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Save Girl Child Project ISR

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Save Girl Child Project ISR

  1. 1. 1 MAMTA SINGH ADM NO: DPGD/OC13/1730 SOCIAL CAUSE: SAVE GIRL CHILD NGO: SAVE GIRL CHILD ORGANISATION PRIN. L. N. WELINGKAR INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT & RESEARCH. YEAR OF SUBMISSION: 2014
  2. 2. 2 DECLERATION I, Mamta Singh, student of Prin.L.N.Welingkar Institute of management development & research, with admission no. DPGD/OC13/1730; hereby declare that I have completed this project on ISR -SAVE GIRL CHILD, NGO-SAVE GIRL CHILD ORGANISATION (S.G.C.O) in the academic year 2014.The information submitted is true and original to the best of my knowledge. Signature of the Student Mamta Singh
  3. 3. 3 Table of Content SR. NO. PARTICULARS PAGE NO. 1 Executive Summary 4 2 Introduction 5 3 Key Issues 6  Medical Ethics “  Declining Child Sex Ratio “  Female Foeticide “  The Background “  Legal Jurisdiction 7-8  Evolution of the Law 8 o Key stages “  Acts & Regulations “  Key definition “  Key Highlights “  Code of Medical Ethics 9 4 Socio-Economic Issues 10  Initiatives 11  Child marriage “  Causes & consequences “  Conclusion 12  Child Labour 12-15 5 Save Girl Child Organization 16-17 6 National Plan of Action to Save Girl Child 18-19 7 Other Steps Taken 20-21 8 Right of Abortion V. Child in Mother’s womb 22-24 9 Empowerment of Woman in India 25-26 10 Case Study 27 11 Ngos Working for this Cause 28 12 News & Release 29-32 13 Mind Set Revolution 33 14 Remedial Measures 34 15 Founder & Director 35  Honor & Awards 36 16 Key Features 37-49 17 Bibliography 50
  4. 4. 4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The project attempts to give an idea about the various Individual Social responsibilities (ISR) and awareness about the requirement of how we as individuals can perform our social responsibility. The social cause on which I have worked on in this project is -Save Girl Child‘. A brief insight is given on NGO – Save Girl Child Organization, working on to save the Girl Child which is major concern in India. The same is the subject of the project. Finally an attempt is made to make a video and highlighting their work.
  5. 5. 5 INTRODUCTION People always pray for a BOY Not for a GIRL Blessings of elders are for MALE Not for FEMALE But in need of wealth People pray to Ma LAXMI, For success in education People pray to Ma SARASWATI, For removal of tension People pray to Ma AMBAJI And to escape from the devil People pray to Ma KALI. Now tell me, why do people hesitate to have a FEMALE in the family, While those whom they pray to during trouble, are FEMALES? SAVE THE GIRL CHILD!!! Just because I am Girl child,I have been killed in my mother womb for more than of million times in last decades
  6. 6. 6 Key Issues Medical Ethics Declining Child Sex Ratio The term ‘epidemic’ has a new meaning in India. In a country where a selective ‘human breeding’ is rampant, figures throw up some of the most startling trends in history. India represents one of the most adverse Child Sex Ratio (CSR) figures amongst the Southeast Asian countries, reflecting a highly undesirable reversal of the norms of nature. Female Foeticide “Invest only Rs. 600 now and save your precious Rs. 50,000 later…” -Catchline issued by one of the flourishing clinics dealing with sex determination. The 2001 Census conducted by Government of India, showed a sharp decline in the child sex ratio in 80% districts of India. India, in all its glory of being an IT superpower and one of the fastest developing countries, tragically represents the lowest child sex ratio in the world. Systematic gender discrimination in India is reported to have claimed up to a whopping 50 million female lives. The Census Report of 2001 reveals a highly skewed child sex ratio (0-6 year-olds), that fell from 945 females per 1,000 males in 1991 to an all-time low of 927 in 2001. The ratio even dropped further to 800:1,000 in some specific parts of the country. Additional data from the India’s birth and death registration service indicates that the figures have further fallen to fewer than 900 females per 1,000 men over the last few years.
  7. 7. 7 The Background Atrocities against women in various forms have been an integral part of the civilization since ages. However, India has unabashedly been home to some of the most barbaric acts against this ‘gentler’ breed of humanity, starting from dowry deaths and sati, going up to female infanticide and female foeticide. Technology facilitates a series of pre-natal diagnostic tools to identify and cure any potential birth defects and associated conditions. In a gross misuse of the scientific tools, female fetuses are selectively aborted after such pre-natal sex determination, in spite of a massive influx of legal regulations banning the same. Techniques such as Amniocentesis were introduced in 1975 to identify any genetic abnormalities. Sadly, these soon became a tool for sex determination and proved to be a call of death for the tiny unborn female fetuses. What is most alarming is that the CSR is far more skewed in the ‘Bermuda Triangle’, which includes the land-rich and affluent states of Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh. The national capital, New Delhi, is also known to be on top of the list. As per the latest government data available pertaining to births, the CSR in Punjab stood at a mere 775 females per 1000 males. Shockingly, a recent survey of 10 villages around Chandigarh (that fall within 29 km radius of the city), revealed that the number of boys outnumbered girls in every village. Reports indicate that more than 12,000 sex determination tests were carried out across the scores of private clinics in 1997 in Delhi alone. In fact, the steep rise in sex crimes in Delhi has also been attributed to the unequal sex ratio. In the same year, 105 female infants had been reportedly killed every month in Dharmapuri district of Tamil Nadu. The apathetic attitude of the administration coupled with inefficient legislative implementation further adds to the woes of the girl child in India, facing elimination and discrimination in their very right to live. Legal Jurisdiction Judiciary in India has declared the year 2007 as the ‘Awareness year of female foeticide’. “The system will deal strictly with those responsible for this crime”, Chief Justice of India Y K Sabharwal, declared.
