Eurodidaweb2013 05-06

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Eurodidaweb2013 05-06

  1. 1. Eurodidaweb 201305/6-05/10 / 2013-Stefano Lariccia – Digilab- NoematicsSapienza Università di RomaAlberto PigliacelliEuropaclubFrom e-learning to Web-learning:placeless, connected, expansible, flexible,effective learningstefano.lariccia@uniroma1.it
  2. 2. Premises and objectives• What are the objectives of this course?– The main objective of this course is to expose theparticipants / (emulating) students, to a vast body ofknowledge and competences on the different uses ofICT (information and communication technologies)throughout the globe, focusing especially on– new learning methods based on the– ubiquitous worldwideweb.This is what we call– web-learning. Much of the class focuses ondiscussion based on readings assigned out of class.
  3. 3. Premises and objectives• What are the objectives of thiscourse?– Another objective of this course is to givestudents hands-on experience with:• web 2.0 / web 3.0 tools to cope with thecomplexity of the cloud based, ubiquitous, newstyle of knowledge management;• with international practices of web-learningthrough web technology; with a critical analysisof what our students are exposed to in theirnomadic usage of the Web.
  4. 4. Premises and objectives• What are the objectives of thiscourse?–Throughout the course, during thisweek, we work on:• globally-based projects• that leverage the benefits of informationand communication technologies• to positively affect many diverse learningcommunity.
  5. 5. Premises and objectives• What are the objectives of this course?• How will be achieved?
  6. 6. premises• How will be achieved?In grasping experience some of us perceive new informationthrough experiencing the concrete, tangible, felt qualities of theworld, relying on our senses and immersing ourselves in concretereality.Others tend to perceive, grasp, or take hold of new informationthrough symbolic representation or abstract conceptualization –thinking about, analyzing, or systematically planning, rather thanusing sensation as a guide.Similarly, in transforming or processing experience some of us tendto carefully watch others who are involved in the experience andreflect on what happens, while others choose to jump right in andstart doing things. The watchers favor reflective observation, whilethe doers favor active experimentation.
  7. 7. premises• How will be achieved?Each dimension of the learning process presents us with achoice. Since it is virtually impossible, for example, tosimultaneously• drive a car (Concrete Experience) and• analyze a driver’s manual about the car’s functioning(Abstract Conceptualization), we resolve the conflict bychoosing.Because of our hereditary equipment, our particular past lifeexperiences, and the demands of our presentenvironment, we develop a preferred way of choosing.We resolve the conflict between concrete or abstract andbetween active or reflective in some patterned, characteristicways.We call these patterned ways “learning styles.”Kolb, D. A. (1984) Experiential Learning. Englewood Cliffs, NJ.Prentice HallRead more: Experiential Workplace Learning | E-LearningCurve Blog
  8. 8. Web learning: basics• What is the WorldWideWeb?• When it was developed?• Who controls its progress and its evolution?• Why the web is so fast-growing?• Why a teacher / learner should learn aboutthe WorldWideWeb?
  9. 9. WorldWideWeb=learning• You are using e-mail: e-mail started since 1970• You are using e-learning: e-learning started in1980• 2010 and forward: you will probably use web-learning: where the web 2.0-3.0 and ease ofuse are bridging together to enhance teachingand learning activities
  10. 10. Web-learning 2.0 basics:let me introduce to you some useful tool
  11. 11. Web-learning 2.0 basics:let me introduce to you some useful tool1. Internet is a safe place… provided youbehave safely. Once you will begin to use theWeb 2.0 you will discover soon that a Web2.0 user is overwhelmed by many accesspasswords.2. First of all, then, you need a keychain3. My suggestion is: Lastpass; OpenSource, free,
  12. 12. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)1. Internet is a safe place… provided youbehave safely. Once you will begin to use theWeb 2.0 you will discover soon that a Web2.0 user is overwhelmed by many accesspasswords.2. First of all, then, you need a keychain3. My suggestion is: LastPass ****; OpenSource, free,
  13. 13. 1. Internet is a huge place… and you can loose yourselfin the clouds…2. Once you will begin to use the Web 2.0 you willdiscover soon that a Web 2.0 user is overwhelmedby many bookmarks ...3. And the right one is ever in the wrong place. Let’stransform Bookmarks into “placeless tags”: xmarkswill do this work for youWeb-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  14. 14. 1. Internet is a huge place… and you can looseyour own teaching material …2. Once again you will need a placeless safelocation to save your didactic presentation ...3. You’ve got thousands of slideshowspresentation … And the right one is ever inthe wrong place. Let’s transform PowerPointinto “placeless slide repository”: Slidesharewill do this work for youWeb-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  15. 15. 1. Internet is such a huge repository … and youcan loose your own book reference list …2. Once again you will need a placeless safelocation to save your book references...3. You’ve got thousands of reading list for yourstudents … And the right one is ever in thewrong place. Let’s transform “Biblioscape”into a “placeless references repository”:Citeulike will do this work for youWeb-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  16. 16. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)1. Internet is such a huge repository … and youcan loose your own Contact List …2. Once again you will need a placeless safelocation to save your book references...3. You’ve got thousands of reading list for yourstudents … And the right one is ever in thewrong place. Let’s transform “Outlook” into a“placeless contact list and calendar”: Plaxowill do this work for you
