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Wearable Technology 
Part 2 
4imprint.com
Prepare to be amazed—the magic of wearable 
technology is coming to a theatre near you 
By now, if you read part one of the series on wearable technology, http:// 
info.4imprint.com/blue-paper/wearable-technology-part-1/ you are familiar with 
the magical world of wearable technology and know that it’s a trend that is 
probably here to stay. The trend is not slowing down either, in fact it’s growing at 
exponential speed. In fact, Gartner® claims that in the upcoming year, demand for 
wearable technologies will exceed tablet demand. Moreover, it’s estimated that 
this year, the wearable devices market will reach approximately 2 million units.1 
And that’s only scratching the surface—by 2018, research shows that wearable 
device shipments will reach anywhere from 130 to as much as 170 million.2 Even 
by the end of 2014, it is predicted that wearable use will increase by 10 times 
the initial estimate.3 
In case you’re still in the dark, let’s shed some light on wearable technology. 
Essentially, wearable technology is the concept of gadgets, worn on the body, 
that do everything from monitor personal body performance or help you 
complete activities otherwise performed on a computer or laptop. A wearable 
can come in the form of many things—from eyeglasses, clothing, watches and 
more. It’s like magic, except there’s no hidden illusion—it’s real. 
The wearable technology revolution is changing the business landscape, and 
companies need to be prepared if they decide to permit wearable use in the 
office. Yet estimates show that 85 percent of the public sector is unprepared for 
the impact of wearable technology on its IT infrastructure.4 Is your company one 
of the 85 percent? Do you know how to manage the implementation of wearable 
technologies across your organization? Even more importantly, is it a good idea in 
the first place? 
Just as you wouldn’t throw a magic show without some practice, you shouldn’t 
allow wearables in the office unless you’ve weighed the pros and cons and 
thought about how to do it. Too much can go wrong if you don’t, exposing tricks 
of the trade to a wider audience. First and foremost, companies need to consider 
if there is business value to wearables and whether or not the pros outweigh 
1 Rossi, Ben. “Wearable Technology: A Cyber Risk on Your Wrist? | Information Age.” Information Age. N.p., 8 
May 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/technology/security/123457968/wearable-technology- 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 
cyber-risk-your-wrist>. 
2 Green, Chloe. “Wearable Device Shipments to Reach 130 Million by 2018 | Information Age.” Information 
Age. N.p., 2 Dec. 2013. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/technology/mobile-and-networking/ 
123457481/wearable-device-shipments-to-reach-130-million-by-2018>. 
3 Rossi, Ben. “85% of the Public Sector Is Unprepared for the Impact of Wearable Technology on Its IT 
Infrastructure.” Information Age. N.p., 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/ 
technology/data-centre-and-it-infrastructure/123457858/85-public-sector-unprepared-impact-wearable-technology- 
its-it-infrastructure>. 
4 Ibid.
the cons. This Blue Paper® examines the implications of wearable technology, 
particularly what it means to the workplace and how it will affect business 
functions like human resources (HR) and technology. As noted, few companies 
have policies to manage the growing trend, yet it needs to be addressed. This 
paper will identify how to be prepared and provide business leaders with tips on 
how to establish guidelines and enforce policies, should you choose to adopt a 
wearable policy in the first place. So get ready to take to the stage, because it’s 
time for the curtain call. 
It’s not all magic and fun behind the scenes: The impact of wearable technology 
The thrilling world of wearable technology is enticing and most can’t take their 
eyes off the stage. But as fascinating as it might be, the allure comes with a cost. 
A lot goes on behind the scenes, and if you aren’t prepared, you might not be 
able to afford the show. In other words, wearable technology will challenge 
corporations in three key areas, and the implications should be addressed before 
unleashing the magic. These include: data protection, privacy protection and 
system security and bandwidth.5 
Data protection methods will be challenged by wearables, and this will require 
you to review current practices to make sure they are sufficient. To protect 
corporate data, you might have to take it up a notch and upgrade security 
and impose tighter controls. Why? Because all of a sudden, employees have 
unprecedented access to sensitive business information, thus presenting more 
opportunities for misuse. Just like the Bring Your Own Device trend, companies 
need to take measures to protect intellectual capital. You might be able to 
leverage some of the data protection measures found in BYOD policies— 
companies that have a BYOD policy will be a step ahead. But wearable technology 
will be far more complex, leading some to say it will seem like a cakewalk in 
comparison to BYOD implementation. There are a host of new issues and risks, 
and additional security measures might be required. 
Once again, as with BYOD, the data ownership will be called into question. 
Companies need to determine who will own the data contained in wearables. 
Will data be owned by the individual or the company? If data on a wearable has 
personal information, will companies be able to access it? Believe it or not, some 
organizations require full access to any data on a wearable—even if it’s personal 
information.6 It’s becoming more commonplace to demand full disclosure and 
permit corporate access to any information captured in your wearable if they are 
used for business functions. 
5 Rossi, Ben. “85% of the Public Sector Is Unprepared for the Impact of Wearable Technology on Its IT 
Infrastructure.” Information Age. N.p., 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/ 
technology/data-centre-and-it-infrastructure/123457858/85-public-sector-unprepared-impact-wearable-technology- 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 
its-it-infrastructure>. 
6 Ng, Cindy. “5 Privacy Concerns about Wearable Technology.” Varonis Blog The Metadata Era RSS. N.p., n.d. 
Web. 19 June 2014. <http://blog.varonis.com/5-privacy-concerns-about-wearable-technology/>.
Perhaps the largest impact of wearable technology relates to privacy, particularly 
how it is upheld and maintained. Employees will no longer simply be using a 
desktop computer to carry out their daily duties, but will be able to interact 
and engage with a whole host of computing interfaces, often without your 
knowledge. You won’t necessarily know when information is being collected 
or recorded, and it could violate privacy rights. Companies must be vigilant in 
defining safeguards to ensure employees are not violating the privacy of others 
in the organization. As noted in the next section, in the future, privacy rights 
may be tightly controlled—at this moment new legislation is pulling in the reins 
on the issue. In fact, some states are already lobbying for greater controls and 
regulations surrounding the use of wearables. 
Along these same lines, wearable technology will present challenges to 
confidentiality. Users will have access to confidential information, literally with 
the blink of an eye, and it will be hard to know when employees are accessing 
valuable information. Your business could be at risk from employees covertly 
copying crucial and sensitive information via wearable technology and later 
downloading this information onto Cloud-like networks or their own personal 
desktop. Data can even be passed directly to a competitor without you ever 
knowing it. Accordingly, companies need to be proactive and find ways to protect 
confidential business knowledge. 
