Emotions In Management Communication i

Effective Use of Emotions
In Management Communications

Rhapsodie McClintick
TMGT....
Emotions In Management Communication ii

Table of Contents
EFFECTIVE USE OF EMOTIONS ........................................
Emotions In Management Communication iii
Emotions In Management Communication A

Figures and Tables
The Vicious Cycle of Emotions and Reactions Table 12.1

Table 1...
Emotions In Management Communication B

Business Communication - Mind Map

http://www.bized.co.uk/sites/bized/files/images...
Emotions In Management Communication C

Figure 12.15. Information Richness

Effective Communication
The Art, Science, and ...
Emotions In Management Communication D

The Four Main Goals of Communication
1. To inform - you are providing information ...
Emotions In Management Communication E
4. Think and organize before you proceed.
5. Think from your audience point of view...
Emotions In Management Communications 1

Introduction
While communicating is a transfer of thoughts, often through speech,...
Emotions In Management Communication 2
1. Self-Awareness- The ability to recognize your moods, emotions, and drives,
as we...
Emotions In Management Communication 3
Research also proves that emotions are essential for making choices. “In fact, emot...
Emotions In Management Communication 4

Necessity often requires getting a goal fulfilled, but along with necessity comes ...
Emotions In Management Communication 5
The reasons for this examination is important, if you as an individual are still em...
Emotions In Management Communication 6
internal noise, is critical. The Receiver takes in the Sender’s Message silently, w...
Emotions In Management Communication 7
Data- Facts and figures newly collected for the project. Two ways are used to colle...
Emotions In Management Communication 8
persuade through content and argument. Along with the persuasion in content and arg...
Emotions In Management Communication 9
communication is to match the communication channel with the goal of the communicat...
Emotions In Management Communication 10
three guiding principles, but the information is often disguised amidst all the ot...
Emotions In Management Communication 11
guidelines for success are based upon the heart, when the heart is forgotten the m...
Emotions In Management Communications a

References
12.2. Communication Barriers. (n.d.). Welcome to Web Books Publishing....
Emotions In Management Communications b
Costa, M. (2010). ENGAGEMENT: Customer engagement improves brand profits.
Marketin...
Emotions In Management Communications c
Objectives . (n.d.). Conflict Resolution Education Connection: Home. Retrieved Nov...
Emotions In Management Communications d

The Tortoise and The Hare
A Hare was making fun of the Tortoise one day for being...
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Management Communication Paper

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Communication is one of the greatest reasons for staying alive. Being a leader and a manager in business can fail without proper communication and understanding of the emotions behind it.

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Management Communication Paper

