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A SPECIAL INTEREST SECTION BY MEDIAPLANET
Publisher: Ryan Shepherd Business Developer: Jacob Weingarten Managing Director: Martin Kocandrle Production Director: Carlo Ammendolia
Lead Designer: Matthew Senra Digital Content Manager: Scott Dixon Cover Photo credit: MMA World Series of Fighting Photo credits: All images are from Getty Images unless
otherwise credited. Send all inquiries to ca.editorial@mediaplanet.com. This section was created by Mediaplanet and did not involve Maclean’s Magazine or its editorial departments.
HEARING HEALTH
SilencingAllDoubts
THE NATIONAL CAMPAIGN FOR
BETTER HEARING
Book your FREE Hearing Test!
VISIT CampaignForBetterHearing.org/MACL OR CALL 1-888-904-1702
We believe everyone over the age of 60 should get a FREE baseline hearing test.
You can join us by simply booking YOUR test today. It takes less than 60 minutes
and there’s no cost or obligation whatsoever! Plus, more than 200 hearing clinics
are donating $4.00 for every test in order to provide hearing aids for those who
can’t afford them. Our goal is to raise over $250,000 for hearing aids – So book
your test, bring your friends, and together, we can make a difference!
SPF-CFBH-MACL
PERSONALHEALTHNEWS.CA
Living His Dream
The Hammer, an inspiration
and role model for the deaf,
is all smiles alongside his
wife, Sahar.
Matt“TheHammer”Hamillhasovercomemany
opponentsinhislife­—thetoughestbeingborndeaf.
Mediaplanet How did you first get
involved in wresting and what led to
your transition towards mixed
martial arts?
Matt Hamill I first got into wrestling when I
was younger, I was getting into trouble at the
time because I couldn’t hear. My stepfather was
a wrestling coach. He brought me to a wresting
practice and put me against another kid. As soon
as the other kid touched me I felt goose bumps.
I took him down and knew wrestling was my
sport. I was hooked. I went on to win three na-
tionalchampionshipsincollegeforRochesterIn-
stitute of Technology. I also won two gold medals
inthedeafOlympics. 
As far as transferring into MMA, I was work-
ing at a bar as a bouncer and two university foot-
ball players came in. They were causing prob-
lems; I kindly asked them to leave. One tried to
attack me.I snapped him down and dragged him
out the door.The other tried to grab my legs. Be-
ing aworld classwrestler — I snapped him down
and threw him out. 
Afterwards, the owner came over to me. I
thoughthewasgoingtofireme.Hesaid,“Hamill,
read my lips,Why don’t you join the UFC?” It was
a good idea. The next day I went to the library
and filled out an application. One week later I
received a letter that I was selected to be on The
UltimateFighter3.
MP Being born deaf, what is it like to be
facing an opponent one-on-one in a
wrestling or MMA match?
MH Being deaf, there are a lot of advantages and
disadvantages in MMA and wrestling. I cannot
hear my corner yelling or giving advice when
I am in a match or fight. I also cannot hear the
crowd cheering, which is an advantage and
disadvantage. Also, being deaf, I do not have any
distractions and it is easy to rest and concentrate
beforeamatchorfight. 
MP Have you ever been told you
shouldn’t be fighting and to give up?
MH My whole life, I had people say I shouldn’t
do this or I shouldn’t do that. I prove them
wrong every time. It gives me motivation. 
MP What advice would you give
to children who are deaf, who may
struggle with being bullied or have
been told they cannot achieve their
greatest aspirations?
MH I travel the world giving motivational and
anti-bullying presentations to schools. I am
living proof that if you set goals and pursue
your dreams — it will happen and come true. 
MP Who has inspired you the most
on your journey to becoming such a
successful deaf athlete?
MH I have many mentors and people I look up
to. My grandfather was always an inspiration
for me. He had amazing work ethic and made
sure I never gave up. 
MP What’s next for you?
MH I am in the best shape of my life. I am going
to continue fighting and I will be a world cham-
pion. It is a new beginning for the Hammer!
Wooooooooo!