  8. 8. 8 (A) EVOLUTION OF THE LAW India has witnessed a long-drawn process, defining the evolution of an anti-female foeticide law. Here we highlight the most important milestones: Key Stages 1976: The Centre banned sex-determination tests in government facilities. 1988: The Maharashtra Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act, followed by similar acts by the governments of Punjab, Gujarat and Haryana 1994: The Punjab Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Control & Regulation) Act 1994: The Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation and Prevention of Misuse) Bill (introduced in Parliament in 1991, passed in 1994) 1996, January 1: Enforcement of central Act in Punjab December 1997: The Directorate of Health Services and Family Welfare, Punjab is appointed the authority to implement the Act Meanwhile, the IPC recognizes Female Infanticide as a punishable offence under the Indian law. (B) ACTS AND REGULATIONS The Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation and Prevention of Misuse) Act, 1994. The Pre-natal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation and Prevention of Misuse) Act, 1994 was enacted and brought into operation from January 1, 1996. Primarily, the Act prohibits determination and disclosure of the sex of foetus. Key Definition:
  9. 9. 9 An Act to provide for the regulation of the use of pre-natal diagnostic techniques for the purpose of detecting genetic or metabolic disorders or chromosomal abnormalities or certain congenital malformations or sex linked disorders and for the prevention of the misuse of such techniques for the purpose of pre-natal sex determination leading to female foeticide; and, for matters connected there with or incidental thereto [20th September, 1994: Act No. 57 of 1994] The Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Prohibition of Sex Selection) Act, 1994 The Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act was amended in 2003 to empower the above further in light of the new fertility technologies, which facilitate the selection of the sex of the foetus before conception. The Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Prohibition of Sex Selection) Act and Rules 1994 (as amended up to 2002) (the PCPNDT Act) mandates that sex selection by any person, by any means, before or after conception, is prohibited. Key Highlights: The law chiefly provides for the following:  Prohibition of sex selection, before and after conception  Regulation of prenatal diagnostic techniques (e.g. amniocentesis and ultrasonography) for detection of genetic abnormalities, by restricting their use to registered institutions. The Act allows the use of these techniques only at a registered place for a specified purpose and by a qualified person, registered for this purpose.  Prevention of misuse of such techniques for sex selection before of after conception.  Prohibition of advertisement of any technique for sex selection as well as sex determination.  Prohibition on sale of ultrasound machines to persons not registered under this Act.  Punishment for violations of the Act.”[5] Violations carry a five-year jail term and a fine of about 2,300 U.S. dollars. The Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971 An Act to provide for the termination of certain pregnancies by registered Medical Practitioners and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. [Act No. 34 of 1971, 10th August 1971] Code of Medical Ethics Constituted by the Indian Parliament in the Medical Council Act, 1956, the relevant section of the Code of Medical Ethics states: On no account, sex determination test shall be undertaken with the intent to terminate the life of a female foetus developing in her mother’s womb, unless there are other absolute indications for termination of pregnancy as specified in the Medical Termination of Pregnancy
  10. 10. 10 Act, 1971. Any act of termination of pregnancy of normal female foetus, amounting to female foeticide, shall be regarded as professional misconduct on the part of the physician leading to penal erasure besides rendering him liable to criminal proceedings as per the provisions of this Act (Clause 7.6). It is here important to note that the penalty for unindicated sex determination and female foeticide is striking off the name from the register apart from criminal action. Socio-economic issues Education – The Right to Learn “Educate a man, you educate one person, educate a woman, you educate a complete family.” Reports estimate that more than 50 percent of girls in India fail to enroll in school and those who do are likely to drop out by the age of 12. As in a series of other aspects, the girl child is also discriminated against extensively in the right to education, even basic at times. Lack of education denies the girl child, the knowledge and skills needed to advance their status. Education enables the child to realize her full potential, to think, question and judge independently; to be a wise decision-maker, develop civic sense and learn to respect, love his fellow human beings and to be a good citizen. Figures also report that there is discrimination even in the field of higher education. At least a 40% of girls are not allowed to pursue higher studies, due to the conservative familial ideologies. Initiatives In 1994, the Government of India passed a universal female education bill that offers parents incentives for access and punishment for keeping a girl out of school. In another important initiative, the government also announced free and reduced cost education for girls. The program has been designed with the aim to offer free education at high school level to all girls of single child
  11. 11. 11 families. The offer also includes provisions for fellowships of US$ 45 per month for those undertaking post-graduate studies. Child marriages “Child marriage is a gross violation of all categories of child rights.” UNICEF A report by the UNICEF revealed that 82 percent of girls in Rajasthan are married before they are 18, 15 percent of girls in rural areas across the country are married before 13 and a major 52 percent of girls have their first pregnancy between 15 and 19. By the Indian law, it is illegal to allow or facilitate marriage of a boy under 21 and a girl under 18. Amongst all the states in India, it is Rajasthan that tops the list with the average age of a girl at marriage being 16.6 years, closely followed by Bihar (17.2 years) and Madhya Pradesh (17 years). Defying the law right in the eye, hundreds of children tied the knot in Rajgarh, 65 miles northwest of Bhopal in May 2005. According to sources, hundreds of children, some even as young as seven years old were married over a period of one week. As if to mock at the law, the ceremonies were held at the same time as the ‘Akkha Teej’, a summer festival believed to auspicious for weddings. Meanwhile all the officials could do was to record the names of the children being married. Despite the existence of legislation banning child marriage since 1929, the practice continues to be a social reality in the present India. Causes and Consequences Laments Girija Mewada, a police constable posted at a Hindu temple in Rajgarh, “The law to stop child marriage is not powerful enough.” In fact, a recent survey revealed that there were never more than 89 attempted prosecutions across India in any one year pertaining to child marriages. Experts point towards the weak norms of law. The police do not have the authority to arrest anyone about to take part in a marriage, and the bureaucracy involved is so complicated, that most weddings are already materialized by the time papers are ready. Willingness of the girl’s family to pass on the ‘burden’ of a daughter’s expenses and hope of
