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Sixteen:Nine Presentation

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Feb. 11th presentation to InfoPresses conference in Montreal

Published in: Technology
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Sixteen:Nine Presentation

  1. 1. DIGITAL SIGNAGE: A crash course on what all the fuss is about
  2. 2. WHO IS THIS GUY?
  3. 3. SIXTEEN:NINE BLOG www.sixteen-nine.net
  4. 4. LOOKING BACK This stuff has actually been around for a while
  5. 5. WHERE WE ARE NOW …
  6. 6. $6.1 BILLION MEDIA INDUSTRY IN 2008
  7. 7. 12.9% PROJECTED GROWTH RATE OVER NEXT THREE YEARS
  8. 8. 100S OF VENDORS AND 100S OF NETWORKS - five software firms just in Montreal!
  9. 9. CHAOS ABOUNDS
  10. 10. SO WHY IS THAT?
  11. 11. WILD WEST DAYS - land grab attitude persists - few standards on measurement, content - little advocacy or organization - big promises made, few kept
  12. 12. FLAWED BUSINESS MODELS - build it and they will come mindset - media companies run by technology people - ANYTHING as a media opportunity - shovel-ware content
  13. 13. BAD EXECUTION - screens and PCs that are dead - screens in the wrong places - moronic media strategies - people selling media who have no idea how to do it
  14. 14. COST OF CONTENT - keeping content fresh costs big money - stale content gets ignored - content done cheap usually looks it, and has the expected impact (none)
  15. 15. TOO MUCH ENTHUSIASM, TOO LITTLE EXPERIENCE
  16. 16. TOO MUCH NOISE - how can so many companies be the world leader?
  17. 17. CAPITAL AND OPERATING COSTS WERE HIGH - money gone before ad revenues materialized - chicken and egg thing about critical mass and making enough money to build out to critical mass
  18. 18. AND … IT WAS JUST TOO EARLY
  19. 19. WHERE WE ARE NOW…
  20. 20. SUCCESS STORIES EMERGING - Consistent, reliable evidence of real sales impact in stores - ROI models can be developed and believed - efficient, ultimately inexpensive way to market
  21. 21. BUSINESS MODELS - Ad-driven networks - Private networks - Sponsored networks - Hybrid networks - Layered services
  22. 22. DEPLOYMENTS EVOLVING - Different screens for different places and reasons - from signature feature areas to small, simple shelf-edge units
  23. 23. NETWORK AGGREGATION - aggregated planning groups - conjoined sales teams - ad marketplace - common focus alliances One Plan. One Buy. One Bill.
  24. 24. THE CULL IS UNDERWAY - companies folding tents or selling - latest, TorStar’s Transit TV files for bankruptcy - 8,500 screens, 500 million riders
  25. 25. SHIFTING CONTENT - broadcasters and publishers moving content to this platform - social media stuff starting to intermingle - content work is also getting better
  26. 26. BLURRING LINES - POS systems - kiosks - mobile devices - in-store audio
  27. 27. DROPPING COSTS - panels less than $1,000 - PCs less than $500, soon sub-$300 - free or bundled software
  28. 28. DOOH-SPECIFIC MEDIA BUYS - Schering-Plough commits $8-$10 M
  29. 29. BIG GUYS ARE IN - IBM, Microsoft, Cisco, Dell, Fujitsu, Samsung and others - Is Google coming?
  30. 30. NEW TECHNOLOGIES - OLED’s thin, flexible screens - Electronic ink - Wireless broadband - Multi-touch and gesture-driven screens - LED micro projectors and window film - Adobe Flash Flex and Silverlight
  31. 31. NEW PLACES FOR SCREENS - sides of buses - rear windows of vehicles - building faces - queues - shopping carts and price checkers
  32. 32. NEW STAKEHOLDERS - human resources departments - store and venue operations - retail merchandising and design - public safety officials - interactive sector
  33. 33. BETTER MEASUREMENT - biometric gaze tracking may be a game-changer - trigger ads and events based on who is looking - but some worries about privacy
  34. 34. OVAB GUIDELINES
  35. 35. “ Average Unit Audience should be the currency metric for out-of-home video networks. Average Unit Audience is defined as the number and type of people exposed to the media vehicle with an opportunity to see a unit of time equal to the typical advertising unit.”
  36. 36. HUH???
  37. 37. OVAB EXPLAINED - presence, notice  and  dwell time .
  38. 38. OVAB EXPLAINED - the foot traffic in a venue, like a medical clinic - the foot traffic in the area(s) where the screens are up and running - what percentage of that foot traffic actually looked at the screen - dwell time in the vicinity of the screen - length of the playlist loop
  39. 39. OVAB EXPLAINED - gross “eyeball” count not good enough - 50,000 eyeballs turns into 1,487 audience units - finally, the beginnings of a way to compare audiences across network types
  40. 40. CANADIAN VERSION? - doesn’t exist - Canadian Outdoor Measurement Bureau has nothing formalized for this space - open question as to whether planners WANT this level of detail
  41. 41. ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM - many networks that sell on the basis of sheer eyeballs don’t want a better read on the “real” audience - massive dilution and re-think on rates?
  42. 42. LOOKING AHEAD - far fewer networks and vendors - screens everywhere - DOOH becomes a mainstream media buy
  43. 43. LOOKING AHEAD - technology goes to Internet cloud - digital signage no longer just a nice to have for retail and outdoor - like online, this is evolving very quickly now
  44. 44. WAKEY WAKEY! - Thanks for listening - Contact: [email_address] 289-242-3332

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