PERSONALHEALTHNEWS.CA A SPECIAL INTEREST SECTION BY MEDIAPLANET
Understanding How HearingWorks
Y
our familymaybe frustrated that
you aren’t hearing as well as you
used to.You are feeling more and
more isolated and withdrawn
because it takes too much energy
to engage in activities you enjoy.
Eventually, you go to speak with
an audiologist to talk about your hearing.
Many people have the idea that hearing aids will
fix hearing loss. Let’s put that idea into context. How
does our hearing work? Structures in the ear trans-
late sounds into nerve signals. These signals trav-
el along nerve path-
ways to centres in the
brain where we recog-
nize the sounds and
understand what the
sounds are and how
they relate to our lives.
An audiologist will interview you to learn how your
hearing ability fits into your own lifestyle and ex-
pectations. Part of the interview will involve tests
to determine the reason for the hearing loss. Parts of
your hearing system may be damaged through dis-
ease, excessive exposure to loud noise, medications,
degeneration, or other factors.
While there may be discussions about adjusting
and adapting expectations it is important to under-
stand hearing aids are not glasses. Visual impair-
ments can often be corrected for by simply refocus-
ing the incoming stimuli. Hearing aids make sounds
louder, but those sounds still need to pass through a
damaged system.
While your audiologist knows the limitations asso-
ciated with a hearing aid and likely tried to set up real-
istic expectations, you
leave the clinic and
spend the next 364 days
around people who
now think you went
and got your hearing
fixed. The family din-
ner can actually be worse for a while, until you are able
to work with your family to also understand the bene-
fits and limitation of hearing aids. Your audiologist will
be able to help you to find ways to adjust and to guide
your family and others towards understanding your
changing hearing perception.
It is important to take control of your own hearing
health just like you take responsibility for the rest of
your health and personal goals. If you delay, you risk
missing out on good quality of life and relationships.
As with your other health professionals, it is
important to find an audiologist you can trust, who
speaks to you first about your hearing loss and what
it means to your life. You can work together to meet
your goals and manage realistic expectations for
yourself and your family.
Bill Hodgetts, PhD, MSc (Aud), President,
Canadian Academy of Audiology
Jean Holden, MSc, MBA, Executive Director,
Canadian Academy of Audiology
Supporting Partner
Recent data released by Stats Canada
paints a grim picture of hearing health in this
country with some 70 percent of Canadians
being unaware they have hearing loss.
That’s not surprising to Steven Aiken, Associate Profes-
sor, Audiology, Surgery, Psychology & Neuroscience at
Dalhousie University in Halifax. “People sometimes as-
sume hearing loss is just a normal part of life, and it’s al-
right to get by with just turning up the television or the
stereo. But, changes in your hearing are changes in your
body and in your health. Undiagnosed hearing loss is as-
sociated with all sorts of problems, including tinnitus,
depression,socialwithdrawal,andcognitivedecline.”
While hearing loss might be inevitable with the nat-
ural aging process if you are genetically predisposed,
there is much that can be done about the rate and de-
gree. Hearing loss is often the result of a lifetime of ex-
posure to noise. So, it’s important to use protection in
noisy, everyday situations — whether you’re mowing
the lawn, riding a motorcycle, or using power tools. As
Aikenpointsout:“Itdoesn’tmeanyoucanneverbeany-
whereloud,butyoushouldtakeprecautions.Agoodpair
ofearplugscanmakethingssofterwithoutcompromis-
ingsoundquality,andyourearswillthankyou.” 
Hidden hearing loss
The belief used to be that the ringing in your ears ex-
perienced after attending a loud concert, for example,
was just a temporary event that would dissipate after 48
hours. New research says the damage to your auditory
systemmightactuallybepermanentbecauseofnoiseex-
posure. Hidden hearing loss is an issue of concern since
Maintain Hearing for Life with Regular
Testing and Diligent Protection
itmaynotshowupinahearingtest.Researchisongoing
aboutwhetherthistypeofdamagecanbereversed.