  12. 12. 12 early adaptation to the in-laws’ house adds on to the gruesome list of causes. In India, one woman is reported to have died every seven minutes from a pregnancy-related cause, with the situation getting further aggravated by early marriage. A recent survey revealed that 56% of adolescent girls in India in the age group 15-19 years are anemic. Child support agencies present the following as the dire set of consequences:  Child’s education is sacrificed  Girls become more vulnerable to domestic violence  Early pregnancies weaken the mother  Babies born to girls under 17 are 60 percent more likely to die in their first year of life Conclusion “Nobody should expect the evil of child marriage to be eradicated overnight or just by launching an awareness drive”, states Archana Chitnis, State Minister for Women and Child Development. According to Renuka Chowdhury, Minister for Women and Children, the Prohibition of Child Marriage Bill, passed in 2006, is likely to provide protection to scores of children forced into marriage every year. One surely wonders what is it that is likely to wake up the authorities to some real, constructive and result-oriented action. A set of even more startling research reports and studies, coupled with a genuine outcry from the child welfare organizations and the public perhaps! Child Labor Child laborers – The Cheap Commodity of India Shiva, an eight-year old orphan was reported dead on June 29, 1993, after he was caught escaping and then beaten and scorched to death by his employer. In another incident, 446 children were rescued from over 200 zari shops in the glamorous city of Mumbai, while 25 children were rescued from an ill-lit small room converted into a zari factory in the national capital, New Delhi. The 1991 Census carried out by Government of India states that there are 11.28 million working children under the age of fourteen years in India. Advocacy groups suggest the real figure could be as high as 60 million. With figures from varied sources giving verdict, India is known to have the largest number of working children in the world. A research carried out by Save the Children, shows that
  13. 13. 13 74 percent of child domestic workers in India are between the ages of 12 and 16, most of them working at measly wages. Toiling in the heat of stone quarries, working in the fields for long hours, picking rags in city streets or stashed away as domestic servants, these children are sentenced to a life of misery, suffering and horrors. In most of the Indian industries, girls are recognized as unrecognized laborers because they are seen as Help & Supporters and not workers. Hence, this section remains almost totally unprotected by law. The Background Welfare organizations define a child laborer as a child who has to work everyday, sometimes for more than 14 hours a day and is not paid as per norms. The International Labor Office reports that children work the longest hours and are the worst paid of all laborers. The Child Labor Act of India prohibits employment of children less than 14 years of age in 13 occupations and 57 processes. The law also lays down penalties for employment of children in violation of the provisions of this Act and regulates the employment of children with respect to working hours, number of holidays, health and safety in workplace. Nevertheless, the menace continues to grow unbridled. No doubt, the industries and the families of such children share the blame, but the onus lies first on the lawmakers and watch-guards of our society and nation. Child labor presents itself in a series of forms of labor involving children. These include:  Domestic servants  Forced and bonded labor  Commercial sexual exploitation  Industrial and plantation work  Street work  House hold work Experts point out towards the following as being the root cause of the rampant child labor scenario in India:  Poverty
  14. 14. 14  Family debt  Administrative attitude  Easier and cheaper availability of child laborers  Social mindset In a prominent uproar, the National Human Rights Commission also (NHRC) issued notices to the Delhi government over reports of continuing instances of child labor in the Capital despite the ban. Sex Ratio In India Sex Ratio is a term used to define number of females per 1000 males. It's a great source to find the equality of males and females in a society at a given period of time. InIndia Sex Ratio was okay till the time of Independence, thereafter it has declined regularly. According to Census of India 20011, Indian sex ratio has shown some improvement in the last 10 years. It has gone up from 933 in 2001 to 940 in 2011 census of India. There has been some improvement in the Sex Ratio of India but it has gone down badly in some states like Haryana. The state of Kerala with 1084 females for every 1000 males has the best sex ratio in India. It has shown a tremendous improvement in the last 10 years. Haryana has the lowest sex ratio of 877 females per 1000
  15. 15. 15 males. So Sex Ratio of India varies from region to region. Kerala and Puducherry are only two places in India where total female population is more than the male population. Other states like Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Karnataka are also showing an increase in their sex ratio. The states of South India have the best Sex Ratio of females per 1000 males. Some important facts about Sex Ratio of India are presented here:  Kerala with 1084 females per 1000 males has the highest sex ratio according to 2011 Census of India.  The state of Haryana has the lowest female literacy rate in India.  In Union Territories of India, Daman and Diu has the lowest female sex ratio while Pondicherry has the highest female sex ratio in India.  There is some extent of gender bias in India which is responsible for this decline in female ratio however it has started to show some improvement in the last 20 years.  Lack of education and poverty in rural areas leads to gender bias.
  16. 16. 16 SAVE GIRL CHILD ORGANISATION (S.G.C.O) The Organization for Eradication of illiteracy and Poverty seeks to awaken the social consciousness of society towards its own ills. We are challenging the formation of conscience in order to bring about a social change where one lives in a classless and unbiased society. Dr. Bernard Malik is the Director of this organization. He has strong belief in the basic goodness of human beings. Human beings have a strong instinct to choose good over evil. Therefore Dr. Malik believes education is the key to resolve the evils of the society. The lack of education is the cause of many problems around. Education provides freedom from illiteracy and poverty. Literacy serves as an instrument of poverty alleviation. Therefore Dr. Bernard Malik founded the Organization for Eradication of Illiteracy and Poverty. By this he seeks to affect a worldwide campaign of educational empowerment.
  17. 17. 17 To bring about social awareness and affect a positive change towards Girl Child. To provide education to the girl child and thus make her economically self-reliant. To highlight issues of the girl child and attempt to seek solutions of the same. To promote equality in terms of gender, education, and other opportunities. To work towards the all-round progress of the girl child at all levels.
  18. 18. 18 National Plan of Action to Save Girl Child (1991-2000) INTRODUCTION The National Plan of Action for the Girl Child for 1991-2000, is a specially formulated action plan by the Government of India to protect and promote the Girl Child. THE AIM This plan seeks to prevent female feticide and infanticide, eliminate gender discrimination, provide safe drinking water and fodder near homes, rehabilitate and protect girls from exploitation, assault and abuse.
  19. 19. 19 KEY MEASURES The key measures planned under the National Plan include: Strengthening of the existing primary health care infrastructure Consolidation and maintenance of levels of immunization coverage Stepping up immunization where coverage is low Polio eradication through immunization Ensuring essential supplies and drugs Training of doctors and Para-medical health workers Educating women and girls on safe motherhood Providing primary education facilities in un served areas Providing child care services Community mobilization and involvement
  20. 20. 20 Other Steps The Background Historically, India has been one of the first countries to identify the Girl Child as the focus of attention for improving the overall social and economic status of women. Steps The Balika Samriddhi Yojana in 1997 is one of the most important initiatives of the Government to raise overall status of the girl child. The Yojana aims to change family and community attitudes towards both, the girl child and the mother. A series of incentives were included in the Yojana, including the likes of a gift of Rs. 500/- to the mother on delivery of a baby girl and the provision of an annual scholarship for the girl, with the overall aim of improving enrolment and retention of girls in school. In another major initiative, in 2005, the Government of India also announced free and reduced cost education for girls. Those with two girls and no other children were promised discounts of up to 50%. The program also offered fellowships of US$ 45 per month for those undertaking post-graduate studies. Various State Governments have formulated State Plans of Action for Girl Child, appropriate to the condition prevailing in each state, prominently including Governments of Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Goa.
