
the King Creativity Fund, established
in 2000 with an endowment provided
by W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93.
Each year, the endowment supports
up to 20 “innovative and visionary
projects” proposed by Southwestern
students. Among the projects funded
this year were a new musical group on
campus, a new biomedical instrument
and a video documenting the threats
imposed by exotic species in Florida
and Texas. Students presented their
projects at a symposium on April 15.
In its 10-year history, the program
has funded a total of 125 projects.
To learn more about the program
visit w w w.southwestern.edu/
kingcreativity.
AmericanElectricPowerCo.
16 Southwestern Magazine	
Dedication of Prothro Center
for Lifelong Learning
On March 11, it was 70 degrees and sunny with a light
breeze blowing across campus, as President Jake B.
Schrum ’68—along with donors, alumni, faculty, students,
staff and friends—dedicated the new Charles and Elizabeth
Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning.
The Prothro Center is a three-story, 40,000-square foot
building and the last to be added to the Roy H. Cullen
Academic Mall. Its campus placement creates a bridge
between the residential living centers on the east side of
campus and the academic facilities.
Consolidating many functions of student life and provid-
ing the campus community with additional classrooms
and conference rooms, the Prothro Center is now home
to the: Priddy Charitable Trust Center for Paideia®
; M.D.
Anderson Center for Intercultural Learning; Office of Civic
Engagement; Cross Cultural Center; Grogan Lord Center for
Academic Success; Office of Career Services; Alkek Center
for Counseling and Health Services; Senior University,
Georgetown; and Information Technology Services. It also
features the Fondren Conference/Seminar Suite, the Dorothy
Perry White Atrium and the Mabee Lobby.
Constructed with gifts from donors, not tuition dollars,
the building is the second on campus designed with
Southwestern’s commitment to sustainability in mind.
Georgetown Welcomes Music of Aaron Copland
The 2010 Festival of the Arts, to be held June 3–6 in
Georgetown, will feature the music of American composer
Aaron Copland. Highlights of the 2010 festival include a
choral concert featuring soloists Virginia Dupuy ’71 and
Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, and a Sunday
morning piano duo by Pam Gregory Rossman ’72 and Eve
Porter Fariss ’60 at First United Methodist Church. Other
weekend performances will feature several Southwestern
University faculty members.
This is the sixth year of the festival—started by Professor
Emeritus F. Ellsworth Peterson ’55—which attracts audi-
ences and musical attention from beyond Central Texas,
along with local music enthusiasts and invited lecturers
and soloists, creating four full days and evenings of events.
Megan McCarty ’09 is serving as administrative assistant
for the festival this year, and Senior Paloma Mayorga created
the Copland image that is being used on festival posters,
bookmarks and programs.
Visit www.gtownfestival.org, for more information on
the festival.
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 17
FACULTY NEWS
Five New Faculty Members
Reginald Byron has joined the Sociology and Anthropology
Department as an assistant professor of sociology. His research
focuses on workplace inequality and discrimination.
Patrick Hajovsky holds a new position in Latin American
art history that Southwestern was able to fund initially with
a $200,000 grant from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations.
Hajovsky specializes in pre-Columbian and colonial-period
art of Latin America.
Molly Jensen and Kenneth Mello have joined the
Department of Religion and Philosophy as assistant profes-
sors of religion. Jensen’s research focuses on religion and
society and Mello’s research focuses on native traditions of
North America.
Dustin Tahmahkera’s research focuses on represen-
tations of native peoples in television, film and music.
He joins Southwestern as an assistant professor of
communication studies.
Conducting Biomedical Research at SU
Lynn Guziec, assistant professor of chemistry, will receive
more than $200,000 over two years to work with a colleague
at The University of Texas at Austin on a project that could
enable physicians to detect diseases earlier and more easily
than current methods.
Guziec and Jennifer Brodbelt, a professor of chemistry
at UT, developed a new technique to detect biomarkers,
which are small molecules that are characteristic of certain
diseases. For example, an amino acid known as sarcosine is
characteristic of prostate cancer. “These biomarkers have
been known to exist for a long time, but researchers have
never developed methods that would allow physicians to
detect them easily or quickly,” Guziec says.
They will research the idea of preparing special compounds
to trap the biomarkers and using a mass spectrometer to
detect them. Specifically, Guziec will design and synthe-
size the compounds that can trap the biomarkers. Such
compounds have never been made before. Guziec’s husband,
Frank Guziec, a professor of chemistry at Southwestern, will
assist with making the compounds.
The grant was part of the federal government’s economic
stimulus program. The National Institutes of Health put out
a call for research proposals that were “of high risk, but that
would yield high benefits.” Only 1 percent of the record
20,000 proposals submitted were funded.
Guziec says, “Receiving the grant allows us to allocate
funds that would normally support our research projects
to Capstone students instead. In essence, we now have
the funds to support three Southwestern chemistry work-
study students’ individual research projects, unrelated to
the grant.”
Inspiring Others Through Research
Maria Cuevas, associate professor of biology, and Maria
Todd, associate professor of biology, have received a grant
from the National Science Foundation that will enable them to
purchase several key pieces of equipment to help further their
research on a membrane protein known as claudin-3.
“Students who participate in our research projects will
learn both cellular and molecular biology techniques,”
Todd says. “And, the new equipment will provide oppor-
tunities for students to use state-of-the-art equipment not
typically found in undergraduate programs. Both laboratory
research skills and experience with instrument utilization
will make Southwestern students more competitive when
applying to the graduate schools of nationally recognized
institutions.”
Cuevas and Todd are focusing their research on the func-
tion of human claudin-3 in breast cells. By manipulating the
cellular levels of claudin-3 protein with small interference
RNA (siRNA), they hope to determine its role in critical
processes such as cell motility (migration), invasion and
signaling. Rebecca Sheller, associate professor of biology, is
assisting with the research.
The Breast Cancer Resource Centers of Texas have
presented Cuevas, Todd and Sheller with its first “Inspiring
Hope” award for their research. Part of the “Inspiring Hope”
initiative is to point out how women are inspiring and
teaching others.
New faculty members pictured left to right are Dustin
Tahmahkera, Kenneth Mello, Reggie Byron and Patrick Hajovsky.
Not pictured: Molly Jensen.
Faculty NEWS
LucasAdams
18 Southwestern Magazine
Southwestern Theatre in Eastern Europe
‘Durang, Durang’ premiers in Bulgaria
Rick Roemer, chair and artistic director of the Theatre
Department, and Desi Roybal, associate professor of theatre
and resident scenic designer, spent their sabbaticals last fall
helping the Rhodopi Drama Theatre produce the Bulgarian
premiere of “Durang, Durang” by Tony Award-winning play-
wright Christopher Durang. Roemer directed the play and
Roybal designed the set.
Despite the fact that most of the Bulgarian cast and crew
did not speak English, Roemer said everyone involved in the
production was able to communicate effectively through
looks and gestures. “After a while we knew what we
were all thinking,” Roemer says. “Creativity is a universal
language…”
Roemer said the experience also taught him that it does
not take a lot of money to produce good theatre. “We were
able to produce exciting, quality theatre with ingenuity, little
money, passion and sweat.”
‘Angels in America’ arrives in Macedonia
A group of Southwestern theatre professors and students
spent their winter break helping to bring the Tony Award-
winning play “Angels in America” to the country of
Macedonia—one of the first times it was performed for audi-
ences in Eastern Europe.
Jared J. Stein, visiting assistant professor of theatre, directed
the play. Sergio Costola, associate professor of theatre,
served as dramaturg, and Desi Roybal, associate professor
of theatre and resident scenic designer, designed the set.
Becca Plunkett, junior, served as assistant director; Kinsey
Keck, senior, served as costume and acting intern; and Tyler
King, junior, served as set and dramaturg intern.
Upon the group’s return to Southwestern, Stein remarked,
“The collaboration with the Skopje Dramski Theatre was
an extraordinarily intense six weeks. We had to contin-
uously find linguistic, societal and personal parallels for
a play that, in many ways, uses 1980s American political
culture as its theatrical language to achieve the wonderfully
impossible—dramatically, aesthetically and emotionally.
Amidst the simplistic fanfare of staging the premier of the
play in Macedonia, the pursuit of the universal was the proj-
ect’s obsession and highest responsibility.”
Tony Kushner’s “Angels in America” deals with AIDS and
many other aspects of America in the 1980s.
Discrimination in Affordable Housing?
Professor of Economics Dirk Early will help the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
determine whether minorities face additional barriers when
trying to rent affordable housing in neighborhoods that are
perceived as more desirable.
“This is an area I have wanted to study for a while,” Early
says. “I’ve always been curious about how housing markets
work and the interplay with discrimination.” He adds that
research projects such as these are of interest to his students
because they show the practical implications of economic
theory and empirical models.
Early’s research focuses on HUD’s Housing Choice Voucher
program and will enable him to study the subject of discrimi-
nation against minorities trying to rent in certain areas.
He has developed a method that will enable him to quan-
tify the difference in rents between minority and majority
households and to determine whether these differences
are influenced by the racial/ethnic composition or the
poverty level of the neighborhood, and/or the tightness of
the housing market.
Southwestern R.O.C.K. Partnership
At the Ride On Center for Kids (R.O.C.K.) in Georgetown,
families and staff members say “miracles happen every day”
when children and adults with disabilities, such as autism
spectrum disorder (ASD), are given the opportunity to ride
horses. Thanks to a new partnership between R.O.C.K. and
Southwestern, this claim can be backed up by quantitative
research provided by three psychology Capstone students
and Jacquie Muir-Broaddus, professor of psychology. Their
research quantifies changes in the behavioral, cognitive and
linguistic functioning of children with ASD after equine
therapy sessions at R.O.C.K.
Two students in a kinesiology Capstone class taught by
Scott McLean, associate professor of kinesiology, began track-
ing physiological changes (specifically, postural balance) in
the same children.
“Hippotherapy seems to have a calming effect on children
with ASD, but (so far) this is all anecdotal,” McLean says. He
adds that the partnership is a “natural connection” since
many kinesiology majors plan to go into physical therapy.
Muir-Broaddus says the partnership gives her students the
opportunity to see what real clinical research is like.
Many Southwestern students, staff and faculty members
have been involved with the organization as volunteers since
it was founded in 1998. Two former Southwestern administra-
tors, George and Barbara Brightwell, donated the land where
R.O.C.K. is located a mile and a half from campus.
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 19
Research Down Under
It’s not uncommon for Southwestern
students to conduct research with their
professors, but few get the opportu-
nity to do so in Australia, as Morgan
Mingle, a junior animal behavior major,
did last summer.
Mingle worked with Jesse Purdy,
a psychology professor who special-
izes in aquatic animal behavior, on a
project at the National Marine Science
Centre, located in Coffs Harbour, on
the east coast of Australia, 400 miles
north of Sydney. The centre is affiliated
with Southern Cross University.
Purdy and Mingle worked with
mulloway, Argysomus hololepidotus,
a fish species with high commercial
potential because it reproduces easily
and adapts well in captivity, grows
up to two meters long and can weigh
more than 200 pounds. Mulloway
also are highly prized in the sport
fishing industry.
Purdy and Mingle determined
whether hatchery-raised mulloway
could learn about different predators
and whether an attack was immi-
nent, and studied whether or not the
response was appropriate to the preda-
tor. They also compared anti-predatory
behaviors with those of mulloway
caught in the wild.
Mingle spent the last month of
the summer on her own, doing a
research project at the Pet Porpoise
Pool, a marine animal park in Coffs
Harbour. Because one of the dolphins
at the facility was pregnant, Mingle
helped develop a study that would
examine how vocalizations in a group
of dolphins change before and after
a baby is born. She brought back
more than 30 hours of recordings to
analyze.
In December, Mingle and fellow
animal behavior major, junior
Stephanie Henderson, went back to
Pet Porpoise Pool for four weeks.
They were able to fund the trip
through a 2009/2010 King Creativity
grant. See www.southwestern.edu/
kingcreativity.
In Pursuit of a Teaching Career
Senior Samantha
Lingamfelter was
one of three students
selected statewide
to receive a schol-
arship from the
Texas Association
of School Personnel
A d m i n i s t r a t o r s
(TASPA) for the 2009/2010 school
year. The scholarship honors the best
teacher candidates in the state.
This is the 10th year in a row that
a student in Southwestern’s Teacher
Certification Program has received a
TASPA scholarship. Lingamfelter hopes
to teach high school math, and eventu-
ally Spanish as well.
Southwestern Welcomes
Rwandan Students
Southwestern welcomed two students
from Rwanda last fall as part of a program
designed to help rebuild their country.
Rwanda suffered extensively during the 1990s
as a result of genocide and civil war. Between
800,000 and 1 million Rwandans died, includ-
ing most of its educated citizens.
Three years ago, the president of Hendrix
College in Conway, Ark., started a program
to bring students from Rwanda to the United
States. There are now 52 students partici-
pating at colleges and universities across
the country.
Yvette Niyomugaba and Jean Pierre Murenzi
are the two students who enrolled at
Southwestern. Both are studying computer
science, which they hope will aid their coun-
try’s technological development. After gradu-
ation, the students have agreed to work in
Rwanda for at least five years.
“I am glad I am a student at Southwestern,
and I am sure it will be a benefit to my
country,” Murenzi says.
Before arriving at Southwestern, Niyomugaba
and Murenzi spent a month at the University of
Arkansas undergoing intensive English train-
ing. Both speak Kinyarwanda, the national
language of Rwanda, and were educated in
French. They say learning “American” English
has been a challenge.
“I learned English in high school from Ugandan
and Kenyan teachers,” Niyomugaba says.
“Their accents were close to British accents,
which are very different from American
accents. I like to learn foreign languages,
though, and I would like to learn Spanish
before I leave Texas.”
Niyomugaba also says that coming to the
United States fulfilled a big dream for her.
“I love Rwanda, but I’m very glad I’m studying
here and I think that by the time I graduate,
I will have the skills that will enable me to
make my life a success.”
STUDENT NEWS
The Megaphone Gets
a Mega-Upgrade
The 2009/2010 academic year brought
a new look to Southwestern’s student-
run newspaper, The Megaphone. The
new tabloid format of the weekly
paper is enhanced by the organiza-
tion’s new and improved Web site:
http://megaphone.southwestern.edu,
which features video links, blog posts,
Twitter comments and more.
CarlosBarron’10
DesignbyCarlosBarron’10
20 Southwestern Magazine	
Scoreboard 2009/2010
ATHLETICS
Gear Up…Pirate Style.
The Athletics Department has
launched a new online storefront where
you can purchase polos, dri-fit shirts,
jackets and hats with Southwestern’s
logo! Up to 35 percent of each sale
will be donated back to SU Athletics
when you do your online shopping at
www.southwesternpirates.com and
click on the “Save Some BUCS, Shop
Here” button.
All Hands on Deck!
The Pirate Crew wants YOU…to be
a part of the action as a member of
the Athletics Department booster club.
Show your support for Pirate student-
athletes as they commit themselves to
excellence in the classroom and athletic
competition. Financial contributions
positively influence student-athletes’
opportunities and Southwestern
Experiences. Pirate Crew members
receive a monthly e-mail update from
the Athletic Department, including
player and coach insights, as well as
behind-the-scenes information about
programs, coaches and student-athletes.
Additional benefits include invitations
to special Pirate Crew events, such as
tailgates and receptions before or after
selected home contests. As a bonus,
inaugural year members will receive a
commemorative t-shirt.
volleyball: The Southwestern
women’s volleyball team finished its
season undefeated in the Southern
Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC),
with an overall record of 32-4. The
team also won the conference tourna-
ment, extending its win streak to 30
and making it an automatic qualifier
for the national tournament. The team
participated in the NCAA tournament
for the fifth year in a row, and was this
year’s tournament host.
Head Coach Hannah Long was
named SCAC and American Volleyball
Coaches Association (AVCA) South
Region Coach of the Year. Senior Audra
Gentry was named SCAC Player of the
Year and Senior Sam Lingamfelter was
named SCAC Backrow Player of the
Year. Gentry and Lingamfelter, and
sophomores Lindsay Thompson and
Christina Nicholls were named to the
AVCA All-South Region First Team.
Gentry also received All American
Second Team honors; Lingamfelter, All
American Third Team; and Nicholls and
Lingamfelter, All American Honorable
Mentions. The SCAC All-Sportsmanship
Award went to Senior Ali Zein-Eldin.
men’s basketball: Senior Anthony
“AC” Cox was named the Tex Kassen
Male Athlete of the Year for 2008–2009.
He was honored at a basketball game
this spring.
women’s gol f : The 2008–09
Southwestern women’s golf team
placed second in the country on the
National Golf Coaches Association list of
women’s intercollegiate golf programs
with the highest collective GPA for
the season. Southwestern’s team had
a GPA of 3.756 for the year. In addition,
Marisa Mauldin ’09 was named the
Carla Lowry Female Athlete of the Year
for 2008–2009. She was honored at a
basketball game this spring.
lacrosse: The men’s varsity lacrosse
team kicked off its 2010 season on
March 13, with a game at home against
Trine University, Angola, Ind.
women’s soccer: SU women finished
the season with a 10-8-1 record,
winning five of nine home games.
Senior A.J. Andreola was named to
the NSCAA All-West Region Second
Team as well as the All-SCAC Second
Team, while junior Amy Douglas and
sophomore Maria Pollifrone received
All-SCAC Third Team nominations.