Finally, wearables will impact security and bandwidth. Today, an employee may 
have only a few devices accessing the network, but this number could jump to as 
much as 15 to 20 devices per employee in the upcoming years.7 Companies need 
to make sure they are ready for increased traffic and establish advanced security 
measures in order to access servers or other corporate repositories. You’ll also 
need to ensure enough security is in place to prevent unauthorized third parties 
from deciphering the content. Administrators can employ greater Secure Socket 
Layer (SSL) protocols for encryption that safeguard materials in transit from being 
snooped or stolen by a third party, but protection will take time and money. 
What about network capabilities? Is your current network ready for the 
bandwidth required to handle the influx of wearable devices? Companies need 
to look at the existing network and reevaluate its capabilities to make sure it can 
handle increases in traffic and access. As the adoption of wearable technology 
gains momentum, many organizations risk losing control of their network with 
device overload. 
7 “The Effect of Wearable Technology on the Corporate Network in 2014.” TechRadar. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 June 
2014. <http://www.techradar.com/us/news/world-of-tech/future-tech/the-effect-of-wearable-technology-on-the-corporate- 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 
network-in-2014-1207314#null>.
Silence cell phones and turn off cameras before 
the show—addressing privacy 
You’ve probably been in a theater that asks the audience to turn off phones 
before a performance or screening and explicitly prohibits the use of video 
cameras. This practice isn’t just to limit disruptions for the audience and actors— 
there are usually legitimate concerns behind this policy. If you think about it, as a 
magician, your biggest asset is the ability to captivate an audience with a slight of 
the hand. One video can expose your trick, impacting show profits and sales. 
The same principle holds true in a business setting. If you don’t protect your 
organization and employees from unwanted (or illegal) exposure, the 
effects can impact your business for years to come. Trade secrets, proprietary 
information and critical business strategies can be easily captured and dispersed 
to competitors or other third parties. You can also be held liable for violating 
personal privacy rights if you aren’t careful about documenting the use of 
wearable technology. Employees might even use captured data to support 
lawsuit claims or other litigation. 
Ultimately, the issue is about privacy and protecting it for both the corporation 
and the individual. As noted, privacy issues will be at the forefront of the debate 
regarding wearable technology. Google Glass has barely hit the market but some 
are already advocating for increased regulations. Privacy watchdogs in particular 
are concerned about protecting personal privacy—particularly in light of the 
recent revelations regarding the National Security Agency (NSA) and what some 
viewed as a privacy infringement. Other legislation is in the works to control 
when wearables can’t be used. Overall, it’s safe to say that the use of wearables 
will face an uphill battle as demands to protect privacy and safety emerge from a 
number of different sources. 
For example, some restaurants, casinos, bars and theaters have already 
banned the use of Google Glass out of fear that patrons or customers could 
be photographed or recorded without explicit permission. In fact, in 2013, a 
Seattle restaurant made headlines when it banned wearable technology to make 
customers feel safe. It is likely that legislation will address where a wearable 
device can be used and require full disclosure from users. In the interim, other 
companies are asking employees to wear a plastic identification tag, much like a 
security card, to alert others that they have a personal device in their possession. 
Although Google Glass, for instance, is designed to flash a blinking light when it 
is use, some aren’t convinced that wearables, or the person wearing them, will 
accurately alert when they are or are not in use. Full disclosure is becoming the 
expected norm, but enforcing compliance can be tricky, especially when some 
wearables are small and nearly undetectable. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
To an extent, the healthcare arena has already tackled the privacy issue. You are 
probably familiar with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 
(HIPAA). In brief, the legislation aims to safeguard private health information 
across any platform. Healthcare organizations are also required to notify users if 
there’s been a security breech regarding their personal information. 
But despite these protections, HIPPAA policies don’t necessarily extend to regulate 
wearables, even if the wearable is designed to collect data related to personal 
health. In other words, while HIPPA compliance is mandated in healthcare, it 
doesn’t extend to corporations. Few organizations outside of the healthcare 
industry apply HIPPA standards—so far there is only one documented case where 
a company adopted HIPPA and state security laws across the organization. The 
California-based company Lark® which creates wearables that track sleep patterns, 
unveiled a stringent privacy policy that weaves HIPPA elements with additional 
privacy guidelines. For example, explicit consent is required to provide access to 
sleep data and privacy protection policies are clearly outlined and enforced. 
As an individual, to maintain personal privacy, read the fine print and pay 
attention to measures designed to ensure data safety and security. Most 
consumers object to allowing third parties access to personal information, 
especially without their knowledge. Yet while some disclaimers say that 
privacy is respected, if you read closely there might be disclosures that say 
your information may be shared with third parties in certain cases. Read 
privacy guidelines with a careful eye to fully understand how personal 
information might be used and find out exactly how privacy is protected 
from unauthorized access, use or reuse. Again, some apps and websites 
promise that information will not be shared and provide opt-out options, 
but it’s not always obvious how to do this. 
Privacy is just one area that might see increased regulation with the introduction 
of wearable technology. Other legislation in the works prevents wearables while 
driving. The concern, obviously, is that using wearables while driving will present 
a danger to both the individual and others around them. For this reason, some 
believe it should be illegal to use wearables while driving or performing other 
activities that require your full attention. A few states introduced legislation that 
bans all wearables, including Google Glass, while driving. Google is aggressively 
fighting those efforts.8 Opponents to the legislation, including Google, claim that 
in some cases the wearables are less distracting than cell phones or GPS devices 
because they don’t have to be held in your hand. 
8 Kline, Daniel. “Google Takes on Laws That Ban Wearable Technology.” N.p., 28 Feb. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. 
<http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/02/28/google-takes-on-laws-that-ban-wearable-technology.aspx>. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
Use of Google Glass may also open up a host of legal issues—in some cases, 
wearables use may violate existing laws. Today, anti-wiretapping or privacy laws 
in some states prohibit recording private conversations without the consent of all 
of the parties involved. In one case, an Ohio man was questioned about wearing 
Google Glasses in a movie theater. It is a federal offense and considered piracy 
to record movies in a theater, and the individual was detained and questioned 
regarding his activities and intent. 
Google is being proactive and established policies aimed to protect privacy and 
define proper use. The company published a guide for those that use Google 
Glass and outlines the dos and don’ts that individuals should practice when 
wearing Glass. Google itself used the derogatory term cautioning users not to be 
a “glasshole” and the phrase has caught on to describe any inappropriate use of 
Glass. The guidelines touch on some obvious times you should avoid use, such as 
high impact sports. It also suggests that they are not to be used for an extended 
period of time. Overall, Google recommends that users adopt the same policy as 
cell phones—if it’s not appropriate for a cell phone camera, it’s not appropriate 
for Glass. Consider leveraging some of the guidelines created by Google across 
your organization for any and all wearables. If nothing else, it’s a good starting 
point to open dialogue and establish boundaries. 