  21. 21. 21 Adding on, the Government had also set up policies like the National Nutrition Policy (1993), which recognizes the stage of adolescence as a special period for a multi-sectoral nutrition intervention for the females. To ensure effective implementation of the Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation and Prevention of Misuse) Act, 1994, a Central Supervisory Board was also set-up under the chairpersonship of the Minister-in-charge of Health and Family Welfare. Furthermore, the National Policy on Education (1986) was formulated to address the question of setting right the traditional gender imbalances in education, making a strong commitment in favor of education for women’s equality. A recent news story also reported a unique campaign being carried out by over 200 people across five northern and western states of India, under the leadership of the well-known religious leader and social activist, Swami Agnivesh. Chief Minister of Haryana (India), Mr. Bhupinder Singh Hudda, also lauded the consistent efforts of Swami Agnivesh in the Campaign Against Female Foeticide and pledged to extend all possible infrastructural support and assistance. Other beneficial schemes include the Adolescent Girls Scheme, the Child Survival and Safe Motherhood Programme, the Universal Immunization Programme, special health check up schemes for primary school students, introduction of health cards in selected areas, evaluation of health programmes, the Mid-day Meal Scheme for primary school children and nutrition education. Reports also indicate that the government aims to eliminate all forms of child labor by 2020.
  22. 22. 22 (Right of Abortion v. Child in Mother's Womb) Abortion in India is legal only up to twenty weeks of pregnancy under specific conditions and situations which are broadly defined as: A. The continuance of the pregnancy would involve a risk to the life of the pregnant woman or of grave injury of physical or mental health, or there is a substantial risk that if the child were born, it would suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped. B. An adult woman requires no other person's consent except her own. C. Abortion in India is controversially the cause of Gendercide. In many parts of India, daughters are not preferred and hence sex-selective abortion is commonly practiced, resulting in an unnatural male to female population sex ratio due to millions of developing girls selectively being targeted for termination before birth. Before 1971 The Indian Penal Code, which was enacted in 1860 and was written in accordance with British law at the time of its creation, declared induced abortion as illegal. Induced abortion was defined as purposely "causing miscarriage”,. Abortion practitioners would either be incarcerated for up to three years, fined, or both; women undergoing abortions could be imprisoned for up to seven years and also be charged an additional fine. The only exception was when abortion was induced in order to save the life of the woman. Despite the fact that this passage in the penal code was changed in Great Britain in 1967, India did not change it until 1971. Countless women died attempting illegal abortions as a result of the penal code, and it was a combination of this and the growing population that made the country reconsiders its initial stance. In 1964, the Central Family Planning Board of the Government of India met and formed a committee designed to examine the subject of abortion from medical, legal, social, and moral standpoints. The Abortion Study Committee, lead by the then Health Minister of the state of Maharashtra Mr. Shantilal Shah, spent the next two years studying the issue, and submitted a report with its suggestions in December 1966. This report considered the penal code to be too restrictive and recommended that the law's qualifications should be relaxed; many of these suggestions were included in the subsequent Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP) Act.
  23. 23. 23 1971 and beyond The Indian abortion laws falls under the Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP) Act, which was enacted by the Indian Parliament in the year 1971 with the intention of reducing the incidence of illegal abortion and consequent maternal mortality and morbidity.The MTP Act came into effect from 1 April 1972 and was amended in the years 1975 and 2002. Pregnancies not exceeding 12 weeks may be terminated based on a single opinion formed in good faith. In case of pregnancies exceeding 12 weeks but less than 20 weeks, termination needs opinion of two doctors. The Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP) Act of India clearly states the conditions under which a pregnancy can be ended or aborted, the persons who are qualified to conduct the abortion and the place of implementation.Some of these qualifications are as follows: Women whose physical and/or mental health were endangered by the pregnancy Women facing the birth of a potentially handicapped or malformed child Rape Pregnancies in unmarried girls under the age of eighteen with the consent of a guardian Pregnancies in "lunatics" with the consent of a guardian Pregnancies that are a result of failure in sterilization
  24. 24. 24 Statistics Unsafe abortions are killing a woman every two hours in India (which is approximately 4000 deaths a year), according to estimates and calculations correlating data on maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and Sample Registration System (SRS) data by Ipas, India, an international NGO working on increasing access to safe abortion services. A Lancet paper in 2007 said there were 6.4 million abortions, of which 3.6 million or 56 per cent were unsafe. Ipas has calculated this based on the latest population and crude birth rates (CBR) which peg the number of induced abortion at 5,007,932.According to Census 2011, abortion taking place in institution varies from 32.0% in Chhattisgarh to 73.9% in Assam. Sex-selective abortion Pre-natal diagnostic techniques like Medical Ultrasonography are capable of determining the sex of the foetus. In many parts of India, daughters are not preferred and hence sex-selective abortion is commonly practiced, a form of Gendercide, resulting in an unnatural male to female population sex ratio due to millions of developing girls being terminated before birth. According to The Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation and Prevention of Misuse) Amendment Act, 2002 the following are cognizable, non-bail able and non-compoundable offences Conducting or associating or helping to conduct Pre-Natal Diagnostic tests. Sex selection on a woman or a man or both on any tissue, embryo, concepts’ fluid or gametes derived from either or both of them Advertisement or communication in any form in print, by electronic media or internet by units, medical professionals or companies on the availability of sex determination and sex selection in the form of services, medicines, or any kind of techniques. Three years imprisonment and fine of Rs. 10,000 and five years imprisonment and fine of Rs. 50,000 for subsequent offence for service providers is stipulated by the law ; those who seek aid shall be punishable with a term that may extend to three years and a fine that may extend to Rs 50,000 for the first offence and for any subsequent offence with imprisonment which may extend to five years and with fine which may increase to Rs. 100,000. Implementation Unsafe abortions continue to outnumber safe and legal abortions. The Central government constituted an expert committee in the year 2010 to make recommendations.