  1. 1. Emotions In Management Communication i Effective Use of Emotions In Management Communications Rhapsodie McClintick TMGT. 5001 Doctor Back October 18, 2012
  2. 2. Emotions In Management Communication ii Table of Contents EFFECTIVE USE OF EMOTIONS ..................................................................................................I IN MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATIONS.....................................................................................I FIGURES AND TABLES..............................................................................................................A TABLE 12.2. DON’T USE THAT TONE WITH ME!................................................................................A FIGURE 12.15. INFORMATION RICHNESS..........................................................................................C INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................1 AN EXAMINATION OF EMOTIONS............................................................................................1 WHAT IS EMOTION? ....................................................................................................................2 MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS................................................................3 COMMUNICATION PRINCIPLES TIED TO EMOTIONS.................................................................3 SETTING COMMUNICATION GOALS...................................................................................................3 AUDIENCE ANALYSIS.....................................................................................................................4 LISTENING..................................................................................................................................5 POINT OF VIEW...........................................................................................................................6 CONTENT & ARGUMENT................................................................................................................7 STRUCTURE.................................................................................................................................8 CHOOSING MEDIA........................................................................................................................8 STYLE AND TONE..........................................................................................................................9 GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK...................................................................................................9 EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION RESULTS...........................................................9 CONCLUSION.........................................................................................................................10 REFERENCES................................................................................................................................A THE TORTOISE AND THE HARE.................................................................................................D
  3. 3. Emotions In Management Communication iii
  4. 4. Emotions In Management Communication A Figures and Tables The Vicious Cycle of Emotions and Reactions Table 12.1 Table 12.2. Don’t Use That Tone with Me! Placement of the emphasis What it means I did not tell John you were late. Someone else told John you were late. I did not tell John you were late. This did not happen. I did not tell John you were late. I may have implied it. I did not tell John you were late. But maybe I told Sharon and José. I did not tell John you were late. I was talking about someone else. I did not tell John you were late. I told him you still are late. I did not tell John you were late. I told him you were attending another meeting. ( 12.2. Communication )
  5. 5. Emotions In Management Communication B Business Communication - Mind Map http://www.bized.co.uk/sites/bized/files/images/buscommmap.gif Guide for When to Use Written Versus Verbal Communication
  6. 6. Emotions In Management Communication C Figure 12.15. Information Richness Effective Communication The Art, Science, and Practice
  7. 7. Emotions In Management Communication D The Four Main Goals of Communication 1. To inform - you are providing information for use in decision making, but aren't necessarily advocating a course of action 2. To request for a specific action by the receiver 3. To persuade - to reinforce or change a receiver's belief about a topic and, possibly, act on the belief 4. To build relationships - some messages you send may have the simple goal of building good-will between you and the receiver Benefits of Effective Communication • Achieves shared understanding • Directs the flow of information • Helps people overcome barriers to open discussion • Stimulates others to take action to active goals • Channels information to encourage people to think in new ways and to act more effectively KFC - the Three Aspects of Successful Communication 7 • Know what you want • Find out what you are getting • Change what you do until you get what you want The 10 Essentials of Effective Communication 1. Know your audience and match your message to the audience. 2. Respect your audience and suspend judgments. 3. Know exactly what you want to achieve.
  8. 8. Emotions In Management Communication E 4. Think and organize before you proceed. 5. Think from your audience point of view. 6. Be mindful of what you face and body are conveying nonverbally. 7. Listen carefully to all responses. 8. Be willing to share what you know and hear what you don't know. 9. Stay focused on what you want to achieve and don't get distracted. 10. Find a way to get your audience to explain what they think you said. Discuss differences until you hear a satisfactory version of the message you wanted to convey. http://www.icsti.su/rus_ten3/1000ventures_e/business_guide/crosscuttings/communication_ main.html