Since the rise of wearable technology appears unstoppable, it will face many legal 
challenges to come. You can bet that further official guidelines and legislation 
will be necessary to ensure that the implications of use are controlled and safe for 
everyone. Companies will need to pay close attention to the debate to make sure 
their organizations comply with any additional restrictions that are applied. 
The dress rehearsal—ironing out the details 
With so many challenges and business implications, many companies get cold 
feet when they think of taking the show on the road. At this point, you may be 
wondering if introducing wearables in your organization is even worth the effort. 
Before the show takes to the stage, you might consider whether the theater will 
sell out and if the show will be profitable. In other words, ask a fundamental 
question: Will your company benefit from wearable technology? 
Some say that wearable technology should only be considered acceptable in the 
office if it brings value to the company or makes an employee’s life easier so he/ 
she can perform better.9 It’s a big undertaking, and if you’re only doing it to keep 
up with other kids on the block, you might reevaluate its appeal. You will need to 
9 “Protecting Data Against Wearable Technology Risks.” Security 500. N.p., 1 June 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. 
<http://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/85549-protecting-data-against-wearable-technology-risks>. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
invest time and money in the process, and if there’s no business value, you might 
consider postponing opening night. The bottom line? Look at the whole picture 
before saying yes to wearable technology. 
And, in many cases, organizations are saying no, despite the rising popularity. 
According to a study from Tech Pro®, only 11 percent said their organizations are 
using, implementing or allocating budgets toward wearables. Another 25 percent 
said they are planning to implement but haven’t established a budget, and a 
whopping 64 percent reported no interest or plans to deploy wearables.10 
(Figure 1.) 
Figure 1. Use of wearables across organizations 
For some, despite the challenges to infrastructure and privacy, some companies 
say there are tangible business benefits that outweigh any of the downsides. 
Indeed, according to a recent study, wearables may improve productivity as much 
as 8.5 percent and increase job satisfaction by 3.5 percent.11 Likewise, research 
from Gartner® forecasts that Google Glass and other «smart glasses” alone will 
help make employees more efficient, ultimately adding more than $1 billion per 
year to company profits by 2017.12 And many employees are ready to embrace 
the trend. A study from Cornerstone OnDemand®, a Caliornia-based technology 
provider, found that 58 percent of employees would be willing to use wearable 
tech if it enabled them to do their jobs better.13 
10 Hammond, Teena. “Research: 92 Percent Are Interested in Wearables.” ZDNet. N.p., 2 June 2014. Web. 23 
June 2014. <http://www.zdnet.com/research-92-interested-in-wearables-7000030054/>. 
11 “Wearable Technology Can Boost Employee Productivity, Job Satisfaction: Study.” Tech Times RSS. N.p., n.d. 
Web. 02 June 2014. <http://www.techtimes.com/articles/6396/20140503/wearable-technology-can-boost-employee- 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 
productivity-job-satisfaction-study.htm>. 
12 Starner, Tom. “Wearable Tech in the Workplace.” www.HREOnline.com. N.p., 16 Jan. 2014. Web. 23 June 2014. 
<http://www.hreonline.com/HRE/view/story.jhtml?id=534356618>. 
13 Ibid.
Some of the benefits are discussed in part one of this series, but what are some 
real world examples on how it can improve your business? In other words, where 
will you find true business value that can be gained by wearable technology? 
As outlined in part one of the series, experts say wearables can help with simple 
business tasks, such as: 
• tracking mileage and business expenses more accurately; 
• distributing business cards; 
• gathering biometric data; and 
• providing on-the-fly sales data.14 
But wearables may have additional business benefits and show great promise in 
the following areas: 
• measuring employee productivity; 
• monitoring employee activity in the workplace; 
• allowing for collaboration and information sharing; 
• enhancing workplace safety; and 
• enhancing employee training through simulation and virtual 
augmented reality.15 
You might ask if wearables will improve productivity or help monitor key 
business activities in your organization. Perhaps it will help track time more 
efficiently and seamlessly log hours for payroll. With more automation, 
employees will spend less time on busywork and more time with customers. It 
might also have an impact on improving collaboration and information sharing. 
Some of the wearable technology will make it seem as though teams are meeting 
in-person, thus enabling a greater exchange of information and collaboration. 
How will it enhance workplace safety? If your company is one that provides 
installation or maintenance services, wearables might be beneficial because they 
will allow employees in the field to access technical documentation or procedures 
in real-time. Inspectors checking the safety of a fleet of tractor-trailers could 
similarly use wearables to generate safety inspection data and regulations. In 
addition, those who work in potentially dangerous environments will be able to 
access data instantaneously and document information quickly. 
14 Purdy, Kevin. “4 Ways Wearable Technology May Soon Benefit Your Business.” Workintelligently. N.p., 17 Feb. 
2014. Web. 10 June 2014. <http://www.workintelligent.ly/technology/trends/wearable-technology/>. 
15 “Wearable Technology Is Making a Splash in the Workplace.” The Inquisitr News. N.p., 23 Jan. 2014. Web. 17 
June 2014. <http://www.inquisitr.com/1106532/wearable-technology-is-making-a-splash-in-the-workplace/>. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
Some say that the ability to provide more efficient and realistic training will 
shorten onboarding processes, thus freeing up time for human resources and 
other business functions. Wearables may guide new employees around the office 
to learn the layout and keep track of new names and faces. Plus, providing 
realistic simulations and augmented reality could make training a more hands-on, 
interactive experience. Overall, experts believe that wearables will have the 
potential to become cost-effective enhancements to internal training curriculum. 
Are you curious as to what industries are using wearable technology? Figure 
2. illustrates the industries that are implementing wearables. Not surprising, 
healthcare has the greatest deployment of wearables, with 54 percent 
reporting that they’re either using wearable technology or are in the midst 
of implementing, or planning to implement wearables. On the flip side, 78 
percent of government organizations have no plans to implement wearable 
technology whatsoever.16 
Figure 2. Industry implementation of wearables17 
Opening night—are you ready for the 
magic show? 
If you’ve decided to jump on board and embrace wearable technology, it’s time to 
make some magic happen. You need to make sure your company is ready to open 
the doors and give the audience a good show. So where do you start? 