  25. 25. 25 Empowerment of Women in India (2001) The National Policy for the Empowerment of Women in India (2001) is hailed as one of the biggest achievements in the history of Indian women’s human rights. The law states as, “All forms of discrimination against the girl child and violation of her rights shall be eliminated by undertaking strong measures, both preventive and punitive within and outside the family. These would relate specifically to strict enforcement of laws against prenatal sex selection and the practices of female foeticide, female infanticide, child marriage, child abuse and child prostitution.” (8.1) Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Act, 1986 The Child Labour Act prohibits employment of children (under 14 yrs) in 13 occupations and 57 processes contained in Part A & B of the schedule to the Act. It also lays down penalties for employment of children in violation of the provisions of this Act and regulates the employment of children with respect to working hours, number of holidays, health and safety in work place. The other provisions relate to prohibition of traffic in human beings and forced labour (Article 23). Certain principles of policy to be followed by the State stipulate that children be secured against exploitation
  26. 26. 26 The Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Prohibition of Sex Selection) Act. The Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Prohibition of Sex Selection) Act and Rules 1994 (as amended up to 2002) (the PCPNDT Act) mandates that sex selection by any person, by any means, before or after conception, is prohibited Child Marriage Bill 2006. According to the Child Bill (2006), people marrying children and people involved in these practices, people abetting or attending a child marriage would face up to two years in prison and a fine of 100,000 rupees. Child Sexual Abuse Under the Indian law, those accused of child sexual abuse are currently charged under Section 376 as a punishment for rape and Section 377, that defines unnatural sexual offences, of the Indian Penal Code. Code of Medical Ethics Constituted by the Indian Parliament in the Medical Council Act, 1956, the Code of Medical Ethics lays down that: “On no account sex determination test shall be undertaken with the intent to terminate the life of a female foetus developing in her mother’s womb, unless there are other absolute indications for termination of pregnancy as specified in the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971. Any act of termination of pregnancy of normal female foetus, amounting to female feticide, shall be regarded as professional misconduct on the part of the physician leading to penal erasure besides rendering him liable to criminal proceedings as per the provisions of this Act (Clause 7.6). It is here important to note that the penalty for unindicted sex determination and female feticide is striking off the name from the register apart from criminal action.” Others Apart from the above, there are legal provisions for working children in other laws such as: The Factories Act, 1948 The Mines Act, 1952 The Motor Transport Worker’s Act, 1961 The Beedi and Cigar Workers (Conditions of Employment) Act, 1966 The Plantations Labour Act, 1951The Minimum Wages Act, 1948
  27. 27. 27 CASE Study Case Study I Source: The Femina, January 31, 07 25 years back, a man in Punjab brought his wife to an ultrasound clinic to determine the sex of the foetus. The doctors informed him it was a female. He went home only to return a few months later, requesting for an abortion. After the doctors aborted the foetus, they discovered they had made a mistake and that the dead foetus was a male child. The man was so upset that he went public, alleging that the hospital was responsible for killing his only male issue. It was then the investigations uncovered the truth behind the series of sex determination tests. Case Study II Source: HindustanTimes ePaper An extraordinary four-year research in the heart of rural India, post 2001 Census, shows that people living in areas with a higher level of education and affluence slaughter more female foetuses than those languishing in the social and economic backwaters. The study, funded by the Swedish Research Council and carried out by the economic history department of Lund University as part of its research on developing economies, shows that “progressive areas” of India have a lower child sex ratio (CSR). Researchers claim that “ill- focused development is triggering a conscious choice to eliminate the girl child from the family”. The study carried out in five states - Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Uttaranchal - revealed wide differences in sex ratio in villages of Karnataka and Uttaranchal. The less prosperous villages had a healthy ratio, while their wealthier neighbours, with higher indices of education and development, logged lesser number of girl children. It showed a strong shift from “son preference to active daughter discrimination”.
  28. 28. 28 NGOS working for this cause List of NGOs Here we list a few of the prominent NGOs focusing on the issues related to the girl child in India: CRY (Child Rights and You) - Mumbai The organization supports grassroots groups involved in putting a stop to child labor and child poverty, such as supporting Mahita in Hyderabad and Help & Supporting in imparting education to under-privileged girl children. NANHI KALI - Mumbai Run by the K C Mahindra Trust, an all-India Organization, Nanhi Kali, allows you to sponsor a girl child’s education through their network. DREAM A DREAM – Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore A professionally run, registered not-for profit organization working with children coming from vulnerable backgrounds such as from streets, slum communities, runaway children, orphans and HIV+ children. POPULATION FIRST – Mumbai The organization runs a campaign called ‘Laddli’, which tackles the issue of the falling sex ratio. Child in NeedInstitute – Kolkata An organization actively supporting the cause of child rights and Help & Supporting the children in need. INDIANNGOS.COM Organizing plans, which lead to provision of sponsorships of the girl child. INDIA ALLIANCE FOR CHILD RIGHTS (IACR) The India Alliance for Child Rights represents a countrywide alliance of networks, NGOs, think tanks, activists, academia, and concerned individuals working for the realization of the rights of children.
  29. 29. 29 News & Release Man dies of shock as wife bears baby girl A man in Orissa was so shocked after he heard that his wife had given birth to a girl child that he fell to the ground, hit his head against a wall and succumbed to his injuries Times of India, Bangalore (Orissa), 30 Aug, 2006 Women and girls must be protected from violence, UN Special Adviser on Gender Issues tells rights committee States who have signed on to the United Nations international bill of rights for women must continue to press for an end to gender-based violence, the Special Adviser to the Secretary- General on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women today told experts gathering in New York to evaluate compliance with the treaty UN News centre, 15 January, 2007 Graveyard of unborn daughters Over 100 female fetuses were dug out of a well near Patiala. A mass grave of female foetus was detected today in a vacant plot owned by quacks Pritam Singh, an ex-serviceman and his wife Amarjit Kaur of this town, by a high-level team of state health authorities after it raided the premises of the local Sahib Hospital run by these quacks. They had been allegedly involved in illegal abortions for the past many years. The Tribune, Patran (Patiala, Punjab, India), 9 August, 2006
  30. 30. 30 Key Causes Poverty The macabre scenario of discarded female fetuses in India is the handiwork of the brain of a human being. It is little surprising then, unless the citizens of India themselves wake up to the need, the evil of female foeticide and other such malpractices targeting the Indian girl child shall not be done away with. The common man on the road, the head of the family in a middle or an upper-middle class family, the intellectual human rights activist; conscientious citizens from all walks of life need to contribute to curb the menace. Such a mindset revolution needs mobilization of action right from personal to governmental levels. As an individual, the most important and effective thing you can do is to influence the attitudes of those around you. Make your friends, relatives and immediate family aware of the girls’ capabilities. Try to make the young girls around you aware of their self-worth, especially the under-privileged ones. Women need to make an effort to reach out to each other through groups, share experiences and give support. Parents should also have an open mindset towards enrolling their children in co- education schools to ensure healthy exposure. Sex education should be imparted at an appropriate age by the parents or guardians themselves. One of the earliest forms of support in the educated circles of our society, .i.e. sponsoring the education of a girl child, is still one of the most effective forms of contribution. Social Stigma Prabhuji mein tori binti karoon Paiyan Paroon bar bar Agle Janam Mohe Bitiya Na Dije Narak Dije Chahe Dar...
