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Don't think of a camel

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Slides from our Twestival talk in Suffolk - to raise money for the Suffolk Disability Care Fund. Please note: we are not crediting the research as our own work. Stories and research come from the minds and books of Rory Sutherland, Seth Godin, Martin Lindstrom, Malcolm Gladwell and Dan Ariely.

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Don't think of a camel

  1. 1. Don’t think of a camel with Chris Waters and James Kindred of Condiment
  2. 2. Standing on the shoulders of giants
  3. 3. Rory Sutherland
  4. 4. Martin Lindstrom
  5. 5. Malcolm Gladwell
  6. 6. Seth Godin
  7. 7. Dan Ariely
  8. 8. Stories
  9. 9. Things you might like to consider
  10. 10. Fast bits
  11. 11. The Aircraft’s Toast.
  12. 12. Aircraft don’t fall out of the sky.
  13. 13. Odds of being killed in a flight with one of the top 25 airlines with the best accident rates?
  14. 14. One in 9.2 million
  15. 15. Some say aircraft areas dependable as toasters.
  16. 16. Plane crashes most likely occur because of an accumulation of minor events.
  17. 17. The typical aircraft crash involves seven consecutive human errors.
  18. 18. And those seven errors are rarely ones of skill or knowledge.
  19. 19. They’re errors of communication.
  20. 20. Perhaps this is the same of many businesses.
  21. 21. They don’t fail for one reason.
  22. 22. They don’t fail because theproduct or service is simply terrible.
  23. 23. They fail because they can’t communicate the benefits of their product or service.
  24. 24. Communication is vital –regardless of your industry.
  25. 25. The Scientist’s Jumper
  26. 26. Many of us wouldn’t consider ourselves superstitious.
  27. 27. But we don’t walk under ladders.
  28. 28. Or walk over three drains.
  29. 29. And we say ‘touch wood’, or we find some wood to touch for luck.
  30. 30. Or we toast to good health.
  31. 31. Rationally, of course,none of this makes any sense.
  32. 32. In a turbulent world, we seek control in whichever way we can.
  33. 33. Bruce Hood is the Director of the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre in theExperimental Psychology Department at the University of Bristol
  34. 34. Hood proved his point at a science fair in Norwich a few years ago.
  35. 35. He held aloft a jumper, and asked if anyone would be prepared to try it on for him.
  36. 36. He would pay the model ten pounds.
  37. 37. Hands were aloft everywhere.
  38. 38. Hood then told the audience that the jumper once belonged to Fred West.
  39. 39. Hands shot down.
  40. 40. Evil cannot exist inside a jumper.
  41. 41. We are not rational creatures.
  42. 42. We don’t buy for rational reasons.
  43. 43. The King’s Spuds
  44. 44. In 1774, Frederick the Great of Prussia was looking for an alternative to bread.
  45. 45. If he could introduce another crop, he’dreduce the price of bread and mitigate the risk of famine following a bad harvest.
  46. 46. He chose potatoes.
  47. 47. His people were unimpressed.
  48. 48. “Not even the dogs will eat them.”
  49. 49. For royalty only.
  50. 50. But as every peasant knows...
  51. 51. If something’s worth guarding, it’s worth stealing.
  52. 52. Before long, potatoes were being grown all over Prussia.
  53. 53. Change perceptions. Not products.
  54. 54. The Intern’s Turn
  55. 55. In 2008, an advertising agency in Canada werecharged with increasing the sales of Shreddies.
  56. 56. It’s reported that the campaign idea came from an intern.
  57. 57. With one very subtle change, the advertising agency created a memorable campaign.
  58. 58. And that subtle changewas a 45-degree turn.
  59. 59. The problem and solutiondon’t always have to be sensible.
  60. 60. Highlight a problem nobody’s ever noticed.
  61. 61. Dyson’s Bladeless Fan
  62. 62. “No blades. No buffeting.”read the marketing material
  63. 63. No one has ever complained of buffeting.