  9. 9. Emotions In Management Communications 1 Introduction While communicating is a transfer of thoughts, often through speech, management communication requires an understanding of man’s heart. “. . . For out of the overflow of his heart his mouth speaks.” (Luke 6:45, NIV) There is proof that shows the affects of emotions upon the hearts of men, but a true leader needs to understand how their heart and their personal emotions will affect and alter the outcome of their communication. Managers, who are good leaders, also need to understand how another’s heart will alter the interpretation and affects of communication. So the effective use of emotions can; actually will, alter the outcome of management communication. An individual first needs to understand that emotions are part of being human. Self examination is the start of understanding emotional communication as a manager. This emotional perspective will eventually result in more success with practice of understanding. “Effective communication is an important process in everyday life.” (Baron) And a manger needs to examine the affects of communication in regards to emotion because it is vital for success. Daniel Goleman has described the reason for this concisely: For employees, how a leader makes them feel plays a large role in their level of motivation, commitment, and even drives their brain in (or out of) the best zone for marshaling whatever cognitive abilities and skills they bring to the job.” The reader, of this material, needs to take the time to consider while reading in order to gain understanding. An examination of emotions leads into management communication and the emotionally effective use of communication principles. This knowledge provides success for effective communication with audiences great and small. The social success of a manager then can result. An understanding of what emotions really are is beneficial for an understanding of how to use emotions effectively in management communications. An examination of emotions A reason for each manager to review the effective use of emotions is because success follows knowledge. This is described as EI or emotional intelligence. “For leadership positions emotional intelligence competencies account for up to 85% of what sets outstanding managers apart from the average.” (Goldman, D) “New business realities mean managers are being assessed not so much by length of service and academic intelligence, but rather by their operational actions, results achieved and levels of emotional intelligence.” (Business Consultancy, p.2634) A manager desiring success should really try to gain emotional intelligence. The review of the emotional quotients is pertinent. Of the 10 listed by Mr. Goleman, five are repeatedly accented in different articles and training seminar advertisements. The five are listed and illustrated below:
  10. 10. Emotions In Management Communication 2 1. Self-Awareness- The ability to recognize your moods, emotions, and drives, as well as their effect on others. 2. Self-Regulation- The ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods, and the propensity to suspend judgment and think before acting. 3. Motivation- A passion to work for reasons that go beyond money or status and a propensity to pursue goals with energy and persistence. 4. Empathy- The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people. 5. Social Skills- A proficiency in managing relationships and building networks. (2634) These descriptions of emotion add value for managers trying to be effective communicators. (Business Consultancy, p.2634) “With these factors an understanding of the value is also illustrated below.” An examination of some of the factors of emotional intelligence is highlighted throughout this document, but there are multiple factors to emotional intelligence that will not be examined. Knowledge is required in order to discern emotion. So understanding of emotion starts with knowledge, then perception of self in accord with knowledge, and finally with an application of perception to others emotions. What is emotion? Webster’s collegiate dictionary defines emotion as “the affective aspect of consciousness.” (Webster’s, 10th, 1999) The influence of emotions upon our consciousness adds force, depth, and texture to whatever we are saying. “Emotions help us communicate.” Emotions have the potential to be used constructively, when they are understood and used for the intended creative purposes. And the heart of each individual is conveyed through the body language. “To be effective communicators, we need to align our body language, appearance, and tone with the words we’re trying to convey. Research shows that when individuals are lying, they are more likely to blink more frequently, shift their weight, and shrug.” (12.2. Communication) So managers, need to remember that “paying attention to [] nonverbal communication and attempting to keep it consistent with our verbal message is important for delivering messages that communicate what we want them to.” (Objectives)