  31. 31. 31 (Oh, God, I beg of you, I touch your feet time and again, Next birth don't give me a daughter, Give me Hell instead...) Folk Song, Uttar Pradesh The current trends have even refuted the common belief that the practice of eliminating the female child will get discouraged with the economic independence of women on the rise. A survey by Action India of women in Delhi revealed that even the highly educated women have resorted to as many as a whopping eight abortions to ensure that they only give birth to a son. One of the main reasons as pointed out by the experts is the Indian government’s attempts to control its burgeoning population of over 1 billion through controlling women’s fertility. This could literally serve as the doomsday verdict as the government’s two-child family concept encourages elimination of female fetuses in order to obtain a ‘complete family’ with at least one son. The obsessive inborn hunger of the Indian patriarchal set-up to have a male child in its progeny has virtually brought the ethical systems of India into shambles. The prejudice finally takes its toll and shows itself in a drastically lopsided sex ratio in the country.
  32. 32. 32 An Insight The society is meant to be the most vital support system of a human being. It is shame then, that in a developing country, such norms of the society itself have victimized and endangered the very existence of the female child in India. We give you an insight into the most crucial reasons: We give you an insight into the most crucial reasons: Menace of dowry Fear of loss of face in local community esire to keep the wealth within the family, through sons Fear of dependence of the girl on the family, for life Attempt to control family size Wish to appease Gods in times of crisis
  33. 33. 33 Mind Set Revolution The macabre scenario of discarded female fetuses in India is the handiwork of the brain of a human being. It is little surprising then, unless the citizens of India themselves wake up to the need, the evil of female foeticide and other such malpractices targeting the Indian girl child shall not be done away with. The common man on the road, the head of the family in a middle or an upper-middle class family, the intellectual human rights activist; conscientious citizens from all walks of life need to contribute to curb the menace. Such a mindset revolution needs mobilization of action right from personal to governmental levels. As an individual, the most important and effective thing you can do is to influence the attitudes of those around you. Make your friends, relatives and immediate family aware of the girls’ capabilities. Try to make the young girls around you aware of their self-worth, especially the under-privileged ones. Women need to make an effort to reach out to each other through groups, share experiences and give support. Parents should also have an open mindset towards enrolling their children in co- education schools to ensure healthy exposure. Sex education should be imparted at an appropriate age by the parents or guardians themselves. One of the earliest forms of support in the educated circles of our society, .i.e. sponsoring the education of a girl child, is still one of the most effective forms of contribution
  34. 34. 34 Remedial Meassures: Administrative Measures India, as a country, needs a heroic administrative impetus to break the shackles and come out of the morbid shadows of such practices. No amount of individual efforts or non-governmental movements can have an impact unless the administration takes up the cudgels. Political will Through active generation of political will and result-oriented action plans, the government can effectively Help & Support the situation. Here we list some of the main solutions possible: Provision of free and compulsory education in practice, not only in theory Effective implementation of the Dowry Prohibition Act and other relevant laws Grant of equal property rights to girls A department for women and a commission for women must be established at central and state levels Women’s organizations, media houses and magazines should offer forums for networking Extensive support should be available to NGOs and such organizations In fact, the government of India needs to follow in the footsteps of places like Nigeria. Through legislation, Nigeria prohibits the withdrawal of girls from school in order to ensure that they can continue and complete their education.
  35. 35. 35 Founder & Directors to the S.G.C.O Dr. Bernard Malik Director Email: director@savegirlchild.org Mr. Navnish Bansal Country Director Email: help@savegirlchild.org Belief Bernard Malik is a devout Christian and believes in that life begins with conception: "But thou art he that took me out of the womb: thou didst make me hope when I was upon my mother's breasts. I was cast upon thee from the womb: thou art my God from my mother's belly.” Associations Being a person committed towards the betterment of the society, he is associated with numerous non-profit, non-governmental organizations: International Council of Evangelical Churches Federation of Indian American Christian Organizations of North America Save Girl Child Organization Organization for Eradication of Illiteracy and Poverty International Foundation of Minority Empowerment and Global Friendship Philanthropic work A true philanthropic soul, he has involved himself with many human rights issues and has always tried his best to champion the causes of the downtrodden, the voiceless, and the deprived, to the authorities in concern, so that an effective change may be brought about. He has been part of Interfaith Delegation of Non Resident Indians to Gujarat for healing communal wounds.