  64. 64. Frank Bench’s Gamble
  65. 65. Otto Frederick Rohwedder
  66. 66. Born on July 7, 1880.
  67. 67. By the age of 32, he had formed an unshakeable belief.
  68. 68. He believed that pre-sliced bread would be a major convenience for consumers.
  69. 69. So in 1912, Otto began working on an automatic bread slicer.
  70. 70. Unfortunately, bakers scoffed atOtto Rohwedder’s early slicers.
  71. 71. Otto persisted.
  72. 72. Sixteen years later, Otto created a way for his bread slicer to wrap the bread in wax paper immediately after slicing.
  73. 73. He travelled to Chillicothe, Missouri to meet Frank Bench.
  74. 74. Frank gambled. And on 7 July, 1928, started selling “Sliced Kleen Maid Bread”.
  75. 75. Frank Bench’s sales skyrocketed.
  76. 76. Two years later, Wonder Bread began to commercially produce sliced bread.
  77. 77. Great ideas require inspiration ... and perspiration.
  78. 78. The Bartender’s Bet?
  79. 79. There are many real ale drinkers out therewho’ll tell you the reason lager is served cold.
  80. 80. Because it numbs the taste buds.
  81. 81. Even Fosters acknowledged it:“Well, you wouldn’t want a warm one!”
  82. 82. So if differentiation in thelager market is minimal ...
  83. 83. How did Corona become one of the world’sbiggest selling lagers in a short space of time?
  84. 84. A wedge of lime.
  85. 85. The reason isn’t important.(Only that the reason remains a mystery.)
  86. 86. Corona with lime is now a ritual.
  87. 87. Ritual: “a series of actions or type of behaviourregularly and invariably followed by someone”
  88. 88. Why do we have Magners with ice?
  89. 89. Why do we wait for a Guinness?
  90. 90. Rituals are perhaps theultimate brand experience.
  91. 91. Make your solution sound cleverer than it actually is.
  92. 92. Isotonic sports drinks sound like a wonderful scientific invention.
  93. 93. Isotonic drinks have the same proportion of salt and sugar as you lose during exercise.
  94. 94. That’s it. Water, salt and sugar.
  95. 95. The Economist’s Mistake?
  96. 96. 80% bought the web and print subscription
  97. 97. Nobody bought the print only subscription
  98. 98. 20% bought the web only subscription
  99. 99. The rational approach?
  100. 100. Remove the option nobody buys.
  101. 101. 20% chose the web and print subscription
  102. 102. 80% chose the cheaper web subscription
  103. 103. A weekend in Paris – all expenses paidA weekend in Rome – all expenses paid
  104. 104. A weekend in Paris – all expenses paid (doesn’t include coffee)
  105. 105. Inferior options help our decision paralysis
  106. 106. The Children’s Chips
  107. 107. “To do a common thinguncommonly well brings success.” Henry J. Heinz
  108. 108. Kids love lots of chips with lots of sauce.
  109. 109. Parents prefer their kids to have fewer chips with less sauce.
  110. 110. A typical five-year-old consumes 40% more ketchup than a typical forty-year-old
  111. 111. Condiments provide a child with their onlysource of independence at the dinner table.
  112. 112. The glass bottle kept the parents in charge of their child’s sauce consumption.
  113. 113. So in 2002, Heinz introduced the inverted squeezy ketchup bottle.
  114. 114. Ketchup consumption has risen by as much as 12% in homes that use squeezy bottles.
  115. 115. Product buyers and product usersdon’t have to be the same people.
  116. 116. We’re overworked, underpaid and stressed.
  117. 117. We’re vulnerable.
  118. 118. Play on fear.
  119. 119. Shampoo stings.
  120. 120. Your child will cry.
  121. 121. Johnson & Johnson No More Tears
  122. 122. The Guitarist’s Melody
  123. 123. Francisco de Asís Tárrega y Eixea
  124. 124. At an early age, an infection permanently impaired his eyesight.
