Implementing Agile Tester Perspective Janet Gregory

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Lessons learned from implementing Agile, a tester's perspective. Janet Gregory talks about agile and agile testing.

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Implementing Agile Tester Perspective Janet Gregory

  1. 1. Lessons Learned Implementing Agile From a Tester’s Perspective Agile Specifications, BDD and Agile Testing Exchange November 27, 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire Inc. Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  2. 2. My experience comes … As a tester on agile teams Coaching and training Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  3. 3. Takeaways Symptoms vs.. problems Some lessons learned How to recognize some common problems Practical steps you can take today .. But, first a bit of agile so everyone is on the same page 3 Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  4. 4. Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  5. 5. Agile is a term to describe methodologies that: • have short iterations • encourage active customer participation • demand whole team collaboration • test features as they are coded • deliver business value at regular intervals • adapt their processes based on feedback and so on . Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  6. 6. Are you solving a problem or a symptom? • Question -- What is the real problem? • Ask ---Why, why, why, why....and why? • Use experts • Too many times we solve the wrong thing • Use retrospectives to identify symptoms Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  7. 7. Problem 1: Calling it “Agile” Teams call it agile, and say it doesn’t work. Start by questioning • Do they understand the values and practices or take the myths as reality? Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  8. 8. Are You Doing Agile? How Do You Know? Questions I ask... • How big are your iterations? • Do you have continuous integration? • Are your stories “done” at the end of an iteration? • What does “done” mean to you? • Do you have a potentially shippable product every iteration? • Are your regression tests automated? Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  9. 9. Before you claim you are doing agile, Really understanding what agile means Ask experts Follow critical practices Short iterations – 2 weeks Potentially shippable product every iteration Collaborate: testers, programmers, customers Stories are done when they are tested 9 Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  10. 10. #2: The team structure didn’t really change Still have a separate test team Not everyone participates in planning sessions Still have functional silos Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  11. 11. Encourage the Whole Team Approach The team committed to testing, quality The team solves problems All team members participate in planning sessions Anyone can do any task Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  12. 12. Acknowledge training needs • Changed Roles – Functional Managers, testers, programmers, customer • Agile principles • Communication strategies • New testing terminology 12 Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  13. 13. Problem 3: Practicing Mini-Waterfall Your testing is at the end of the iteration or.. in the next iteration 13 Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  14. 14. Symptoms • Stories are not “done” (i.e. tested) • Your team has defined “done-done” • Bugs are left until later to fix • Testing feedback is too late to change anything Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  15. 15. Try • Breaking stories up smaller (<3 days) • Learn to slice the stories vertically – Create feature teams – Rather than component teams • Define acceptance tests during planning • Give tests to programmers before coding starts Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  16. 16. Automate your regression testing to enable you to do more exploratory testing. Mike Cohn’s Test Automation Pyramid Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  17. 17. Problem 4: Complacency Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  18. 18. Or Stress, panic Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  19. 19. Recognize complacency or panic when • Old habits resurface – eg. your bugs are ‘to be fixed later’ • New people influence your process negatively – eg. you start building requirements documents again • Forget to keep the code clean • Forget to keep the tests running green Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  20. 20. Focus .. • Instil a learning organization mentality • Shu Ha Ri • Make the process visible • Make the metrics visible • Understand the why behind the process • Have a coach who is monitoring the process • Use your retrospectives to find problems 20 Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  21. 21. Whole Team Participation Automate Regression Tests Collaboration Practice, prevent complacency Be involved Provide Feedback 21 Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  22. 22. Now Available Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams By Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory www.agiletester.ca My contact info www.janetgregory.ca http://janetgregory.blogspot.com/ janet@agiletester.ca Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  23. 23. Agile Resources • www.lisacrispin.com • agile-testing@yahoogroups.com • www.testobsessed.com • www.testingreflections.com • vwww.mountaingoatsoftware.com – Mike Cohn’s web site (and all his books) • Mary Poppendieck and Tom Poppendieck, Lean Software Development, 2003 Addison-Wesley (series of 3) • Jean Tabaka, Collaboration Explained, 2006 Addison-Wesley • Lisa Crispin and Tip House, Testing Extreme Programming, 2002 Addison-Wesley • Agile Manifesto: http://agilemanifesto.org/ Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire
  24. 24. Let’s talk about your problems ? Copyright 2009 Janet Gregory, DragonFire

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