Advertising + shopping

5,049 views

Published on

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Advertising + shopping

  1. 1. Shopping © PDST Home Economics
  2. 2. AdvertisingAdvertising  Why? To persuade consumers to buy a product /serviceWhy? To persuade consumers to buy a product /service  Who? Used by manufacturers, retailers & serviceWho? Used by manufacturers, retailers & service providersproviders  How? Advertising outlets:How? Advertising outlets: newspapers/magazinesnewspapers/magazines television/radiotelevision/radio cinema/dvdscinema/dvds buses/bus shelters/vansbuses/bus shelters/vans bill boardsbill boards sporting events/concertssporting events/concerts t-shirts/labels/carrier bagst-shirts/labels/carrier bags shop windowsshop windows packets, leaflets, classified adspackets, leaflets, classified ads internetinternet
  3. 3. Function of advertisingFunction of advertising  Introduce new productsIntroduce new products  Increase salesIncrease sales  To provide informationTo provide information  Though it adds to the cost of products it reduces theThough it adds to the cost of products it reduces the cost to the public of TV, radio, concerts, festivals,cost to the public of TV, radio, concerts, festivals, sporting events, newspapers and magazinessporting events, newspapers and magazines
  4. 4. Effective AdvertisingEffective Advertising  Appeals to the consumerAppeals to the consumer  Entices the consumer to try aEntices the consumer to try a new/improved product or servicenew/improved product or service
  5. 5. Techniques/Language  Adverts portray products inAdverts portray products in bestbest possible waypossible way  NoNo faultsfaults pointed outpointed out  LanguageLanguage designed to work on our emotionsdesigned to work on our emotions  Advertising is designed around:Advertising is designed around: love/romance humour/musiclove/romance humour/music glamour envy/social acceptanceglamour envy/social acceptance guilt colourguilt colour fear/insecurity public figuresfear/insecurity public figures  Ads are aboutAds are about persuasionpersuasion  ThinkThink about the product don’t be misledabout the product don’t be misled
  6. 6. Control of advertising  Standards set to ensure consumers are not misledStandards set to ensure consumers are not misled  Some standards are legal some are voluntarySome standards are legal some are voluntary  Legal control:Legal control: Consumer Information Act 1978Consumer Information Act 1978 EU Misleading Advertising DirectiveEU Misleading Advertising Directive Employment Equality ActEmployment Equality Act  Voluntary controls:Voluntary controls: Advertising Standards Authority of Ireland (ASAI)Advertising Standards Authority of Ireland (ASAI) monitors ads to ensure they aremonitors ads to ensure they are legal, decent, honest and truthfullegal, decent, honest and truthful
  7. 7. Advantages and Disadvantages of Advertising Advantages:  Gives information  Provides employment  Increases sales which improves economy  Keeps down cost of concerts, magazines, TV etc… Disadvantages:  Can mislead  Increases price of product  Causes dissatisfaction with ordinary life  Encourages overspending  Can reinforce stereotypes  Can effect natural environment eg. billboards
  8. 8. Marketing  A business that specialises in making products sellA business that specialises in making products sell  Techniques include:Techniques include: AdvertisingAdvertising PackagingPackaging Sales promotions (free gift)Sales promotions (free gift) Public relations activities eg. product sponsoring aPublic relations activities eg. product sponsoring a charitycharity
  9. 9. Market ResearchMarket Research  Carried out by market research companies usingCarried out by market research companies using questionnaires to discover likes and dislikes ofquestionnaires to discover likes and dislikes of consumersconsumers  This information is used to develop products andThis information is used to develop products and adverts etc. that appeal more to the target marketadverts etc. that appeal more to the target market
  10. 10. Shopping Outlets  Small independent shops e.g. often family runSmall independent shops e.g. often family run  Supermarkets e.g. SupervaluSupermarkets e.g. Supervalu  Department stores e.g. Brown ThomasDepartment stores e.g. Brown Thomas  Chain Stores e.g. DunnesChain Stores e.g. Dunnes  Voluntary Chain Stores e.g. Mace, SparVoluntary Chain Stores e.g. Mace, Spar  Specialist Shops e.g. clothes, butcher, bakerySpecialist Shops e.g. clothes, butcher, bakery  Discount Store e.g. ArgosDiscount Store e.g. Argos
