This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agricultu...
Twitter: @AlexNetLit#netlitGoogle+: eXtension Network LiteracyFacebook: NetworkLiteracyhttp://extension.org/network_literacy
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Twitter: @AlexNetLit#netlitGoogle+: eXtension Network LiteracyFacebook: NetworkLiteracyhttp://extension.org/network_literacy
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World
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Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World

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As Extension professionals explore effective technologies for delivering urban extension programs, it is important that they not only understand effective uses of technology, but they also must understand how the information they share can be used and what practices and tools they can enlist to ensure that that information is only available in ways they expect. In this presentation we'll discuss some best practices for online security and take a hands-on look at the privacy settings in some popular social networking tools, like Facebook and Google+. Participants will gain a better appreciation for online security and privacy, and leave equipped to adjust their own settings and assist their clients and colleagues.

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  • For starters, before you enter sensitive data on a Web form or page, look for two things:1. Signs that the site uses data encryption: https (“s” is for secure).A closed padlock. It must be here, beside the Web address, or in the lower right corner of the window. 2. Signs of a trusted site, such as the green address bar in Windows® Internet Explorer®. The graphic in the slide shows what each of those things looks like in your browser.That’s the first strategy for protecting sensitive information. Another precaution you can take is to think before you click.Before submitting your name, email address or other personal information online, you need to be sure that the privacy of that information will be protected. Look at the website privacy policy which should state how the information will be used and whether or not the information will be distributed to other organizations. SSL – Secure sockets layers is used to encrypt information online to protect against hackers. You should always look for https instead of http and a lock icon in the bottom right corner of the window when submitting any personal information online.Additionally you should do would be to ask yourself do you trust the business with your information or is the organization an established organization? Also if you can avoid submitting credit card information online, use only one credit card to purchase online, and avoid using debit cards completely for online purchases.
  • CONFIRM WITH THE SENDER THAT THE E-MAIL OR INSTANT MESSAGE IS REALCall the company using a number you already have for it.Or check it against what you find on Bing, Google, or an online phone directory.To visit the site, TYPE THE WEB ADDRESS YOURSELF instead of clicking the link in the message.Or, use your own bookmark or favorite.USE A BROWSER WITH SAFETY FEATURESSuch as the anti-phishing feature (SmartScreen® Filter) and the pop-up blocker that’s on by default in Internet Explorer 8.If you’re ever in doubt about a site, consult a Web site that identifies known scams:Such as www.snopes.com.Another way to protect sensitive data is to use strong passwords.
  • You should at least check your privacy settings and make sure they match what you want. Everyone uses Facebook for different purposes, and the default settings may not be the settings you want.
  • Facebook has given you easy access to the most common privacy settings.
  • Quickly change some privacy settings.
  • Dig a little deeper by going to the detailed settings page.
  • You should definitely enable Secure Browsing – there’s no downside.Login notifications will send you an email when you (or someone else!) logs in to your account for the first time from a new device. Minimal bother.Login approvals will require you to enter a code, sent by Facebook to you as a text or from a smartphone app, each time you log in from a new device. It may be an inconvenience, but someone couldn’t log in as you, even if they have your username and password.
  • These set the defaults for who can see and interact with items on your timeline. You can change this on a post-by-post basis.
  • You can block users, apps, and events if you’d prefer not to interact with them again.
  • While counterintuitive, you should click on the “Ads” link and check your settings.
  • Do you want your name associated with the ads Facebook shows?
  • Online Privacy and Security Tune Up: Being Responsible in an Online World

    1. 1. This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture,and the Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth, U.S. Department of Defense under Award No. 2010-48869-20685.
    2. 2. Twitter: @AlexNetLit#netlitGoogle+: eXtension Network LiteracyFacebook: NetworkLiteracyhttp://extension.org/network_literacy
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    16. 16. Twitter: @AlexNetLit#netlitGoogle+: eXtension Network LiteracyFacebook: NetworkLiteracyhttp://extension.org/network_literacy

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