Senior Laura Kromann was named to
the All-Sportsmanship Team.
men’s cross country:
Junior Daniel Rudd received SCAC
All-Sportsmanship Team honors.
women’s cross country: Senior,
Tami Warner received South/Southeast
All-Region honors, and junior Lili
McEntire was named to the SCAC
All-Sportsmanship Team.
DaveJohnson
ENGAGING FINDS
Global Mind Change:
The Promise of the 21st Century
By Willis Harman
www.intuition.org/txt/harman2s.htm
“Willis Harman’s Global Mind Change
calls into question the operating assump-
tions on which our current economy and
consumer-oriented behaviors rest. He opens
minds by questioning our current paradigm and introduc-
ing alternatives. Each year, after reading the book, students
in my Contemporary Issues in Global Business course have
rich discussions about how they might create a world in
which they most want to live.” ~Mary Grace Neville, associ-
ate professor of business, Paideia®
Professor
Cradle to Cradle
By William McDonough and
Michael Braungart
www.mcdonough.com/
cradle_to_cradle.htm
“Cradle to Cradle is a must. It’s a real para-
digm shift for sustainability and is probably
one of the most groundbreaking books of the
last decade.” ~Jeff Acker Kaplan ’01
Down and Out in Paris and London
By George Orwell
www.george-orwell.org/
Down_and_Out_in_Paris_and_London
“Down and Out in Paris and London is
a book about how success is perceived—for
it’s view of a tramping lifestyle, class percep-
tions and taking risks.” ~Joey King ’93
Greater than Yourself: The Ultimate
Lesson of True Leadership
By Steve Farber
www.stevefarber.com
“When I need to be reminded of why
I chose to be a leader and not a follower I
re-read Greater Than Yourself. ~Scarlett
Foster-Moss ’86
Find more recommendations go to the Bonus Pages.
The Pixar Touch:
The Making of a Company
By David A. Price
www.pixartouchbook.com
“The Pixar Touch follows the people, tech-
nology and market for computer animated
films.” ~Don Parks, associate professor of
business; Paideia®
Professor; holder of the
John Shearn Chair in Business Administration
Future Shock
By Alvin Toffler
www.alvintoffler.net
“Future Shock has probably influenced
me more than any other book. It has proven
to be brilliant over time. The thesis is that
we cannot count on anything staying the
same; everything will change with increas-
ing rapidity as time passes. In the digital age, the idea is
common knowledge, but in 1970, it was revolutionary and
brilliant.” ~Joe Seeber ’68
“I read Future Shock and its sequel, The Third Wave, in
high school. They had the most daring effect on me. I want
to eventually encounter education and business systems with
the same approach.” ~Yen-Hong Tran ’00
The Road to Serfdom
By F. A. Hayek
http://jim.com/hayek.htm
“The Road to Serfdom is a landmark
book written during World War II in which
Hayek—later awarded the Nobel Prize in
economics—warns the Western world about
the threat of totalitarianism. The book is
credited with reawakening free market thinking from the
doldrums it had suffered in the wake of the Bolshevik take-
over of Russia, the despair of the Great Depression and the
carnage of World War II.” ~Fred Sellers, associate professor
of business
Rich Dad Poor Dad
By Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter
www.richdad.com
“Rich Dad Poor Dad changed my
perspective on having my own business.”
~Yesenia Garcia ’03
Summer Reading List
A syllabus from Southwestern alumni and faculty.
22 Southwestern Magazine
	There’s No Bu
Don Parks, Associate Professor of Business,
Paideia®
Professor and Holder of the John
Shearn Chair in Business Administration
Photography by Lance Holt, Holt Images
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 23
For 16 years, Southwestern business students have integrated
business and organization issues with research and writing,
thanks to Don Parks and his Strategic Management Capstone,
Foundations of Business (management, marketing and produc-
tion/operations), Leadership Perspectives, Entrepreneurship
and other courses. They have even completed in-depth studies
of companies like Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream. Pass the scoop,
please!
“Personally,” says Parks, “it has been rewarding to identify
and develop a liberal arts approach to business education,
both within the structure of the business major and within the
content of each course.” Corporate and social responsibility
concerns permeate the business curriculum.
Parks explains that to the extent liberal arts is about inte-
grating one’s understanding of the world through multiple
perspectives, business is a great lens, integrating many disci-
plines, including: economics, psychology, math, sociology,
political science and communication, among others. Business
also integrates multiple levels of analysis, including individual,
small groups (teams), large groups (departments), organiza-
tions (business and others), and the business environment
(customer, competitive, technological, societal, local, national
and global).
The focus of Parks’ teaching and research had been strategic
management, which he says, “required me to explore a variety
of relationships that impact an organization’s success and
allowed me to put my fingers in a lot of different pies.” Bringing
that knowledge to the Southwestern campus in 1994, Parks was
able to teach a broad array of courses to the 22 students then
majoring in business. In more recent years, the department has
grown exponentially, with 120 or more business majors per
year. “Increasing our faculty* has allowed us to further develop
the program in the interest of the students,” he says.
Liberal Arts + Business = Entrepreneurship
One of the ways in which the business program at
Southwestern has grown and developed is through the inclu-
sion of the elements of entrepreneurship in its courses.
“Entrepreneurship has many definitions,” says Parks. “To the
extent that entrepreneurship is combining people, capital and
other resources in unique ways, Southwestern’s liberal arts
approach to business provides a great background for students
who want to pursue entrepreneurial careers.”
usiness Like…	 Business
24 Southwestern Magazine
HomecomingAwards’09
Parks says that one of the benefits of a program
like Southwestern’s is that students who choose to
start their own business can and have succeeded.
Examples of SU alumni who started their own busi-
nesses are many. (See nine examples beginning on
Page 6, including Joe Seeber ’63, who spoke to
Parks’ Capstone class last semester.) Others, he
says, have likely become “intrapreneurs” (entrepre-
neurs inside organizations) and are perhaps even
more prevalent.
While most students have not specifically taken
a course on entrepreneurship, Parks has taught
one at Southwestern a number of times. Alumnus
W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93 (See Page 9), and Parks
have team-taught the course more than once, and
Tom Forbes ’71, attorney and founding president
of the Center of Child Protection in Austin, partici-
pated in Parks’ courses several times as a business
plan judge.
Reflections on Life at Southwestern
AsParkspreparestoretireattheendofthisacademic
year, he reflects on his time at Southwestern—both
personally and professionally.
“I have been blessed to work with students and
colleagues in the exploration of business as a liberal
art, through theories, models and concepts, applied
to many organizations—business, not-for-profit and
others,” he says.
Parks’ students say he is compassionate, warm-
hearted, genuine and eager to help create new
leaders. First-Year Student Lauren Lansford says, “Dr.
Parks was my professor for my First-Year Seminar,
titled Fantastical Leaders. He made sure we could
make real life connections to the material and helped
set us on a positive track from the beginning.” First-
Year Student David Briner adds, “Dr. Parks teaches
with zeal and knowledge and conveys the experience
he has gained over the years.”
“In the interest of building
bright, moral, courageous
leaders, we teach students to
consider the ‘triple bottom
line’—people, planet and profit.”
Alumni agree. Marc Harrison ’03, founder of
Global Encounters, an adventure travel company,
says, “Don Parks helped shape me into the person
I am today. He told me after the last day of my busi-
ness Capstone course, ‘when you find something
that you are truly passionate about, you’re going to
move mountains.’”
“Our business majors make us proud,” boasts
Parks, adding that his advising and service commit-
ments at Southwestern have been rewarding as well.
“My experience and scholarship have enabled me to
help students explore opportunities that will help
them be competitive in their chosen careers.”
Looking back, Parks says, “I would not trade
the experiences and opportunities I’ve had at
Southwestern over the years. I’m thankful to all
who shared their lives with me.” Beginning with his
retirement in May, Parks plans to catch up on those
things that have been put aside until “one of these
days.” He says, “‘One of these days’ is getting closer.
I’ll miss the relationships here, but I look forward
to what lies ahead.”
* Made possible in part through the support of donors
via Thinking Ahead: The Southwestern Campaign.
Social Entrepreneurship
Starts on Campus
“A social entrepreneur is someone who recog-
nizes a social problem and uses entrepreneur-
ial principles to organize, create and manage a
venture in order to make social change,” says
Don Parks, associate professor of business at
Southwestern.
One of the most widely recognized social entre-
preneurs was Mother Teresa, founder of the
Missionaries of Charity.
Identifying and solving large-scale social prob-
lems requires committed people who have
the vision and determination to persist in the
face of sometimes daunting odds. Parks says
many Southwestern alumni fit this bill. “The
typical SU graduate wants to make the world
a better place.”
Why? Because Southwestern offers students the
opportunity to develop social entrepreneurship
abilities through numerous courses and service
projects. “For example,” Parks says, “several of
my business Capstone classes and one of my
Paideia cohorts worked with The Caring Place of
Georgetown to help explore and develop plans
to increase services provided to the needy of
Williamson County.”
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 25
The Highest Honor
The Distinguished Alumna/us Award is the highest honor
awarded by The Association of Southwestern University
Alumni. Recipients exemplify the qualities of excellence
as taught and represented by Southwestern.
Known for being a servant to others and never concerned
with earning recognition, Dr. Douglas Benold ’44, has
served the Georgetown and Southwestern University commu-
nities for the vast majority of his life.
Graduating from Georgetown High School in 1940, Benold
attended Southwestern as his father before him had, but
left in 1943 to serve in World War II. Upon his return, he
completed a biology degree at Southwestern. He went on to
graduate third in his class from Baylor College of Medicine,
marry his college sweetheart, Nell Barnes ’48, and return
to Georgetown to practice medicine.
During 56 years of practicing medicine in Georgetown,
Benold helped establish the Georgetown Hospital and Clinic
and even made house calls to elderly and homebound patients
long after others were no longer willing to do so. In 2003, he
and other citizens concerned about quality health care for the
uninsured, added the Georgetown Community Clinic—now
Lone Star Circle of Care—to the community.
It was more than five decades of practicing medicine that
Benold considers his greatest professional achievement;
however, he says, “The most significant achievement of my
life was—with the help of my wife, Nell—raising our four
fine children.”
Also dedicated to Georgetown and its citizens, Benold
helped achieve school integration in the 1960s. When the
Douglas Benold Middle School was dedicated in his honor
in 1999, Benold affirmed, “I’ve always thought providing
education for our children is the most important thing we
as a community can do.”
A Quiet but Powerful Force
In 1974, Benold, along with the Williamson County commis-
sioners, organized the first Williamson County Emergency
Medical Service, earning him the Citizen of the Year award
from the Chamber of Commerce.
Benold has also received the Service Above Self award
from the Georgetown Rotary Club and the Citation of Merit
from The Association of Southwestern University Alumni. In
January 2009, he received the Martha Diaz Hurtado College
Town Award from Southwestern for his efforts to enhance
the “college town” environment.
University President Jake B. Schrum ’68 has said, “In a
quiet but determined way, Doug Benold has been a powerful
force for the betterment of Georgetown…[and is] someone
who doesn’t trumpet his own accomplishments…”
2009 Young Alumna Achievement Award recipient, Megan
Schubert Leese ’01, agrees. “Dr. Benold and I were both
on a Destination: Service trip to Honduras in the spring of
2000,” she says. “He worked so hard, sun up to sun down,
never losing sight of the goal to serve as many people as
possible…he listened to their life stories…and treated them
all with respect.”
Although Benold retired from medicine in 2006, he
remains active and continues to serve on the Southwestern
University Board of Trustees, the Wesleyan Homes Board
and the Georgetown Healthcare Foundation.
Upon receiving the Distinguished Alumnus Award from
The Association of Southwestern University Alumni, Benold
said, “For more than a century, Southwestern has meant so
much to my family, and I believe in the role the University
plays in bettering the life of our city, our state and the world
by producing educated and well-motivated graduates.”
In the Spirit of Service
Dr. Douglas Benold
Distinguished Alumnus
26 Southwestern Magazine
Exceptional Service
The Citation of Merit is awarded to a former Southwestern
University student who has performed exceptional civic
and/or professional services in a given geographic area
or field of endeavor. Recipients represent the highest stan-
dards of Southwestern’s commitment to values-centered
curriculum and development of the whole person.
Dr. Lawrence Stanberry ’70 is the Reuben S. Carpentier
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the
College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University,
and Pediatrician-in-Chief of Morgan Stanley Children’s
Hospital of New York Presbyterian, where he oversees a
500-member department and directs patient care, research
and educational initiatives.
“I’ve never been reluctant to try
things. Southwestern is a place that
gives students permission to explore...”
Stanberry is also an internationally recognized authority
on infectious diseases, the author of more than 200 scientific
articles and the editor of several textbooks. He has served
on numerous review panels and advisory boards, including
the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
After receiving a bachelor of science degree in chem-
istry from Southwestern, Stanberry went on to earn both
his medical degree and a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the
University of Illinois at Chicago. His postgraduate medical
training was in pediatrics, infectious diseases and virology
at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and
the University of Utah.
“I gained much from each of the institutions I attended,
but I feel the most fondly about Southwestern,” he says.
While Stanberry’s professional accomplishments speak for
themselves, and colleagues refer to him as “accomplished
clinician-scientist” and “physician par excellence,” friends
concur that he is a “sterling individual” above all.
Stanberry says he’s been fortunate to have had opportuni-
ties to make contributions in the areas of education, patient
care and research discoveries, but says, “It’s not about me.”
He credits the researchers who blazed the trail before him
and the colleagues who have worked alongside him.
Friends describe Stanberry as smart, humorous, warm and
insightful, and remark that his scientific contributions have
always been made with a sense of humility and consideration
for the bigger picture.
A Leader in Action
Stanberry’s passion for education goes beyond science and
medicine—he translates his experience and discoveries into
clinical care. In fact, his vaccine research has had a global
impact on improving lives, and has important implications
for the development of vaccines that may protect humans
against sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV.
It has been Stanberry’s warmth and compassion that has
had a personal impact on those around him, who say he is
sensitive to seemingly inconsequential things that can have
a huge impact…small things like warming his stethoscope
before examining a child.
Stanberry has been married for 40 years and has two grown
children, one of whom, Martin, followed in his father’s
footsteps, graduating from Southwestern in 2008.
Global Mind, Local Heart
Dr. Lawrence Stanberry
Citation of Merit
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 27
Setting a Standard
The Young Alumna/us Achievement Award is presented
to former Southwestern students who have graduated
in the last 10 years and whose achievements in the civic
and/or professional realm set a standard of excellence.
Recipients represent Southwestern’s finest young alumni
and the University’s commitment to a values-centered
curriculum and development of the whole person.
According to family and friends, Megan Schubert Leese ’01,
has only just started to impact the well-being of humanity.
It all began when Leese was a student at Southwestern,
majoring in biology and Spanish, and she traveled with
Destination: Service on a medical mission trip to Honduras.
That’s where she learned what it really means to have nothing.
She was inspired on the trip by Southwestern alumnus
Douglas Benold ’44, who accompanied the group.
“The whole trip inspired me,” Leese says. “It showed me
that there are many ways to contribute to the health of a
person and a society. Dr. Benold showed me that you can
be both efficient and compassionate while working with
under-served populations.”
Of her time on campus, Leese says, “Southwestern gave
me a great introduction to good teaching through knowl-
edgeable and approachable professors…I was well prepared
for grad school.”
After graduating in 2001, Leese became an AmeriCorps
Volunteer with Hudson River Health Care in New York, where
she served in a migrant medical clinic as an interpreter and
community educator.
Through a Lens of Compassion
Friends and family say Leese has always looked at every-
one—rich or poor, educated or uneducated—as individuals,
and with a compassionate eye.
As a volunteer, Leese created the Migrant Diabetes
Education Initiative, which today provides education and
care for 150 diabetic farm workers. For her work, she
received the AmeriCorps Volunteer of the Year Award in
2002, before accepting the position of Manager of Migrant
Health Promotion with Hudson River Health Care.
“My greatest accomplishment,
both personally and professionally,
has been fostering independence
and developing the ability to do
things on my own terms.”
At the same time, Leese was also working on a master’s
degree in public health at Columbia University, which she
earned in 2007. She then became the Supervisor of Managed
Care for New York Presbyterian Hospital.
A former colleague says that Leese is a shining light of
energy, optimism and compassion…a true advocate for the
under-served. Her sister explains, “Things always work
out for Megan, not because she’s lucky, but because she
works hard to make them happen…she reaches everyone
she meets.”
It was for her dedication and concern for the less fortunate,
her commitment to providing quality health care to those
in need, and her positive attitude and love of life, that Leese
received the 2009 Young Alumna Achievement Award.
Advocate for the Under Served
Megan Schubert Leese
Young Alumna
Achievement Award
28 Southwestern Magazine
Doing It All
The Mr./Ms. Homecoming Award is an honor bestowed
upon a member of the Southwestern University faculty as
a token of the affection and respect of former students.
The award carries special meaning to the recipient, as
it symbolizes the strength of the University: the strong,
personal relationships between students and faculty,
clearly indicating that alumni recall with appreciation
the contributions of the recipient to the students’ educa-
tion and development.
In the 30 years that she has been a member of Southwestern’s
fine arts and women’s studies faculty, students have admired
Mary Hale Visser’s ability to “do it all” as a dedicated and hard
working professor, mother, artist, activist and friend.