Thislatestnewsunderscorestheneedforbeingdiligent
abouthearingprotection.Usingearplugsorturningdown
the volume of your music player is something we can do.
“Unfortunately, the latest data shows that many Can-
adiansarereluctanttotakestepstoprotecttheirhearing,”
says Jillian Price, a London, ON, based certified audiolo-
gist and member of CASLPO (College of Audiologists and
Speech-Language Pathologists of Ontario). “Thirty-nine
percentofpeoplewhoknewtheyworkedinnoisyenviron-
mentssaidtheyrarelyorneverusedprotection.”
Make your first step in preserving your hearing —
schedule a hearing test. Dr. Price recommends every
adulthaveonesochangescanbemonitoredandtracked
inthefuture.
Michele Sponagle Source: 2012–13 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS)
20%
of adults aged 19 to 79 had
at least mild hearing loss in at
least one ear.
70%
of adults with measured hearing
loss did not report any diagnosis
by a health care professional.
42%
of Canadians aged 16 to 79 have
worked or currently work in an
environment where it is required
to speak in a raised voice to
communicate with someone
standing an arm’s length away.
ACAAcademie canadienne d’audiologie
Entendus. Compris.
CAA Canadian Academy of Audiology
Heard. Understood.
“If you delay [taking responsibility
for your hearing health] you risk
missing out on good quality of life
and relationships.”
Jillian Price
M.Sc, Aud (C), Reg.
CASLPO,
Chief Audiologist
Steven Aiken
Associate Professor,
Audiology, Surgery,
Psychology &
Neuroscience,
Dalhousie University
MEDIAPLANETA SPECIAL INTEREST SECTION BY MEDIAPLANET
F
or Canadians over 65 years of age,
one in two suffer from hearing
loss. That’s why health officials are
sounding the alarm over what is
often called a silent health issue.
“Many people don’t recognize they
have hearing loss, says Dr. Marshall Chasin, a Toron-
to clinical audiologist.“It’s slow progressing and isn’t
associated with pain.”
Because childhood is a critical time for language
development, experts suggest parents have their chil-
dren’s hearing tested if the child has ongoing ear infec-
tions or if a hearing impairment is suspected. “At the
age of 35, people should get a hearing checkup, because
researchshowsalinkbetweenhearinglossanddecline
in brain function,” says Dr. Chasin.
Because
sound
matters
*For references see www.oticonmedical.com/studies
Ponto Plus &
Ponto Plus Power
Ponto Streamer
Two out of three bone anchored patients prefer Ponto
For more information contact us at:
www.oticonmedical.com or Phone: 1-888-277-8014 or
A methodical review of studies* that have compared Oticon Medical’s Ponto sound processors to other sound processors reveal that when
users had the opportunity to test the performance of two different devices in daily life, the majority chose Ponto. This was found consistently
across the studies where patients were asked to rate their preference at the end of the test.*
World of sounds open up with new options
If hearing impairment can’t be medically treated —
excess ear wax or infection — then a wide-range of
hearing assistance devices are available. These aren’t
the clunky hearing aids your grandpa used to have.
Many are very small and look nice cosmetically. They
are technologically advanced, with some even being
able to be controlled by your smartphone.
Dependingonthecauseofyourhearingloss,ahearing
aid on its own may not be the best solution. In some cases
a cochlear implant or bone anchored system can restore
hearing for those that have severe to profound deafness.
The bone anchored system is good for people who have
problems with the middle ear or ear drum and cannot be
helped with a conventional hearing aid — because these
issues are chronic or they have no ear/earcanal at all. It
transmitsthesoundthroughanimplantintheskullabove
theear,andreachestheinnerear.“Thetechnologyforthis
system has advanced significantly in recent years,” says
Richard Larocque, a Clinical Support and Business De-
velopmentManagerforOticonMedical,amemberofoneof
the world’s largest groups of hearing health care compan-
ies. “It uses a minimally invasive surgical technique that
takesjust10minutesandcanbedoneasanoutpatient.”
