Yom KippurBy Philip SchultzYou are asked to stand and bow  your head,  consider the harm youve  caused,  the respect youve...
You are asked to believe in the  spark  of your divinity, in the purity  of the words of your mouth  and the memories of y...
You are asked to forgive the past and remember the dead, to gaze across the desert in your heart toward Jerusalem. To sepa...
To believe that no matter whatyou have done to yourself and othersmorning will come and the mountainof night will fade. To...
• Source:  http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/poem/2008/08/
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Yom Kippur, a poem

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Yom Kippur, a poem

  1. 1. Yom KippurBy Philip SchultzYou are asked to stand and bow your head, consider the harm youve caused, the respect youve withheld, the anger misspent, the fear spread, the earnestness displayed in the service of prestige and sensibility, all the callous, cruel, stubborn, joyless sins in your alphabet of woe so that you might be forgiven.
  2. 2. You are asked to believe in the spark of your divinity, in the purity of the words of your mouth and the memories of your heart. You are asked for this one day and one night to starve your body so your soul can feast on faith and adoration.
  3. 3. You are asked to forgive the past and remember the dead, to gaze across the desert in your heart toward Jerusalem. To separate the sacred from the profane and be as numerous as the sands and the stars of heaven.
  4. 4. To believe that no matter whatyou have done to yourself and othersmorning will come and the mountainof night will fade. To believe,for these few precious moments,in the utter sweetness of your life.You are asked to bow your headand remain standing,and say Amen.
  5. 5. • Source: http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/poem/2008/08/

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