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Sustainable Production and Consumption by Individual Upcycling in the UK

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The slides were used for the presentation in the consortium meeting of the Centre for Industrial Energy, Materials and Products in September, 2015. The presentation shows the brief summary of the PhD research on "Sustainable Production and Consumption by Individual Upcycling in the UK".

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Sustainable Production and Consumption by Individual Upcycling in the UK

  1. 1. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Kyungeun Sung Supervisors: Tim Cooper and Sarah Kettley Sustainable Consumption Research Group School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment CIE-MAP consortium meeting Sustainable Production and Consumption by Individual Upcycling in the UK
  2. 2. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment What is individual upcycling? Creation or modification of any product out of used products, components or materials in an attempt to result in a product of higher quality or value than the compositional elements
  3. 3. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Why individual upcycling? – Benefits  More sustainable way of making, crafting or personalising products  Contributing to reductions in waste  Eliminating the need for a new product  Reducing new raw materials use and conserving the natural resources  Reducing (industrial) energy usage  Leading to greenhouse gas emissions reduction  Creating strong product attachment for product longevity  Saving money + potential income opportunities  Psychological well-being and socio-cultural benefits (e.g. learning & empowering)  ….
  4. 4. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Why individual upcycling? – Increasing upcyclers  contemporary Maker movement  readily available physical resources  shared digital resources
  5. 5. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment “How might individual upcycling significantly contribute to sustainable production and consumption in the UK by influencing household behaviours and industries through appropriate interventions?” Central question
  6. 6. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment  Why they are upycling when they do?  Why they are not doing it when they don’t?  What drives, facilitates or hinders the behaviour?  What interventions do we need? How to intervene behaviours?
  7. 7. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment  To gain insights into individual upcycling in the UK  To identify the UK-specific key drivers and facilitators for and key barriers to individual upcycling  To formulate policy and design interventions for successful scaling-up of individual upcycling Objectives
  8. 8. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Research design
  9. 9. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment What I have done 1. Behaviour model identification 2. Interview (+ exploratory questionnaire study) with 23 UK-based consumers 3. Interview analysis with NVivo 4. Exploratory questionnaire study analysis with SPSS 5. Behaviour model refinement for operationalisation 6. Survey pretests + pilot test & analysis 7. Survey proper with 227 responses (online) 8. Ongoing survey proper analysis
  10. 10. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Main findings – from interview  Perceived benefits – practical, environmental, and psychological  Social factors – social norm of ‘environmentally conscious’ + occupational and relationship roles  Emotions – both negative (frustration) and positive (happiness & satisfaction)  Habits – art and craft / hacking, tinkering, DIY, repair, etc. both concurrent and childhood memories  Facilitating conditions – competence, materials, space, social situation and cultural perception, tools, spare time, and interest  Demographic differences
  11. 11. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Main findings – from exploratory questionnaire  When people feel attached to their upcycled products:  Higher degree of attachment  Intend to use products longer  Self-expression, group affiliation, (special) memories and pleasure confirmed as ‘product attachment determinants’  Women and older consumers + ornamental products, personal belongings and furniture to consider for potential scaling up
  12. 12. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment What to do next?
  13. 13. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment  Sung, K. and Cooper, T. (2015). Sarah Turner – Eco artist and designer through craft-based upcycling. Craft Research, 6(1), pp. 113-122.  Sung, K. (2015). Source reduction; Appropriate technology; Renewable resources; and Waste. Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Design (publication in November)  Sung, K., Cooper, T. and Kettley, S. (2015). An Exploratory Study on Individual Upcycling: Links with Product Attachment and Product Longevity, and Implications for Designers. International Journal of Design (queued for review) Publications
  14. 14. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Conference proceedings  Sung, K., Cooper, T. and Kettley, S. (2015). Individual Upcycling Practice: Exploring the Possible Determinants of Upcycling Based on a Literature Review. Copenhagen, Sustainable Innovation 2014 Conference, pp. 237-244.  Sung, K. (2015). A Review on Upcycling: Current Body of Literature, Knowledge Gaps and a Way Forward. Venice, International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability 2015 Conference, pp. 28-40.  Sung, K., Cooper, T. and Kettley, S. (2015). An Exploratory Study on the Consequences of Individual Upcycling: Is It Worth Making People Feel Attached to Their Upcycled Products?. Nottingham, CADBE Doctoral Conference 2015. (selected as the best paper)  Sung, K., Cooper, T. and Kettley, S. (2015). An Exploratory Study on the Links between Individual Upcycling, Product Attachment, and Product Longevity. Nottingham, Product Lifetimes and the Environment 2015 Conference, pp. 349-356
  15. 15. Kyungeun Sung, Sustainable Consumption Research Group, School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Thank you! Any question? Kyungeun.sung2013@my.ntu.ac.uk http://kyungeunsung.com/ https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kyungeun_Sung

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