16 Hammond, Teena. “Research: 92 Percent Are Interested in Wearables.” ZDNet. N.p., 2 June 2014. Web. 23 
June 2014. <http://www.zdnet.com/research-92-interested-in-wearables-7000030054/>. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 
17 Ibid.
After wearable technology passes the test on business value, it’s time to start 
asking questions regarding usage and guidelines. You’ll need to explicitly 
address when and how wearables can be used and outline a formal policy 
that is distributed across the company. To get started, it’s a good idea to ask 
and answer a few key questions to help shape your corporate policy. Some of 
these questions are: 
• Will all employees be allowed to use wearable technology, or will certain 
types of employees be barred from doing so? 
• Will anyone be required to use it to do their job? 
• How will personnel be identified and approved for its use? 
• Is it necessary to restrict capabilities, such as by disabling certain features? 
• Where will wearable technology will be allowed or prohibited? 
Answers to these questions will help build the foundation for a wearable 
technology policy—to put it bluntly, giving employees guidelines designed to 
protect both data and privacy rights is a “must have.” Within the corporation, 
just like the BYOD trend, companies must outline exactly when and where 
wearable technologies can be used, along with what is off limits. For example, 
you may want to ban wearables in meetings or other key business interactions 
to make sure nothing is being recorded without permission. Although Google 
Glasses have a blinking light to let others know when they are in use, this won’t 
necessarily stop people from using it in inappropriate settings—the same holds 
true for other wearables. 
Overall, experts suggest that policies and procedures should be driven by the HR 
function. Particularly, HR teams should: 
• review and update employment contracts and any applicable corresponding 
social media or disciplinary policy to expressly prohibit the acquisition and 
disclosure of confidential information through wearable technology; 
• remind the workforce of confidentiality regulations; 
• ensure that any monitoring of communications policy includes wearable 
technology; and 
• update dress code policies to prevent undetected use or make it easy to see 
when someone is using a wearable.18 
These are all critical activities that can help protect intellectual capital and 
avoid privacy violations. More importantly, employees need to be reminded 
of any existing policies related to confidentiality across the organization and 
18 Wessing, Taylor. “The Wearable Technology Revolution: Is Your Workplace Prepared?” Global Data Hub. N.p., 
June 2013. Web. 07 July 2014. <http://www.taylorwessing.com/globaldatahub/article_wearable_technology_ 
revolution.html>. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
understand the same regulations apply to wearables. It’s really about enhanced 
communication on how and when wearable technology can be used, and then 
communicating this policy consistently across the organization. 
Enforcing theater etiquette 
You have the policies in place, how do you enforce them? Unfortunately, many 
companies do not measure or evaluate compliance—even when it comes to things 
like BYOD. In fact, in the area of network management, research shows that 
93 percent of companies implemented network management tools to protect 
data and unauthorized access, yet a mere 23 percent bother to review whether 
networks are jeopardized.19 Research also shows that, despite the security features 
offered by network tools, almost 65 percent of companies can’t differentiate 
between wired and wireless devices on their network. 
Enforcement of wearable technology policies is critical. A company should 
conduct regular and frequent reviews to make sure network access guidelines are 
obeyed. Human resource teams must be diligent—after all, if you aren’t following 
up with wearable guidelines, there’s no point in establishing them at all. There 
are activities that HR can do to monitor implementation of corporate policy. Some 
of these include: 
• checking disciplinary and grievance policies to ensure that employees are 
expressly prohibited from bringing such devices into hearings and formal 
meetings; 
• enforcing policies and verifying compliance in order to avoid covert 
recording and harassment allegations; 
• regulating the use of wearable technology in the workplace; and 
• expressly prohibiting the recording of individuals around the office, and 
taking a zero-tolerance approach to such recordings. 
What else can human resources do to get ready for the wearable revolution? 
Mainly, it’s necessary to make sure everyone in the company is on the same page 
when it comes to using wearables. Training sessions should spend time reviewing 
guidelines in detail and provide real life examples on what is permitted. Be 
clear and concise regarding use, and make sure employees understand the 
consequences of misuse. 
19 Rossi, Ben.“85% of the Public Sector Is Unprepared for the Impact of Wearable Technology on Its IT 
Infrastructure.” Information Age. N.p., 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/ 
technology/data-centre-and-it-infrastructure/123457858/85-public-sector-unprepared-impact-wearable-technology- 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 
its-it-infrastructure>.
In closing, these recommendations are just a starting point, and as employees 
continue to introduce new wearables to the office, policies and procedures 
will need to be updated and enforced. It will become a continuous process as 
wearables become more commonplace. Just when you think you’ve outlined how 
and when to use wearables, a new host of challenges may emerge that require 
you to revisit the policy as a whole. 
Oops … don’t forget to bring the magic hat 
and wand on the stage 
You’d be remiss to take to the stage without a magic hat and wand, just as 
you’d be remiss if you didn’t address the technology needs that accompany 
wearables. Overall, wearable technology will present challenges to the existing 
technology infrastructure and may require significant adjustments. Just when 
companies finally figured out how to implement BYOD, wearables are added 
to the mix, adding yet another dimension of technology challenges. The 
technology requirements for wearables could be a paper in itself, but a few 
are outlined below. 
Some of the technology challenges are the same as those presented by BYOD–it 
will require IT teams to revisit big issues such as data security and network access. 
You may need to bulk up your technology team and make sure that wearable 
technology does not put your organization at risk. Simply, there will be more 
opportunity to access corporate data—this will put data protection and security 
in the spotlight. Accordingly, you might need to hire more people to manage and 
monitor wearable access long term. Think about these costs in advance so you 
aren’t caught off guard. 
What about the costs of upgrading networks or using more technology to protect 
corporate data? This could potentially be yet another investment required 
from your organization, although you might be able to leverage mobile device 
management (MDM) software that’s already in place. Some experts suggest that 
companies should have, at a minimum, a personal firewall, antivirus software and 
protection from malware. If you don’t have this type of software in place you 
might consider investing in new platforms. Again, factor in the costs early on to 
avoid any surprises. 
As with BYOD, you should also consider what happens when an employee loses 
a device or moves on to another company. You’ll need a way to make sure they 
don’t leave with sensitive corporate data and that network access is terminated. 
Likewise, if an employee loses the device, there should be remote capabilities to 
delete data and access. Consider developing remote-wipe services to protect the 
data from falling into the wrong hands. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
Other security services to explore include hard disk or file encryption, strong 
authentication, secure communications, ensured integrity and digital signatures. 
Security services such as these should be tested and configured for wearables 
to make sure you can protect corporate data and access. At the very least, 
think about requiring wearable users to protect individual accounts with login 
authentication and strong passwords. This can help verify their identity and 
prevent unauthorized access. It will also alert the organization when and how a 
wearable is connecting to the network. 
Ready to sell out the theater? 