  36. 36. 36 He has been a pioneer and lead voice on issues of Human Rights for Indians. He has been associated with and has made representations to the Prime Minister of India, President of the United States of America, many ministers of Indian Government, , White House Advisors, Members of Parliament in many countries, US Senators, Congressmen, US State of Department, United Nations and International Human Rights Organizations He has been Churches NGO Representative to the United Nations since 1997 Honors and Awards The global community has acknowledged his outstanding work. Numerous human rights and church related associations in US, Canada, India and Africa, have honored him. He also has been felicitated with numerous awards and distinctions: Sole NRI invite to 2000 Years of Christ (Krist Janti) celebrations in Bangalore Invited to the State Dinner at White House by President Bush Honored by Canadian Council of South Asian Christians Honored by 7-Eleven Franchise Owners Association of Delaware Honored by Universal Human Rights Organization, India
  37. 37. 37 Key features LIST OF STATE / UNION TERRITORY APPROPRIATE AUTHORITIES/MULTI MEMBER UNDER PRE-CONCEPTION AND PRE-NATAL DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES ACT, 1994. ANDHRA PRADESH Dr. C.Sulochana, Chairperson State Appropriate Authority for PNDT and Additional. Director of MCH & State EPI Officer, O/o Commissionerate of Family Welfare, DM&HS Campus, Sultan Bazar, Hyderabad-500 095. 040-24606378, 2465 3771 2465 0365, 2465 2267 (F) 984990221 ARUNACHAL PRADESH Dr. T.Basar, Joint DHS (FW), Directorate of Health Services, Government of Arunachal Pradesh, Naharlagun – 791 110, Arunachal Pradesh. 0360-2351036, 2244178 (F), 2248129 ASSAM Dr. Moti Lal Nunisa, Director (Family Welfare), Directorate of Family Welfare, Hengrabari, Government of Assam, Guwahati – 781 006, Assam. 0361 – 2224196 (TF), 24651063 BIHAR Dr. R.K.Choudhry, State Immunisation Officer, Deptt. of Health/Med.Ed./FW Vikas Bhawan, New Secretariat, Government of Bihar, Patna – 8000 001. 0612-221-7-6, 2532982 (F)
  38. 38. 38 CHATTISGARH Dr. D.K.Sen, Director of Health Services, Directorate of Health Services, Old Nurse Hotal,Behind Mantraya_Raipur 0771-2231621 Sh. M.P. Sharma. Additional Secretary (Law), Govt. of Chattigarh, Deptt. of Law Mantralya Dan Kalyan Singh Bhawan, Raipur 0771-4080343 Smt. Laxmi Raghawan, Women Representative (NGO), D-2 Engineering College Complex, G-E Road Raipur, 0771-2221058 DELHI Director, Family Welfare, Directorate of Family Welfare, SDA College Building, Malka Ganj, Delhi-110007. 23854839 (T), 23855090 (F), 2385 1384 (T) Dr. Tripta Gupta, NGO, 182, Mukherji Park, New Delhi. Ph. 20550490 Joint Secretary, ( Law of Justice), Delhi Secretariat, IP Estate, New Delhi -2 Ph. 23392024
  39. 39. 39 GOA Mr. U.R.Worch, Secretary(Health) Panaji. 0832-2419417, 0832-2419633(F) Mr.Utkarsh Bakre, Secretary(Law) Member 0832-2437272 Dr.(Mrs.)Purnima Usgaonker Ponda-Goa. 922457596. GUJARAT Dr. (Mrs.)Vikasben Desai, Addl. Director (FW), Commissionerate of Health, Medical Services & ME(HS), Government of Gujarat, 5, Dr. Jivraj Mehata Bhavan, Gandhi Nagar-382 010, Gujarat. 079-23253311 & 12, 23253321(F) 0-9825433408 Smt.Ilaben Pathak, Secretary, Ahmedabad Women Action Group, Awaj Kunj Budarpura, Ambavadi,Ahmedabad., 079-26441214,M-9327004235 Sh.S.Kadari, Joint Secretary(A-Branch), Legal Deptt., Block No.4/1, Sardar Patel Bhawan, Gandhi Nagar. 079-23254702. HARYANA Dr.N.K.Sharma, Director General, Health Services Haryana-cum Project Director (RCH),
  40. 40. 40 Health Department, State Institute Health and Family Welfare, Sector –6, Panchkula, Haryana. 0172-2585505 (F), 2584549 (T), 2585189 HIMACHAL PRADESH Dr. M.L.Mahajan Director of Health Services, Government of Himachal Pradesh, Kusumpti, JAMMU & KASHMIR Dr. Jasbir Singh, The Director, FW, MCH & Immunization and Project Director, RCH Project, Jammu &Kashmir, 105, Karan Nagar, Jammu. 0191-2546338, 2549632(F), 941980727 JHARKHAND Dr. R.N. Das, Joint Director, Deptt. of Halth & FW, Jharkhand. 0651-2340373, 2260361 (F),M.-9431326430 KERALA Dr. (Mrs.)B.Mohilamony, Director of Health Services, Directorate of Health Services, Thiruvananthapuram – 695 037, Kerala. 0471-2303025, 2304712
  41. 41. 41 KARNATKA Project Director (RCH) Directorate of Health & F.W. Services, Anandarao Circle, Bangalore-9, Karnataka. 080-22201980, 22201813 (F), 9448155009. Mrs. S.G. Susheela Ramma, President, Sumangyali, Sevashrama, Cholanakana Halli, R.T. Nagar , Bangolore-32, Ph. 080-23330499 V.K. Badiger, Deputy Secretary to Govt. (opinion 4), Deptt. of Law of Parliamentary Affars, Vidhan Soudha Bangalore, Ph. 080-22257611 Dr.(Mrs.) Shalini, Joint Director (RCH), Directorate of Health & F.W. Services, Anandarao Circle, Bangalore-9, Karnataka. 9341239645 MAHARRSHTRA Dr. S.B.Chavan, Addl. Director (Health Services & FW), Government of Maharashtra, Kutumb Kalyan Bhavan, 8, Kennedy Road, Behind Pune Railway Station, Pune-411001.020-26058 996, 26058 935, 26058 766 (F) Under Secretary (FW), Public Health Department, Mantralaya, Mumbai Dr. Usha P. Dave,
  42. 42. 42 534, Pairatkar Patil Nursing Home, Muttal Home Terrace ,4th Floor,Opera House,Mumbai. MADHYA PRADESH Dr. Yogiraj. Sharma, Director (Public Health & Family Welfare), Directorate of Health Services, Satpura Bhawan, 5th Floor, Madhya Pradesh, Bhopal – 462 016. 0755-25529588888, 2550193, 2552958 (F) MANIPUR Dr. W. Raghunath Singh, Director, (FW), Family Welfare Services, B.T. Road, Imhphal-795004 Manipur. MEGHALAYA Dr. P.Lyndem, Director of Health Services (MCH& FW) Directorate of Health Services. Govt. of Meghalaya, Room No. 510, Ad Building Secretariat, Meghalaya, Shilong-793001. 0364-2228493 (TF), 2224354 (T) MIZORAM Director, Hospital & Medical Education, Government of Mizoram Aizwal-796001, Mizoram, 0385-2226069, 2315211 (Fax0 Joint Director of Health Services 0389-2313721 President, MHIP, General Headquarter, Aizwal , 0389-2343884