“I strive to provide knowledge
and skills that promote individual
appreciation and understanding of art
as a discipline and its contribution to
the history and culture of the world.”
Visser’s art has been included in more than 120 interna-
tional, national and regional juried exhibitions, including
two pieces of sculpture—created through the process called
rapid prototyping—that toured as part of the 2008 Olympics
in Beijing, China.
Her work has been featured in publications, including
Texas Monthly, Sculpture Journal and Ceramics, Art and
Perception, and has received numerous awards, includ-
ing the “Design Excellence Award” from the City of Austin
Design Commission.
However, former students say that Visser is a great teacher
first and an artist second, encouraging students to be inde-
pendent and to try new things. One student says her style of
teaching makes Visser an unsung hero, but not a pushover.
“She won’t hesitate to hold your feet to the fire if necessary,”
he says.
Another alumna changed her major from pre-med to sculp-
ture after taking classes with Visser, and says she guides
students in life as well as art—helping them appreciate art
by fostering their imagination and creativity, regardless of
their major.
Visser says, “My goal is to nurture and support the creative
spirit of each individual.”
Mutual Admiration
As much as students admire Visser, she takes equal pride
in them. In 2004, she organized Southwestern’s first-ever
alumni art exhibit, giving the Southwestern community a
chance to see former students and their current works.
Visser says the moments she remembers most are those
“when a student becomes excited about art and it helps to
enrich his or her life.”
Described as being strong, independent, consistent,
supportive, loyal and having a good sense of humor, it is
clear that Visser’s former students regard her not only with
respect, but consider her a guiding force in their lives.
For being the type of teacher whose encouragement helps
students sculpt a life true to themselves, The Association of
Southwestern University Alumni presented Visser with the
2009 Ms. Homecoming Award.
Teacher, Artist, Unsung Hero
Mary Hale Visser
Ms. Homecoming
Good and Faithful Servant
The Pearl A. Neas Service Award is presented annually
to a member of the Southwestern University staff for the
purpose of recognizing long and faithful service to the
University. The award is named for the later Pearl A. Neas,
who served Southwestern for 40 years.
As they say, not rain, nor sleet, nor snow, the mail must
go. On the Southwestern campus, Debbie Sanderfer is the
person that makes that happen! For the past four years, she
has even been found at the University on weekends and
holidays, working to stay ahead of the mail.
But the campus post office isn’t the only place Sanderfer
has left her cheerful mark on the University. She spent 20
years in the Office of Financial Assistance and three years
in the Registrar’s Office before becoming Mail Service
Supervisor in 2005.
All About the Students
In each of her positions, Sanderfer has made it clear that
she is all about the students. More than one of Sanderfer’s
colleagues first met her when they were students, and agree
that she always had their best interest at heart. They call her
sincere, selfless and loyal to Southwestern.
Sanderfer is also community minded. A recipient of
Southwestern’s Joe S. Mundy Award for Exemplary Service,
she has served on numerous committees at Southwestern,
assisted in planning the student job fair and held posi-
tions as varied as cheerleader sponsor and SU Connections
mentor.
Over the years, Sanderfer influenced co-workers and
countless students through her expertise, kindness and
love. Dedicated to her work and never satisfied with the
status quo, she always wants things to be done right and
works hard to make them so.
Known to be inspirational, devoted and generous,
Sanderfer’s thoughtfulness touches those around her. She
is there for her friends and colleagues, celebrating the good
times and providing compassion in the difficult ones.
For her loyalty and service, for helping to make
Southwestern a community where people matter and for
making students her number one priority, The Association
of Southwestern University Alumni has awarded Sanderfer
the 2009 Pearl A. Neas Service Award.
Not Rain, Nor Sleet, Nor Snow
Debbie Sanderfer
Pearl A. Neas Service Award
Photographer Lance Holt made use of a large-format view camera
to create this year’s collection of Homecoming Award portraits. As
the University celebrated the 100th anniversary of Homecoming,
Southwestern featured technology that would have been available at
the time of the first Homecoming and that remains relevant today.
30 Southwestern Magazine	
Academics in Focus is compiled
from In Focus, Southwestern’s
official weekly online newsletter,
and highlights student, faculty
and staff honors. Check out
www.southwestern.edu/
newsroom/infocus for archived
issues of In Focus,
BIOLOGY
ROMI BURKS, associate
professor of biology, published
an article in Science Signaling
about co-authoring papers with
undergraduates. The paper
was co-authored by MATT
CHUMCHAL ’01, who is now an
assistant professor of biology
at Texas Christian University.
BEN PIERCE, professor of biology,
is the author of a textbook titled
Genetics Essentials: Concepts
and Connections. Pierce has
authored several genetics
textbooks used by colleges and
universities across the country.
CHEMISTRY
NIKOS BENTENITIS, assistant
professor of chemistry, had a
paper published in the Journal
of Physical Chemistry. NICK COX,
junior, was co-author on the paper.
LYNN GUZIEC, assistant professor
of chemistry, FRANK GUZIEC,
professor of chemistry, and KYLE
MARSHALL ’08, were co-authors
on a paper published in Bioorganic
and Medicinal Chemistry, 2009.
The GUZIECS also published a
paper in The Analyst, which was
co-authored by Jennifer Brodbelt,
professor of chemistry at The
University of Texas at Austin,
and SUNCERAE SMITH ’05, a
graduate student at UT, who was
awarded a National Science
Foundation grant for her work.
Senior chemistry majors
JENNIFER PITZEN and NATALIE
SANDERS presented research at
the American Chemical Society
meeting in Washington, D.C.
Pitzen presented research that she
completed with FRANK GUZIEC,
professor of chemistry. Sanders
presented research that she
completed with LYNN GUZIEC,
assistant professor of chemistry.
SANDRA LOUDWIG, visiting
assistant professor of
chemistry, co-authored a
paper published in the Journal
of Inclusion Phenomena &
Macrocyclic Chemistry.
COMMUNICATION STUDIES
JULIA JOHNSON, associate
professor of communication
studies, presented a paper
titled “Qwe’reing/Queering
Alliances through Silence: An
Autoethnographic Exploration
of ‘Living out Loud’” at the
annual convention of the
National Communication
Association in Chicago, Ill.
SALLY SPALDING ’09, received
the 2009 Undergraduate Paper
Award from the Organization
for the Study of Communication,
Language and Gender. She wrote
a paper titled “Power Play: The
Intersection of Religion and
Gender in Christian Women’s
Narratives” for her communication
studies research Capstone
class under the direction of
JULIA JOHNSON, associate
professor of communication
studies and feminist studies.
Spalding also presented a version
of her paper at the Religious
Communication Association
pre-conference of the National
Communication Association
annual convention in Chicago, Ill.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
BARBARA BOUCHER OWENS,
associate professor of computer
science, was the keynote speaker
at the Fifth University Course
Forum in Computer Science held in
Chengdu, Sichuan, China. Owens
also participated in the Grace
Hopper Celebration of Women in
Computing in Tucson, Ariz., where
she represented Southwestern
at the meeting of the Academic
Alliance of the National Center
for Women in Technology.
Three teams from Southwestern
participated in the world’s most
prestigious computer programming
competition—the International
Collegiate Programming Contest,
sponsored by IBM and run by
the Association for Computing
Machinery. Participating
Southwestern students included
seniors DANIEL BAUER, LANE
HILL, AARON KINSMAN and
MICHAEL PARTY; juniors
DARREN ALLEN, NICHOLAS
ASHFORD, ALAN LOWRY and
ADAM SCULLY; and first-year
students ERICK BAUMAN and
JASON CATRON. Coaches were
RICHARD DENMAN, associate
professor of mathematics
and computer science, and
BARBARA ANTHONY, assistant
professor of computer science.
ECONOMICS
KEN ROBERTS, professor of
economics, will have a paper titled
“The Impact of Circular Migration
on the Position of Married Women
in China,” published in the July
2010 issue of Feminist Economics.
ENGLISH
EILEEN CLEERE, professor of
English, was invited by the
Victorian Studies Seminar at Rice
University to present the final
chapter of her book manuscript,
The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture
and the Victorian Cleanliness
Campaigns, as a work-in-progress.
DAVID GAINES, associate
professor of English, gave an
invited lecture at the 92nd
Street Y in New York City.
His lecture was titled “Bob
Dylan’s Senses of Humor.”
T. WALTER HERBERT JR.,
professor emeritus of English, has
published a book titled Faith-Based
War: From 9/11 to Catastrophic
Success in Iraq. Herbert was
also elected president of the
Herman Melville Society.
ELISABETH PIEDMONT-MARTON,
associate professor of English,
contributed a chapter to the book
Thirty Years After: New Essays on
Vietnam War Literature, Film, and
Art. The chapter is titled “‘I’m not
trying to compete with you’: Gulf
War Fiction and Discursive Space.”
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
JINELLE SPERRY, a postdoctoral
fellow in the Environmental
Studies Program, had a paper
she co-authored accepted for
publication by the journal Ecology.
Sperry also co-authored a paper
published in the April edition of
American Midland Naturalist.
LANGUAGES
PATRICIA SCHIAFFINI, part-time
assistant professor of Chinese,
conducted two workshops
in Tibet for early-childhood
education and distributed two
new children’s books in Tibetan
that have been published by her
nonprofit organization, the Tibetan
Arts and Literature Initiative.
LAURA SENIO BLAIR, associate
professor of Spanish, presented
a paper titled “Driving Class
Conflict: Taxis and Taxistas
in Contemporary Chilean
Cinema” at the Geographical
Imaginaries and Hispanic Film
Conference in New Orleans, La.
MATHEMATICS
RICHARD DENMAN, professor
of mathematics and computer
science, has had an article
accepted for publication in the
College Journal of Mathematics, a
publication of the Mathematical
Association of America. The
article was co-authored by
DAVID HAILEY ’83, and
Michael Rothenberg.
Five mathematics, computational
mathematics and computer
science majors presented
research and expository talks at
the Mathematical Association of
America meeting in Portland, Ore.
SARAH STERN, senior, presented
research that she conducted
with ALISON MARR, assistant
professor of mathematics. SEAN
WATSON, senior, presented
research that he conducted with
FUMIKO FUTAMURA, assistant
professor of mathematics. Watson
received a Pi Mu Epsilon Student
Speaker Award for his talk. Also
presenting were DARREN ALLEN,
junior, TOMMY ROGERS, senior,
and STEPHEN FOSTER ’09.
Academics in Focus
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 31
POLITICAL SCIENCE
ALISA GAUNDER, associate
professor of political science,
wrote a chapter for a book
published by the Brookings
Institution titled Political Change
in Japan: Electoral Behavior, Party
Realignment, and the Koizumi
Reforms. Gaunder also presented
a paper at the Southwest
Conference on Asian Studies, and
was a panelist on a roundtable
discussion that analyzed the 2009
Lower House election in Japan.
SHANNON MARIOTTI, assistant
professor of political science,
presented a paper at the American
Political Science Association
Conference in Toronto, Canada. A
revised version of her essay will be
published in A Political Companion
to Ralph Waldo Emerson in 2011.
An interview with ERIC SELBIN,
professor of political science, was
published in Russian Journal under
the title “The Magic of Revolution:
Debates on Revolution.” Selbin
also chaired and participated on
several panels at the International
Studies Association-South Region
meeting in Nashville, Tenn.
RELIGION and PHILOSOPHY
LAURA HOBGOOD-OSTER,
professor of religion, gave a
presentation at Yale University
Divinity School about animals in
Christian liturgy. Hobgood–Oster
also attended the American
Academy of Religion meeting
in Montreal, Canada, where
she chaired all of the panels
on animals and religion.
SAROFIM SCHOOL
OF FINE ARTS
DUNCAN ALEXANDER ’09,
won the 2009 Austin Critics
Table Award for video design
for his work on “The Color of
Dissonance,” which premiered
at Southwestern in April 2009.
CARLOS BARRON, senior, and
MARY VISSER, professor of
art, were among 55 artists
whose art was selected for
the Banner Project—a public
arts event in Georgetown.
MICHAEL COOPER, professor of
music, presented papers at two
conferences held in the former
East Germany. Cooper also gave
a presentation at the October
meeting of the Southwest Chapter
of the American Musicological
Association, held at The University
of Texas at San Antonio.
THOMAS HOWE, professor of
art history, participated in a
symposium held at the Getty Villa
in Malibu, Calif., in conjunction
with an exhibit at the Los
Angeles County Museum of Art
titled “Pompeii and the Roman
Villa: Art and Culture around
the Bay of Naples.” Howe, who
is the coordinator general of
the Restoring Ancient Stabiae
Foundation, hosted the second
international conference on recent
work at the ancient Roman villa
site of Stabia at the foundation’s
center in Castellammare di Stabia,
Italy. He also led discussions with
a delegation from the Hermitage
State Museums in St. Petersburg,
Russia, that may allow the
archaeological department of the
Hermitage to open an excavation
at Stabia as early as summer 2010.
LOIS FERRARI, professor of
music, conducted the Washington
All-State Wind Ensemble at the
Washington Music Educators
Association Conference in
February. Ferrari also conducted
the Austin Civic Orchestra
in concert at the Pflugerville
Performing Arts Center.
PALOMA MAYORGA, senior,
created a portrait of composer
Aaron Copland for the poster and
brochures publicizing the 2010
Festival of the Arts in Georgetown.
EILEEN MEYER-RUSSELL,
associate professor of music, and
KIYOSHI TAMAGAWA, professor
of music, collaborated on recitals
performed in San Marcos, as well
as in Twin Lake, Mich., Shoreline,
Wash., and Eugene, Ore. Meyer-
Russell performed another recital
in Portland, Ore., with pianist
Jason Kwak, assistant professor
of music at Texas State University.
ROMI BURKS, associate professor
of biology, in collaboration with
STAR VARNER, professor of art,
developed an artwork component
for her First-Year Seminar
class on chocolate. Burks took
chocolate-themed student artwork
to the Austin Chocolate Festival
in September. Students whose
work was featured included
first-year students MICHAEL
ESPINOZA, JEAN MURENZI,
OLUBUSOLA OKUNNU and
RACHEL THIBODEAU; sophomores
JUSTICE KINLEY, EDUARDO
RAMERIZ and NICOLE REA; and
juniors CATIE ERTEL, MATTHEW
KAMAS, BAILEY THOMPSON
and JULIE ANN WHITE.
MARY VISSER, professor of art,
had her sculpture, “Circle of Life,”
featured in the Winter 2009 issue
of Creative Quarterly. The sculpture
received the Silver Award in the
Fine Arts Professional division.
A second sculpture of Visser’s,
“Women in Movement,” was
selected as a runner up.
SOCIOLOGY
ED KAIN, professor of sociology
and University Scholar, has been
named the 2010 recipient of the
Southern Sociological Society’s
Distinguished Contributions
to Teaching Award.
OTHER
ALEX ANDERSON, associate
director of Career Services,
had an article in the NACE
Journal, published by the
National Association of Colleges
and Employers. RACHEL
OSBORNE ’08, conducted the
research for the project as an
independent research assistant
under TRACI GIULIANO, professor
of psychology. The research
looked for correlations between
students’ post-graduation
outcomes and their contacts
with Career Services.
KAYLA COMEAUX, junior,
participated in a five-day
symposium held at NASA’s
Kennedy Space Center, one
of several in which she will
participate after having been
selected as a NASA MUST
Scholar for 2009/2010.
ELLEN DAVIS, director of
communications, contributed
an article for Volume 3 of the
Crisis Management Stylebook,
published by PR Newswire.
SUZY PUKYS, director of
civic engagement, LAURA
BURROW ’09, and seniors
SARAH CROMWELL and JANET
DEL REAL, gave a presentation
about their internship experiences
at the National Domestic
Violence Summit in Irving.
ROGER YOUNG, director of
career services, has been
elected to a two-year term
on the Board of Directors of
the Southern Association of
Colleges and Employers.
The Rainbow Program, a children’s
nutritional program developed
by GILLIAN GRAHAM, junior,
has been added to Rachel
Ray’s Yum-o!®
Web site.
Members of the Southwestern
community contributed more
than $1,700 worth of food
to The Caring Place this fall.
Economics Professor MARY
YOUNG donated $1,300 worth
of ground beef from her ranch,
and faculty, staff and students
donated $400 worth of canned
food to accompany the beef.
Five Southwestern University
faculty members have received
Sam Taylor Fellowship awards
for 2009/2010: DANIEL
CASTRO, professor of history;
LAURA HOBGOOD-OSTER,
professor of religion; JACQUIE
MUIR-BROADDUS, professor of
psychology; MICHAEL SAENGER,
associate professor of English;
and ELIZABETH STOCKTON,
assistant professor of English.
CORRECTION
In the Fall 2009 issue of
Southwestern, Daniel Bauer’s
name was misspelled. We
apologize for the mistake.
32 Southwestern Magazine
Now Is the Time To Be Actively Engaged with The Association
In the past six years, The Association has launched 14 local associations and 19 alumni
connection groups to connect Southwestern alumni where they live and through
their interests. These groups increase alumni professional and social networks and
provide access to meaningful educational and service opportunities.