In truth, there’s no magical wand—most companies are still figuring out 
how to implement wearables, particularly because it’s so new. But just as a 
good magician gauges the audience before a show—your company should 
do the same and view the level of interest and feasibility behind wearables. 
Some are making it up as they go along and crossing their fingers that 
wearables will not cause a major upheaval in the office. But just as you wouldn’t 
risk sawing the lady in half unless you knew what you were doing, you shouldn’t 
give the green light for wearables unless you’re positive it will work. Like BYOD, 
you must establish guidelines and policies before moving forward. Figuring out 
how to do this will make implementation easier in the longer term. And who 
knows, your organization could turn out to be the next box office hit in the 
magical world of wearables. 
4imprint serves more than 100,000 businesses with innovative promotional items throughout the United States, 
Canada, United Kingdom and Ireland. Its product offerings include giveaways, business gifts, personalized gifts, 
embroidered apparel, promotional pens, travel mugs, tote bags, water bottles, Post-it Notes, custom calendars, 
and many other promotional items. For additional information, log on to www.4imprint.com. 
© 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved

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1 p 14-0714 wearable technology part 2 blue paper

  • 1. Wearable Technology Part 2 4imprint.com
  • 2. Prepare to be amazed—the magic of wearable technology is coming to a theatre near you By now, if you read part one of the series on wearable technology, http:// info.4imprint.com/blue-paper/wearable-technology-part-1/ you are familiar with the magical world of wearable technology and know that it’s a trend that is probably here to stay. The trend is not slowing down either, in fact it’s growing at exponential speed. In fact, Gartner® claims that in the upcoming year, demand for wearable technologies will exceed tablet demand. Moreover, it’s estimated that this year, the wearable devices market will reach approximately 2 million units.1 And that’s only scratching the surface—by 2018, research shows that wearable device shipments will reach anywhere from 130 to as much as 170 million.2 Even by the end of 2014, it is predicted that wearable use will increase by 10 times the initial estimate.3 In case you’re still in the dark, let’s shed some light on wearable technology. Essentially, wearable technology is the concept of gadgets, worn on the body, that do everything from monitor personal body performance or help you complete activities otherwise performed on a computer or laptop. A wearable can come in the form of many things—from eyeglasses, clothing, watches and more. It’s like magic, except there’s no hidden illusion—it’s real. The wearable technology revolution is changing the business landscape, and companies need to be prepared if they decide to permit wearable use in the office. Yet estimates show that 85 percent of the public sector is unprepared for the impact of wearable technology on its IT infrastructure.4 Is your company one of the 85 percent? Do you know how to manage the implementation of wearable technologies across your organization? Even more importantly, is it a good idea in the first place? Just as you wouldn’t throw a magic show without some practice, you shouldn’t allow wearables in the office unless you’ve weighed the pros and cons and thought about how to do it. Too much can go wrong if you don’t, exposing tricks of the trade to a wider audience. First and foremost, companies need to consider if there is business value to wearables and whether or not the pros outweigh 1 Rossi, Ben. “Wearable Technology: A Cyber Risk on Your Wrist? | Information Age.” Information Age. N.p., 8 May 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/technology/security/123457968/wearable-technology- © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved cyber-risk-your-wrist>. 2 Green, Chloe. “Wearable Device Shipments to Reach 130 Million by 2018 | Information Age.” Information Age. N.p., 2 Dec. 2013. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/technology/mobile-and-networking/ 123457481/wearable-device-shipments-to-reach-130-million-by-2018>. 3 Rossi, Ben. “85% of the Public Sector Is Unprepared for the Impact of Wearable Technology on Its IT Infrastructure.” Information Age. N.p., 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/ technology/data-centre-and-it-infrastructure/123457858/85-public-sector-unprepared-impact-wearable-technology- its-it-infrastructure>. 4 Ibid.
  • 3. the cons. This Blue Paper® examines the implications of wearable technology, particularly what it means to the workplace and how it will affect business functions like human resources (HR) and technology. As noted, few companies have policies to manage the growing trend, yet it needs to be addressed. This paper will identify how to be prepared and provide business leaders with tips on how to establish guidelines and enforce policies, should you choose to adopt a wearable policy in the first place. So get ready to take to the stage, because it’s time for the curtain call. It’s not all magic and fun behind the scenes: The impact of wearable technology The thrilling world of wearable technology is enticing and most can’t take their eyes off the stage. But as fascinating as it might be, the allure comes with a cost. A lot goes on behind the scenes, and if you aren’t prepared, you might not be able to afford the show. In other words, wearable technology will challenge corporations in three key areas, and the implications should be addressed before unleashing the magic. These include: data protection, privacy protection and system security and bandwidth.5 Data protection methods will be challenged by wearables, and this will require you to review current practices to make sure they are sufficient. To protect corporate data, you might have to take it up a notch and upgrade security and impose tighter controls. Why? Because all of a sudden, employees have unprecedented access to sensitive business information, thus presenting more opportunities for misuse. Just like the Bring Your Own Device trend, companies need to take measures to protect intellectual capital. You might be able to leverage some of the data protection measures found in BYOD policies— companies that have a BYOD policy will be a step ahead. But wearable technology will be far more complex, leading some to say it will seem like a cakewalk in comparison to BYOD implementation. There are a host of new issues and risks, and additional security measures might be required. Once again, as with BYOD, the data ownership will be called into question. Companies need to determine who will own the data contained in wearables. Will data be owned by the individual or the company? If data on a wearable has personal information, will companies be able to access it? Believe it or not, some organizations require full access to any data on a wearable—even if it’s personal information.6 It’s becoming more commonplace to demand full disclosure and permit corporate access to any information captured in your wearable if they are used for business functions. 5 Rossi, Ben. “85% of the Public Sector Is Unprepared for the Impact of Wearable Technology on Its IT Infrastructure.” Information Age. N.p., 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/ technology/data-centre-and-it-infrastructure/123457858/85-public-sector-unprepared-impact-wearable-technology- © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved its-it-infrastructure>. 6 Ng, Cindy. “5 Privacy Concerns about Wearable Technology.” Varonis Blog The Metadata Era RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 June 2014. <http://blog.varonis.com/5-privacy-concerns-about-wearable-technology/>.