  43. 43. 43 Secretary, Law & Judicial Department, 0389-23326088 NAGALAND Dr. G.B.Sikashi, Director (Family Welfare), Dte. of Family Welfare Services, Govt. of Nagaland, P.R.Hills, Kohima – 791 001. Nagaland. 0370-2224699 (F), 2222626, 2243595 Dr. D. Kapfo. Addl. Director Health Services, Government of Nagaland, P.R.Hills, Kohima – 791 001 Nagaland. 0370-2241401/2224699 (F), 2222626, 2243595 (T) ORISSA Dr. B.K. Das, Director (Family Welfare), Dte. of Family Welfare, Head of the Department Building, Government of Orissa, Orissa, Bhubaneshwar-751 001. 0674-2402490, 24071129 (F) PUNJAB Dr.(Mrs.) Rana Harinder, Director, Health Services, Dte. of Health Services, Government of Punjab, Parivar Kalyan Bhawan, Civil Secretariat, Sector – 34, Chandigarh. 0172-2603611, 2609142 (F), 9814042214 Dr. Malti Thapar, Ex. Minister & Women Representative Moga, Punjab
  44. 44. 44 Sh. R.K. Joshi , Senior Advocate, #235 Sector 11-A, Chandigarh. Ph. 172-2746542 RAJASTHAN Dr. S.P.Yadav, Director (FW), Directorate Medical, Health & F.W. Services, Government of Rajasthan, Tilak Marg, Jaipur- 302 001, Rajasthan, 9414016297 (M), 0141-2228707 (T), 222865 (F) SIKKIM Dr. L.D.Lepche Additional Director, F.W. State Appropriate Authority (PNDT), Deptt. of Health & Family Welfare, Govt. of Sikkim, Gangtok- 747101, Sikkim. 03592-220345(TF) President Association for Social Health in India Joint Secreatry Department of Law Government of Sikkim TAMILNADU (Capt.) N. Kalyanasundaram, Directorate of Medical and Rural Health Services Government of Tamil Nadu, Teynampet Chennai-6. 044-24343271 Mr. M.Senthamizhan, Joint Director of Public Health & Preventive Medicine (Imm)
  45. 45. 45 State Appropriate Authority (PNDT) Office of the Director of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Government of Tamil Nadu, 359-Anna Salai, Chennai-6.044-24336674 (TF). TRIUPRA Dr. T.K.Das, Joint Director (F.W. & P.H)., Dte. of FW& P.H., Government of Tripura, Health Directorate Building, 2nd Floor, Pandit Nehru Complex, Agartala – 700 006. Tripura. Ph. 0381-2226602 Mrs. A. Sarkar Secretary, Shishu Grih, Agartala Deputy Secretary Department of Law Government of Tripura UTTARANCHAL Dr. R.C.Arya, Director General, Medical Health & F.W. Services, Dte. of Medical Health & F.W. Services, Government of Uttaranchal, Chandra Nagar, Dehradun. 0135-2720311, 272 9888897 (F) UTTAR PRADESH Director General, Family Welfare, Directorate of Family Welfare, Government of Uttar Pradesh, Jagat Narayan Road, (Near Silver Jubilee Maternity Hospital), Lucknow-226001. 0522-2258073 , 2258085(fax) Mrs. Yashodra, Kriti Resource Centre,
  46. 46. 46 C-1485, Indira Nagar, Lucknow Ph. 2310860 Sh. Vinay Kumar Mathur, Special Secretary & Additional Legal Advisor, Govt. of U.P., WEST BENGAL Dr. Krishi Chandra Barui, Director, Health Services. Dte. of Health & FW, Government of West Bengal, CIT Building, 5th Floor, P-16, India Exchange Place Extn. Kolkata-700 073. 9433310103, 033-23577904 (F) ANDAMAN & NICOBAR ISLAND Dr. N. Sadasivan , Director of Health Services, A & N Administration, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Port Blair – 744 104. 0312-232723 (T), 233331 (TF), 23210 (F) Smt. ShantaLakshman Singh, Chairperson, Social Welfare Advisory Board, A&N Island Port, Blair-744104 03192-23362 Smt. Sonalee Namdhi Chakraborty, DS(Law), A&N Admn., Secretariat, Port Blair-744104 Ph. 03192-232477 CHANDIGARH U.T. Dr. C.P. Bansal, DHS-Cum-Appropriate Authority,
  47. 47. 47 Chandigarh Admn. Tel & Fax No. 2780781 Ms. Paramvir Nijar, Legal Remembercer Chandigarh Admn. 0172-2741995 Mrs. Harjinder Kaur, Ex-Major Municipal Corporation, H.No. 2352 Sector-35-C, Chandigarg Multi Member 0172- 2621111 9814669919 DAMAN & DIU Dr. S. S. Vaishya, Director, Medical & Health Services, PHC, Moti Daman, DAMAN-396 210. Daman & Diu 0260-2230847 (O), 2230470(O) 2254371 (R) (F) 0260-2230570 Mrs. Prabhanen Shah, Member of Women Organization, President , Mahila Mandal, Near Vegetable Market Moti Daman-Daman-396220 Mr. Orlanso Mirande, Public Prosecutor, Moti Daman, Daman-396210 DADRA & NAGAR HAVELI Dr. L.N. Palra, Director (RCH), Administration of Dadra & Nagar Haveli, Medical & PH Department,
  48. 48. 48 Silvassa-396 230 Dadra & Nagar Haveli. 0260-2642061 (TF), 0-9426117593 Shri Prakash, N. Patel District & Civil Court, Silvasa, A.P.P. Ph. 09824455636 Smt. Sumitraben T. Desai, Lioness, President, Lioness Club of Silvassa. LAKSHADWEEP Dr. K. Attakoya, Director of Medical Services & State EPI Officer, Dte. of Medical Services, UT of Lakshadweep, Kavaratti Island -682 555 via Head Post Office, Kochi. Lakshadweep. 04896262317 04896-262817 F), 262819(F) Smt. M.P. Sainabe, President, Aykiyam Women’s Groups, Kavaratti. 04896-262057 Additional Secretary (Legal), UT. Lakshadweep, Kavaratti. 04896-262464
  49. 49. 49 PONDICHERRY Dilip Kumar Baliga, Director of Health and Family Welfare Services, Directorate of Family Welfare Services, Health Deptt. Complex, New Saran Pondicherry-605 001. 0413-2249350,2249351 (Fax) Dr. D. Seema Devi, W/o B. Devasenapathy, 106, Mlar Nilayam, Akkasamy Madam, Street Muthiapet, Pondicdherry, Ph. 09443337994 Dr. D. Seema Devi, W/o B. Devasenapathy, 106, Mlar Nilayam, Akkasamy Madam, Street Muthiapet, Pondicdherry, Ph. 09443337994 Thiru N. Rajendra, US to Govt. (Law), Chief Secretariat, Pondicherry- 605001
  50. 50. 50 Bibliography Save Girl Child Organization Hand Book Websites http://www.savegirlchild.org/ http://www.indianchild.com/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abortion_in_India http://www.childlineindia.org.in/ http://www.indiaonlinepages.com/ http://www.infochangeindia.org/

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