Once you have hearing loss it is permanent, that’s
why its prevention is important. Equally important is
seeking help if you do suspect you have a hearing im-
pairment. “Hearing loss can impact your work and so-
ciallife,” says Larocque.“Restoringone’s hearinggives
people their life back.”
Ken Donohue
One in four Canadians under the age of 65 have hearing loss significant enough to necessitate treatment.
MUSIC TO THE EARS
NEW ADVANCES IN HEARING TECHNOLOGY

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  • 1. A SPECIAL INTEREST SECTION BY MEDIAPLANET Publisher: Ryan Shepherd Business Developer: Jacob Weingarten Managing Director: Martin Kocandrle Production Director: Carlo Ammendolia Lead Designer: Matthew Senra Digital Content Manager: Scott Dixon Cover Photo credit: MMA World Series of Fighting Photo credits: All images are from Getty Images unless otherwise credited. Send all inquiries to ca.editorial@mediaplanet.com. This section was created by Mediaplanet and did not involve Maclean’s Magazine or its editorial departments. HEARING HEALTH SilencingAllDoubts THE NATIONAL CAMPAIGN FOR BETTER HEARING Book your FREE Hearing Test! VISIT CampaignForBetterHearing.org/MACL OR CALL 1-888-904-1702 We believe everyone over the age of 60 should get a FREE baseline hearing test. You can join us by simply booking YOUR test today. It takes less than 60 minutes and there’s no cost or obligation whatsoever! Plus, more than 200 hearing clinics are donating $4.00 for every test in order to provide hearing aids for those who can’t afford them. Our goal is to raise over $250,000 for hearing aids – So book your test, bring your friends, and together, we can make a difference! SPF-CFBH-MACL PERSONALHEALTHNEWS.CA Living His Dream The Hammer, an inspiration and role model for the deaf, is all smiles alongside his wife, Sahar. Matt“TheHammer”Hamillhasovercomemany opponentsinhislife­—thetoughestbeingborndeaf. Mediaplanet How did you first get involved in wresting and what led to your transition towards mixed martial arts? Matt Hamill I first got into wrestling when I was younger, I was getting into trouble at the time because I couldn’t hear. My stepfather was a wrestling coach. He brought me to a wresting practice and put me against another kid. As soon as the other kid touched me I felt goose bumps. I took him down and knew wrestling was my sport. I was hooked. I went on to win three na- tionalchampionshipsincollegeforRochesterIn- stitute of Technology. I also won two gold medals inthedeafOlympics.  As far as transferring into MMA, I was work- ing at a bar as a bouncer and two university foot- ball players came in. They were causing prob- lems; I kindly asked them to leave. One tried to attack me.I snapped him down and dragged him out the door.The other tried to grab my legs. Be- ing aworld classwrestler — I snapped him down and threw him out.  Afterwards, the owner came over to me. I thoughthewasgoingtofireme.Hesaid,“Hamill, read my lips,Why don’t you join the UFC?” It was a good idea. The next day I went to the library and filled out an application. One week later I received a letter that I was selected to be on The UltimateFighter3. MP Being born deaf, what is it like to be facing an opponent one-on-one in a wrestling or MMA match? MH Being deaf, there are a lot of advantages and disadvantages in MMA and wrestling. I cannot hear my corner yelling or giving advice when I am in a match or fight. I also cannot hear the crowd cheering, which is an advantage and disadvantage. Also, being deaf, I do not have any distractions and it is easy to rest and concentrate beforeamatchorfight.  MP Have you ever been told you shouldn’t be fighting and to give up? MH My whole life, I had people say I shouldn’t do this or I shouldn’t do that. I prove them wrong every time. It gives me motivation.  MP What advice would you give to children who are deaf, who may struggle with being bullied or have been told they cannot achieve their greatest aspirations? MH I travel the world giving motivational and anti-bullying presentations to schools. I am living proof that if you set goals and pursue your dreams — it will happen and come true.  MP Who has inspired you the most on your journey to becoming such a successful deaf athlete? MH I have many mentors and people I look up to. My grandfather was always an inspiration for me. He had amazing work ethic and made sure I never gave up.  MP What’s next for you? MH I am in the best shape of my life. I am going to continue fighting and I will be a world cham- pion. It is a new beginning for the Hammer! Wooooooooo!