  17. 17. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)1. Internet is such a huge repository … and you canloose your own Contact List and Calendar …2. Once again you will need a placeless safelocation to save your book references...3. You’ve got thousands of reading list for yourstudents … And the right one is ever in the wrongplace. Let’s transform “Outlook” into a “placelesscontact list and calendar”: Google Calendar will dothis work for you as well
  18. 18. • Social Network– Social Network management systems can be asupport to learning activities– You should try to encourage selection and usageof a serious social network like environment– Linkedin is a generalist yet “professional oriented”SN environmentWeb-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  19. 19. – Edmodo | Secure Social Learning Network for Teachers and Students• www.edmodo.com/; Edmodo provides a safe and easy way for your class to connect andcollaborate, share content, and access homework, grades and school notices. Our goal isto ...– TeachersRecess - The Teacher Social Network and File Sharing ...• www.teachersrecess.com/ The Teachers Social Network. ... Teachers Recess Community.Use the Community to: • Make Friends • Find Colleagues • Network • Share Ideas andMore! FAQs - Wtf911 swaggsec bitchessss - Help - Register now!– Home - Teachers Social Network• www.teachersn.com/ - Get in touch with other teachers trough this social network site.Exchange teaching experiences, ideas and teaching materials with other teachers andstudents. Lesson Plans - Register - Web Site Terms and ... - About– NEA - Online Social Networking for Educators• www.nea.org/home/20746.htm - The vast majority of educators use social networkingdiscreetly and professionally to make connections that can enhance careers, notjeopardize them.– 25 Excellent Social Media Sites for Teachers | The Digital Learning ...• toponlineuniversityreviews.com/.../25-excellent... - 25 Excellent Social Media Sites forTeachers. Are you a teacher who wants to increase collaboration and skill developmentto students? Teamwork can increase ...Web-learning 2.0 - Social Networks
  20. 20. – http://www.educationalnetworking.com/List+of+Networks– Guidelines for Educators Using Social Networking Sites - Home ...• doug-johnson.squarespace.com/.../guidelines-f... -• 7 Aug 2009 – The district strongly discourages teachers from accepting invitations to friend studentswithin these social networking sites. When students gain ...– Free Educational Resources for Educators and Teachers ...– www.teachade.com/ - Stati Uniti -– The first social networking website designed specifically for educators. Because of the abilityto harness the online community, Teachade has become one of the ...– Teachers and Social Networks: To Facebook Or Not To Facebook?• blogs.gartner.com/.../teachers-and-social-netwo... -• 6 Jun 2009 – First of all, there is no clear code of conduct for teachers on social media: someautomatically accept any students or parent s request, some ...– Teaching and learning through social networks | TeachingEnglish ...– www.teachingenglish.org.uk/.../teaching-learning-thro...– In 2007, the British Council conducted market research into how the Internet has affected thepreferred learning ...Web-learning 2.0 - Social Networks
  21. 21. – Impact of Social Networks on learning andteaching activities• http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC56958.pdfWeb-learning 2.0 - Social Networks
  22. 22. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  23. 23. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)• University of Auckland,• The Auckland University of Technology,
  24. 24. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  25. 25. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  26. 26. Web-learning 2.0 basics: (cont.)
  27. 27. Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0
  28. 28. Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0
  29. 29. Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0
  30. 30. Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0
  31. 31. Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0
  32. 32. Web 2.0 -> Web 3.0
  33. 33. Crowdsourcing - Crowdcast
  34. 34. Plone CMS – thinking as a PluralOne
  35. 35. Plone CMS – thinking as a PluralOne
  36. 36. Plone CMS – thinking as a PluralOne
  37. 37. Plone as a repository• IMS Consortium• IMS vision
  38. 38. Online Education Experiences usingPlone as a repository• OCW Consortium
  39. 39. Online Education Experiences usingPlone as a repository• OCW Consortium
  40. 40. Online Education Experiences usingPlone as a repository• OCW Consortium
  41. 41. Online Education Experiences usingPlone as a repository• OCW Consortium
  42. 42. Other Online Education Experiences• Openstudy (MIT)
  43. 43. Other Online Education Experiences• Mass WebLearning: EdXEdX Consortium:MIT,Harvard,Berkely …
  44. 44. Other educationalresources on the Web• Webinars for secondary schools– http://www.evobeaker.com/products-k-12/Webinars• Other resources for teachers– http://www.ies.be/training/bridging-the-gap
  45. 45. Resources and referencesResource type and name: References:Plone; A definitive Guide to PloneExe LO Editor Manual http://wikieducator.org/Online_manual/Embedding_eXe_resources

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