  • 4. Perhaps the largest impact of wearable technology relates to privacy, particularly how it is upheld and maintained. Employees will no longer simply be using a desktop computer to carry out their daily duties, but will be able to interact and engage with a whole host of computing interfaces, often without your knowledge. You won’t necessarily know when information is being collected or recorded, and it could violate privacy rights. Companies must be vigilant in defining safeguards to ensure employees are not violating the privacy of others in the organization. As noted in the next section, in the future, privacy rights may be tightly controlled—at this moment new legislation is pulling in the reins on the issue. In fact, some states are already lobbying for greater controls and regulations surrounding the use of wearables. Along these same lines, wearable technology will present challenges to confidentiality. Users will have access to confidential information, literally with the blink of an eye, and it will be hard to know when employees are accessing valuable information. Your business could be at risk from employees covertly copying crucial and sensitive information via wearable technology and later downloading this information onto Cloud-like networks or their own personal desktop. Data can even be passed directly to a competitor without you ever knowing it. Accordingly, companies need to be proactive and find ways to protect confidential business knowledge. Finally, wearables will impact security and bandwidth. Today, an employee may have only a few devices accessing the network, but this number could jump to as much as 15 to 20 devices per employee in the upcoming years.7 Companies need to make sure they are ready for increased traffic and establish advanced security measures in order to access servers or other corporate repositories. You’ll also need to ensure enough security is in place to prevent unauthorized third parties from deciphering the content. Administrators can employ greater Secure Socket Layer (SSL) protocols for encryption that safeguard materials in transit from being snooped or stolen by a third party, but protection will take time and money. What about network capabilities? Is your current network ready for the bandwidth required to handle the influx of wearable devices? Companies need to look at the existing network and reevaluate its capabilities to make sure it can handle increases in traffic and access. As the adoption of wearable technology gains momentum, many organizations risk losing control of their network with device overload. 7 “The Effect of Wearable Technology on the Corporate Network in 2014.” TechRadar. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 June 2014. <http://www.techradar.com/us/news/world-of-tech/future-tech/the-effect-of-wearable-technology-on-the-corporate- © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved network-in-2014-1207314#null>.
  • 5. Silence cell phones and turn off cameras before the show—addressing privacy You’ve probably been in a theater that asks the audience to turn off phones before a performance or screening and explicitly prohibits the use of video cameras. This practice isn’t just to limit disruptions for the audience and actors— there are usually legitimate concerns behind this policy. If you think about it, as a magician, your biggest asset is the ability to captivate an audience with a slight of the hand. One video can expose your trick, impacting show profits and sales. The same principle holds true in a business setting. If you don’t protect your organization and employees from unwanted (or illegal) exposure, the effects can impact your business for years to come. Trade secrets, proprietary information and critical business strategies can be easily captured and dispersed to competitors or other third parties. You can also be held liable for violating personal privacy rights if you aren’t careful about documenting the use of wearable technology. Employees might even use captured data to support lawsuit claims or other litigation. Ultimately, the issue is about privacy and protecting it for both the corporation and the individual. As noted, privacy issues will be at the forefront of the debate regarding wearable technology. Google Glass has barely hit the market but some are already advocating for increased regulations. Privacy watchdogs in particular are concerned about protecting personal privacy—particularly in light of the recent revelations regarding the National Security Agency (NSA) and what some viewed as a privacy infringement. Other legislation is in the works to control when wearables can’t be used. Overall, it’s safe to say that the use of wearables will face an uphill battle as demands to protect privacy and safety emerge from a number of different sources. For example, some restaurants, casinos, bars and theaters have already banned the use of Google Glass out of fear that patrons or customers could be photographed or recorded without explicit permission. In fact, in 2013, a Seattle restaurant made headlines when it banned wearable technology to make customers feel safe. It is likely that legislation will address where a wearable device can be used and require full disclosure from users. In the interim, other companies are asking employees to wear a plastic identification tag, much like a security card, to alert others that they have a personal device in their possession. Although Google Glass, for instance, is designed to flash a blinking light when it is use, some aren’t convinced that wearables, or the person wearing them, will accurately alert when they are or are not in use. Full disclosure is becoming the expected norm, but enforcing compliance can be tricky, especially when some wearables are small and nearly undetectable. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
  • 6. To an extent, the healthcare arena has already tackled the privacy issue. You are probably familiar with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). In brief, the legislation aims to safeguard private health information across any platform. Healthcare organizations are also required to notify users if there’s been a security breech regarding their personal information. But despite these protections, HIPPAA policies don’t necessarily extend to regulate wearables, even if the wearable is designed to collect data related to personal health. In other words, while HIPPA compliance is mandated in healthcare, it doesn’t extend to corporations. Few organizations outside of the healthcare industry apply HIPPA standards—so far there is only one documented case where a company adopted HIPPA and state security laws across the organization. The California-based company Lark® which creates wearables that track sleep patterns, unveiled a stringent privacy policy that weaves HIPPA elements with additional privacy guidelines. For example, explicit consent is required to provide access to sleep data and privacy protection policies are clearly outlined and enforced. As an individual, to maintain personal privacy, read the fine print and pay attention to measures designed to ensure data safety and security. Most consumers object to allowing third parties access to personal information, especially without their knowledge. Yet while some disclaimers say that privacy is respected, if you read closely there might be disclosures that say your information may be shared with third parties in certain cases. Read privacy guidelines with a careful eye to fully understand how personal information might be used and find out exactly how privacy is protected from unauthorized access, use or reuse. Again, some apps and websites promise that information will not be shared and provide opt-out options, but it’s not always obvious how to do this. Privacy is just one area that might see increased regulation with the introduction of wearable technology. Other legislation in the works prevents wearables while driving. The concern, obviously, is that using wearables while driving will present a danger to both the individual and others around them. For this reason, some believe it should be illegal to use wearables while driving or performing other activities that require your full attention. A few states introduced legislation that bans all wearables, including Google Glass, while driving. Google is aggressively fighting those efforts.8 Opponents to the legislation, including Google, claim that in some cases the wearables are less distracting than cell phones or GPS devices because they don’t have to be held in your hand. 8 Kline, Daniel. “Google Takes on Laws That Ban Wearable Technology.” N.p., 28 Feb. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/02/28/google-takes-on-laws-that-ban-wearable-technology.aspx>. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
