Pancake Day worksheet

27,096 views

Published on

Published in: Spiritual, Health & Medicine
2 Comments
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Very great, Thanks ! More hotwebcam girls in live without registration on http://BestCamX.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • A really clear and well resourced lesson -ideal for a one off with a group or as a planned unit.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
27,096
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
76
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
590
Comments
2
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pancake Day worksheet

  1. 1. Teaching English Through the Topic A Scheme of Work designed by Gina Cocks Upper Primary Literacy, Science/Geography/History, Art Curriculum Learning Objectives through the cultural theme Pancake Day also Known as Shrove Tuesday
  2. 2. Teacher’s Information Sheet – Pancake Day/Shrove Tuesday By Gina Cocks In the UK, Shrove Tuesday is also known as Pancake Day because it is the one day of the year when almost everyone eats a pancake. The name Shrove comes from the old word quot;shrivequot; which means to confess. On Shrove Tuesday, the local church would ring the shriving bell to call people to come and confess their sins so that they were forgiven before the season of Lent began. Over the years the ringing bell has also become known as the pancake bell. Lent is important in the Christian calendar and begins on Ash Wednesday, the day after Pancake Day and lasts for 40 days (not including Sundays). It reminds people of the 40 days and nights that Jesus spent in the desert with no food being tempted by the devil. It is a time when Christians prepare for Easter by thinking of things they have done wrong and trying to correct them. They think about promises they have made in the past and how they can keep them. During Lent, some Christians ‘fast’. This means they stop eating ‘rich’ foods like meat, eggs, butter and milk. Nowadays, it is more common for people to only give up eating their favourite food, such as chocolate or cakes. Shrove Tuesday is the last chance to indulge yourself, and to use up the foods that aren't allowed during Lent. Since pancakes contain, butter, milk, flour and eggs (which were all forbidden during Lent) it became tradition to use up these ingredients by making pancakes for dinner on Shrove Tuesday. Pancake racing takes place in many counties across the UK. According to tradition, in 1445 a woman in a village called Olney in Buckinghamshire, heard the shriving bell being rang at the church but was still preparing her pancakes. The story says that so she wasn’t late to church she ran there in her apron, still clutching her frying pan. The Olney pancake race is now world
  3. 3. famous. Competitors have to be local housewives and they must wear an apron and a hat or scarf. Each contestant has a frying pan containing a hot pancake and she must toss it three times during the race. The first woman to complete the course and arrive at the church, serve her pancake to the bell ringer, and be kissed by him, is the winner. She also receives a prayer book from the vicar. The current record is 63 seconds set in 1967. During Shrovetide, (the three days before Lent) other activities take place. In Scarborough, on Shrove Tuesday, everyone assembles on the promenade to skip. Long ropes are stretched across the road and there maybe be ten or more people skipping on one rope. In Ashbourne, Derbyshire the oldest, largest, longest and maddest football game in the world takes place. The game begins on Shrove Tuesday and lasts two days, involving thousands of players. The goals are three miles apart and there are only a few rules. The ball is hand-painted and filled with cork. Vocabulary fast - to stop eating forbidden - not allowed Lent – 40 day period before Easter pancake - frixuelo – cake made from batter in a frying pan promenade- wide pavement next to the seafront rich foods - delicious, indulgent foods shrive - to confess sins shriving bell – bell rang to call people to church to confess shrove - old English from the verb ‘to shrive’ Shrovetide – 3 days before the beginning of Lent sins - bad things people say or do skipping - jumping over a turning rope toss - throw something high into the air and catch it again
  4. 4. Question and Answers Activity Game Photocopy and then cut out the questions and answers. Put children in small groups and give each group a question or an answer. The object of the game is for the children to read their paper and find its pair. Ask the groups to walk around the room asking each other to read their paper. All groups share their information with the class. Shrove Tuesday is the last chance to indulge yourself, and to use up the foods that aren't allowed during Lent. Pancakes are eaten on this day because they contain, butter, milk, flour and eggs which were all forbidden during Lent. So why do we eat pancakes on Shrove Tuesday? Lent begins on Ash Wednesday, the day after Pancake Day and lasts for 40 days (not including Sundays). 40 days has a special meaning because it reminds Christians about the 40 days and nights Jesus spent alone in the desert without food being tempted by the Devil. How long does Lent Last?
  5. 5. Lent is the time when Christians prepare for Easter by thinking of things they have done wrong and trying to correct them. They think about promises they have made in the past and how they can keep those promises. During Lent, Christians used to stop eating ‘rich’ foods like meat, eggs, butter and milk. This is known as fasting. Nowadays, some people just give up their favourite food, such as chocolate or cakes. What is Lent? The name Shrove comes from the old word quot;shrivequot; which means to confess. On Shrove Tuesday people used to confess their sins so that they were forgiven before the season of Lent began. What does fasting mean? Why do we call the day Shrove Tuesday?
