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Siyavula Teachers Conference Workgroup Slidesnew

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The community building slides from the Siyavula Teachers' Workshop.

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Siyavula Teachers Conference Workgroup Slidesnew

  1. 1. Workgroup Sessions Teachers’ Workshop Durbanville, 21st / 22nd August, 2009
  2. 2. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  3. 3. Participant introductions <ul><li>Introduce yourself to a new person every time the music stops. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell them what your interest in this weekend is. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell them what your hopes and expectations are. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  5. 5. E D G E REASONS for not crossing the edge in the form of real or perceived internal and external messages cause the anxiety Increased ANXIETY as the individual approaches or is pushed towards or over and edge. SUPPORT AND CONTAINMENT helps the individual over the edge EDGE SYMPTOMS in the form of anxiety and defense mechanisms appear. The “EDGE” is something that is hard to do, to say, to feel, to think, or to look at. Mindell’s concept of the edge
  6. 6. Edge symptoms DEFENSE MECHANISMS Denial Withdrawal Aggression Humour ANXIETY SYMPTOMS Dry mouth Racing heart Going blank Sore stomach GENERAL SYMPTOMS Odd or unusual behaviour Cycling Mixed messages / incongruities
  7. 7. Edge discussion In groups of four: Discuss what some of your edges may be for this weekend.
  8. 8. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  9. 9. Communication
  10. 10. Communication Exercise Source of photograph: www.sifatipp.de
  11. 11. Communication Exercise - Debrief Source of photograph: www.stille-post.de
  12. 12. Listening Ignoring <ul><li>You ignore communication by rejecting it (e.g. interrupting someone mid-sentence, playing around with pen and paper or computer, writing text messages, suppressing the words of the speaker with own mental chatter… </li></ul><ul><li>Ignoring someone is a way of exercising power over them. </li></ul>Controlling & Projecting <ul><li>Sometimes the way we look at someone, our body language, sounds we make or hierarchical position controls the way others communicate with us. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes we hear what others tell us through a filter of previous judgements and decision. Whatever is communicated reinforces these judgements. </li></ul>Empathising <ul><li>Empathy requires observing the world from the speaker’s point of view. </li></ul><ul><li>You don’t just hear the open content of communication, but also the intent on which this communication is based. (WHY?) </li></ul><ul><li>Great communicators stand out by their ability to listen to the way their words are “taken” while they speak. </li></ul><ul><li>They hear themselves with the ears of others. </li></ul>Mastery
  13. 13. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  14. 14. Communities of practice or “workgroups” Members of a community are informally bound by what they do together and by what they have learned through their mutual engagement in these activities. A community of practice is different from a community of interest or a geographical community, neither of which implies a shared practice. A community of practice defines itself along three dimensions: It is a joint enterprise as understood and continually renegotiated by its members There is mutual engagement that bind members together into a social entity It produces a shared collection of communal resources that members have developed over time. © Etienne Wenger, 1998 We will refer to communities of practice as workgroups
  15. 15. Communities of practice or “workgroups” Move into groups of 5 and consider the following question: How would it be useful for you to work in a group of teachers to develop curriculum material? Note your answers on cards, one per card.
  16. 16. Debrief, feedback and questions Good morning!!!
  17. 17. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  18. 19. Self-organising principles Self-organising principles are governed by “attractors” at their centre. These are central values, beliefs or other psychological forces which determine the self-organising principles that emerge around them. Attractors evoke the same behaviour in different people.
  19. 20. Self-organising principles continued An individual’s identity is closely linked to the self-organising principles that guide their behaviour. Individuals identify with values and activities that are similar to their own internal drivers and once they identify with them, their passion is evoked.
  20. 21. Self-organising principles continued If you think about everything you have seen so far about the Siyavula project and the Connexions website, what is the one thing that would make you want to start or join a Connexions workgroup?
  21. 22. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  22. 23. Group dynamics – Mindell’s concept of rank E D G E E D G E Will eventually resort to sabotage Will comply temporarily Passive aggressive behaviour This group makes decisions Will seek support Individuals or groups with less or no rank Individuals or groups with more rank Feedback blocked by the edge
  23. 24. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  24. 25. We take this opportunity to wish everyone who started fasting today Ramadaan Mubarak. May Allah’s strength and guidance accompany you through this blessed month.
  25. 26. Group dynamics – roles in workgroups Functional Political Psychological Emotional The context and the task of the group will determine the roles required by the group. There are four different types of roles: Critic Leader Peacemaker Clown Excitement Envy Mother Disturber Saboteur Teacher Expert Victim
  26. 27. Group dynamics – roles discussion Move into groups of 5 and consider the following question: Think about the different roles that will be needed and possibly emerge in workgroups. Include as many of the different types of roles as possible. Examples are given below: Functional: Co-ordinator Political: Leader, follower Psychological: Critic, supporter Emotional: Excitement, anticipation, irritation Write each role on a card.