  • 7. Use of Google Glass may also open up a host of legal issues—in some cases, wearables use may violate existing laws. Today, anti-wiretapping or privacy laws in some states prohibit recording private conversations without the consent of all of the parties involved. In one case, an Ohio man was questioned about wearing Google Glasses in a movie theater. It is a federal offense and considered piracy to record movies in a theater, and the individual was detained and questioned regarding his activities and intent. Google is being proactive and established policies aimed to protect privacy and define proper use. The company published a guide for those that use Google Glass and outlines the dos and don’ts that individuals should practice when wearing Glass. Google itself used the derogatory term cautioning users not to be a “glasshole” and the phrase has caught on to describe any inappropriate use of Glass. The guidelines touch on some obvious times you should avoid use, such as high impact sports. It also suggests that they are not to be used for an extended period of time. Overall, Google recommends that users adopt the same policy as cell phones—if it’s not appropriate for a cell phone camera, it’s not appropriate for Glass. Consider leveraging some of the guidelines created by Google across your organization for any and all wearables. If nothing else, it’s a good starting point to open dialogue and establish boundaries. Since the rise of wearable technology appears unstoppable, it will face many legal challenges to come. You can bet that further official guidelines and legislation will be necessary to ensure that the implications of use are controlled and safe for everyone. Companies will need to pay close attention to the debate to make sure their organizations comply with any additional restrictions that are applied. The dress rehearsal—ironing out the details With so many challenges and business implications, many companies get cold feet when they think of taking the show on the road. At this point, you may be wondering if introducing wearables in your organization is even worth the effort. Before the show takes to the stage, you might consider whether the theater will sell out and if the show will be profitable. In other words, ask a fundamental question: Will your company benefit from wearable technology? Some say that wearable technology should only be considered acceptable in the office if it brings value to the company or makes an employee’s life easier so he/ she can perform better.9 It’s a big undertaking, and if you’re only doing it to keep up with other kids on the block, you might reevaluate its appeal. You will need to 9 “Protecting Data Against Wearable Technology Risks.” Security 500. N.p., 1 June 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/85549-protecting-data-against-wearable-technology-risks>. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
  • 8. invest time and money in the process, and if there’s no business value, you might consider postponing opening night. The bottom line? Look at the whole picture before saying yes to wearable technology. And, in many cases, organizations are saying no, despite the rising popularity. According to a study from Tech Pro®, only 11 percent said their organizations are using, implementing or allocating budgets toward wearables. Another 25 percent said they are planning to implement but haven’t established a budget, and a whopping 64 percent reported no interest or plans to deploy wearables.10 (Figure 1.) Figure 1. Use of wearables across organizations For some, despite the challenges to infrastructure and privacy, some companies say there are tangible business benefits that outweigh any of the downsides. Indeed, according to a recent study, wearables may improve productivity as much as 8.5 percent and increase job satisfaction by 3.5 percent.11 Likewise, research from Gartner® forecasts that Google Glass and other «smart glasses” alone will help make employees more efficient, ultimately adding more than $1 billion per year to company profits by 2017.12 And many employees are ready to embrace the trend. A study from Cornerstone OnDemand®, a Caliornia-based technology provider, found that 58 percent of employees would be willing to use wearable tech if it enabled them to do their jobs better.13 10 Hammond, Teena. “Research: 92 Percent Are Interested in Wearables.” ZDNet. N.p., 2 June 2014. Web. 23 June 2014. <http://www.zdnet.com/research-92-interested-in-wearables-7000030054/>. 11 “Wearable Technology Can Boost Employee Productivity, Job Satisfaction: Study.” Tech Times RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 June 2014. <http://www.techtimes.com/articles/6396/20140503/wearable-technology-can-boost-employee- © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved productivity-job-satisfaction-study.htm>. 12 Starner, Tom. “Wearable Tech in the Workplace.” www.HREOnline.com. N.p., 16 Jan. 2014. Web. 23 June 2014. <http://www.hreonline.com/HRE/view/story.jhtml?id=534356618>. 13 Ibid.
  • 9. Some of the benefits are discussed in part one of this series, but what are some real world examples on how it can improve your business? In other words, where will you find true business value that can be gained by wearable technology? As outlined in part one of the series, experts say wearables can help with simple business tasks, such as: • tracking mileage and business expenses more accurately; • distributing business cards; • gathering biometric data; and • providing on-the-fly sales data.14 But wearables may have additional business benefits and show great promise in the following areas: • measuring employee productivity; • monitoring employee activity in the workplace; • allowing for collaboration and information sharing; • enhancing workplace safety; and • enhancing employee training through simulation and virtual augmented reality.15 You might ask if wearables will improve productivity or help monitor key business activities in your organization. Perhaps it will help track time more efficiently and seamlessly log hours for payroll. With more automation, employees will spend less time on busywork and more time with customers. It might also have an impact on improving collaboration and information sharing. Some of the wearable technology will make it seem as though teams are meeting in-person, thus enabling a greater exchange of information and collaboration. How will it enhance workplace safety? If your company is one that provides installation or maintenance services, wearables might be beneficial because they will allow employees in the field to access technical documentation or procedures in real-time. Inspectors checking the safety of a fleet of tractor-trailers could similarly use wearables to generate safety inspection data and regulations. In addition, those who work in potentially dangerous environments will be able to access data instantaneously and document information quickly. 14 Purdy, Kevin. “4 Ways Wearable Technology May Soon Benefit Your Business.” Workintelligently. N.p., 17 Feb. 2014. Web. 10 June 2014. <http://www.workintelligent.ly/technology/trends/wearable-technology/>. 15 “Wearable Technology Is Making a Splash in the Workplace.” The Inquisitr News. N.p., 23 Jan. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.inquisitr.com/1106532/wearable-technology-is-making-a-splash-in-the-workplace/>. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
  • 10. Some say that the ability to provide more efficient and realistic training will shorten onboarding processes, thus freeing up time for human resources and other business functions. Wearables may guide new employees around the office to learn the layout and keep track of new names and faces. Plus, providing realistic simulations and augmented reality could make training a more hands-on, interactive experience. Overall, experts believe that wearables will have the potential to become cost-effective enhancements to internal training curriculum. Are you curious as to what industries are using wearable technology? Figure 2. illustrates the industries that are implementing wearables. Not surprising, healthcare has the greatest deployment of wearables, with 54 percent reporting that they’re either using wearable technology or are in the midst of implementing, or planning to implement wearables. On the flip side, 78 percent of government organizations have no plans to implement wearable technology whatsoever.16 Figure 2. Industry implementation of wearables17 Opening night—are you ready for the magic show? If you’ve decided to jump on board and embrace wearable technology, it’s time to make some magic happen. You need to make sure your company is ready to open the doors and give the audience a good show. So where do you start? 16 Hammond, Teena. “Research: 92 Percent Are Interested in Wearables.” ZDNet. N.p., 2 June 2014. Web. 23 June 2014. <http://www.zdnet.com/research-92-interested-in-wearables-7000030054/>. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved 17 Ibid.