Four Years of Record-Breaking Attendance
Homecoming and Reunion Weekend has provided opportunities for students and
alumni to share ideas and establish relationships. Last year, the Homecoming
celebration of 40-years of African-American Alumni Achievement brought together
generations of alumni with shared experiences, and gave Southwestern students
opportunities to meet those alumni who paved the way for them.
Continuing the Lifelong Southwestern Experience
The 2010 Roy and Margaret Shilling Lecture Series offered one of many outstanding
opportunities for alumni to continue their lifelong Southwestern Experience by
hearing (in person or online) Bill Foege, one of the world’s foremost epidemiolo-
gists, speak about addressing critical global health issues.
Shaping the Plan
The Board of Trustees, half of whom are alumni, recently approved Shaping Our
Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020. Five alumni,
including me, directly contributed to the Commission on Planning and Action,
which drafted the plan. Many others participated through information sessions,
conference calls and by submitting feedback forms. As alumni you will have
opportunities to help shape the implementation of the plan.
Get Involved and Stay Informed
Visit www.sualumni.net. Check out the calendar, which includes dates for
Homecoming and Reunion Weekend, upcoming centennial celebrations for Pi
Kappa Alpha and Delta Delta Delta, campus and online lectures, events in your area
and much more. Register for the online community and consider volunteering.
This is our Association! It’s fun! Let’s benefit from it!
Steve Raben ’63
President, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni
Alumni Council
President
Steve Raben ’63
President-Elect
Blake Stanford ’81
Class Relations Chair
Nisa Sharma ’92
Nominations and Awards Chair
Rev. Dr. Paul Barton ’83
Homecoming and Reunions Chair
Sarah Walthall Norris ’68
Local Associations Chair
Maxie Duran Hardin ’73
Alumni Connection Groups Chair
Katherine Merrill Andre ’99
Assembly Program Chair
Rev. Milton Jordan ’62
Assembly Program Chair-Elect
Yesenia Garcia ’03
Alumni Communications Chair
Lisa Dreishmire ’91
Lifelong Learning Chair
Ken Holley ’71
At-Large Member
John Dapper ’91
At-Large Member
Theodore Caryl ’76
Trustee Representative
John Curry ’70
Student Representative
Zoe Martin ’12
Association
of Southwestern University Alumni
The
Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 33
ALUMNI NEWS
2009 Legacy Students
Southwestern welcomed 32 legacy
students among the 2009 first-year and
transfer class. Contact the Office of
Admission at 800-252-3166 to register
your child or relative for the Legacy
Link Program.
Call for Class Representation
The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni Assembly held
its annual meeting during Volunteer
Leadership Weekend 2010, where
new members of the Alumni Council
were voted in by Assembly Delegates.
Delegates include an array of alumni
who represent local associations,
alumni connection groups and classes.
Many classes are not yet represented
on the Alumni Assembly, which is the
governing body of The Association.
Assembly Delegates serve a two-
year term and meet once-a-year at
Southwestern to conduct regular busi-
ness. Delegates serve an important
volunteer role for The Association by
serving as advisors and sharing class
news with friends and classmates. If
you are interested in serving as a Class
Delegate on the Alumni Assembly,
e-mail alumni@southwestern.edu.
Windy City Home to 14th
Local Association
The Association of Southwestern
University Alumni welcomes the
Chicago Association as the 14th
local association! More than 140
Southwestern alumni live in and
around Chicago, Ill. Georgianne
Bode Harms ’84, Jill Johnson
Andrews ’99, Merritt Foy ’04 and
Caitlyn Bodine ’05 have volunteered
to serve as officers of the new asso-
ciation and welcome suggestions for
events and activities in the area. Send
ideas to alumni@southwestern.edu.
Hispanic Alumni/
Student Connection
In the fall of 2009, members of
the Southwestern University student
organization, Latinos Unidos, asked
alumni to help recruit Latino students
and to serve as career mentors. This
request resulted in the formation of
the Southwestern University Hispanic
Alumni Connection Group in January
2010. This is the 19th group to formally
affiliate with The Association of
Southwestern University Alumni and
the first to officially open its member-
ship to students, faculty and staff. In
addition to assisting with student
recruitment and serving as career
mentors, the group aspires to promote
the lifelong Southwestern Experience
through events and programming. To
become a member of the group, e-mail
alumni@southwestern.edu.
Pi Kappa Alpha Centennial
The Alpha Omicron Chapter of
the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity will
celebrate its centennial during
Homecoming and Reunion Weekend,
November 5–7, 2010. The weekend
will be full of activities in which Pike
brothers can participate, reconnect
and celebrate. Mark your calendar and
plan to attend. For more information,
contact Daniel Webb AO ’05, ’08 at
webbd@southwestern.edu, or visit
www.aopikes.com.
To learn more about the alumni
assembly, local associations, alumni
connection groups and special events,
visit www.sualumni.net.
Legacy students pictured with their relatives during Student and Parent Orientation, Aug. 16, 2009.
LucasAdams
70+ Events  ·  1000+ Pirates  ·  Countless Adventures
How much fun can you pack into one weekend?
Mark your calendar! November 5–7, 2010
2010_Spring_ISSUU
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2010_Spring_ISSUU
2010_Spring_ISSUU
2010_Spring_ISSUU
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2010_Spring_ISSUU
2010_Spring_ISSUU
2010_Spring_ISSUU
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2010_Spring_ISSUU

  • 1. Spring 2010 “Of course, we came. We could not think of missing it!” Homecoming ’09 Celebrating the 100th Anniversary
  • 2. Southwestern University’s Core Purpose Fostering a liberal arts community whose values and actions encourage contributions toward the well-being of humanity. Southwestern University’s Core Values Cultivating academic excellence. Promoting lifelong learning and a passion for intellectual and personal growth. Fostering diverse perspectives. Being true to oneself and others. Respecting the worth and dignity of persons. Encouraging activism in the pursuit of justice and the common good. Southwestern University’s recruiting of students, awarding of financial aid, and operation of programs and facilities are without regard to sex, race, color, religion, age, physical handicap, national or ethnic origin, or any other impermissible factor. The University’s commitment to equal opportunity includes nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Board of Trustees *Ex-Officio Southwestern is published semiannually by the Office of Institutional Advancement. Bulk rate postage paid at Austin, Texas. Merriman Morton ’63, Austin, Chair Helen E. Black McAllister ’49, San Antonio, Co-Vice Chair Larry J. Haynes ’72, Coppell, Co-Vice Chair R. Griffin Lord, Belton, Secretary-Treasurer Martin Aleman Jr. ’68, Austin L. James Bankston ’70, Houston Lisa Barrentine, Allen Douglas M. Benold ’44, Georgetown W. Earl Bledsoe*, Plano Bobby Smith Cohn, Houston W. Mark Craig, Dallas Roy H. Cullen, Houston John S. Curry ’70, Pampa James E. Dorff*, San Antonio Robert W. Dupuy ’69, Dallas Thomas A. Forbes ’71, Austin James W. Foster ’72, Houston Jack Garey, Georgetown Roberto L. Gómez ’69, Mission Robert H. Graham, Houston Kay Granger, Fort Worth Ronald D. Henderson, Plano C. Preston Hollis ’09, Austin Janice Riggle Huie*, Houston Robert W. Karr ’71, St. Louis, Mo. Bart C. Koontz ’78, San Antonio J. Michael Lowry*, Fort Worth Red McCombs ’49, San Antonio Michael McKee, Hurst J. Eric McKinney ’72, Georgetown David J. McNitzky ’77, San Antonio Laura A. Merrill ’84, Wimberley Charles R. Millikan ’68, Pearland Barbara Prats Neely ’77, Fort Worth Ernesto Nieto ’64, Kyle Steven A. Raben ’63*, Houston Robert T. Rork ’62, San Antonio Jake B. Schrum ’68*, Georgetown Robert C. Scott, San Antonio Peter A. Sessions ’78, Dallas Namiqa A. Shipman, Big Spring H. Blake Stanford ’81, Austin Stephen G. Tipps, Houston Donald W. Underwood ’70, Plano James V. Walzel, Houston D. Max Whitfield*, Albuquerque, N.M. Doak M. Worley IV ’08, Fort Worth Robert D. Wunsch, Austin   Spring 2010 Creative services Kristina Moore Writer/Editor Antonio Banda Graphic Designer Keely Doering Creative Services Coordinator magazine@southwestern.edu Alumni & Parent Relations Georgianne Hewett ’90 Associate Vice President for Alumni and Parent Relations JoAnn Lucero Associate Director of Alumni Relations Grace Josey Pyka ’05 Assistant Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Daniel Webb ’08 Assistant Director of Alumni Relations alumni@southwestern.edu parents@southwestern.edu University Relations Cindy Locke Associate Vice President for University Relations Ellen Davis Director of Communications John Kotarski ’93 Director of Web Development and Communication Meredith Barnhill Assistant Director of Web Development and Communication Chief Administrative Officers Jake B. Schrum ’68, President Richard L. Anderson, Vice President for Fiscal Affairs Gerald Brody, Vice President for Student Life James W. Hunt, Provost and Dean of the Faculty Beverly Jones, University Chaplain W. Joseph King ’93, Vice President for Innovation C. Richard McKelvey, Vice President for Institutional Advancement Thomas J. Oliver ’89, Vice President for Enrollment Services Francie Schroeder, Executive Assistant to the President Ronald L. Swain, Senior Advisor to the President for Strategic Planning and Assessment Telephone: (512) 863-6511 Alumni & Parent Relations: (800) 960-6363 Office of Admission: (800) 252-3166
  • 3. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 3 Spring 2010 And the winner is… The Fall 2009 issue of Southwestern (pictured left) recently received a Grand Gold Award—the highest award possible— from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) District IV. A big “Thank you!” to all contributors for your help in achieving this honor. In every issue 5 | President’s Message 13 | Kiosk 14 | On Campus 20 | Athletics 21 | Engaging Finds 30 | Academics in Focus 33 | Alumni News 35 | Class Notes 42 | Last Word Note: Content pertains to the 2009/2010 academic year. Features 6 | The S Factor: Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts Nine alumni share their entrepreneurial stories. 22 | There’s No Business Like Business for Don Parks Associate Professor of Business; Paideia® Professor; holder of the John Shearn Chair in Business Administration 25 | 2009 Homecoming Awards The Association of Southwestern University Alumni honors five. Fall 2009 In this issue: SENIOR STORIES P.13 “Live the life you want to live on your terms and with a good heart and clear conscience.” Commencement 2009 P.24 Fall preview: TOBIAS WOLFF P.26 + 35 22
  • 4. With your help we can bridge the gap. Your gifts enhance our ability to attract and retain students, as well as provide an exceptional undergraduate learning experience—a Southwestern Experience. Private philanthropy is as important to the University’s growth, improvement and competitiveness as capital investments are to any business venture. Thank you! Average Gifts per Enrolled Student* Fiscal Years 2004–2008 $6,570 $11,054Centre College Sewanee DePauw University Birmingham-Southern College Austin College Hendrix College Rhodes College Trinity University Southwestern Millsaps College Colorado College Oglethorpe University Every gift matters. Make a gift at www.southwestern.edu/makeagift or call 800-960-6363. *Calculated over a five-year period beginning in the 2003–2004 fiscal year by dividing the average annual total gifts received by the fall student enrollment headcount. Data was taken from the VSE reports published by The Council for Aid to Education. The schools included in the chart are members of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC).
  • 5. Entrepreneurship: Alive and Well at Southwestern In this issue of Southwestern, you will read examples of Southwestern University alumni who have become successful entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurship is thriving on campus as well. Southwestern’s small size makes it easy for students to start new organizations, and faculty members are more than happy to support them in these ventures. For example, as a junior, Sarah Gould ’10 started an organization called the Society of Young Women Leaders (SYWL) under the guidance of Suzy Pukys, Southwestern’s director of civic engagement. Gould wanted to do something to help young women in high school focus on their career goals and develop their leadership potential. The ultimate goal of the program is to make sure women have a presence as leaders, both in business and the community. Members of SYWL began by mentoring five students from Georgetown High School. The following academic year, they continued working with those students and added another six. In all, nearly 30 students are now involved in the program. SYWL isn’t the only group Gould has started at Southwestern. She also formed a Mock Trial Team (which made it to a national tournament in its second year), and helped revive the Brooks Prize Debate. Other students have been just as successful in launching new ventures that include everything from a dance team to a steel drum band to a Model UN program. The experience students gain by starting such initiatives on campus gives them the confidence they need to start new ventures after graduation. Although she came to Southwestern planning to attend law school, Gould now thinks she wants to start her own business. Over the past 10 years, students have had the opportunity to foster their entrepreneurial spirit with assistance from the King Creativity Fund, which was endowed and established in 2000 by a gift from W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93, to support the “innovative and visionary projects” of Southwestern students. Less interested in outcomes and artifacts than in the process, the program emphasizes that the joy is in the journey! While supporting one of Southwestern’s core values—fostering diverse perspectives—the Fund encour- ages students to take risks and ask questions. Southwestern faculty members are just as entrepreneurial, as evidenced by First-Year Seminars, which are designed to be engaging, while at the same time exposing students to important skills such as reading, writing, critical thinking, discussion and creativity. Each year, faculty members come up with interesting new seminars to engage students. This past fall, for example, Alison Marr, assistant professor of mathematics, taught a seminar titled “Wheels and Deals” that explored the world of television game shows. Marr, a long-time fan of game shows, says the idea for the class came from a famous math problem known as “The Monty Hall Problem,” based on the television game show “Let’s Make a Deal.” Elizabeth Green Musselman, associate professor and chair of the History Department, taught a seminar titled “Knitting: It’s Not Just for Grannies,” in which she combined her personal passion for knitting with a serious discussion of topics such as the history of women in the labor force and how mathemati- cians have used crochet to understand the geometry of hyperbolic planes. Faculty members are entrepreneurial off campus as well. Economics Professor Mary Young runs a ranch in Lexington, Texas, where she raises a rare breed of grass-fed cattle known as Irish Dexters. She says the experience of being a business owner has made her a much better professor of economics because she deals firsthand with topics such as supply and demand and profits and losses. Perhaps the best example of entrepreneurship at Southwestern is the Paideia® Program, which started as an idea from Provost Jim Hunt, and has since developed into a program that is unique among liberal arts colleges. Sarah Gould credits Paideia with giving her a passion for entre- preneurship because it showed her how to articulate ideas and passions into tangible programs. The bottom line is that the liberal arts environment is perfect preparation for entrepreneurship. After all, you don’t need to be a business major to become an entrepre- neur. You just need to have a good idea and the courage to pursue it. Jake B. Schrum ’68 President, Southwestern University President’s message
  • 6. Illustrations by Duncan Alexander ’09 acrylic on canvas
  • 7. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 7 Merriam-Webster defines “entrepreneur” as a noun, from the French word “entreprendre,” meaning “to undertake.” More specifically, “One who organizes, manages and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise.” But how does one explain “entrepreneurial spirit?” One possible definition comes from Steve Jobs, co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc., who has been noted to say, “I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.” You may immediately think of one of Southwestern’s most recognizable alumni entrepreneurs, Red McCombs ’49, founder of the Red McCombs Automotive Group, co-founder of Clear Channel Communications, former owner of the San Antonio Spurs, Denver Nuggets and Minnesota Vikings, member and former Chair of the Southwestern University Board of Trustees and the recipient of the 1990 Distinguished Alumnus Award, presented by The Association of Southwestern University Alumni. Southwestern would like to introduce you to some more entrepreneurs Southwestern University has helped to produce over the years—alumni who exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit that continues to thrive in the Southwestern commu- nity. Perhaps in reading their profiles, the entrepreneurial voice in your head will ask, “Why not?” The S Factor: Entrepreneurship in the Liberal Arts
  • 8. 8 Southwestern Magazine Counting Street Lights Joe Seeber ’63 Following the motto, “Work hard and you will get lucky,” Joe Seeber ’63 has done both. He started TriStem Ltd. to sell and service energy management systems for large buildings. Over time, the business evolved into an organization that audits electric bills for clients including school systems, cities, states and the federal government. Sometimes calling himself a “street light counter,” Seeber says his type of busi- ness is one of the few that prospers during a down economy because people are looking to save every nickel they find. On advice from mom: Something my mother always taught me was, “All you can do is all you can do.” Business ventures have ups and downs. Sometimes one does not know if it will work. Sometimes one doesn’t quite know the right thing to do. Mom’s advice has served me well. On his Southwestern story: I came to Southwestern behind the curve, so to speak. The kind of teaching and instruction I received was essential to earning my bachelor’s degree in business administration and to becoming the person I am today. Just as important to me, though, was the social aspect. The friends that “adopted” me then are still my best friends today—50 years later. On what inspires his work: To be successful, one must maintain a broad view of the world. To do that, one must go out and experience it. Travel teaches us how small we are, and how much we can become. To learn more about Seeber’s company, TriStem Ltd., visit www.tristem.com. An Uncluttered Life Lorie Kling Marrero ’90 As a sociology major at Southwestern, Lorie Kling Marrero ’90 didn’t know what she wanted to do when she grew up. But, she says her education gave her a breadth of understanding and knowledge that has come together in serendipitous ways. Having a liberal arts education, she says, has been an “incredible and unforeseen gift.” On what she did when she grew up: I became a profes- sional organizer; I took what I knew and put it online. My program, The Clutter Diet® , has helped thousands of people in nine countries organize their homes and their lives. On what entrepreneurs need to know: Believe in yourself and your ideas. If you’re not doing something that scares you, you’re probably not challenging yourself enough. Also, think big! As the famous quote by Marianne Williamson, author, activist and founder of The Peace Alliance, says, “Your playing small does not serve the world.” On what has influenced her thinking: Books. The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks helps you manage the fears and beliefs that hold you back—one of an entrepreneur’s greatest challenges. (See Page 21 for additional “summer reading” suggestions.) On an inspirational quote: A quote that inspires me (a la Bill Gates’ favorite Gatsby quote; Business Week, June 13, 2000), is by Dorothea Brande—“Act boldly and unseen forces will come to your aid.” Want to organize your home, office or life in general? Visit www.clutterdiet.com or pick up Marrero’s book, The Clutter Diet: The Skinny on Organizing Your Home and Taking Control of Your Life.