  11. 11. Other Shopping OutletsOther Shopping Outlets  Shopping Centres e.g. BlanchardstownShopping Centres e.g. Blanchardstown  Street marketStreet market  Mobile shopMobile shop  Vending MachineVending Machine  AuctionsAuctions  Mail order e.g. Family AlbumMail order e.g. Family Album  Doorstep sellingDoorstep selling  Party Selling e.g. TupperwareParty Selling e.g. Tupperware  Online Shopping e.g. amazon.comOnline Shopping e.g. amazon.com
  12. 12. Changes in ShoppingChanges in Shopping  Self-serviceSelf-service  Expanding range of productsExpanding range of products  Closure of local shopsClosure of local shops  More chain storesMore chain stores  Shopping centresShopping centres  Weekly shoppingWeekly shopping  Few give creditFew give credit  Late night and Sunday shoppingLate night and Sunday shopping  Online shoppingOnline shopping  Barcodes and ScannersBarcodes and Scanners  Self checkout countersSelf checkout counters
  13. 13. Self ServiceSelf Service AdvantagesAdvantages  Quick, convenientQuick, convenient  Browse & selectBrowse & select  Goods well displayedGoods well displayed  Goods priced clearlyGoods priced clearly  Lower staff cost,Lower staff cost, less expensiveless expensive  Quick turnover,Quick turnover, fresher goodsfresher goods  Wide range of productsWide range of products DisadvantagesDisadvantages  Less personalLess personal  More difficult forMore difficult for disabled and elderlydisabled and elderly  Tempts impulse buyingTempts impulse buying  Queuing at checkoutQueuing at checkout  No credit givenNo credit given
  14. 14. Shopping GuidelinesShopping Guidelines  Shop around, compare pricesShop around, compare prices  Use a listUse a list  Do a weekly shopDo a weekly shop  Avoid impulse buyingAvoid impulse buying  Make use of sales and special offersMake use of sales and special offers  Think of the environment , reusable bags, packaging,Think of the environment , reusable bags, packaging, air miles, chemicals etc..air miles, chemicals etc..
  15. 15. Paying for goods and servicesPaying for goods and services MethodMethod AdvantagesAdvantages DisadvantagesDisadvantages CashCash Simple, cheapestSimple, cheapest Could lose the cashCould lose the cash Debit CardDebit Card (Laser)(Laser) Can use over phone orCan use over phone or internetinternet Charge, can’t beCharge, can’t be used for smallused for small amountsamounts Credit CardCredit Card 28 days interest-free28 days interest-free creditcredit High interest rateHigh interest rate if debt not clearedif debt not cleared ChequeCheque Useful for postalUseful for postal paymentspayments May involved bankMay involved bank chargescharges Direct DebitDirect Debit Bills paid for you onBills paid for you on time by the banktime by the bank Charged by bank.Charged by bank. Risk of too manyRisk of too many direct debitsdirect debits
  16. 16. Techniques used by shops toTechniques used by shops to encourage spendingencourage spending  Music, warmth, smellsMusic, warmth, smells  Attractive displaysAttractive displays  Products at checkoutProducts at checkout  Luxuries at eye level,Luxuries at eye level, essentials lower downessentials lower down  Essentials far awayEssentials far away from checkoutfrom checkout  Heavy goods at entrance toHeavy goods at entrance to get customers to take aget customers to take a trolley e.g. vegetablestrolley e.g. vegetables  Associated items placedAssociated items placed together eg.soft drinks/crispstogether eg.soft drinks/crisps  Special offers, free samples,Special offers, free samples, 2 for 3, buy 1 get 1 free etc..2 for 3, buy 1 get 1 free etc..  Loss LeadersLoss Leaders
  17. 17. Reasons For PackagingReasons For Packaging  Protects product from damage and contaminationProtects product from damage and contamination  Convenience – transporting, storing , sellingConvenience – transporting, storing , selling  Carries informationCarries information  Preservation – vacuum pack, cansPreservation – vacuum pack, cans  MarketingMarketing  Protects consumers from dangerous productsProtects consumers from dangerous products
  18. 18. Characteristics needed inCharacteristics needed in Packaging MaterialsPackaging Materials  StrongStrong  HygienicHygienic  SafeSafe  Easy to openEasy to open  ResealableResealable  Reusable, recyclable or biodegradableReusable, recyclable or biodegradable