  • 2. PERSONALHEALTHNEWS.CA A SPECIAL INTEREST SECTION BY MEDIAPLANET Understanding How HearingWorks Y our familymaybe frustrated that you aren’t hearing as well as you used to.You are feeling more and more isolated and withdrawn because it takes too much energy to engage in activities you enjoy. Eventually, you go to speak with an audiologist to talk about your hearing. Many people have the idea that hearing aids will fix hearing loss. Let’s put that idea into context. How does our hearing work? Structures in the ear trans- late sounds into nerve signals. These signals trav- el along nerve path- ways to centres in the brain where we recog- nize the sounds and understand what the sounds are and how they relate to our lives. An audiologist will interview you to learn how your hearing ability fits into your own lifestyle and ex- pectations. Part of the interview will involve tests to determine the reason for the hearing loss. Parts of your hearing system may be damaged through dis- ease, excessive exposure to loud noise, medications, degeneration, or other factors. While there may be discussions about adjusting and adapting expectations it is important to under- stand hearing aids are not glasses. Visual impair- ments can often be corrected for by simply refocus- ing the incoming stimuli. Hearing aids make sounds louder, but those sounds still need to pass through a damaged system. While your audiologist knows the limitations asso- ciated with a hearing aid and likely tried to set up real- istic expectations, you leave the clinic and spend the next 364 days around people who now think you went and got your hearing fixed. The family din- ner can actually be worse for a while, until you are able to work with your family to also understand the bene- fits and limitation of hearing aids. Your audiologist will be able to help you to find ways to adjust and to guide your family and others towards understanding your changing hearing perception. It is important to take control of your own hearing health just like you take responsibility for the rest of your health and personal goals. If you delay, you risk missing out on good quality of life and relationships. As with your other health professionals, it is important to find an audiologist you can trust, who speaks to you first about your hearing loss and what it means to your life. You can work together to meet your goals and manage realistic expectations for yourself and your family. Bill Hodgetts, PhD, MSc (Aud), President, Canadian Academy of Audiology Jean Holden, MSc, MBA, Executive Director, Canadian Academy of Audiology Supporting Partner Recent data released by Stats Canada paints a grim picture of hearing health in this country with some 70 percent of Canadians being unaware they have hearing loss. That’s not surprising to Steven Aiken, Associate Profes- sor, Audiology, Surgery, Psychology & Neuroscience at Dalhousie University in Halifax. “People sometimes as- sume hearing loss is just a normal part of life, and it’s al- right to get by with just turning up the television or the stereo. But, changes in your hearing are changes in your body and in your health. Undiagnosed hearing loss is as- sociated with all sorts of problems, including tinnitus, depression,socialwithdrawal,andcognitivedecline.” While hearing loss might be inevitable with the nat- ural aging process if you are genetically predisposed, there is much that can be done about the rate and de- gree. Hearing loss is often the result of a lifetime of ex- posure to noise. So, it’s important to use protection in noisy, everyday situations — whether you’re mowing the lawn, riding a motorcycle, or using power tools. As Aikenpointsout:“Itdoesn’tmeanyoucanneverbeany- whereloud,butyoushouldtakeprecautions.Agoodpair ofearplugscanmakethingssofterwithoutcompromis- ingsoundquality,andyourearswillthankyou.”  