  • 9. Jack-of-All-Trades Derek Christian ’96 As an international studies and business major at Southwestern, Derek Christian ’96, learned to come out of his shell, thanks to his resident assistant, Jon Porter ’93, whose advice was, “there’s more to college than sitting in class.” Christian also learned that the love of learning would be important to his career. “An entrepreneur must be a jack-of-all-trades,” he says, “especially in the early years.” On his current business venture: I bought My Maid Service a couple of years ago when I left my sales and marketing job at Proctor & Gamble. We’ve since tripled our business in Cincinnati and have opened offices in Dayton, Ohio, and Dallas. I like service businesses because of the low capital requirements (the amount of money a business needs for normal operations) and because service businesses are a growing part of the economy. On if he had it to do over: I owned another business while at P&G—a dog daycare/boarding company—but decided I didn’t want to work nights, weekends and holidays anymore. I sold that business for the capital to acquire my current company. If I had it to do over again, I would have started My Maid Service sooner! On what entrepreneurs need to know: First, you have to be brutally honest about your strengths and weaknesses. Second, you must have an understanding of money and basic accounting—this is not an area you want to leave to someone else. To learn why Christian calls My Maid Service “the best residential and commercial cleaning service in town,” visit www.mymaidservice.net and click on “About Us.” Serial Entrepreneur W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93 Joey King ’93 has often been called a “serial entrepre- neur.” Having started no less than six companies, it’s a description that fits. Currently Vice President for Innovation at Southwestern and Executive Director of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), King is well-equipped to offer advice to new and future entrepreneurs. On his first start-up: I was in grad school when a friend and I developed “F-5”—a load balancer that managed virtual traffic at half the cost of super computers that were being used at that time. We had clients the likes of Tower Records, Time Warner, Mapquest and Yahoo. The company went public in June 1999. F5 Networks, Inc. (NASDAQ: FFIV) has since become the industry leader in network traffic management. On what makes an entrepreneur successful: Half do the same thing as someone else, but they do it better or cheaper or faster. The other half identify a need, license a product to meet that need and take it to market. Three important things to remember: don’t think you can’t, be willing to make sacrifices and keep in mind that many successful entrepreneurs have failed many times. On his vision for NITLE: Our goal is to grow our member- ship, fund new initiatives and make the organization fully sustainable within five years. Having our offices located on the Southwestern campus keeps us engaged with our clients, rather than theorizing about what they want or need. To learn more about King and about NITLE, visit www.nitle.org.
  • 10. 10 Southwestern Magazine Helping Houston Go Green Jeffrey Acker Kaplan ’01 Having been an entrepreneur since the age of eight—he had a chain of lemonade stands in southwest Houston—Jeff (Acker) Kaplan ’01 decided in 2008 that his goal was to start a socially responsible business, which led to the birth of his most recent venture. New Living, located in Houston, sells locally made products, non-toxic paint, sustainable flooring, carpet, countertops and custom cabinets, as well as organic mattresses and bedding, and non-toxic cleaning and baby products to home owners and professionals. On making it happen: I helped start three different businesses after graduating from Southwestern, but New Living is the first one that’s been my full-time job. I managed to get started on an incredibly tight budget. It’s amazing what you can get done when you have no other options. At the end of the day, I feel like I’ve gone from being 30 years old to 18 again; I’ve never been happier. On going green: Without any hesitation, I will tell you that Southwestern gave me a much stronger conscience for how I want to conduct business. New Living is a green building and home supply business. Our mission is to make the green building and green living movement more accessible and affordable. We measure our success on the social, environmental and economic impact we have on our community. Thinking of going green? Find out how to begin at www.newliving.net. Help a Child, Help a Family Eliette Cohen ’97 A double major in biology and kinesiology, Eliette Cohen ’97, is the founder of KidTherapy, a pediatric reha- bilitation center in South Austin, specializing in integrated therapeutic services for children and teenagers. A first generation American, Cohen says her parents, who moved to the U.S. from Argentina, always stressed the importance of education. “Like my parents, I learned to value the opportuni- ties that came my way, and I developed strength and courage by taking advantage of them,” she explains. On becoming an entrepreneur: I had never started a business before, but I learned about serving the community as a Southwestern student and member of APO (Alpha Phi Omega). I went into business blind, learning step by step as I went along. I’m still learning. On her mission: My mission, and that of KidTherapy, is to provide the highest quality integrated therapeutic services through individualized, compassionate and professional treat- ment. I work with 23 employees and independent contractors who agree that when we help a child, we help a family. On her inspiration: Outside the business world, children are what inspire me. They have a unique way of bringing light to those who surround them. I am so proud that I have created something that allows talented people to come together to help the children and families of Austin achieve their goals. For more information about KidTherapy, call 512-916-1511, e-mail info@kidtherapyaustin.com or visit www.kidtherapyaustin.com.
  • 11. Dill Pickle Popcorn? Nikki Dugas ’06 Nikki Dugas ’06 owns Cornucopia Popcorn Creations, a gourmet popcorn shop in Austin, with her best friend and business partner, Nadia Elhaj. Customers choose from 45 different flavored popcorns, including the best-selling dill pickle flavor. The duo recently added a biscuits and gravy flavor that Dugas says is “to die for!” On her top three pieces of advice: (1) Even if everyone thinks you’re crazy, you have to trust yourself. (2) You can do anything you want in this life, you just have to make it happen. (3) Don’t let your business run you. Most people start businesses in order to have the life they want—no boss, flex- ible schedule, etc.—always remember your original goal. On business and the economy: Previously, I owned a business called “Barbecuties,” selling brisket sandwiches out of a cart near UT in Austin. After a couple of years, I decided I needed to look for something different. Nadia was tired of the corporate world…so here we are. Did you know popcorn became popular during the Great Depression? Our business is thriving in this economy! On what inspires her: Psychology…that makes sense, right? (Dugas was a psychology major at Southwestern.) Two of my favorite books, The Medici Effect by Frans Johansson and The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, use a lot of psychological experiments to illustrate their points. How about a snack? To discover your favorite flavor, start by visiting www.austincornucopia.com. Finding Her Voice Yesenia Garcia ’03 After graduating from Southwestern with a degree in theatre and communication studies, Yesenia Garcia ’03 went on to earn a Master of Fine Arts degree in acting from The University of Texas at Austin. While spending the past eight years on the stage and in front of the camera (you may have seen her in episodes of “Friday Night Lights” or “Prison Break”), Garcia developed a growing interest in the production and marketing world behind the camera. On creating opportunities for herself: The decision to create my company, Echo Earth Media—a creative agency specializing in multi-media, high definition video production, Web design, image branding and marketing strategies— came after working for a film production company in New York. I realized that instead of waiting for others to give me opportunities to work, I could create them for myself. On Southwestern’s influence: At Southwestern, I learned how to present and defend my creative choices and to articulate myself in a professional, creative way. When I was awarded a theatre scholarship in 1999, it changed the course of my life! SU helped me to grow confident in creating my own work and allowing my passions to influence my path. On what entrepreneurs need to know: First, network! Business is built on relationships. Next, focus on what gives your company an edge—find a niche and go for it. And finally, never give up! Persistence is key. For me, these first few years in business have been about making mistakes and learning from them. For more information about Echo Earth Media, go to www.echoearthmedia.com. For Garcia’s acting resume and photos, see www.yesenia-garcia.com.
  • 12. 12 Southwestern Magazine Striving to Find Solutions Michael Maine ’07 Michael Maine ’07 began his entrepreneurial career as a high school student. As a business major at Southwestern, and after receiving the Wright Entrepreneurship Scholarship, he became a Mobile Electronics Certified Professional. He is currently a new business coordinator at Interlex, USA, a cause-related marketing/advertising firm. He is also working on more than one entrepreneurial venture, including Global Mind Frame, a global communication Web site. On the future of business: I think the future of busi- ness is knowledge-based. I learned through my courses at Southwestern that business doesn’t have to be only about the bottom line. There are real issues—and real solutions—out there. I want to find a way to harness the power of mass communication, new media and positive initiatives to foster positive change. On how Southwestern shaped him: I think everyone at Southwestern played a role in shaping who I am today—from my friends to the administration to Ms. Ella (a beloved Sodexo employee). Academically, Don Parks, associate professor of business, encouraged me to push myself and follow my heart, and Maria Lowe, professor of sociology, helped me step out of my comfort zone. On research and inspiration: I don’t really have a “go-to- guide,” but I am an avid reader and most everything I read gives me some sort of information or insight or inspiration. From technology blogs to science fiction novels that play into socioeconomic strata, I learn from all of it. See Page 21 for a “summer reading list” of your own. Creating… Duncan Alexander ’09 The challenge? Create painted portraits of the SU alumni featured in this issue of Southwestern. The artist for the job? Duncan Alexander ’09, a freelance designer and artist living in Austin. With a bachelor’s degree in studio art and an internship with Southwestern’s Creative Services Department under his belt, Alexander plans to apply to graduate schools in the fall. His hope is to become a self-employed artist (a.k.a. entrepreneur), following in the footsteps of his artistic heroes, Andy Warhol and Barbara Kruger. On creating the alumni portraits: I combined a portrait of the entrepreneur with elements repre- sentative of his or her business, drawing inspiration from painter Eric Fischl. Bringing all of it together on canvas was an exciting challenge, and I’m pleased with the results. (So are we!) On his artistic inspiration: Most of my inspiration comes from a fascination with technology, culture and nature. In my work, I try to find both the obvious and hidden variables in order to improve the impact of the message. To see more of Alexander’s original artwork, visit www.hypothete.blogspot.com.
  • 13. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 13 Kiosk Recent & Upcoming Events February 11–12The 32nd Brown Symposium “Imperium: The Art of Empire in Rome and America.” 26 Large Act Concert, featuring rapper and two-time Grammy award winner Common. March 3–7Urinetown, The Musical performed by Southwestern theatre students. 11Dedication of the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning and 11th annual Shilling Lecture, featuring internationally known epidemiologist Bill Foege. April 15King Creativity Fund 10th annual symposium and anniversary celebration. 16Steve Byrne—Comedian featured on NBC’s “The Tonight Show” and Comedy Central’s “Premium Blend.” May 8Southwestern University’s 166th Commencement ceremony. August 23First day of classes for all students. Visit www.southwestern.edu and click on the calendar link for a schedule of upcoming events. This new Kiosk, located near the entrance of the recently dedicated Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning (See Page 14.), displays posters and announcements for campus and local area events. PaigeCurtis
  • 14. 14 Southwestern Magazine Shaping Our Future: Approved Jake B. Schrum ’68, Southwestern President and Chair of the Commission on Strategic Planning and Action, is pleased to announce that the faculty, staff, University Council, Student Congress and Board of Trustees have approved “Shaping Our Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020.” Specifics of the Plan will be featured in the Fall 2010 issue of Southwestern. The Plan can be found at www.southwestern. edu/offices/planning/planning.php. Share your ideas at shareyourideas@ southwestern.edu. CarlosBarron’10 Decomposition is Exciting! Students for Environmental Activism and Knowledge (SEAK) is harnessing the power of nature and bringing it to campus in the form of compost- ing. Four self-aerating compost bins have been placed in several conve- nient locations around campus. To encourage involvement of the campus community, SEAK enlisted the SU Art Association to paint the containers. Pictured: Senior Tami Warner. 2,000 New Library Books Two noted historians and former Georgetown residents have donated more than 2,000 books on topics such as American history and the American West; the Civil War and Reconstruction; Texas; and environ- mental and historic preservation to Southwestern’s A. Frank Smith, Jr. Library Center. Robert Utley is the former chief historian for the National Park Service and has written 16 books on the American West. His wife, Melody Webb, is a former regional historian for the National Park Service. Utley used the Southwestern library extensively to do research for his book on the Texas Rangers, Lone Star Justice: The First Century of the Texas Rangers, published in 2002. Six New to Board of Trustees Six new members have joined the Southwestern Board of Trustees, including Rev. Jim Bankston ’70, Lisa Barrentine, Rev. David McNitzky ’77, H. Blake Stanford ’81 and Stephen Tipps, each nominated to four-year terms. Preston Hollis ’09 will serve a two-year term as a recent graduate selected by the student body. Bankston is the senior pastor at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Houston. Barrentine is the president of First Preston Management, Inc. in Addison. McNitzky is the senior pastor at Alamo Heights United Methodist Church in San Antonio. Stanford is the founder and president/chairman of the board of Southwest Human Development Services, Inc. in Austin. Tipps is a partner with Baker Botts L.L.P. in Houston. $100 Million Milestone Thinking Ahead: The Southwestern Campaign has received more than $100 million in gifts and pledges. Launched in 2002, the campaign’s goal is $125 million to fund priorities in the University’s 2010 Strategic Plan, includ- ing four broad initiatives—support- ing students, supporting faculty, diversity enrichment and enhancing the living-learning environment on campus. This is the first time in the University’s history that a campaign has raised more than $100 million. “It is a compliment to this University, our faculty and students, that our alumni, parents and friends would contribute such resources to help us accomplish our mission,” says President Jake B. Schrum ’68. “Your generosity is espe- cially meaningful when we consider the economic challenges our nation and the world experienced during the past seven years.” Funds raised to date have enabled Southwestern to: Add 18 tenure-track• faculty positions. Launch the• Paideia® Program, which promotes connections between academic courses, offers intercultural and diversity experiences, encourages civic engagement, and supports collaborative or guided research and creative works. Create the Office of• Civic Engagement. Expand scholarship programs.• Construct several new buildings,• including the Dorothy Manning Lord Student Residential Center, the Wilhelmina Cullen Admission Center and the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning. Renovate additional buildings: the• Fine Arts Center, Herman Brown Hall and Moody-Shearn Hall. Thinking Ahead: The Southwestern Campaign was scheduled to end on Dec. 31, 2010, but the University is planning to launch Phase II of the campaign this fall to cover additional priorities that have been identified through Shaping Our Future: The Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020. For more informa- tion, visit www.southwestern.edu/ thinkingahead/campaign.php. To learn more about the Strategic Plan, visit www.southwestern.edu/offices/ planning/beyond2010. On campus
  • 15. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 15 Black and Gold Goes Green Prompted by Southwestern students determined to set an example of environmental responsibility, in January of this year the University signed an agreement with the City of Georgetown that will enable wind power to meet Southwestern’s electric needs over the next 18 years. The agreement makes Southwestern the first university in Texas and one of fewer than 20 universities in the country— according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency—to have procured 100 percent “green” power for its electric needs­. The initial contract is for five years and is renewable through 2028. President Jake B. Schrum ’68 said the agreement will help Southwestern move toward its long-term goal of being carbon neutral, which it agreed to strive toward when Schrum signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) in February 2009. The ACUPCC formally commits campuses to eliminating greenhouse gas emissions over time and to educating students about climate neutrality. “Since Southwestern students visited with city representa- tives about renewable energy last year, both the city and Southwestern have worked diligently to bring this agreement to reality,” Schrum says. “We hope Southwestern will be an inspiration to other universities to advance sustainability.” Fraternity Turns Up the Heat The Phi Delta Theta fraternity has installed an 8×10 solar panel on the roof of its house as part of a system that enables the house to use solar energy to heat some of its water. The system was installed by Jeff Bendall ’00, a former Phi Delt active who now works for a solar energy company in Austin. The system has three components. The most obvious is the solar collector, which consists of 30 tubes that heat a combination of distilled water and propylene glycol. The heated liquid flows down to a solar storage tank where heat exchange coils pre-heat water, which is then delivered to a 120-gallon hot water heater. Bendall estimates that the system should reduce the amount of energy required to heat water by an average of 70 percent a year, and should pay for itself in 12 years. KCF10 2010 marks the 10th anniversary of the King Creativity Fund, established in 2000 with an endowment provided by W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93. Each year, the endowment supports up to 20 “innovative and visionary projects” proposed by Southwestern students. Among the projects funded this year were a new musical group on campus, a new biomedical instrument and a video documenting the threats imposed by exotic species in Florida and Texas. Students presented their projects at a symposium on April 15. In its 10-year history, the program has funded a total of 125 projects. To learn more about the program visit w w w.southwestern.edu/ kingcreativity. AmericanElectricPowerCo.