  • 11. After wearable technology passes the test on business value, it’s time to start asking questions regarding usage and guidelines. You’ll need to explicitly address when and how wearables can be used and outline a formal policy that is distributed across the company. To get started, it’s a good idea to ask and answer a few key questions to help shape your corporate policy. Some of these questions are: • Will all employees be allowed to use wearable technology, or will certain types of employees be barred from doing so? • Will anyone be required to use it to do their job? • How will personnel be identified and approved for its use? • Is it necessary to restrict capabilities, such as by disabling certain features? • Where will wearable technology will be allowed or prohibited? Answers to these questions will help build the foundation for a wearable technology policy—to put it bluntly, giving employees guidelines designed to protect both data and privacy rights is a “must have.” Within the corporation, just like the BYOD trend, companies must outline exactly when and where wearable technologies can be used, along with what is off limits. For example, you may want to ban wearables in meetings or other key business interactions to make sure nothing is being recorded without permission. Although Google Glasses have a blinking light to let others know when they are in use, this won’t necessarily stop people from using it in inappropriate settings—the same holds true for other wearables. Overall, experts suggest that policies and procedures should be driven by the HR function. Particularly, HR teams should: • review and update employment contracts and any applicable corresponding social media or disciplinary policy to expressly prohibit the acquisition and disclosure of confidential information through wearable technology; • remind the workforce of confidentiality regulations; • ensure that any monitoring of communications policy includes wearable technology; and • update dress code policies to prevent undetected use or make it easy to see when someone is using a wearable.18 These are all critical activities that can help protect intellectual capital and avoid privacy violations. More importantly, employees need to be reminded of any existing policies related to confidentiality across the organization and 18 Wessing, Taylor. “The Wearable Technology Revolution: Is Your Workplace Prepared?” Global Data Hub. N.p., June 2013. Web. 07 July 2014. <http://www.taylorwessing.com/globaldatahub/article_wearable_technology_ revolution.html>. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
  • 12. understand the same regulations apply to wearables. It’s really about enhanced communication on how and when wearable technology can be used, and then communicating this policy consistently across the organization. Enforcing theater etiquette You have the policies in place, how do you enforce them? Unfortunately, many companies do not measure or evaluate compliance—even when it comes to things like BYOD. In fact, in the area of network management, research shows that 93 percent of companies implemented network management tools to protect data and unauthorized access, yet a mere 23 percent bother to review whether networks are jeopardized.19 Research also shows that, despite the security features offered by network tools, almost 65 percent of companies can’t differentiate between wired and wireless devices on their network. Enforcement of wearable technology policies is critical. A company should conduct regular and frequent reviews to make sure network access guidelines are obeyed. Human resource teams must be diligent—after all, if you aren’t following up with wearable guidelines, there’s no point in establishing them at all. There are activities that HR can do to monitor implementation of corporate policy. Some of these include: • checking disciplinary and grievance policies to ensure that employees are expressly prohibited from bringing such devices into hearings and formal meetings; • enforcing policies and verifying compliance in order to avoid covert recording and harassment allegations; • regulating the use of wearable technology in the workplace; and • expressly prohibiting the recording of individuals around the office, and taking a zero-tolerance approach to such recordings. What else can human resources do to get ready for the wearable revolution? Mainly, it’s necessary to make sure everyone in the company is on the same page when it comes to using wearables. Training sessions should spend time reviewing guidelines in detail and provide real life examples on what is permitted. Be clear and concise regarding use, and make sure employees understand the consequences of misuse. 19 Rossi, Ben.“85% of the Public Sector Is Unprepared for the Impact of Wearable Technology on Its IT Infrastructure.” Information Age. N.p., 1 Apr. 2014. Web. 17 June 2014. <http://www.information-age.com/ technology/data-centre-and-it-infrastructure/123457858/85-public-sector-unprepared-impact-wearable-technology- © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved its-it-infrastructure>.
  • 13. In closing, these recommendations are just a starting point, and as employees continue to introduce new wearables to the office, policies and procedures will need to be updated and enforced. It will become a continuous process as wearables become more commonplace. Just when you think you’ve outlined how and when to use wearables, a new host of challenges may emerge that require you to revisit the policy as a whole. Oops … don’t forget to bring the magic hat and wand on the stage You’d be remiss to take to the stage without a magic hat and wand, just as you’d be remiss if you didn’t address the technology needs that accompany wearables. Overall, wearable technology will present challenges to the existing technology infrastructure and may require significant adjustments. Just when companies finally figured out how to implement BYOD, wearables are added to the mix, adding yet another dimension of technology challenges. The technology requirements for wearables could be a paper in itself, but a few are outlined below. Some of the technology challenges are the same as those presented by BYOD–it will require IT teams to revisit big issues such as data security and network access. You may need to bulk up your technology team and make sure that wearable technology does not put your organization at risk. Simply, there will be more opportunity to access corporate data—this will put data protection and security in the spotlight. Accordingly, you might need to hire more people to manage and monitor wearable access long term. Think about these costs in advance so you aren’t caught off guard. What about the costs of upgrading networks or using more technology to protect corporate data? This could potentially be yet another investment required from your organization, although you might be able to leverage mobile device management (MDM) software that’s already in place. Some experts suggest that companies should have, at a minimum, a personal firewall, antivirus software and protection from malware. If you don’t have this type of software in place you might consider investing in new platforms. Again, factor in the costs early on to avoid any surprises. As with BYOD, you should also consider what happens when an employee loses a device or moves on to another company. You’ll need a way to make sure they don’t leave with sensitive corporate data and that network access is terminated. Likewise, if an employee loses the device, there should be remote capabilities to delete data and access. Consider developing remote-wipe services to protect the data from falling into the wrong hands. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved
  • 14. Other security services to explore include hard disk or file encryption, strong authentication, secure communications, ensured integrity and digital signatures. Security services such as these should be tested and configured for wearables to make sure you can protect corporate data and access. At the very least, think about requiring wearable users to protect individual accounts with login authentication and strong passwords. This can help verify their identity and prevent unauthorized access. It will also alert the organization when and how a wearable is connecting to the network. Ready to sell out the theater? In truth, there’s no magical wand—most companies are still figuring out how to implement wearables, particularly because it’s so new. But just as a good magician gauges the audience before a show—your company should do the same and view the level of interest and feasibility behind wearables. Some are making it up as they go along and crossing their fingers that wearables will not cause a major upheaval in the office. But just as you wouldn’t risk sawing the lady in half unless you knew what you were doing, you shouldn’t give the green light for wearables unless you’re positive it will work. Like BYOD, you must establish guidelines and policies before moving forward. Figuring out how to do this will make implementation easier in the longer term. And who knows, your organization could turn out to be the next box office hit in the magical world of wearables. 4imprint serves more than 100,000 businesses with innovative promotional items throughout the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Ireland. Its product offerings include giveaways, business gifts, personalized gifts, embroidered apparel, promotional pens, travel mugs, tote bags, water bottles, Post-it Notes, custom calendars, and many other promotional items. For additional information, log on to www.4imprint.com. © 2014 4imprint, Inc. All rights reserved