  11. 11. Emotions In Management Communication 3 Research also proves that emotions are essential for making choices. “In fact, emotions drive 80% of decision-making, and logic only 20%.” (Addis) This makes a reasonable person assume that if the heart is touched first, then managers need to determine the degree which emotions are stimulated in order to communicate and stimulate positive emotions for effective actions. MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS “The ability to effectively communicate is a necessary condition for successfully planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.” (Jones) Communication is vital to organizations—it’s how we coordinate actions and achieve goals. It is defined in the Merriam-Webster’s dictionary as “a process by which information is exchanged between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior.” Effective use of emotions is a definite need in comparison to emotions and management communication requirements. Further information is shared with these two respects when reviewing effective use of emotion in comparison to the principles of communication. COMMUNICATION PRINCIPLES TIED TO EMOTIONS The principles of communication are necessary for good management communication outcomes. An examination of the basic principles of management communication follows with a discussion of the effective use of emotion for each. Setting communication goals The reason one speaks is because the desire to express one’s self understandably is great. A manager can speak and is trained but, “[b]efore communication happens, the manager must define priorities.” The communication of goals requires considering what goals are emotionally. Goals emotionally equal desires, wants, necessities, excitement, anticipation, and fears. (Hattersley, p.17) Time and circumstances can diminish the value of the goals emotional impact unless the heart continues to be reminded of the value of the goal. While considering this point a person can see that the emotions of defined value are based on worth, import, and being good or bad in accord with judgment. This necessitates a review of the previously mentioned emotions. Fear of a goal is often related to a fear of change, which will be discussed later in this paper. But the fear of a goal can also be related to a fear of the unknown, “what am I getting into, what should I expect?” Anticipation of gaining the goal often offers a wait and see attitude. “We will get there, but I am still excited,” type of feeling. Excitement about a goal is often found when there is purpose, a reason, and a way to see the goal fulfilled. Examples, stories, and desires will affect the excitement for the goal.
  12. 12. Emotions In Management Communication 4 Necessity often requires getting a goal fulfilled, but along with necessity comes fear. If the goal is accomplished the fear is removed. Goals and wants are often the same thing, but a want can set a goal, or a goal can set a want. A want is a desire for what is available, but not gained yet. Desires and wants are tied closely together. But often desires are defined by the feeling of hope, self satisfaction, and anticipation. For a goal to be desirable an individual needs to feel personally affected by the consequences of reaching the goal. For communication a manager needs to feel the goal, and then he or she needs to share this feeling with others, in order to effectively succeed in accomplishing the goal. But to share this feeling with others requires an understanding of who is being communicated with. An audience analysis is required in all situations, but this is even more important for effective management. AUDIENCE ANALYSIS “Audience analysis means understanding the interests, values, and goals of those people who you want to influence to do something.” Take a step up to the mirror; this is the first person you as an individual affect each day. But comprehension of others means that each individual needs to understand the reasons for their own perceptions relating to interests, values, and goals. This understanding of the relation of perceptions to actions for an individual can be used to understand how others “think; how they perceive their interests; what will move them to support you, or stay out of your way.” (Hattersley, p.39) Perceptions How do you as an individual think, perceive your interests, and why do you support actions or stay away from them? If an individual examines their thought patterns tied to their heart, answers to individual understanding grows. Understanding about interests, how values are altered by perceptions, and the emotions behind goals can open up an understanding of others emotional actions and reactions to communication. A good thing to do is to review the past. This can open up an individual’s heart to understanding of their reasons for perceptions, actions, and reactions. But perceptions that are carried from childhood into life need to be examined for accuracy. How is this done? Ask yourself the following questions and take the time to consider the true answer. • • • • • As a child who were the key individuals in your life? What key characteristics did each of these individuals have? What emotions do you now have in accord with those individuals? Do the emotions gained from your childhood perspectives still affect you? If yes, and yes is normally the common answer, you now can work on altering those perceptions in accord with more mature understanding?