  • 16. 16 Southwestern Magazine Dedication of Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning On March 11, it was 70 degrees and sunny with a light breeze blowing across campus, as President Jake B. Schrum ’68—along with donors, alumni, faculty, students, staff and friends—dedicated the new Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Center for Lifelong Learning. The Prothro Center is a three-story, 40,000-square foot building and the last to be added to the Roy H. Cullen Academic Mall. Its campus placement creates a bridge between the residential living centers on the east side of campus and the academic facilities. Consolidating many functions of student life and provid- ing the campus community with additional classrooms and conference rooms, the Prothro Center is now home to the: Priddy Charitable Trust Center for Paideia® ; M.D. Anderson Center for Intercultural Learning; Office of Civic Engagement; Cross Cultural Center; Grogan Lord Center for Academic Success; Office of Career Services; Alkek Center for Counseling and Health Services; Senior University, Georgetown; and Information Technology Services. It also features the Fondren Conference/Seminar Suite, the Dorothy Perry White Atrium and the Mabee Lobby. Constructed with gifts from donors, not tuition dollars, the building is the second on campus designed with Southwestern’s commitment to sustainability in mind. Georgetown Welcomes Music of Aaron Copland The 2010 Festival of the Arts, to be held June 3–6 in Georgetown, will feature the music of American composer Aaron Copland. Highlights of the 2010 festival include a choral concert featuring soloists Virginia Dupuy ’71 and Bruce Cain, associate professor of music, and a Sunday morning piano duo by Pam Gregory Rossman ’72 and Eve Porter Fariss ’60 at First United Methodist Church. Other weekend performances will feature several Southwestern University faculty members. This is the sixth year of the festival—started by Professor Emeritus F. Ellsworth Peterson ’55—which attracts audi- ences and musical attention from beyond Central Texas, along with local music enthusiasts and invited lecturers and soloists, creating four full days and evenings of events. Megan McCarty ’09 is serving as administrative assistant for the festival this year, and Senior Paloma Mayorga created the Copland image that is being used on festival posters, bookmarks and programs. Visit www.gtownfestival.org, for more information on the festival.
  • 17. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 17 FACULTY NEWS Five New Faculty Members Reginald Byron has joined the Sociology and Anthropology Department as an assistant professor of sociology. His research focuses on workplace inequality and discrimination. Patrick Hajovsky holds a new position in Latin American art history that Southwestern was able to fund initially with a $200,000 grant from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations. Hajovsky specializes in pre-Columbian and colonial-period art of Latin America. Molly Jensen and Kenneth Mello have joined the Department of Religion and Philosophy as assistant profes- sors of religion. Jensen’s research focuses on religion and society and Mello’s research focuses on native traditions of North America. Dustin Tahmahkera’s research focuses on represen- tations of native peoples in television, film and music. He joins Southwestern as an assistant professor of communication studies. Conducting Biomedical Research at SU Lynn Guziec, assistant professor of chemistry, will receive more than $200,000 over two years to work with a colleague at The University of Texas at Austin on a project that could enable physicians to detect diseases earlier and more easily than current methods. Guziec and Jennifer Brodbelt, a professor of chemistry at UT, developed a new technique to detect biomarkers, which are small molecules that are characteristic of certain diseases. For example, an amino acid known as sarcosine is characteristic of prostate cancer. “These biomarkers have been known to exist for a long time, but researchers have never developed methods that would allow physicians to detect them easily or quickly,” Guziec says. They will research the idea of preparing special compounds to trap the biomarkers and using a mass spectrometer to detect them. Specifically, Guziec will design and synthe- size the compounds that can trap the biomarkers. Such compounds have never been made before. Guziec’s husband, Frank Guziec, a professor of chemistry at Southwestern, will assist with making the compounds. The grant was part of the federal government’s economic stimulus program. The National Institutes of Health put out a call for research proposals that were “of high risk, but that would yield high benefits.” Only 1 percent of the record 20,000 proposals submitted were funded. Guziec says, “Receiving the grant allows us to allocate funds that would normally support our research projects to Capstone students instead. In essence, we now have the funds to support three Southwestern chemistry work- study students’ individual research projects, unrelated to the grant.” Inspiring Others Through Research Maria Cuevas, associate professor of biology, and Maria Todd, associate professor of biology, have received a grant from the National Science Foundation that will enable them to purchase several key pieces of equipment to help further their research on a membrane protein known as claudin-3. “Students who participate in our research projects will learn both cellular and molecular biology techniques,” Todd says. “And, the new equipment will provide oppor- tunities for students to use state-of-the-art equipment not typically found in undergraduate programs. Both laboratory research skills and experience with instrument utilization will make Southwestern students more competitive when applying to the graduate schools of nationally recognized institutions.” Cuevas and Todd are focusing their research on the func- tion of human claudin-3 in breast cells. By manipulating the cellular levels of claudin-3 protein with small interference RNA (siRNA), they hope to determine its role in critical processes such as cell motility (migration), invasion and signaling. Rebecca Sheller, associate professor of biology, is assisting with the research. The Breast Cancer Resource Centers of Texas have presented Cuevas, Todd and Sheller with its first “Inspiring Hope” award for their research. Part of the “Inspiring Hope” initiative is to point out how women are inspiring and teaching others. New faculty members pictured left to right are Dustin Tahmahkera, Kenneth Mello, Reggie Byron and Patrick Hajovsky. Not pictured: Molly Jensen. Faculty NEWS LucasAdams
  • 18. 18 Southwestern Magazine Southwestern Theatre in Eastern Europe ‘Durang, Durang’ premiers in Bulgaria Rick Roemer, chair and artistic director of the Theatre Department, and Desi Roybal, associate professor of theatre and resident scenic designer, spent their sabbaticals last fall helping the Rhodopi Drama Theatre produce the Bulgarian premiere of “Durang, Durang” by Tony Award-winning play- wright Christopher Durang. Roemer directed the play and Roybal designed the set. Despite the fact that most of the Bulgarian cast and crew did not speak English, Roemer said everyone involved in the production was able to communicate effectively through looks and gestures. “After a while we knew what we were all thinking,” Roemer says. “Creativity is a universal language…” Roemer said the experience also taught him that it does not take a lot of money to produce good theatre. “We were able to produce exciting, quality theatre with ingenuity, little money, passion and sweat.” ‘Angels in America’ arrives in Macedonia A group of Southwestern theatre professors and students spent their winter break helping to bring the Tony Award- winning play “Angels in America” to the country of Macedonia—one of the first times it was performed for audi- ences in Eastern Europe. Jared J. Stein, visiting assistant professor of theatre, directed the play. Sergio Costola, associate professor of theatre, served as dramaturg, and Desi Roybal, associate professor of theatre and resident scenic designer, designed the set. Becca Plunkett, junior, served as assistant director; Kinsey Keck, senior, served as costume and acting intern; and Tyler King, junior, served as set and dramaturg intern. Upon the group’s return to Southwestern, Stein remarked, “The collaboration with the Skopje Dramski Theatre was an extraordinarily intense six weeks. We had to contin- uously find linguistic, societal and personal parallels for a play that, in many ways, uses 1980s American political culture as its theatrical language to achieve the wonderfully impossible—dramatically, aesthetically and emotionally. Amidst the simplistic fanfare of staging the premier of the play in Macedonia, the pursuit of the universal was the proj- ect’s obsession and highest responsibility.” Tony Kushner’s “Angels in America” deals with AIDS and many other aspects of America in the 1980s. Discrimination in Affordable Housing? Professor of Economics Dirk Early will help the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) determine whether minorities face additional barriers when trying to rent affordable housing in neighborhoods that are perceived as more desirable. “This is an area I have wanted to study for a while,” Early says. “I’ve always been curious about how housing markets work and the interplay with discrimination.” He adds that research projects such as these are of interest to his students because they show the practical implications of economic theory and empirical models. Early’s research focuses on HUD’s Housing Choice Voucher program and will enable him to study the subject of discrimi- nation against minorities trying to rent in certain areas. He has developed a method that will enable him to quan- tify the difference in rents between minority and majority households and to determine whether these differences are influenced by the racial/ethnic composition or the poverty level of the neighborhood, and/or the tightness of the housing market. Southwestern R.O.C.K. Partnership At the Ride On Center for Kids (R.O.C.K.) in Georgetown, families and staff members say “miracles happen every day” when children and adults with disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), are given the opportunity to ride horses. Thanks to a new partnership between R.O.C.K. and Southwestern, this claim can be backed up by quantitative research provided by three psychology Capstone students and Jacquie Muir-Broaddus, professor of psychology. Their research quantifies changes in the behavioral, cognitive and linguistic functioning of children with ASD after equine therapy sessions at R.O.C.K. Two students in a kinesiology Capstone class taught by Scott McLean, associate professor of kinesiology, began track- ing physiological changes (specifically, postural balance) in the same children. “Hippotherapy seems to have a calming effect on children with ASD, but (so far) this is all anecdotal,” McLean says. He adds that the partnership is a “natural connection” since many kinesiology majors plan to go into physical therapy. Muir-Broaddus says the partnership gives her students the opportunity to see what real clinical research is like. Many Southwestern students, staff and faculty members have been involved with the organization as volunteers since it was founded in 1998. Two former Southwestern administra- tors, George and Barbara Brightwell, donated the land where R.O.C.K. is located a mile and a half from campus.
  • 19. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 19 Research Down Under It’s not uncommon for Southwestern students to conduct research with their professors, but few get the opportu- nity to do so in Australia, as Morgan Mingle, a junior animal behavior major, did last summer. Mingle worked with Jesse Purdy, a psychology professor who special- izes in aquatic animal behavior, on a project at the National Marine Science Centre, located in Coffs Harbour, on the east coast of Australia, 400 miles north of Sydney. The centre is affiliated with Southern Cross University. Purdy and Mingle worked with mulloway, Argysomus hololepidotus, a fish species with high commercial potential because it reproduces easily and adapts well in captivity, grows up to two meters long and can weigh more than 200 pounds. Mulloway also are highly prized in the sport fishing industry. Purdy and Mingle determined whether hatchery-raised mulloway could learn about different predators and whether an attack was immi- nent, and studied whether or not the response was appropriate to the preda- tor. They also compared anti-predatory behaviors with those of mulloway caught in the wild. Mingle spent the last month of the summer on her own, doing a research project at the Pet Porpoise Pool, a marine animal park in Coffs Harbour. Because one of the dolphins at the facility was pregnant, Mingle helped develop a study that would examine how vocalizations in a group of dolphins change before and after a baby is born. She brought back more than 30 hours of recordings to analyze. In December, Mingle and fellow animal behavior major, junior Stephanie Henderson, went back to Pet Porpoise Pool for four weeks. They were able to fund the trip through a 2009/2010 King Creativity grant. See www.southwestern.edu/ kingcreativity. In Pursuit of a Teaching Career Senior Samantha Lingamfelter was one of three students selected statewide to receive a schol- arship from the Texas Association of School Personnel A d m i n i s t r a t o r s (TASPA) for the 2009/2010 school year. The scholarship honors the best teacher candidates in the state. This is the 10th year in a row that a student in Southwestern’s Teacher Certification Program has received a TASPA scholarship. Lingamfelter hopes to teach high school math, and eventu- ally Spanish as well. Southwestern Welcomes Rwandan Students Southwestern welcomed two students from Rwanda last fall as part of a program designed to help rebuild their country. Rwanda suffered extensively during the 1990s as a result of genocide and civil war. Between 800,000 and 1 million Rwandans died, includ- ing most of its educated citizens. Three years ago, the president of Hendrix College in Conway, Ark., started a program to bring students from Rwanda to the United States. There are now 52 students partici- pating at colleges and universities across the country. Yvette Niyomugaba and Jean Pierre Murenzi are the two students who enrolled at Southwestern. Both are studying computer science, which they hope will aid their coun- try’s technological development. After gradu- ation, the students have agreed to work in Rwanda for at least five years. “I am glad I am a student at Southwestern, and I am sure it will be a benefit to my country,” Murenzi says. Before arriving at Southwestern, Niyomugaba and Murenzi spent a month at the University of Arkansas undergoing intensive English train- ing. Both speak Kinyarwanda, the national language of Rwanda, and were educated in French. They say learning “American” English has been a challenge. “I learned English in high school from Ugandan and Kenyan teachers,” Niyomugaba says. “Their accents were close to British accents, which are very different from American accents. I like to learn foreign languages, though, and I would like to learn Spanish before I leave Texas.” Niyomugaba also says that coming to the United States fulfilled a big dream for her. “I love Rwanda, but I’m very glad I’m studying here and I think that by the time I graduate, I will have the skills that will enable me to make my life a success.” STUDENT NEWS The Megaphone Gets a Mega-Upgrade The 2009/2010 academic year brought a new look to Southwestern’s student- run newspaper, The Megaphone. The new tabloid format of the weekly paper is enhanced by the organiza- tion’s new and improved Web site: http://megaphone.southwestern.edu, which features video links, blog posts, Twitter comments and more. CarlosBarron’10 DesignbyCarlosBarron’10
  • 20. 20 Southwestern Magazine Scoreboard 2009/2010 ATHLETICS Gear Up…Pirate Style. The Athletics Department has launched a new online storefront where you can purchase polos, dri-fit shirts, jackets and hats with Southwestern’s logo! Up to 35 percent of each sale will be donated back to SU Athletics when you do your online shopping at www.southwesternpirates.com and click on the “Save Some BUCS, Shop Here” button. All Hands on Deck! The Pirate Crew wants YOU…to be a part of the action as a member of the Athletics Department booster club. Show your support for Pirate student- athletes as they commit themselves to excellence in the classroom and athletic competition. Financial contributions positively influence student-athletes’ opportunities and Southwestern Experiences. Pirate Crew members receive a monthly e-mail update from the Athletic Department, including player and coach insights, as well as behind-the-scenes information about programs, coaches and student-athletes. Additional benefits include invitations to special Pirate Crew events, such as tailgates and receptions before or after selected home contests. As a bonus, inaugural year members will receive a commemorative t-shirt. volleyball: The Southwestern women’s volleyball team finished its season undefeated in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC), with an overall record of 32-4. The team also won the conference tourna- ment, extending its win streak to 30 and making it an automatic qualifier for the national tournament. The team participated in the NCAA tournament for the fifth year in a row, and was this year’s tournament host. Head Coach Hannah Long was named SCAC and American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) South Region Coach of the Year. Senior Audra Gentry was named SCAC Player of the Year and Senior Sam Lingamfelter was named SCAC Backrow Player of the Year. Gentry and Lingamfelter, and sophomores Lindsay Thompson and Christina Nicholls were named to the AVCA All-South Region First Team. Gentry also received All American Second Team honors; Lingamfelter, All American Third Team; and Nicholls and Lingamfelter, All American Honorable Mentions. The SCAC All-Sportsmanship Award went to Senior Ali Zein-Eldin. men’s basketball: Senior Anthony “AC” Cox was named the Tex Kassen Male Athlete of the Year for 2008–2009. He was honored at a basketball game this spring. women’s gol f : The 2008–09 Southwestern women’s golf team placed second in the country on the National Golf Coaches Association list of women’s intercollegiate golf programs with the highest collective GPA for the season. Southwestern’s team had a GPA of 3.756 for the year. In addition, Marisa Mauldin ’09 was named the Carla Lowry Female Athlete of the Year for 2008–2009. She was honored at a basketball game this spring. lacrosse: The men’s varsity lacrosse team kicked off its 2010 season on March 13, with a game at home against Trine University, Angola, Ind. women’s soccer: SU women finished the season with a 10-8-1 record, winning five of nine home games. Senior A.J. Andreola was named to the NSCAA All-West Region Second Team as well as the All-SCAC Second Team, while junior Amy Douglas and sophomore Maria Pollifrone received All-SCAC Third Team nominations. Senior Laura Kromann was named to the All-Sportsmanship Team. men’s cross country: Junior Daniel Rudd received SCAC All-Sportsmanship Team honors. women’s cross country: Senior, Tami Warner received South/Southeast All-Region honors, and junior Lili McEntire was named to the SCAC All-Sportsmanship Team. DaveJohnson
  • 21. ENGAGING FINDS Global Mind Change: The Promise of the 21st Century By Willis Harman www.intuition.org/txt/harman2s.htm “Willis Harman’s Global Mind Change calls into question the operating assump- tions on which our current economy and consumer-oriented behaviors rest. He opens minds by questioning our current paradigm and introduc- ing alternatives. Each year, after reading the book, students in my Contemporary Issues in Global Business course have rich discussions about how they might create a world in which they most want to live.” ~Mary Grace Neville, associ- ate professor of business, Paideia® Professor Cradle to Cradle By William McDonough and Michael Braungart www.mcdonough.com/ cradle_to_cradle.htm “Cradle to Cradle is a must. It’s a real para- digm shift for sustainability and is probably one of the most groundbreaking books of the last decade.” ~Jeff Acker Kaplan ’01 Down and Out in Paris and London By George Orwell www.george-orwell.org/ Down_and_Out_in_Paris_and_London “Down and Out in Paris and London is a book about how success is perceived—for it’s view of a tramping lifestyle, class percep- tions and taking risks.” ~Joey King ’93 Greater than Yourself: The Ultimate Lesson of True Leadership By Steve Farber www.stevefarber.com “When I need to be reminded of why I chose to be a leader and not a follower I re-read Greater Than Yourself. ~Scarlett Foster-Moss ’86 Find more recommendations go to the Bonus Pages. The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company By David A. Price www.pixartouchbook.com “The Pixar Touch follows the people, tech- nology and market for computer animated films.” ~Don Parks, associate professor of business; Paideia® Professor; holder of the John Shearn Chair in Business Administration Future Shock By Alvin Toffler www.alvintoffler.net “Future Shock has probably influenced me more than any other book. It has proven to be brilliant over time. The thesis is that we cannot count on anything staying the same; everything will change with increas- ing rapidity as time passes. In the digital age, the idea is common knowledge, but in 1970, it was revolutionary and brilliant.” ~Joe Seeber ’68 “I read Future Shock and its sequel, The Third Wave, in high school. They had the most daring effect on me. I want to eventually encounter education and business systems with the same approach.” ~Yen-Hong Tran ’00 The Road to Serfdom By F. A. Hayek http://jim.com/hayek.htm “The Road to Serfdom is a landmark book written during World War II in which Hayek—later awarded the Nobel Prize in economics—warns the Western world about the threat of totalitarianism. The book is credited with reawakening free market thinking from the doldrums it had suffered in the wake of the Bolshevik take- over of Russia, the despair of the Great Depression and the carnage of World War II.” ~Fred Sellers, associate professor of business Rich Dad Poor Dad By Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter www.richdad.com “Rich Dad Poor Dad changed my perspective on having my own business.” ~Yesenia Garcia ’03 Summer Reading List A syllabus from Southwestern alumni and faculty.
