Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

From optometry to road safety- A design process to enhance visual information for safety critial situations

745 views

Published on

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

From optometry to road safety- A design process to enhance visual information for safety critial situations

  1. 1. From optometry to road safety-A design process to enhance visual informationfor safety critial situationsExemplified by the development processemployed in “Safeway2school”Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 1 of 23
  2. 2. Safe Way 2 School2009–2012Integrated system for safe transportation ofchildren to school.Project 233967. Coordinator: VTI, Sweden The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 233967.Goal: Improving road safetyof (school-) children on the road Österreichischer VerkehrssicherheitsfondsStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 2 of 23
  3. 3. IIID’s Activity A5.5Surrounding traffic information and warningGoal:to research and design visual and audio information(signs/signals) to effectively warn road users on thefact that childen are on the road.Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 3 of 23
  4. 4. OutsetTo create signs which improve the road safetysituation of school children,A design must fulfill the requirements for thesafety critical situation given in a road environment,to establish long distance discrimination (visibility) ofthe created sign.These requirements are:Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 4 of 23
  5. 5. Design for safety critical situationsRequirements to be taken into accountLong distance discrimination (visibility) of visualinformation, depending on:• Viewing distance, governed by:- Driving speed,- Required viewing time (t)- Point-of-Disappearance (POD)- Number of information elements- A driver‘s eyesight (Minute of Arc [MoA])Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 5 of 23
  6. 6. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsViewing distance (D) =Minimum required viewing time (t)1 Information element– 2.33 seconds or2 Information elements– 2.66 seconds+Distance (a) from Point-of-Disappearance (POD)Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 6 of 23
  7. 7. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsViewing distance (D) =Minimum required viewing time (t)+Distance (a) from Point-of-Disappearance (POD)(when information passes out of sight)Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 7 of 23
  8. 8. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsViewing distance (D)The higher the driving speed,the longer the viewing distance (D)Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 8 of 23
  9. 9. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsMinute of Arc (MoA)Minimum size of any detail of the provided visualinformation (eg. road sign),• depending on a driver‘s eyesight (visual acuity):The lower the eyesight,- the larger the needed size of 1 MoAStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 9 of 23
  10. 10. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsMinute of Arc (MoA) 1 MoAOptotype “Landolt ring” is used by optometrists toevaluate visual acuity.It also defines the minimum size of any detail of theprovided visual information (eg. road sign)Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 10 of 23
  11. 11. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsMinute of Arc (MoA) 1 MoA =Using the average visual acuity of 0.73,the dimension of 1 MoA,at a driving speed of e.g. 100 km/h = 31,85 mm.Required viewing distance: 76, 45 metersStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 11 of 23
  12. 12. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsMinimum size (1 MoA) of any detail of the developedSchool Bus (Stop) Sign.Long distance visibilityof every detail of thesign is secured.Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 12 of 23
  13. 13. Design for safety critical situations, requirementsFurther important issues not expained in thispresentation:• Colour and contrast• Degree of understanding (comprehension) of meaning of the designed information, see ISO 9186 “Procedures for the development and testing of graphical symbols”• Conspicuity (Conspicuity index) of the design in the physical environmentStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 13 of 23
  14. 14. Design for safety critical situations, other examplesMore examples of enhanced visual information forsafety critical situations to be found onhttp://www.iiid.net/SOMS/Project%20Report.aspx(Traffic signs and Typeface „Tern“ for the Trans-European Road Network, developed inSOMS/InSafety, EU FP6 Research ProjektStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 14 of 23
  15. 15. Final School Bus (Stop) SignProposal to worldwide substitute all current examplesof School Bus Signs and School Bus Stop Signs.Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 15 of 23
  16. 16. Final School Bus (Stop) Sign - harmonisationChildren pictogram of the signto be used wherever elserequired to support theimmediate comprehension ofthe children pictogram.Example: Danger warning sign„Children“ (European examplewith triangular shape,diamond shape to be used incountries where mandatory.Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 16 of 23
  17. 17. Following pages:Current examples of signs in use, identifiedduring research, proposed to be substitutedby:Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 17 of 23
  18. 18. Current practice examples1 Austria 2 Austria 3 Austria 4 Belgium No Symbol5 Bulgaria 6 Czech Rep. Denmark 7 Estonia 8 Finland No Symbol9 France 10 Germany 11 Great Britain Greece 12 HungaryStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 18 of 23
  19. 19. Current practice examples No Symbol9 France 10 Germany 11 Great Britain Greece 12 Hungary13 India 14 Israel 15 Italy 16 Japan 17 LatviaNo Symbol No SymbolThe Netherlands Norway 18 Poland 19 Portugal 20 Romania21 Slovakia 22 Slovenia 23 Spain 24 Sweden 25 Sweden LEDStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 19 of 23
  20. 20. Current practice examplesPicassemblySW2S-1_2010 Public SAFEWA2SCHOOL, Contract No 2339676. Sign collection6.3 Danger warning sign “children” 38 Vienna Conv. 39 Australia 40 Austria41 Belgium 42 Bulgaria 43 Canada 44 Chile 45 Czech Rep.46 Denmark 47 Estonia 48 Finland 49 France 50 Germany oldStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 20 of 23
  21. 21. Current practice examples46 Denmark 47 Estonia 48 Finland 49 France 50 Germany old51 Germany 52 Great Britain 53 Greece 54 Hungary 55 India56 Ireland 57 Italy old 58 Italy 59 Japan 60 Latvia61 The Netherlands 62 New Zealand 63 Norway 64 Poland 65 PortugalStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 21 of 23
  22. 22. Current practice examples61 The Netherlands 62 New Zealand 63 Norway 64 Poland 65 Portugal66 Romania 67 Slovakia 68 Spain 69 Sweden 70 Switzerland Sign used on LED displays requested71 USA 72 TomTom SwarcoFuturit 73 Googlemaps2010-04-21 7 of 9 International Institute for Information Design (IIID)Stefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 22 of 23
  23. 23. Deliverable D5.5 “Surounding traffic info andwarning visual and audio signs” available on:http://www.iiid.net/Safeway2SchoolReport.aspxStefan Egger, IIID Oct 2011 World Design Expo Taipei, Taiwan 23 of 23

×