  6. 6. Websites http://www.welovepancakes.com/history/ http://www.foodsiteoftheday.com/pancakef.htm http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/shrove.html http://www.answers.com/topic/shrove-tuesday http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/religion/christianity/lent.shtml Literacy I find it useful to introduce a theme by reading a text together. Teacher’s can chose the type of text they use depending on what the learning objective focus is. Genres Children can try several different styles of reading/writing about the pancake theme. Newspapers The following is a newspaper article published in the Mail Online. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-512262/Childrens- pancake-race-axed-health-safety-killjoys.html Children's pancake race axed by health and safety killjoys By CHRIS BROOKE Last updated at 21:00 04 February 2008 (from the Mail online) A cathedral city's traditional pancake race has been scrapped because of fears over health and safety. The event was revived 11 years ago and since then crowds have gathered in the centre of Ripon, North Yorkshire, on Shrove Tuesday to watch school children running down a cobbled street flipping pancakes as they go. The start is signalled by the ringing of the cathedral's ancient quot;pancake bellquot; at 11 am on the day.
  7. 7. The bell, originally sounded to call worshippers to make their confession before the start of Lent, has been rung at that time for at least 600 years. However, organisers have reluctantly scrapped the popular pancake race this year because of mounting costs and bureaucracy linked to health and safety rules. Sorry, not this year: Choristers in a previous pancake race Payments for road closures, policing, insurance risk assessments and volunteer staffing problems have forced the cathedral Dean to call time on the tradition. The Very Rev Keith Jukes, the new Dean of Ripon, said: quot;We have looked at this and there are a number of reasons it won't take place and a big reason sadly this year is health and safety. quot;Any organisation which runs an event has to go through a number of risk assessments. quot;The insurance companies demand it and in the end you have to work out whether it's a risk you take. quot;There is also the whole issue of road closures which can be an expensive business.quot; Organiser Councillor Bernard Bateman added: quot;Health and safety has just gone too far. It makes you think twice about even trying to hold events like this, even though they are extremely popular, especially amongst children. quot;The main issue with health and safety is the cobbled street people could slip on, but it causes us so much trouble just for a little issue. quot;Bureaucracy puts people off, with too much paperwork and most importantly outrageous costs.
  8. 8. quot;This stupidity never happened previously. It's a shame that these issues stop the children enjoying such a traditional event.quot; Mr Bateman said if the event had gone ahead organisers would have faced a charge for road closures, policing and St John Ambulance first aid cover for the first time. quot;We had hoped to make the pancake race as much of a tradition as the pancake bell and it's a travesty that it has been killed off after just 12 years,quot; he added. Public opinion in the city echoed his criticism. Jean Smith, 61, said: quot;It's totally daft. Why should paperwork get in the way of kids having fun. We seem to hear it all the time now but it's bureaucracy gone mad.quot; Recently, army caterers have set up a field kitchen to cook the pancakes for school children and choristers to toss as they race down the street. And in years gone by the races were likened to a village sports day, providing families with the last chance to have fun before the hardships of Lent. Before pancake races became a feature in Ripon, the cathedral bell would summon penitents to be quot;shrivenquot; by confessing before the start of Lent. The first pancake race was said to have taken place in Olney, Bucks, in 1445 and originated from a housewife, busy cooking pancakes to eat before Lent, rushing outside with pan in hand when the bells sounded to summon people to church. Children could read comments sent into the newspaper online from other readers and write their own response. If this is difficult perhaps they could try writing an article about a pancake race they took part in, like a sports report. Below is an example: in racing against each other whilst Pancake Races at flipping their pancakes. Due to the Atalia reported by Gina poor weather conditions the races had to take place under the sports Cocks cover but this didn’t spoil the fun.Lots of Parents came to Yesterday was not a normal support their children and enjoy day for pupils at Atalia the tasty pancakes. This year it School. Shrove Tuesday was was particularly good to see celebrated as always with some teachers and parents racing exciting pancake races. The against each other. children from Primary took turns
  9. 9. Instructional Writing How do you make a pancake? Recipes Imaginative recipes for different flavoured pancakes. Playscripts Using factual information children can create their own playscripts and perform these later in art sessions, (art includes drama). Try writing some plays to explain the following: – How the first pancake race happened. – Traditional Stories like The Naughty Pancake – A performance to enact factual information about pancakes. – A spoof cookery programme – The Ashbourne football match – The year we couldn’t find the special ball Comprehension Of course teachers can also write their own simple versions of text and create question and answer style activities. Gap fill exercises are useful for assessing children’s understanding. Question and Answer Activity Game is noisier but more fun. Puzzles If children are faced with new vocabulary its good to try a present it in many different ways, crosswords and word searches are good for this.

×