  • 22. 22 Southwestern Magazine There’s No Bu Don Parks, Associate Professor of Business, Paideia® Professor and Holder of the John Shearn Chair in Business Administration Photography by Lance Holt, Holt Images
  • 23. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 23 For 16 years, Southwestern business students have integrated business and organization issues with research and writing, thanks to Don Parks and his Strategic Management Capstone, Foundations of Business (management, marketing and produc- tion/operations), Leadership Perspectives, Entrepreneurship and other courses. They have even completed in-depth studies of companies like Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream. Pass the scoop, please! “Personally,” says Parks, “it has been rewarding to identify and develop a liberal arts approach to business education, both within the structure of the business major and within the content of each course.” Corporate and social responsibility concerns permeate the business curriculum. Parks explains that to the extent liberal arts is about inte- grating one’s understanding of the world through multiple perspectives, business is a great lens, integrating many disci- plines, including: economics, psychology, math, sociology, political science and communication, among others. Business also integrates multiple levels of analysis, including individual, small groups (teams), large groups (departments), organiza- tions (business and others), and the business environment (customer, competitive, technological, societal, local, national and global). The focus of Parks’ teaching and research had been strategic management, which he says, “required me to explore a variety of relationships that impact an organization’s success and allowed me to put my fingers in a lot of different pies.” Bringing that knowledge to the Southwestern campus in 1994, Parks was able to teach a broad array of courses to the 22 students then majoring in business. In more recent years, the department has grown exponentially, with 120 or more business majors per year. “Increasing our faculty* has allowed us to further develop the program in the interest of the students,” he says. Liberal Arts + Business = Entrepreneurship One of the ways in which the business program at Southwestern has grown and developed is through the inclu- sion of the elements of entrepreneurship in its courses. “Entrepreneurship has many definitions,” says Parks. “To the extent that entrepreneurship is combining people, capital and other resources in unique ways, Southwestern’s liberal arts approach to business provides a great background for students who want to pursue entrepreneurial careers.” usiness Like… Business
  • 24. 24 Southwestern Magazine HomecomingAwards’09 Parks says that one of the benefits of a program like Southwestern’s is that students who choose to start their own business can and have succeeded. Examples of SU alumni who started their own busi- nesses are many. (See nine examples beginning on Page 6, including Joe Seeber ’63, who spoke to Parks’ Capstone class last semester.) Others, he says, have likely become “intrapreneurs” (entrepre- neurs inside organizations) and are perhaps even more prevalent. While most students have not specifically taken a course on entrepreneurship, Parks has taught one at Southwestern a number of times. Alumnus W. Joseph “Joey” King ’93 (See Page 9), and Parks have team-taught the course more than once, and Tom Forbes ’71, attorney and founding president of the Center of Child Protection in Austin, partici- pated in Parks’ courses several times as a business plan judge. Reflections on Life at Southwestern AsParkspreparestoretireattheendofthisacademic year, he reflects on his time at Southwestern—both personally and professionally. “I have been blessed to work with students and colleagues in the exploration of business as a liberal art, through theories, models and concepts, applied to many organizations—business, not-for-profit and others,” he says. Parks’ students say he is compassionate, warm- hearted, genuine and eager to help create new leaders. First-Year Student Lauren Lansford says, “Dr. Parks was my professor for my First-Year Seminar, titled Fantastical Leaders. He made sure we could make real life connections to the material and helped set us on a positive track from the beginning.” First- Year Student David Briner adds, “Dr. Parks teaches with zeal and knowledge and conveys the experience he has gained over the years.” “In the interest of building bright, moral, courageous leaders, we teach students to consider the ‘triple bottom line’—people, planet and profit.” Alumni agree. Marc Harrison ’03, founder of Global Encounters, an adventure travel company, says, “Don Parks helped shape me into the person I am today. He told me after the last day of my busi- ness Capstone course, ‘when you find something that you are truly passionate about, you’re going to move mountains.’” “Our business majors make us proud,” boasts Parks, adding that his advising and service commit- ments at Southwestern have been rewarding as well. “My experience and scholarship have enabled me to help students explore opportunities that will help them be competitive in their chosen careers.” Looking back, Parks says, “I would not trade the experiences and opportunities I’ve had at Southwestern over the years. I’m thankful to all who shared their lives with me.” Beginning with his retirement in May, Parks plans to catch up on those things that have been put aside until “one of these days.” He says, “‘One of these days’ is getting closer. I’ll miss the relationships here, but I look forward to what lies ahead.” * Made possible in part through the support of donors via Thinking Ahead: The Southwestern Campaign. Social Entrepreneurship Starts on Campus “A social entrepreneur is someone who recog- nizes a social problem and uses entrepreneur- ial principles to organize, create and manage a venture in order to make social change,” says Don Parks, associate professor of business at Southwestern. One of the most widely recognized social entre- preneurs was Mother Teresa, founder of the Missionaries of Charity. Identifying and solving large-scale social prob- lems requires committed people who have the vision and determination to persist in the face of sometimes daunting odds. Parks says many Southwestern alumni fit this bill. “The typical SU graduate wants to make the world a better place.” Why? Because Southwestern offers students the opportunity to develop social entrepreneurship abilities through numerous courses and service projects. “For example,” Parks says, “several of my business Capstone classes and one of my Paideia cohorts worked with The Caring Place of Georgetown to help explore and develop plans to increase services provided to the needy of Williamson County.”
  • 25. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 25 The Highest Honor The Distinguished Alumna/us Award is the highest honor awarded by The Association of Southwestern University Alumni. Recipients exemplify the qualities of excellence as taught and represented by Southwestern. Known for being a servant to others and never concerned with earning recognition, Dr. Douglas Benold ’44, has served the Georgetown and Southwestern University commu- nities for the vast majority of his life. Graduating from Georgetown High School in 1940, Benold attended Southwestern as his father before him had, but left in 1943 to serve in World War II. Upon his return, he completed a biology degree at Southwestern. He went on to graduate third in his class from Baylor College of Medicine, marry his college sweetheart, Nell Barnes ’48, and return to Georgetown to practice medicine. During 56 years of practicing medicine in Georgetown, Benold helped establish the Georgetown Hospital and Clinic and even made house calls to elderly and homebound patients long after others were no longer willing to do so. In 2003, he and other citizens concerned about quality health care for the uninsured, added the Georgetown Community Clinic—now Lone Star Circle of Care—to the community. It was more than five decades of practicing medicine that Benold considers his greatest professional achievement; however, he says, “The most significant achievement of my life was—with the help of my wife, Nell—raising our four fine children.” Also dedicated to Georgetown and its citizens, Benold helped achieve school integration in the 1960s. When the Douglas Benold Middle School was dedicated in his honor in 1999, Benold affirmed, “I’ve always thought providing education for our children is the most important thing we as a community can do.” A Quiet but Powerful Force In 1974, Benold, along with the Williamson County commis- sioners, organized the first Williamson County Emergency Medical Service, earning him the Citizen of the Year award from the Chamber of Commerce. Benold has also received the Service Above Self award from the Georgetown Rotary Club and the Citation of Merit from The Association of Southwestern University Alumni. In January 2009, he received the Martha Diaz Hurtado College Town Award from Southwestern for his efforts to enhance the “college town” environment. University President Jake B. Schrum ’68 has said, “In a quiet but determined way, Doug Benold has been a powerful force for the betterment of Georgetown…[and is] someone who doesn’t trumpet his own accomplishments…” 2009 Young Alumna Achievement Award recipient, Megan Schubert Leese ’01, agrees. “Dr. Benold and I were both on a Destination: Service trip to Honduras in the spring of 2000,” she says. “He worked so hard, sun up to sun down, never losing sight of the goal to serve as many people as possible…he listened to their life stories…and treated them all with respect.” Although Benold retired from medicine in 2006, he remains active and continues to serve on the Southwestern University Board of Trustees, the Wesleyan Homes Board and the Georgetown Healthcare Foundation. Upon receiving the Distinguished Alumnus Award from The Association of Southwestern University Alumni, Benold said, “For more than a century, Southwestern has meant so much to my family, and I believe in the role the University plays in bettering the life of our city, our state and the world by producing educated and well-motivated graduates.” In the Spirit of Service Dr. Douglas Benold Distinguished Alumnus
  • 26. 26 Southwestern Magazine Exceptional Service The Citation of Merit is awarded to a former Southwestern University student who has performed exceptional civic and/or professional services in a given geographic area or field of endeavor. Recipients represent the highest stan- dards of Southwestern’s commitment to values-centered curriculum and development of the whole person. Dr. Lawrence Stanberry ’70 is the Reuben S. Carpentier Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, and Pediatrician-in-Chief of Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, where he oversees a 500-member department and directs patient care, research and educational initiatives. “I’ve never been reluctant to try things. Southwestern is a place that gives students permission to explore...” Stanberry is also an internationally recognized authority on infectious diseases, the author of more than 200 scientific articles and the editor of several textbooks. He has served on numerous review panels and advisory boards, including the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. After receiving a bachelor of science degree in chem- istry from Southwestern, Stanberry went on to earn both his medical degree and a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Illinois at Chicago. His postgraduate medical training was in pediatrics, infectious diseases and virology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and the University of Utah. “I gained much from each of the institutions I attended, but I feel the most fondly about Southwestern,” he says. While Stanberry’s professional accomplishments speak for themselves, and colleagues refer to him as “accomplished clinician-scientist” and “physician par excellence,” friends concur that he is a “sterling individual” above all. Stanberry says he’s been fortunate to have had opportuni- ties to make contributions in the areas of education, patient care and research discoveries, but says, “It’s not about me.” He credits the researchers who blazed the trail before him and the colleagues who have worked alongside him. Friends describe Stanberry as smart, humorous, warm and insightful, and remark that his scientific contributions have always been made with a sense of humility and consideration for the bigger picture. A Leader in Action Stanberry’s passion for education goes beyond science and medicine—he translates his experience and discoveries into clinical care. In fact, his vaccine research has had a global impact on improving lives, and has important implications for the development of vaccines that may protect humans against sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. It has been Stanberry’s warmth and compassion that has had a personal impact on those around him, who say he is sensitive to seemingly inconsequential things that can have a huge impact…small things like warming his stethoscope before examining a child. Stanberry has been married for 40 years and has two grown children, one of whom, Martin, followed in his father’s footsteps, graduating from Southwestern in 2008. Global Mind, Local Heart Dr. Lawrence Stanberry Citation of Merit
  • 27. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 27 Setting a Standard The Young Alumna/us Achievement Award is presented to former Southwestern students who have graduated in the last 10 years and whose achievements in the civic and/or professional realm set a standard of excellence. Recipients represent Southwestern’s finest young alumni and the University’s commitment to a values-centered curriculum and development of the whole person. According to family and friends, Megan Schubert Leese ’01, has only just started to impact the well-being of humanity. It all began when Leese was a student at Southwestern, majoring in biology and Spanish, and she traveled with Destination: Service on a medical mission trip to Honduras. That’s where she learned what it really means to have nothing. She was inspired on the trip by Southwestern alumnus Douglas Benold ’44, who accompanied the group. “The whole trip inspired me,” Leese says. “It showed me that there are many ways to contribute to the health of a person and a society. Dr. Benold showed me that you can be both efficient and compassionate while working with under-served populations.” Of her time on campus, Leese says, “Southwestern gave me a great introduction to good teaching through knowl- edgeable and approachable professors…I was well prepared for grad school.” After graduating in 2001, Leese became an AmeriCorps Volunteer with Hudson River Health Care in New York, where she served in a migrant medical clinic as an interpreter and community educator. Through a Lens of Compassion Friends and family say Leese has always looked at every- one—rich or poor, educated or uneducated—as individuals, and with a compassionate eye. As a volunteer, Leese created the Migrant Diabetes Education Initiative, which today provides education and care for 150 diabetic farm workers. For her work, she received the AmeriCorps Volunteer of the Year Award in 2002, before accepting the position of Manager of Migrant Health Promotion with Hudson River Health Care. “My greatest accomplishment, both personally and professionally, has been fostering independence and developing the ability to do things on my own terms.” At the same time, Leese was also working on a master’s degree in public health at Columbia University, which she earned in 2007. She then became the Supervisor of Managed Care for New York Presbyterian Hospital. A former colleague says that Leese is a shining light of energy, optimism and compassion…a true advocate for the under-served. Her sister explains, “Things always work out for Megan, not because she’s lucky, but because she works hard to make them happen…she reaches everyone she meets.” It was for her dedication and concern for the less fortunate, her commitment to providing quality health care to those in need, and her positive attitude and love of life, that Leese received the 2009 Young Alumna Achievement Award. Advocate for the Under Served Megan Schubert Leese Young Alumna Achievement Award
  • 28. 28 Southwestern Magazine Doing It All The Mr./Ms. Homecoming Award is an honor bestowed upon a member of the Southwestern University faculty as a token of the affection and respect of former students. The award carries special meaning to the recipient, as it symbolizes the strength of the University: the strong, personal relationships between students and faculty, clearly indicating that alumni recall with appreciation the contributions of the recipient to the students’ educa- tion and development. In the 30 years that she has been a member of Southwestern’s fine arts and women’s studies faculty, students have admired Mary Hale Visser’s ability to “do it all” as a dedicated and hard working professor, mother, artist, activist and friend. “I strive to provide knowledge and skills that promote individual appreciation and understanding of art as a discipline and its contribution to the history and culture of the world.” Visser’s art has been included in more than 120 interna- tional, national and regional juried exhibitions, including two pieces of sculpture—created through the process called rapid prototyping—that toured as part of the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. Her work has been featured in publications, including Texas Monthly, Sculpture Journal and Ceramics, Art and Perception, and has received numerous awards, includ- ing the “Design Excellence Award” from the City of Austin Design Commission. However, former students say that Visser is a great teacher first and an artist second, encouraging students to be inde- pendent and to try new things. One student says her style of teaching makes Visser an unsung hero, but not a pushover. “She won’t hesitate to hold your feet to the fire if necessary,” he says. Another alumna changed her major from pre-med to sculp- ture after taking classes with Visser, and says she guides students in life as well as art—helping them appreciate art by fostering their imagination and creativity, regardless of their major. Visser says, “My goal is to nurture and support the creative spirit of each individual.” Mutual Admiration As much as students admire Visser, she takes equal pride in them. In 2004, she organized Southwestern’s first-ever alumni art exhibit, giving the Southwestern community a chance to see former students and their current works. Visser says the moments she remembers most are those “when a student becomes excited about art and it helps to enrich his or her life.” Described as being strong, independent, consistent, supportive, loyal and having a good sense of humor, it is clear that Visser’s former students regard her not only with respect, but consider her a guiding force in their lives. For being the type of teacher whose encouragement helps students sculpt a life true to themselves, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni presented Visser with the 2009 Ms. Homecoming Award. Teacher, Artist, Unsung Hero Mary Hale Visser Ms. Homecoming
  • 29. Good and Faithful Servant The Pearl A. Neas Service Award is presented annually to a member of the Southwestern University staff for the purpose of recognizing long and faithful service to the University. The award is named for the later Pearl A. Neas, who served Southwestern for 40 years. As they say, not rain, nor sleet, nor snow, the mail must go. On the Southwestern campus, Debbie Sanderfer is the person that makes that happen! For the past four years, she has even been found at the University on weekends and holidays, working to stay ahead of the mail. But the campus post office isn’t the only place Sanderfer has left her cheerful mark on the University. She spent 20 years in the Office of Financial Assistance and three years in the Registrar’s Office before becoming Mail Service Supervisor in 2005. All About the Students In each of her positions, Sanderfer has made it clear that she is all about the students. More than one of Sanderfer’s colleagues first met her when they were students, and agree that she always had their best interest at heart. They call her sincere, selfless and loyal to Southwestern. Sanderfer is also community minded. A recipient of Southwestern’s Joe S. Mundy Award for Exemplary Service, she has served on numerous committees at Southwestern, assisted in planning the student job fair and held posi- tions as varied as cheerleader sponsor and SU Connections mentor. Over the years, Sanderfer influenced co-workers and countless students through her expertise, kindness and love. Dedicated to her work and never satisfied with the status quo, she always wants things to be done right and works hard to make them so. Known to be inspirational, devoted and generous, Sanderfer’s thoughtfulness touches those around her. She is there for her friends and colleagues, celebrating the good times and providing compassion in the difficult ones. For her loyalty and service, for helping to make Southwestern a community where people matter and for making students her number one priority, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni has awarded Sanderfer the 2009 Pearl A. Neas Service Award. Not Rain, Nor Sleet, Nor Snow Debbie Sanderfer Pearl A. Neas Service Award Photographer Lance Holt made use of a large-format view camera to create this year’s collection of Homecoming Award portraits. As the University celebrated the 100th anniversary of Homecoming, Southwestern featured technology that would have been available at the time of the first Homecoming and that remains relevant today.