Hidden hearing loss The belief used to be that the ringing in your ears ex- perienced after attending a loud concert, for example, was just a temporary event that would dissipate after 48 hours. New research says the damage to your auditory systemmightactuallybepermanentbecauseofnoiseex- posure. Hidden hearing loss is an issue of concern since Maintain Hearing for Life with Regular Testing and Diligent Protection itmaynotshowupinahearingtest.Researchisongoing aboutwhetherthistypeofdamagecanbereversed. Thislatestnewsunderscorestheneedforbeingdiligent abouthearingprotection.Usingearplugsorturningdown the volume of your music player is something we can do. “Unfortunately, the latest data shows that many Can- adiansarereluctanttotakestepstoprotecttheirhearing,” says Jillian Price, a London, ON, based certified audiolo- gist and member of CASLPO (College of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists of Ontario). “Thirty-nine percentofpeoplewhoknewtheyworkedinnoisyenviron- mentssaidtheyrarelyorneverusedprotection.” Make your first step in preserving your hearing — schedule a hearing test. Dr. Price recommends every adulthaveonesochangescanbemonitoredandtracked inthefuture. Michele Sponagle Source: 2012–13 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) 20% of adults aged 19 to 79 had at least mild hearing loss in at least one ear. 70% of adults with measured hearing loss did not report any diagnosis by a health care professional. 42% of Canadians aged 16 to 79 have worked or currently work in an environment where it is required to speak in a raised voice to communicate with someone standing an arm’s length away. ACAAcademie canadienne d’audiologie Entendus. Compris. CAA Canadian Academy of Audiology Heard. Understood. “If you delay [taking responsibility for your hearing health] you risk missing out on good quality of life and relationships.” Jillian Price M.Sc, Aud (C), Reg. CASLPO, Chief Audiologist Steven Aiken Associate Professor, Audiology, Surgery, Psychology & Neuroscience, Dalhousie University
  • 3. MEDIAPLANETA SPECIAL INTEREST SECTION BY MEDIAPLANET F or Canadians over 65 years of age, one in two suffer from hearing loss. That’s why health officials are sounding the alarm over what is often called a silent health issue. “Many people don’t recognize they have hearing loss, says Dr. Marshall Chasin, a Toron- to clinical audiologist.“It’s slow progressing and isn’t associated with pain.” Because childhood is a critical time for language development, experts suggest parents have their chil- dren’s hearing tested if the child has ongoing ear infec- tions or if a hearing impairment is suspected. “At the age of 35, people should get a hearing checkup, because researchshowsalinkbetweenhearinglossanddecline in brain function,” says Dr. Chasin. Because sound matters *For references see www.oticonmedical.com/studies Ponto Plus & Ponto Plus Power Ponto Streamer Two out of three bone anchored patients prefer Ponto For more information contact us at: www.oticonmedical.com or Phone: 1-888-277-8014 or A methodical review of studies* that have compared Oticon Medical’s Ponto sound processors to other sound processors reveal that when users had the opportunity to test the performance of two different devices in daily life, the majority chose Ponto. This was found consistently across the studies where patients were asked to rate their preference at the end of the test.* World of sounds open up with new options If hearing impairment can’t be medically treated — excess ear wax or infection — then a wide-range of hearing assistance devices are available. These aren’t the clunky hearing aids your grandpa used to have. Many are very small and look nice cosmetically. They are technologically advanced, with some even being able to be controlled by your smartphone. Dependingonthecauseofyourhearingloss,ahearing aid on its own may not be the best solution. In some cases a cochlear implant or bone anchored system can restore hearing for those that have severe to profound deafness. The bone anchored system is good for people who have problems with the middle ear or ear drum and cannot be helped with a conventional hearing aid — because these issues are chronic or they have no ear/earcanal at all. It transmitsthesoundthroughanimplantintheskullabove theear,andreachestheinnerear.“Thetechnologyforthis system has advanced significantly in recent years,” says Richard Larocque, a Clinical Support and Business De- velopmentManagerforOticonMedical,amemberofoneof the world’s largest groups of hearing health care compan- ies. “It uses a minimally invasive surgical technique that takesjust10minutesandcanbedoneasanoutpatient.” Once you have hearing loss it is permanent, that’s why its prevention is important. Equally important is seeking help if you do suspect you have a hearing im- pairment. “Hearing loss can impact your work and so- ciallife,” says Larocque.“Restoringone’s hearinggives people their life back.” Ken Donohue One in four Canadians under the age of 65 have hearing loss significant enough to necessitate treatment. MUSIC TO THE EARS NEW ADVANCES IN HEARING TECHNOLOGY