  19. 19. Forms of PackagingForms of Packaging  PaperPaper: plain, cardboard, waxed, laminated: plain, cardboard, waxed, laminated (to make airtight and waterproof eg. milk(to make airtight and waterproof eg. milk carton)carton)  PlasticPlastic: bags, cling film, cartons, boxes, bottles: bags, cling film, cartons, boxes, bottles  Metal:Metal: tin cans, aluminium cans, aluminium foil trays,tin cans, aluminium cans, aluminium foil trays, aluminium foilaluminium foil  Glass:Glass: bottles or jars, plain or coloured glassbottles or jars, plain or coloured glass
  20. 20. Disadvantages of packagingDisadvantages of packaging productsproducts  Adds to costAdds to cost  Can pollute environment esp if non-biodegradableCan pollute environment esp if non-biodegradable  Uses up non-renewable resources or natural resourcesUses up non-renewable resources or natural resources eg. plastic (oil), paper (trees), metalseg. plastic (oil), paper (trees), metals  Packaging can deceivePackaging can deceive  Product may have to be bought in larger amounts thanProduct may have to be bought in larger amounts than needed causing wasteneeded causing waste
  21. 21. Labelling – why?Labelling – why? To identify productTo identify product To provide consumer informationTo provide consumer information To sell the productTo sell the product
  22. 22. Information on LabelsInformation on Labels  Contents/ingredientsContents/ingredients  Net weightNet weight  Brand nameBrand name  Storage instructionsStorage instructions  Instructions for useInstructions for use  Safety warningsSafety warnings  Manufacturers name andManufacturers name and addressaddress  ColourColour  Number in packetNumber in packet  Care/cleaning instructionsCare/cleaning instructions  OriginOrigin  Quality/standardQuality/standard  Date stampDate stamp  SizeSize
  23. 23. Food LabellingFood Labelling  See textbookSee textbook
  24. 24. Date StampDate Stamp  Use by:Use by: food must be eaten by this datefood must be eaten by this date used on food with shelf life ofused on food with shelf life of <<6 weeks6 weeks  Sell By:Sell By: same as above butsame as above but allows for 2/3 days storage at home after dateallows for 2/3 days storage at home after date  Best before:Best before: used on food with shelf life of 3-18monthsused on food with shelf life of 3-18months
  25. 25. Why instructions?Why instructions?  Labels often carry instructions for theLabels often carry instructions for the storage/use/cooking/care/cleaning etc. of a productstorage/use/cooking/care/cleaning etc. of a product  To use the product correctlyTo use the product correctly  To avoid wasteTo avoid waste  For safety reasonsFor safety reasons  To avoid damaging the productTo avoid damaging the product
  26. 26. PricingPricing  By law the price of products must be :By law the price of products must be :  displayed on the product ordisplayed on the product or  on the shelf oron the shelf or  on a display near the producton a display near the product  Unit Price = price per unit eg. per gram or kg or litreUnit Price = price per unit eg. per gram or kg or litre  Foods sold loosely and weighed at time of purchaseFoods sold loosely and weighed at time of purchase must have unit price displayed beside themmust have unit price displayed beside them  Some prepacked foods eg. cheese haveSome prepacked foods eg. cheese have unit price per kilo on themunit price per kilo on them  In shops that use bar codes the unit price isIn shops that use bar codes the unit price is displayed on the shelf along with the normal pricedisplayed on the shelf along with the normal price  Unit pricing makes it easier to compare pricesUnit pricing makes it easier to compare prices
  27. 27. Bar-codesBar-codes  Set of black lines and spaces printed on a productSet of black lines and spaces printed on a product  Read using a laser scanner at the checkoutRead using a laser scanner at the checkout  Every product has its own bar-codeEvery product has its own bar-code Advantages:Advantages:  Stock and sales accounted forStock and sales accounted for  Individual pricing not necessary , display price on shelfIndividual pricing not necessary , display price on shelf  Detailed receipt giving product name & priceDetailed receipt giving product name & price  Quicker at checkoutQuicker at checkout

×