Agile multitasking and context switching<br />busting<br />the productivity myth<br />
Thank you<br />
Thank you<br />Big Thank You<br />
Greg Gigon<br />
Greg Gigon<br />Sydney<br />
Observing the work<br />
Little research<br />
Multitasking<br />The art of performing multiple task<br />
developing<br />replying to email<br />browsing Internet<br />reading news<br />Tweeting<br />having conversation with a c...
Thanks to<br />
Thanks to<br />
Computers were not always great in multitasking<br />
Computers were not always great in multitasking<br />But they got<br />Improved<br />
?<br />
Context switching<br />Productivity killer<br />
“We are biologically incapable of processing attention-rich inputs simultaneously.”<br />-Dr John Medina<br />
Some statistics when multitasking<br />50% - more time<br />50% - more errors<br />
?<br />
fMRI<br />Dr Jordan Grafman<br />
Brodmann’s Area 10<br />new skills<br />highly educated skills<br />
storing<br />recalling<br />
?<br />
John Cleese<br />Monthy Python<br />
“... The thing I noticed was, that the most dangerous thing , when I was trying to write anything, was to be interrupted. ...
Tortoise enclosure<br />
“This is the great irony of multitasking – that its overall goal, getting more done in less time, turns out to be chimeric...
?!<br />
Interruption<br />
self<br />personal space invaders<br />
self<br />build broken<br />
questions<br />problems<br />
20 minutesmindless web browsing<br />
Sir Fix-a-lot<br />
Joel Spolsky<br />“As it turns out, if you give somebody two things to work on, you should be grateful if they "starve" on...
Mary Poppendieck<br />“Software development requires a lot of deep concentrated thinking in order to get one’s arms around...
?<br />
Agile<br />break requirements into small deliverable pieces of work<br />
Agile<br />break requirements into small deliverable pieces of work<br />sooner than later you’ll finish and pick up next ...
Kanban<br />
Software support<br />developer of the fortnight<br />support day<br />keep all the clients on the same code base<br />
Pairing<br />
less distraction from the personal space invaders<br />less interruption from others in the environment<br />
Pomodoro<br />Francesco Cirillo<br />
work on a task for 25 minutes<br />take 5 minutes breaks<br />write down anything that comes to your mind<br />remove thin...
summary<br />
slow down<br />“Less haste, more speed”<br />
stay on task until the end<br />
keep interrupters informedand away<br />
“There is time enough for everything in the course of the day, if you do but one thing at once, but there is not time enou...
Thank you<br />http://blog.gigoo.org/2010/08/18/agile-multitasking-context-switching<br />http://www.facebook.com/greg.gig...
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Skills matter agile multitasking 2010

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  • All the different places I used to observe how people work. What are the processes, procedures they follow. The likes and dislikes.
  • Sitting on a sofa, laptop on our knees, watching TV, chatting on IM, answering email and God forbids, work
  • Thanks to computers we have a power to do all those things at the same time.
  • Single core, switching context. Chopping work into small pieces, storing information in registers etc.
  • What about humans? How are we doing when it comes to multitasking?
  • Mainly because we got one brain. That is why we work almost in a same way that single core CPU does. We switch context in our brain.
  • Dr JOHN MEDINA is a developmental molecular biologist 
  • Other researchers in the same field have found that there is a limit in the amount of information our brain can process.
  • If multitasking is poor when it comes to productivity, maybe it’s better for learning?
  •  functional magnetic resonance imaging, 1999 experiments,
  • What came out is that we use our frontal Lobes,called Brodmanss’s Area 10 .Your brain is actually trying to learn how to switch tasks.Develop latest, and first to decline.
  • Hippocampus
  • What about creativity?
  • Running around and juggling every day life will not help you being creative. You need to chill out.
  • American novelist, literary critic, and essayist
  • I hope that at this point, I did convinced you that multitasking is bad? !
  • Just like when interruption comes in CPU and it switches task from whatever it was doing.
  • People coming with questions and problems.
  • To return to work
  • It doesn’t matter what you doing, drop it and fix prod 
  • There are ways and simple steps that we can take to help limit our selfs to one task, or lead project in a way there is no jumping between the tasks.Practices that could help us to NOT multitask.
  • Agile manifesto was formulated in 2001. Working software over comprehensive documentation. Formulate your needs and deliver quick. Get ready for change. Don’t draw extensive documentations.
  • Signaling board,
  • The can’t start work before they finish. There is no room for more cards.
  • Evolving, growing, changing. Needs support. Never finished, unless it’s dead.
  • Pair programming is great in many levels. Collaboration, knowledge sharing, quality, constant review.
  • 1992
  • One’s interruption is other person collaboration.
  • Skills matter agile multitasking 2010