  27. 28. Group dynamics – roles discussion
  28. 29. Exercise – 2 Truths, 1 Lie <ul><li>Sit with someone you do not know yet. </li></ul><ul><li>1 partner tells the other 2 things about themselves that are true and 1 that is not true. </li></ul><ul><li>Swap, so that 2nd person can tell first person 3 things about themselves (2 truths, 1 lie). </li></ul><ul><li>Clear up the mystery and chat about it. </li></ul>
  29. 30. <ul><li>As human beings we sort people we meet for the first time into categories immediately. A “stereotype” is helpful when it is: </li></ul>Stereotypes <ul><li>Consciously held </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptive rather than evaluative </li></ul><ul><li>Accurate </li></ul><ul><li>The first best guess </li></ul><ul><li>Modified </li></ul>Rather than pretending not to stereotype it is essential for working across differences to become aware of our stereotypes and learn to set them aside when faced with contradictory evidence!
  30. 31. Perception Parochial “ Our way is the only way.” Ethnocentric “ Our way is best.” Synergistic “ Leveraging our ways and their ways may work best.” <ul><li>Diversity has no impact on organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity causes problems for organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity leads to both problems and advantages for organisations. </li></ul>Strategy <ul><li>Ignore the impact of diversity on organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>Minimise the sources and impact of diversity on organisations. </li></ul><ul><li>Train people to recognise and use differences to create advantages for the organisation. </li></ul>Most Likely Consequences <ul><li>Problems occur but they are not attributed to diversity. </li></ul><ul><li>People reduce problems by reducing diversity. </li></ul><ul><li>They ignore or eliminate potential advantages. </li></ul><ul><li>Groups benefit from the advantages of diversity. </li></ul><ul><li>Some problems remain and must be managed </li></ul>Frequency <ul><li>Very common </li></ul><ul><li>Common </li></ul><ul><li>Less common </li></ul>Source: adapted from Adler (2002), p. 114. Strategies for Managing Cultural Diversity
  31. 32. <ul><li>Introduction and getting to know each other </li></ul><ul><li>The edge concept </li></ul><ul><li>The importance of listening </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice or “workgroups” </li></ul><ul><li>Self-organising principles </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to group dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Group dynamics continued </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing and maintaining workgroups </li></ul>
  32. 33. The membership of workgroups Membership is voluntary. Members will stay involved if the central organising principle of the workgroup is clear, all contributions are invited and supported, and group dynamics are not allowed to take precedence over the organising principle.
  33. 34. The leadership of workgroups Leadership of emerging voluntary groups must have intrinsic legitimacy – in other words they must be lead from the inside, rather than be controlled from the outside. Most importantly, leadership should be shared.
  34. 35. Self-Leadership Self-leadership can be defined as the process of influencing oneself to establish the self-direction and self-motivation needed to perform. This means getting oneself from passive mode to active mode, going on a purposeful journey.
  35. 36. The leadership of workgroups <ul><li>The day-to-day leadership provided by those who organise activities </li></ul><ul><li>The classificatory leadership provided by those who collect and organise information in order to document practices </li></ul><ul><li>The interpersonal leadership provided by those who weave the community's social fabric </li></ul><ul><li>The boundary leadership provided by those who connect the community to other communities </li></ul><ul><li>The institutional leadership provided by those who maintain links with other organizational constituencies, in particular the official hierarchy </li></ul><ul><li>The cutting-edge leadership provided by those who shepherd &quot;out-of-the-box&quot; initiatives. </li></ul><ul><li>The inspirational leadership provided by thought leaders and recognized experts </li></ul>© Etienne Wenger, 1998 Different leadership roles in workgroups:
  36. 37. Stages of development of workgroups © Etienne Wenger, 1998
  37. 38. Good workgroup practices What would you consider as good group practices to ensure the creation and sustainability of Connexions’ Workgroups? Write your ideas on cards.
  38. 39. Good workgroup practices
  39. 40. What next? If you would like our support for a new or existing workgroup, we would love to hear from you. Contact: Neels at [email_address] 082 334 3259 Quinton Davis at quinton.davis@edunova.org or If you want to give more feedback or ask questions: Contact: Mark Horner at [email_address] Helene Smit at [email_address] Layo Seriki at [email_address]
  40. 41. Self-Leadership is NOT Isolation Effective self-leadership is not founded on egoistic or “blindly” independent behaviours with total disregard to the work group or organisation. <ul><li>Self-leadership does not require entirely autonomous behaviour without regards to the team or organisation. </li></ul><ul><li>Self-leadership does not require that the identity and values of each individual group member be put aside in favour of the work group. </li></ul><ul><li>An effective self-leadership perspective encourages individuals to find their own personal identity and mode of contribution as part of establishment of a group that produces synergistic performance. </li></ul><ul><li>It is important to maintain the balance between the self-leadership of an individual and the self-leadership of the work group as a collective. </li></ul>Source: Charles C. Manz and Christopher Neck (2006): “Mastering Self-Leadership: Empowering Yourself for Personal Excellence”

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