Venue Operations
   Roberto Siviero
Introduction

- Venue Operations in 2 sentences:
  -Yes, it is your responsibility.
  -Yes, it is your job.
Venue Operations

- What we did
  - Operational Planning & Venuization
  - Recruitment and Training of Venue Managers
    ...
Venue Operations
General Overview
- Beijing Sport Program plus 6 non-olympic
- 3 Major Complexes to run
  - Maracanã - bew...
Venue Operations
General Overview
- 38 Venue Managers
  - 12 Deputy Venue Managers
  - 37 Operational Supervisors
  - 47 O...
Key Dates
- June 2004 to July 2005
   - Strategic Planning, Budget Allocation, Concepts of Operation
- August 2005
   - Mo...
Objectives and Key Tasks

• Objectives
  – Integrate the functional areas into a cohesive venue
    team
       • Easier s...
Organization chart
• Model Venue Exercise – July/August 2006
   – Central Planning Team & Venue Team
• Venue Planning and ...
Organization chart
• November to December 2006

                                   General Manager
                       ...
Organization chart
     Barra           P. de Açúcar        Deodoro         Maracanã
  Compl. Riocentro   Arena Triatlo   ...
Challenges and Solutions
Key Challenge              Solution
Planning phase: Working    Simplification of planning
underst...
Key Decisions Made

• CO-RIO had a understaffed team for Olympic planning
  model standards.
   – Olympic planning model r...
Key Decisions Made
•   Late Venuization, late surge of workforce for FA’s.
     – We had a power struggle in between the v...
Key Decisions Made

• Lack of test-events on every venue.
   – Real problem – teams don’t act as teams if they don’t play!...
Risks and Contingencies

Risk              Contingency plan
Way too many to   • Do whatever it takes
describe          • M...
Lessons Learned
• What are the key outcomes?
   – We now have effectively created a tremendous workforce with
     large e...
Lessons Learned
• What are the key lessons learned?
   – If you are planning on the Olympic Model, ensure to have a large
...
Lessons Learned
• What would you do differently?
   – Have more personnel somehow, specially when the scope is
     being ...
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Rio 2007 Observers Program - Venue Operations

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Overview of the Planning & Venue Management function that I directed at the Rio 2007 Pan American Games

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Rio 2007 Observers Program - Venue Operations