  • 30. 30 Southwestern Magazine Academics in Focus is compiled from In Focus, Southwestern’s official weekly online newsletter, and highlights student, faculty and staff honors. Check out www.southwestern.edu/ newsroom/infocus for archived issues of In Focus, BIOLOGY ROMI BURKS, associate professor of biology, published an article in Science Signaling about co-authoring papers with undergraduates. The paper was co-authored by MATT CHUMCHAL ’01, who is now an assistant professor of biology at Texas Christian University. BEN PIERCE, professor of biology, is the author of a textbook titled Genetics Essentials: Concepts and Connections. Pierce has authored several genetics textbooks used by colleges and universities across the country. CHEMISTRY NIKOS BENTENITIS, assistant professor of chemistry, had a paper published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry. NICK COX, junior, was co-author on the paper. LYNN GUZIEC, assistant professor of chemistry, FRANK GUZIEC, professor of chemistry, and KYLE MARSHALL ’08, were co-authors on a paper published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, 2009. The GUZIECS also published a paper in The Analyst, which was co-authored by Jennifer Brodbelt, professor of chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin, and SUNCERAE SMITH ’05, a graduate student at UT, who was awarded a National Science Foundation grant for her work. Senior chemistry majors JENNIFER PITZEN and NATALIE SANDERS presented research at the American Chemical Society meeting in Washington, D.C. Pitzen presented research that she completed with FRANK GUZIEC, professor of chemistry. Sanders presented research that she completed with LYNN GUZIEC, assistant professor of chemistry. SANDRA LOUDWIG, visiting assistant professor of chemistry, co-authored a paper published in the Journal of Inclusion Phenomena & Macrocyclic Chemistry. COMMUNICATION STUDIES JULIA JOHNSON, associate professor of communication studies, presented a paper titled “Qwe’reing/Queering Alliances through Silence: An Autoethnographic Exploration of ‘Living out Loud’” at the annual convention of the National Communication Association in Chicago, Ill. SALLY SPALDING ’09, received the 2009 Undergraduate Paper Award from the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language and Gender. She wrote a paper titled “Power Play: The Intersection of Religion and Gender in Christian Women’s Narratives” for her communication studies research Capstone class under the direction of JULIA JOHNSON, associate professor of communication studies and feminist studies. Spalding also presented a version of her paper at the Religious Communication Association pre-conference of the National Communication Association annual convention in Chicago, Ill. COMPUTER SCIENCE BARBARA BOUCHER OWENS, associate professor of computer science, was the keynote speaker at the Fifth University Course Forum in Computer Science held in Chengdu, Sichuan, China. Owens also participated in the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing in Tucson, Ariz., where she represented Southwestern at the meeting of the Academic Alliance of the National Center for Women in Technology. Three teams from Southwestern participated in the world’s most prestigious computer programming competition—the International Collegiate Programming Contest, sponsored by IBM and run by the Association for Computing Machinery. Participating Southwestern students included seniors DANIEL BAUER, LANE HILL, AARON KINSMAN and MICHAEL PARTY; juniors DARREN ALLEN, NICHOLAS ASHFORD, ALAN LOWRY and ADAM SCULLY; and first-year students ERICK BAUMAN and JASON CATRON. Coaches were RICHARD DENMAN, associate professor of mathematics and computer science, and BARBARA ANTHONY, assistant professor of computer science. ECONOMICS KEN ROBERTS, professor of economics, will have a paper titled “The Impact of Circular Migration on the Position of Married Women in China,” published in the July 2010 issue of Feminist Economics. ENGLISH EILEEN CLEERE, professor of English, was invited by the Victorian Studies Seminar at Rice University to present the final chapter of her book manuscript, The Sanitary Arts: Aesthetic Culture and the Victorian Cleanliness Campaigns, as a work-in-progress. DAVID GAINES, associate professor of English, gave an invited lecture at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. His lecture was titled “Bob Dylan’s Senses of Humor.” T. WALTER HERBERT JR., professor emeritus of English, has published a book titled Faith-Based War: From 9/11 to Catastrophic Success in Iraq. Herbert was also elected president of the Herman Melville Society. ELISABETH PIEDMONT-MARTON, associate professor of English, contributed a chapter to the book Thirty Years After: New Essays on Vietnam War Literature, Film, and Art. The chapter is titled “‘I’m not trying to compete with you’: Gulf War Fiction and Discursive Space.” ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES JINELLE SPERRY, a postdoctoral fellow in the Environmental Studies Program, had a paper she co-authored accepted for publication by the journal Ecology. Sperry also co-authored a paper published in the April edition of American Midland Naturalist. LANGUAGES PATRICIA SCHIAFFINI, part-time assistant professor of Chinese, conducted two workshops in Tibet for early-childhood education and distributed two new children’s books in Tibetan that have been published by her nonprofit organization, the Tibetan Arts and Literature Initiative. LAURA SENIO BLAIR, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled “Driving Class Conflict: Taxis and Taxistas in Contemporary Chilean Cinema” at the Geographical Imaginaries and Hispanic Film Conference in New Orleans, La. MATHEMATICS RICHARD DENMAN, professor of mathematics and computer science, has had an article accepted for publication in the College Journal of Mathematics, a publication of the Mathematical Association of America. The article was co-authored by DAVID HAILEY ’83, and Michael Rothenberg. Five mathematics, computational mathematics and computer science majors presented research and expository talks at the Mathematical Association of America meeting in Portland, Ore. SARAH STERN, senior, presented research that she conducted with ALISON MARR, assistant professor of mathematics. SEAN WATSON, senior, presented research that he conducted with FUMIKO FUTAMURA, assistant professor of mathematics. Watson received a Pi Mu Epsilon Student Speaker Award for his talk. Also presenting were DARREN ALLEN, junior, TOMMY ROGERS, senior, and STEPHEN FOSTER ’09. Academics in Focus
  • 31. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 31 POLITICAL SCIENCE ALISA GAUNDER, associate professor of political science, wrote a chapter for a book published by the Brookings Institution titled Political Change in Japan: Electoral Behavior, Party Realignment, and the Koizumi Reforms. Gaunder also presented a paper at the Southwest Conference on Asian Studies, and was a panelist on a roundtable discussion that analyzed the 2009 Lower House election in Japan. SHANNON MARIOTTI, assistant professor of political science, presented a paper at the American Political Science Association Conference in Toronto, Canada. A revised version of her essay will be published in A Political Companion to Ralph Waldo Emerson in 2011. An interview with ERIC SELBIN, professor of political science, was published in Russian Journal under the title “The Magic of Revolution: Debates on Revolution.” Selbin also chaired and participated on several panels at the International Studies Association-South Region meeting in Nashville, Tenn. RELIGION and PHILOSOPHY LAURA HOBGOOD-OSTER, professor of religion, gave a presentation at Yale University Divinity School about animals in Christian liturgy. Hobgood–Oster also attended the American Academy of Religion meeting in Montreal, Canada, where she chaired all of the panels on animals and religion. SAROFIM SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS DUNCAN ALEXANDER ’09, won the 2009 Austin Critics Table Award for video design for his work on “The Color of Dissonance,” which premiered at Southwestern in April 2009. CARLOS BARRON, senior, and MARY VISSER, professor of art, were among 55 artists whose art was selected for the Banner Project—a public arts event in Georgetown. MICHAEL COOPER, professor of music, presented papers at two conferences held in the former East Germany. Cooper also gave a presentation at the October meeting of the Southwest Chapter of the American Musicological Association, held at The University of Texas at San Antonio. THOMAS HOWE, professor of art history, participated in a symposium held at the Getty Villa in Malibu, Calif., in conjunction with an exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art titled “Pompeii and the Roman Villa: Art and Culture around the Bay of Naples.” Howe, who is the coordinator general of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae Foundation, hosted the second international conference on recent work at the ancient Roman villa site of Stabia at the foundation’s center in Castellammare di Stabia, Italy. He also led discussions with a delegation from the Hermitage State Museums in St. Petersburg, Russia, that may allow the archaeological department of the Hermitage to open an excavation at Stabia as early as summer 2010. LOIS FERRARI, professor of music, conducted the Washington All-State Wind Ensemble at the Washington Music Educators Association Conference in February. Ferrari also conducted the Austin Civic Orchestra in concert at the Pflugerville Performing Arts Center. PALOMA MAYORGA, senior, created a portrait of composer Aaron Copland for the poster and brochures publicizing the 2010 Festival of the Arts in Georgetown. EILEEN MEYER-RUSSELL, associate professor of music, and KIYOSHI TAMAGAWA, professor of music, collaborated on recitals performed in San Marcos, as well as in Twin Lake, Mich., Shoreline, Wash., and Eugene, Ore. Meyer- Russell performed another recital in Portland, Ore., with pianist Jason Kwak, assistant professor of music at Texas State University. ROMI BURKS, associate professor of biology, in collaboration with STAR VARNER, professor of art, developed an artwork component for her First-Year Seminar class on chocolate. Burks took chocolate-themed student artwork to the Austin Chocolate Festival in September. Students whose work was featured included first-year students MICHAEL ESPINOZA, JEAN MURENZI, OLUBUSOLA OKUNNU and RACHEL THIBODEAU; sophomores JUSTICE KINLEY, EDUARDO RAMERIZ and NICOLE REA; and juniors CATIE ERTEL, MATTHEW KAMAS, BAILEY THOMPSON and JULIE ANN WHITE. MARY VISSER, professor of art, had her sculpture, “Circle of Life,” featured in the Winter 2009 issue of Creative Quarterly. The sculpture received the Silver Award in the Fine Arts Professional division. A second sculpture of Visser’s, “Women in Movement,” was selected as a runner up. SOCIOLOGY ED KAIN, professor of sociology and University Scholar, has been named the 2010 recipient of the Southern Sociological Society’s Distinguished Contributions to Teaching Award. OTHER ALEX ANDERSON, associate director of Career Services, had an article in the NACE Journal, published by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. RACHEL OSBORNE ’08, conducted the research for the project as an independent research assistant under TRACI GIULIANO, professor of psychology. The research looked for correlations between students’ post-graduation outcomes and their contacts with Career Services. KAYLA COMEAUX, junior, participated in a five-day symposium held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, one of several in which she will participate after having been selected as a NASA MUST Scholar for 2009/2010. ELLEN DAVIS, director of communications, contributed an article for Volume 3 of the Crisis Management Stylebook, published by PR Newswire. SUZY PUKYS, director of civic engagement, LAURA BURROW ’09, and seniors SARAH CROMWELL and JANET DEL REAL, gave a presentation about their internship experiences at the National Domestic Violence Summit in Irving. ROGER YOUNG, director of career services, has been elected to a two-year term on the Board of Directors of the Southern Association of Colleges and Employers. The Rainbow Program, a children’s nutritional program developed by GILLIAN GRAHAM, junior, has been added to Rachel Ray’s Yum-o!® Web site. Members of the Southwestern community contributed more than $1,700 worth of food to The Caring Place this fall. Economics Professor MARY YOUNG donated $1,300 worth of ground beef from her ranch, and faculty, staff and students donated $400 worth of canned food to accompany the beef. Five Southwestern University faculty members have received Sam Taylor Fellowship awards for 2009/2010: DANIEL CASTRO, professor of history; LAURA HOBGOOD-OSTER, professor of religion; JACQUIE MUIR-BROADDUS, professor of psychology; MICHAEL SAENGER, associate professor of English; and ELIZABETH STOCKTON, assistant professor of English. CORRECTION In the Fall 2009 issue of Southwestern, Daniel Bauer’s name was misspelled. We apologize for the mistake.
  • 32. 32 Southwestern Magazine Now Is the Time To Be Actively Engaged with The Association In the past six years, The Association has launched 14 local associations and 19 alumni connection groups to connect Southwestern alumni where they live and through their interests. These groups increase alumni professional and social networks and provide access to meaningful educational and service opportunities. Four Years of Record-Breaking Attendance Homecoming and Reunion Weekend has provided opportunities for students and alumni to share ideas and establish relationships. Last year, the Homecoming celebration of 40-years of African-American Alumni Achievement brought together generations of alumni with shared experiences, and gave Southwestern students opportunities to meet those alumni who paved the way for them. Continuing the Lifelong Southwestern Experience The 2010 Roy and Margaret Shilling Lecture Series offered one of many outstanding opportunities for alumni to continue their lifelong Southwestern Experience by hearing (in person or online) Bill Foege, one of the world’s foremost epidemiolo- gists, speak about addressing critical global health issues. Shaping the Plan The Board of Trustees, half of whom are alumni, recently approved Shaping Our Future: The Strategic Plan for Southwestern University 2010–2020. Five alumni, including me, directly contributed to the Commission on Planning and Action, which drafted the plan. Many others participated through information sessions, conference calls and by submitting feedback forms. As alumni you will have opportunities to help shape the implementation of the plan. Get Involved and Stay Informed Visit www.sualumni.net. Check out the calendar, which includes dates for Homecoming and Reunion Weekend, upcoming centennial celebrations for Pi Kappa Alpha and Delta Delta Delta, campus and online lectures, events in your area and much more. Register for the online community and consider volunteering. This is our Association! It’s fun! Let’s benefit from it! Steve Raben ’63 President, The Association of Southwestern University Alumni Alumni Council President Steve Raben ’63 President-Elect Blake Stanford ’81 Class Relations Chair Nisa Sharma ’92 Nominations and Awards Chair Rev. Dr. Paul Barton ’83 Homecoming and Reunions Chair Sarah Walthall Norris ’68 Local Associations Chair Maxie Duran Hardin ’73 Alumni Connection Groups Chair Katherine Merrill Andre ’99 Assembly Program Chair Rev. Milton Jordan ’62 Assembly Program Chair-Elect Yesenia Garcia ’03 Alumni Communications Chair Lisa Dreishmire ’91 Lifelong Learning Chair Ken Holley ’71 At-Large Member John Dapper ’91 At-Large Member Theodore Caryl ’76 Trustee Representative John Curry ’70 Student Representative Zoe Martin ’12 Association of Southwestern University Alumni The
  • 33. Spring 2010 www.southwestern.edu 33 ALUMNI NEWS 2009 Legacy Students Southwestern welcomed 32 legacy students among the 2009 first-year and transfer class. Contact the Office of Admission at 800-252-3166 to register your child or relative for the Legacy Link Program. Call for Class Representation The Association of Southwestern University Alumni Assembly held its annual meeting during Volunteer Leadership Weekend 2010, where new members of the Alumni Council were voted in by Assembly Delegates. Delegates include an array of alumni who represent local associations, alumni connection groups and classes. Many classes are not yet represented on the Alumni Assembly, which is the governing body of The Association. Assembly Delegates serve a two- year term and meet once-a-year at Southwestern to conduct regular busi- ness. Delegates serve an important volunteer role for The Association by serving as advisors and sharing class news with friends and classmates. If you are interested in serving as a Class Delegate on the Alumni Assembly, e-mail alumni@southwestern.edu. Windy City Home to 14th Local Association The Association of Southwestern University Alumni welcomes the Chicago Association as the 14th local association! More than 140 Southwestern alumni live in and around Chicago, Ill. Georgianne Bode Harms ’84, Jill Johnson Andrews ’99, Merritt Foy ’04 and Caitlyn Bodine ’05 have volunteered to serve as officers of the new asso- ciation and welcome suggestions for events and activities in the area. Send ideas to alumni@southwestern.edu. Hispanic Alumni/ Student Connection In the fall of 2009, members of the Southwestern University student organization, Latinos Unidos, asked alumni to help recruit Latino students and to serve as career mentors. This request resulted in the formation of the Southwestern University Hispanic Alumni Connection Group in January 2010. This is the 19th group to formally affiliate with The Association of Southwestern University Alumni and the first to officially open its member- ship to students, faculty and staff. In addition to assisting with student recruitment and serving as career mentors, the group aspires to promote the lifelong Southwestern Experience through events and programming. To become a member of the group, e-mail alumni@southwestern.edu. Pi Kappa Alpha Centennial The Alpha Omicron Chapter of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity will celebrate its centennial during Homecoming and Reunion Weekend, November 5–7, 2010. The weekend will be full of activities in which Pike brothers can participate, reconnect and celebrate. Mark your calendar and plan to attend. For more information, contact Daniel Webb AO ’05, ’08 at webbd@southwestern.edu, or visit www.aopikes.com. To learn more about the alumni assembly, local associations, alumni connection groups and special events, visit www.sualumni.net. Legacy students pictured with their relatives during Student and Parent Orientation, Aug. 16, 2009. LucasAdams
  • 34. 70+ Events  ·  1000+ Pirates  ·  Countless Adventures How much fun can you pack into one weekend? Mark your calendar! November 5–7, 2010