    1. 1. Agile multitasking and context switching<br />busting<br />the productivity myth<br />
    2. 2. Thank you<br />
    3. 3. Thank you<br />Big Thank You<br />
    4. 4. Greg Gigon<br />
    5. 5. Greg Gigon<br />Sydney<br />
    6. 6. Observing the work<br />
    7. 7. Little research<br />
    8. 8. Multitasking<br />The art of performing multiple task<br />
    9. 9. developing<br />replying to email<br />browsing Internet<br />reading news<br />Tweeting<br />having conversation with a colleague<br />Talking on a mobile<br />listening to music<br />updating status on Facebook<br />
    10. 10. Thanks to<br />
    11. 11. Thanks to<br />
    12. 12. Computers were not always great in multitasking<br />
    13. 13. Computers were not always great in multitasking<br />But they got<br />Improved<br />
    14. 14. ?<br />
    15. 15.
    16. 16. Context switching<br />Productivity killer<br />
    17. 17.
    18. 18. “We are biologically incapable of processing attention-rich inputs simultaneously.”<br />-Dr John Medina<br />
    19. 19. Some statistics when multitasking<br />50% - more time<br />50% - more errors<br />
    20. 20. ?<br />
    21. 21. fMRI<br />Dr Jordan Grafman<br />
    22. 22. Brodmann’s Area 10<br />new skills<br />highly educated skills<br />
    23. 23. storing<br />recalling<br />
    24. 24. ?<br />
    25. 25.
    26. 26. John Cleese<br />Monthy Python<br />
    27. 27. “... The thing I noticed was, that the most dangerous thing , when I was trying to write anything, was to be interrupted. Because the flow of thought that I had when interrupted was not immediately picked up after the interruption ...”<br />“... The key to get into creative state is to avoid<br />Interruption ...”<br />
    28. 28. Tortoise enclosure<br />
    29. 29. “This is the great irony of multitasking – that its overall goal, getting more done in less time, turns out to be chimerical. In reality, multitasking slows our thinking. It forces us to chop competing tasks into pieces, set them in different piles, then hunt for the pile we are interested in, pick up its pieces, review the rules for putting the pieces back together, and then attempt to do so, often quite awkwardly. “<br />Walter Kirn<br />
    30. 30. ?!<br />
    31. 31. Interruption<br />
    32. 32. self<br />personal space invaders<br />
    33. 33. self<br />build broken<br />
    34. 34. questions<br />problems<br />
    35. 35. 20 minutesmindless web browsing<br />
    36. 36. Sir Fix-a-lot<br />
    37. 37. Joel Spolsky<br />“As it turns out, if you give somebody two things to work on, you should be grateful if they "starve" one task and only work on one, because they're going to get more stuff done and finish the average task sooner. ”<br />
    38. 38. Mary Poppendieck<br />“Software development requires a lot of deep concentrated thinking in order to get one’s arms around the existing complexity and correctly add the next piece of the puzzle. Switching to a different task is not only distracting, it takes time and often detracts from the results of both tasks.” <br />
    39. 39. ?<br />
    40. 40.
    41. 41. Agile<br />break requirements into small deliverable pieces of work<br />
    42. 42. Agile<br />break requirements into small deliverable pieces of work<br />sooner than later you’ll finish and pick up next piece of work<br />
    43. 43. Kanban<br />
    44. 44.
    45. 45. Software support<br />developer of the fortnight<br />support day<br />keep all the clients on the same code base<br />
    46. 46. Pairing<br />
    47. 47. less distraction from the personal space invaders<br />less interruption from others in the environment<br />
    48. 48. Pomodoro<br />Francesco Cirillo<br />
    49. 49. work on a task for 25 minutes<br />take 5 minutes breaks<br />write down anything that comes to your mind<br />remove things that are no longer relevant<br />ask to come back at the end of Pomodoro<br />
    50. 50. summary<br />
    51. 51. slow down<br />“Less haste, more speed”<br />
    52. 52. stay on task until the end<br />
    53. 53. keep interrupters informedand away<br />
    54. 54. “There is time enough for everything in the course of the day, if you do but one thing at once, but there is not time enough in the year, if you will do two things at a time.”<br /><ul><li>Lord Chesterfield</li></ul>(1740)<br />
    55. 55. Thank you<br />http://blog.gigoo.org/2010/08/18/agile-multitasking-context-switching<br />http://www.facebook.com/greg.gigon<br />http://www.twitter.com/gregorygigon<br />

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