  1. 1. Venue Operations Roberto Siviero
  2. 2. Introduction - Venue Operations in 2 sentences: -Yes, it is your responsibility. -Yes, it is your job.
  3. 3. Venue Operations - What we did - Operational Planning & Venuization - Recruitment and Training of Venue Managers and Operational Supervisors - Main Clients: EVERYBODY - But: - SPORT - PRESS & BROADCASTERS - GAMES FAMILY & SPONSORS - SPECTATORS
  4. 4. Venue Operations General Overview - Beijing Sport Program plus 6 non-olympic - 3 Major Complexes to run - Maracanã - beware of Cerimonies! - Riocentro (mixture of comp and non-comp venues) - Sports City - 20 sport venues
  5. 5. Venue Operations General Overview - 38 Venue Managers - 12 Deputy Venue Managers - 37 Operational Supervisors - 47 Operational Assistants (Volunteers)
  6. 6. Key Dates - June 2004 to July 2005 - Strategic Planning, Budget Allocation, Concepts of Operation - August 2005 - Model Venue Exercise - September 2005 to July 2006 - Venue Planning/Operational Planning - July 2006 to December 2006 - Planning re-alignment and Detail of Operation and “early” venuization - January 2007 to April 2007 - Resource build-up, transfer of knowledge, completion of venuization - May & June 2007 - Operational Readiness & MOVE TO VENUES!
  7. 7. Objectives and Key Tasks • Objectives – Integrate the functional areas into a cohesive venue team • Easier said than done – Lead the detailed operational planning process • Planners vs. Operators • Key Tasks – Define and refine scope of operations • Again and again and again… and then some – Change Management – Transfer of knowledge – Command and Control – Creativity at problem solving
  8. 8. Organization chart • Model Venue Exercise – July/August 2006 – Central Planning Team & Venue Team • Venue Planning and Operational Planning Phase – August to October 2006 General Manager Roberto Siviero Planning Supervisor Paula Andrade Cluster Manager Cluster Manager Barra/P.Açúcar Maracanã/Deodoro Osiris Silva Jorge Miranda
  9. 9. Organization chart • November to December 2006 General Manager Roberto Siviero Planning Supervisor Paula Andrade Cluster Manager Cluster Manager Barra/P.Açúcar Maracanã/Deodoro Osiris Silva Jorge Miranda Zona Sul Barra Maracanã Deodoro Marco Dornsbach Julio Balthazar Rodrigo Garcia Pascoal Vaz
  10. 10. Organization chart Barra P. de Açúcar Deodoro Maracanã Compl. Riocentro Arena Triatlo Hipismo Compl Maracanã Maracanã Volêi de Praia Tiro Esprtivo Pavilhão 2 Mracanãzinho Lagoa Tiro c/ Arco Pavilhão 3 Júlio Delamare Caiçaras Hoquéi Pavilhão 4 Havelange Pq. Flamengo Pentatlo Compl Autódromo Miécimo Marina Pq Aquático Arena Velódromo • January to March 2007 Outeiro – Gradually… Cid. Rock – “Getting” people from other FA’s Marapendi – Low turnover rate CFZ Barra Bowling
  11. 11. Challenges and Solutions Key Challenge Solution Planning phase: Working Simplification of planning understaffed for Olympic demands, optimizing FA’s planning model time, focus on operations & standards policies Late “real” venuization, Focus on creating & late surge of workforce documenting FA’s for FA’s procedures > transfer of knowledge Lack of test-events on Make the most of every venue opportunities, promote small events, use venue training as an test event
  12. 12. Key Decisions Made • CO-RIO had a understaffed team for Olympic planning model standards. – Olympic planning model requires larger number of workforce at least one year before the Games – We understood that we could not pursue the level/amount of planning required with our numbers – We re-designed the planning and the outputs needed to “fit” the production capacity of the FA’s – Mixed results: FA’s were responsive to the new model, but the planning level is not top notch – sufficient in the majority of the FA’s but insufficient in others
  13. 13. Key Decisions Made • Late Venuization, late surge of workforce for FA’s. – We had a power struggle in between the venue teams and the FA’s – focus on the venue or the FA? – The planning demands were gradually changing for the venue operation, but the FA’s wanted to keep the focus on their business. – We understood the issue and gave FA’s some “breathing room” to focus both on their operations (late tenders) and the venue demands. – Mixed results as well – although Venue Managers were given the “institutional” authority, FA representatives held “allegiance” to the FA’s. – Venue Managers (cluster managers at the time) did not have “real” authority to demand performance from the FA’s until very late. – Focus was given on detailed procedures and ability to transfer knowledge quickly to the new comers
  14. 14. Key Decisions Made • Lack of test-events on every venue. – Real problem – teams don’t act as teams if they don’t play! – Venue teams that had test events operate significantly better than the ones that haven’t – We brought many of the other venues’ FA’s representatives to work on the venues with test events – even if wasn’t necessary – Some venue teams arranged games to be played, even without public, to test at least FOP operations. – Some venues had a really late delivery and suffered in the beginning of operations – hit the ground running!
  15. 15. Risks and Contingencies Risk Contingency plan Way too many to • Do whatever it takes describe • Make things happen • Anticipate! • “You are not here to make friends” (Mr. John Quayle) • Have the ability to pay for the last 5% - it will make a difference
  16. 16. Lessons Learned • What are the key outcomes? – We now have effectively created a tremendous workforce with large events experience – These people will be multipliers of the knowledge gained in the Games – Just with that Sport Operations in Brazil will improve greatly in the next 5 – 10 years – The government and ourselves understand now the scale, complexity and most of the scope of Multi-Sport/Multi-Venues Events – Brazil and Rio have now the sport infrastructure built to become a major player in the international events industry
  17. 17. Lessons Learned • What are the key lessons learned? – If you are planning on the Olympic Model, ensure to have a large enough team in the strategic and concept of operations phases to produce a well structured scope - it will make a difference to have a solid base – it will make change management easier. – If there is legislation that have strong impacts on procurement try to get temporary relief. – Keep your budget flexible! (as much as you can) – Get the most detailed sport information you can – if you don’t there will be problems with the technical delegates – Venue designs are very important – but try to make the venue planning concise – people always want to change something - keep the focus on OPERATIONS - bad venues are tough to operate
  18. 18. Lessons Learned • What would you do differently? – Have more personnel somehow, specially when the scope is being defined – or have more experienced central team at that phase. – Have (good) consultants along the planning ride – shortcuts are really valuable and the issues do repeat themselves – Have a strong project management central team to control the “boring” part – operational manuals, master plans – it is VERY important to know how your organization is performing – it’s human nature to hide mistakes and shortcomings – Have enough resources to venuize at least 8 months before the games. – Move to the large venues at least a month prior to the Games

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