  125. 125. Francisco started playing classical guitar.
  126. 126. 1902, at the age of fifty Francisco wrote a song called ‘Gran Vals’
  127. 127. 91 years later, a decision was made that wouldmake bars 13-16 of Gran Vals one of the most heard melodies in the world.
  128. 128. It became the default Nokia ringtone.
  129. 129. 2000-2002
  130. 130. In 2003, Nokias share of European handset market fell 20%
  131. 131. The Nokia Tune had becomesynonymous with annoyance.
  132. 132. So the next time ...
  133. 133. you pick up a jumper in Gap because you want to feel the material.
  134. 134. notice how the table is a perfect height to entice your touch.
  135. 135. Or the next time ...
  136. 136. you buy a Coke in a paper cup,
  137. 137. notice how distinct the sound is of the straw going through the lid into the drink.
  138. 138. Better still, consider the iPod’s circular songselector and the ‘ticks’ you hear as your thumb makes the circular motion.
  139. 139. Branding isn’t exclusively visual.Could you ‘own’ a sound, scent, touch or taste, too?
  140. 140. The Actor’s Legacy
  141. 141. “I’m Spartacus” cried everybody other than Kirk Douglas in the 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick.
  142. 142. It was a defiant statement to demonstrate that no one person should be punished.
  143. 143. Last year, the phrase became a popular Twitter hashtag after Paul Chambers was fined for ‘threatening’ to blow up Robin Hood airport.
  144. 144. And it was also the basis for one the greatest heckles of all time.
  145. 145. Eric Douglas, son of Kirk,was a stand up comedian.
  146. 146. Once, on stage at Jongleur’s in London, Eric’s struggling to incite laughter.
  147. 147. “Tell us a joke” cries a heckler.
  148. 148. Eric Douglas fires back something offensive.
  149. 149. More people join in.“Tell us a joke!” they demand.
  150. 150. “DON’T YOU KNOW WHO I AM?” shouts Eric Douglas.
  151. 151. “I’M KIRK DOUGLAS’S SON!”
  152. 152. “No,” says a man towards the back.
  153. 153. “I’m Kirk Douglas’s son.”
  154. 154. Another person stands up and declares: “I’m Kirk Douglas’s son.”
  155. 155. Brilliant, spontaneous ideas are infectious. How fast can you ship yours?
  156. 156. The Club’s Decor
  157. 157. You don’t see any cigarette advertising around anymore.
  158. 158. Or do you?
  159. 159. Donna Sturgess, global head of innovation for GlaxoSmithKline:
  160. 160. “It’s an unfortunate irony that as a result ofgovernment ban, tobacco companies have fast- forwarded into the future.”
  161. 161. “In effect, cigarette companies have beenforced to develop a whole new set of skills.”
  162. 162. Philip Morris International is one of the largest tobacco companies in the world.
  163. 163. One of their brands is ...
  164. 164. The Marlboro brand is ingrained in our culture.
  165. 165. Philip Morris has taken to interior design.
  166. 166. These installations are known as ‘Marlboro Motels’ in the industry.
  167. 167. Nightspot lounge areas with comfortable redsofas in front of video screens showing scenes that evoke the Wild West.
  168. 168. Nucleus Accumbens.
  169. 169. Each half of the brain hasone nucleus accumbens.
  170. 170. It plays an important role inreward, craving and addiction.
  171. 171. In fMRI brain scans, the nucleus accumbenslights up when subjects see cigarette packets.
  172. 172. And exactly the same area lights up whensubjects are shown these types of image:
  173. 173. And it’s not just Marlboro with such a strong brand in the tobacco industry.
  174. 174. So next time you’re in a swanky club,
  175. 175. which looks likesomething out of arabian nights.
  176. 176. Don’t think of a Camel.
  177. 177. Thanks.

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