  13. 13. Emotions In Management Communication 5 The reasons for this examination is important, if you as an individual are still emotively tying characteristics of individuals to pre-perceptions then you may be hindering your understanding. A manager needs to go beyond the basic understanding. While understanding is a mental grasp, there is more required to gain true understanding. Merriman Webster’s Dictionary continues to define understand as “A: Friendly or harmonious relationship B: An agreement of opinion or feeling: adjustment of differences.” Audience analysis for a manager requires reviewing the emotions behind perceptions. As a person ages their perceptions change. And choices in how we see people are perceptions about people. Research proves that emotions are essential for making choices. “In fact, emotions drive 80% of decision-making, and logic only 20%.” (Addis) If a manager’s perceptions are based on emotions, then their perceptions are tied to their own emotional history. And an emotive understanding of this is necessary for managers. Understanding others requires having insight into their emotional reasons for perceptions. So questions that are included in a book by Michael Hattersley and Linda McJannet should be considered. “Who are my audiences?; what is my relationship to my audiences?; what are their likely attitudes toward my proposal?; How much do they already know?, and is my proposal to their interests?” (Hattersley, p.39) By considering relationships, attitudes, knowledge, and interests of individuals the manager is considering the emotions that affect these people’s perceptions. But this is just the perceived reason for understanding, real understanding comes from listening. LISTENING “Mangers are constantly required to listen” in order to have true understanding. (Brownwell, J.) The emotions involved in listening require that an individual values, cares, appreciates, and desires to gain more, draw closer, and/or grow with the listening. And this requires listening actively. “Active listening [is defined as] giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.’(O’net) “Carl Rogers, founder of the “person-centered” approach to psychology, formulated five rules for active listening: 1. Listen for message content 2. Listen for feelings 3. Respond to feelings 4. Note all cues 5. Paraphrase and restate “The good news is that listening is a skill that can be learned. (Brownwell) “The first step is to decide that we want to listen. Casting aside distractions, such as by reducing background or
  14. 14. Emotions In Management Communication 6 internal noise, is critical. The Receiver takes in the Sender’s Message silently, without speaking.” (12.2. Communication) Internal distractions are caused by noise based upon emotions. And this noise can emotionally cause ruin or lead into success. One type of noise discussed by Ronald D. Gordon, shares the effects of the emotional reaction to internal noise. “Defense-arousal would seem to be a serious disruptive noise source in human communication systems.” (Gordon) Mr. Gordon continues with an explanation of the action based upon the reaction to that type of noise: When people feel defensive, they want to strike out; when they feel understood, they want to reach out. When people feel defensive, they want to do something to the other person; when they feel understood, they want to do something for the other person, and for people in general. Attention adds to the emotional connection between individuals. Individual’s can recollect how as a youngster they repeatedly asked for a certain gift for Christmas. The adult’s body language can tell a youngster there is hope or no hope for getting a desired gift. These reactions show how much attention the listener was giving to the words of that child. The attention paid to the listener is often just perceived, but clues are shared by body language as to how attentive you are being. Speakers emotionally react to the attention that their words are given. (12.2. Communication) highlights some of these emotional reactions: It appears, then, that while individuals perceived as exceptionally good listeners recognize their ability, those who listen less effectively (as judged by their subordinates) are unaware that others are experiencing some degree of dissatisfaction with their listening behaviors. Managers need to take these words into account in communication. If you are analyzing your audience, but you are actively listening to them, they could become dissatisfied with your behavior and eventually with you as a manager if you are not. Questions for confirmation and understanding are necessary. In this manner you can be given the other’s point of view also, but there is much more involved. POINT OF VIEW “By point of view, we mean the perspective from which you assess a situation and present your findings and recommendations to your audience.” Point of view is based upon “those facts, values, and opinions that matter most to you.” (Hattersley, p.49) The point of view that you have is different than the point of view that the manager in the office across the hall has. An internal and/or external consideration of other points of view is necessary. Facts will be viewed in the manner that they are cared about or are important to an individual. Facts, for each individual, are tied to the information that has been valuable enough to be taken as a fact: “Secondary Data- Facts include financial statements, . . . reports, files, customer letters, . . .and customer lists. Internal Data (Inside the Firm) . . .External Data (outside the firm). Primary
  15. 15. Emotions In Management Communication 7 Data- Facts and figures newly collected for the project. Two ways are used to collect this information Observation and interviews.” (12.2. Communication) But, “[f]acts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.” (Mark Twain, humorist) So we can play with emotions but the view of facts remains stubborn. Values can be altered though. Values are based on “A fair return or equivalent in goods, services, or money for some price.” But a review of values shares the emotional connection. Under value Merriam-Websters Collegiate dictionary continues with the definition of values as “the relative worth, utility, or importance.” And the definition for value judgment is “a judgment assigning a value (as good or bad to something).” (Merriam-Websters Collegiate). First recognize that “many things can stand in the way [and alter the value] of effective communication.” (12.2. Communication) These disconnects often are emotional in nature: These include filtering, selective perception; information overload, emotional disconnects lack of source familiarity or credibility, workplace gossip, semantics, gender differences, differences in meaning between Sender and Receiver, and biased language. A review of those disconnects ties to emotions in listening, point of view, facts and arguments, media for communication, perceptions, and feedback. Opinion is a personal idea and feeling tied to point of view. And then for a good way to share their material with others they need to consider others points of view. “. . . [T]here are also many times in our professional lives when we have crucial conversations—discussions were not only the stakes are high but also where opinions vary and emotions run strong.” (Patterson) This is often the case with content and argument. CONTENT & ARGUMENT “Successful message design depends on content (what you have to say) and argument (how you build your persuasive case).” (Hattersley, p.59) A consideration of content and argument results in many emotional factors. Because “[e]ffective communication is clear, factual, and goaloriented.” (12.2. Communication) For the content to be acceptable it must be “respectful.” (12.2. Communication) References that do not recognize individuality among similarities can “reduce[a] person to [ ] one characteristic. Language that belittles or stereotypes a person poisons the communication process.” A good leader needs to be aware of what is acceptable to use content and argument properly. Also a manager is under obligation to understand the legal aspects of their communication. This is very valuable when a manager considers that, “[e]mployees who perceive unjust treatment usually respond by engaging in activities that ultimately harm a company’s competitive advantage.” (Kleiman, 329) So managers need to take time in consideration before trying to
  16. 16. Emotions In Management Communication 8 persuade through content and argument. Along with the persuasion in content and argument a leader needs to consider how to structure their communication to be emotionally effective. STRUCTURE Structure is a compilation of the previous communication principles and new emotional communication considerations. First, “structure requires making your goal and point of view clear,” while communicating. Second, a structure “demonstrate[s ] your understanding of conflicting viewpoints” along with “citing reasonable opposing proposals” or thoughts. Next, structure needs an individual to “show, why [their] solution is best.” Fourth, structure demands that a communicator, “Acknowledges and neutralizes reasonable alternatives.” And finally an outline of the following steps along with emphasis on “the long-term benefits [of] adopting your proposal.” (Hattersley, p.71) But there is more to structure that can be outlined with emotions used and affected. One that we will discuss is storytelling. Storytelling is one of the most effective forms of instruction and persuasive communication. “Stories can help clarify key values and help demonstrate how things are done within an organization, and story frequency, strength, and tone are related to higher organizational commitment.” (12.2. Communication) The pictures from stories attach to the heart. At the present time the majority of individuals can still you stories related during their childhood. And if you request the information you will be told how those stories still influence their emotions, thoughts, and actions to this day. One example is the story of the tortoise and the hare. “Slow and steady wins the race, versus fast and irregular.” (Aesop) The author of this paper is still working on the steady part of slow and steady. But stories can also be used in communication “to reinforce and perpetuate an organization’s culture.” (12.2. Communication) CHOOSING MEDIA Media choice is tied to the direction of communication and the results desired from your communication. As “disconnects [are] tie[d] to emotions in listening, point of view, facts and arguments, media for communication, perceptions, and feedback.” Then the style of media choice should be carefully considered in comparison to the emotional effectiveness of communicating with certain media. “Information-rich channels convey more nonverbal information . . . verbal communications are richer than written ones.” (12.2. Communication)Research shows that “effective managers tend to use more information-rich communication channels than less effective managers.” (Allen; Yates) The information is displayed in figure 12.15 in the appendices it compares the values of media to information richness. In fact according to Barry and Fulmer, “The key to effective
  17. 17. Emotions In Management Communication 9 communication is to match the communication channel with the goal of the communication. (Barry) While communication strategy requires knowledge of the facts, the emotional effectiveness of the channel used will determine the effectiveness of that communication. But success often rest on the style and tone of delivery. STYLE AND TONE Tone and style are conveyed through the force of persuasion used with your words. Emotions drive the effectiveness when a person is talking. The angry person will say, “shut the door” differently than the excited person. This effect of communication is aptly demonstrated in Table 12.2. An understanding of these effects is necessary in determining how your style and tone are conveyed. Even though what you say is important “what you don’t say can be even more important.” A review of what you have said; could say in comparison to how you should have spoken what you may have to say will affect you use of style and tone. This will also cause others to draw close to you or cringe when you as a manager have spoken. And part of all communication is taking the time to give and receive feedback. GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK Feedback has the power to rearrange all communication. Ineffective feedback can diminish the value of communication, but effective use of feedback is essential for success. The differences between a sender and a receiver’s perception of the message will alter the effectiveness of the communication: When the ‘[s]ender . . .originates the’ message, but the presentation media, style and tone, structure, and point of view are relayed from one emotional perspective, and ‘[t]he Receiver decodes the Message by assigning meaning to the words.’ Meaning often based upon factors such as time, value, position in accord to the sender, and the feelings about the message received.” (12.2. Communication ) A Good manager will prepare for communication that does not always go the way that they planned. This preparation involves using communication tools that are not published in the world because the ties to effectiveness are totally based upon emotion. The tools for the best communication effectiveness are highlighted with the following information. EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION RESULTS “When you foster ongoing communications internally, you will have more satisfied employees who will be better equipped to effectively communicate with your customers,” says Susan Meisinger, President/CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management. (12.2. Communication) But how do you foster ongoing communications internally? There are only
  18. 18. Emotions In Management Communication 10 three guiding principles, but the information is often disguised amidst all the other communication guides: 1. Praise should be done in public, and it is often helpful to praise an individual to one of their workmates or associates while the individual being praised is present. (Gleason) a. Praise causes feelings of appreciation, respect, valuedness, and motivates. b. Praise increases the desire for group participation and competition. c. Those hearing of praiseworthy actions will work to imitate the praiseworthy individual. d. This also increases the respect of individuals for the manager. 2. Discipline should be done in private. (Gleason) a. Take the time to consider the discipline, the manner of delivery, and then show the individual respect by not advertising the mistake. b. For the future this respect for a person’s privacy may result in further confidences. From individuals and from the company itself. 3. All people make mistakes, managers included. “When a mistake is made that affects a small group, call them together and apologize for making that mistake. When a large mistake is made, that you take fault for, apologize.” (Gleason) a. Emotions will cause a manager to feel fear of humiliation, but “fear is the mind killer.” (Herbert) b. An apology will give others a reason to feel trusted, respected, and valued. c. It is easier to trust a man who apologizes than it is to trust a man who is never wrong. This is a system that uses emotions effectively. And imitation of this effective use of emotions in management communications will result in great management outcomes. CONCLUSION “Lee Iacocca, past president and CEO of Chrysler until his retirement in 1992, said, “You can have brilliant ideas, but if you can’t get them across, your ideas won’t get you anywhere.” (12.2. Communication) The interchange from communication leads to an “organization’s ability to function.” Coordination requires self knowledge that can be used to promote growth. “Sharing emotions and feelings[,] bonds teams and unites people in times of celebration and crisis.” (12.2. Communication)This is a great challenge because it will take time effort and energy to understand the changes that take place individually. Courage and shelf sacrifice is a must. Communication is not easy, the effective use of emotions make communication easier. There are different things to consider for communication in order to have a successful communication outcome. Each person needs to remember these four key learning’s. (1) That emotions are 4/5ths of the means for effective communication. (2) Understanding personal emotions opens up access to understanding others emotions and emotional reactions to communication. (3) Patterns for success follow the emotional aspects shared with the communication principles, and (4) the
  19. 19. Emotions In Management Communication 11 guidelines for success are based upon the heart, when the heart is forgotten the mind ceases to care.
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  23. 23. Emotions In Management Communications d The Tortoise and The Hare A Hare was making fun of the Tortoise one day for being so slow. "Do you ever get anywhere?" he asked with a mocking laugh. "Yes," replied the Tortoise, "and I get there sooner than you think. I'll run you a race and prove it." The Hare was much amused at the idea of running a race with the Tortoise, but for the fun of it he agreed. So the Fox, who had consented to act as judge, marked the distance and started the runners off. The Hare was soon far out of sight, and to make the Tortoise feel very deeply how ridiculous it was for him to try a race with a Hare, he lay down beside the course to take a nap until the Tortoise should catch up. The Tortoise meanwhile kept going slowly but steadily, and, after a time, passed the place where the Hare was sleeping. But the Hare slept on very peacefully; and when at last he did wake up, the Tortoise was near the goal. The Hare now ran his swiftest, but he could not overtake the Tortoise in time. The Moral Is: The winner is not always the fastest.

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