Quarantine and animal health legislations in india

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It describes the legislation of quarantine and import of animals and animal products in India.

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Quarantine and animal health legislations in india

  1. 1. Quarantine and Animal Health Legislations in India Dr. Bhoj R Singh Principal Scientist and incharge Epidemiology, CADRAD, IVRI, Izatnagar-243122, India
  2. 2. Quarantine • Quarantine “To separate and restrict the movement of healthy animals which may have been exposed to a communicable disease to see if they become ill. • “to separate ill having a communicable disease from those who are healthy” It is not quarantine but isolation. • Term comes from quarantena, meaning forty-day period. • Very old history: Mentioned in Old Testament.
  3. 3. Quarantine • This was practiced as a measure of disease prevention related to the Black Death. • Between 1348 and 1359 the Black Death wiped out about 30% of Europe's population, as well as a significant percentage of Asia. • The original document from 1377, which is kept in the Archives of Dubrovnik, states that before entering the city, newcomers had to spend 30 days (a trentine) in a restricted location (originally nearby islands) waiting to see whether the symptoms of Black Death would develop. Later on, isolation was prolonged to 40 days and was called quarantine. • A multilateral international sanitary convention was concluded at Paris on 17 January 1912. This convention was most comprehensive and was designated to replace all previous conventions on that matter. • It was signed by 40 countries, and consisted of 160 articles. Ratifications by 16 of the signatories were exchanged in Paris on 7 October 1920. Another multilateral convention was signed in Paris on 21 June 1926, to replace that of 1912. It was signed by 58 countries worldwide, and consisted of 172 articles.
  4. 4. Signals and flags to indicate diseases • Plain yellow, green, and even black flags have been used to symbolize disease both in ships and ports, with the color yellow having a longer historical precedent, as a color of marking for houses of infection, previous to its use as a maritime marking color for disease. • The present flag used for the purpose is the "Lima" (L) flag, which is a mixture of yellow and black flags previously used. It is sometimes called the "yellow jack“ but this was also a name for Yellow fever, which probably derives its common name from the flag, not the color of the victims (cholera ships also used a yellow flag) • The plain yellow flag ("Quebec" or Q in international maritime signal flags), probably derives its letter symbol for its initial use in quarantine, but this flag in modern times indicates the opposite—a ship that declares itself free of quarantinable disease, and requests boarding and routine port inspection.
  5. 5. • • • • • • • • • Important quarantines of the plague northward in Eyam was a village in Britain that chose to isolate itself to stop the spread 1665. They were hindered in this by the time's limited knowledge of the disease: what caused it, what forms infection took, what animal vectors carried it, how it spread. Typhoid Mary was quarantined in New York in the early twentieth century. She was an asymptomatic typhoid carrier and was considered a public health hazard. The astronauts on Apollo 11 were put into quarantine for a couple of weeks in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory to make sure that they didn't carry any unknown diseases from the moon. The 1972 outbreak of smallpox in Yugoslavia was the final outbreak of smallpox in Europe. The WHO fought the outbreak with extensive quarantine, and the government instituted martial law. In 1942, during World War II, British forces tested out their biological weapons programme on Gruinard Island and infected it with anthrax. The quarantine was lifted in 1990 when the island was declared safe and a flock of sheep were released onto the island. Robert Daniels was quarantined in 2007 for having the deadliest form of tuberculosis in an Arizona hospital, partly for not wearing a mask during his time in the outside world. The UK's anti-rabies quarantine regulations were a major plot point in "A Diplomatic Incident", a 1987 episode of Yes, Prime Minister. Andrew Speaker was placed under U.S. federal quarantine in 2007 after flying to Europe while knowing he had tuberculosis, he is the first person since 1963 to be under federal quarantine. On 28 July 1814 the convict ship Surry arrived in Sydney Harbour from England. Over 40 persons had died during the voyage of typhoid including 36 convicts. The ship was placed in quarantine on the North Shore. Convicts were landed and a camp established in the immediate vicinity of what is now Jeffrey Street in Kirribilli. This was the first site in Australia to be used for quarantine purposes.
  6. 6. Animal Quarantine & Certification Services (AQCS) in India • The First Quarantine Station at Delhi was established in 1969, followed by Chennai in 1974, Kolkatta in 1975 and Mumbai in 1981. • Regional Officer (NR), Animal Quarantine and Certification Service Station, Government of India, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, Kapashera (Crossing), New Delhi – 110 001. Gram : ANIQUAR NEW DELHI, Tel. : 011/25063272 Fax.: 011/25060647 • Sl.No. Species Accommodation capacity (in nos.) in Delhi • ____________________________________________________ • 1. Cattle 96 • 2. Sheep & Goat 300 • 3. Dogs/Cats 12 • 4. Horses 20 • 5. Poultry 250 • 6. Pigs 100 • 7. Laboratory animals 500 • 8. Misc. Animals (Elephants, Camels etc.) One shed withopen space
  7. 7. Kolkata Centre • • • • • • • • • • • • • Date of Establishment : 19.10.1975, Area : 2 acres. Regional Officer (ER), Animal Quarantine and Certification Service Station, Government of India, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Animal Husbandry & Dairying, Vill.: Narayanpur, P.O.: R-Gopalpur Distt.: North 24-Praganas, West Bengal – 743 5 Gram : ANIQUARCER – Cal – 700052; Tel. : 033/25739777 Fax.: 033/25739777 Airport Office: CALTEX Building , NSC Bose International Airport , Kolkata-700 052, West Bengal . Tel. : 033/25119418 Fax.: 033/25119418 Accommodation Capacity of Different Types of Animals/Birds in Quarantine: _______________________________________________________ Sl.No. Species Accommodation capacity (in nos.) _________________________________________________________ 1. Cattle 44 2. Sheep & Goat 250 3. Dogs/Cats 06 4. Horses 44 5. Pigs 300 _________________________________________________________
  8. 8. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Mumbai Centre Date of Establishment : 21.10.1981, Area : 5 acres. Quarantine Officer (WR), Animal Quarantine and Certification Service Station, Government of India , Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Animal Husbandry & Dairying, Kopar Khairane, Sector – 11, Navi Mumbai – 400 709. Tel. : 022/27630021 Fax.: 022/27630021 Airport Office: Cargo Terminal Building , Phase I, Chatrapati Shivaji International Airport, Sahar, Mumbai – 400 099. Gram : QUARCERT, MUMBAI – 99 Tel. : 022/26828194 Accommodation Capacity of different Types of Animals/Birds in Quarantine: _________________________________________________________ Sl.No. Species Accommodation capacity (in nos.) _________________________________________________________ 1. Cattle 40 2. Sheep & Goat 100 3. Dogs/Cats 16 4. Horses 20 5. Pigs 100 6. Poultry/Birds (Adult) 320 3. Open yard available which can accommodate another Animal Quarantine http://dahd.nic.in/rtia2005/animal_quarantine.htm 3 of 13 3/26/2013 2:01 PM 40 cattle or 100 sheep, Goat or pigs
  9. 9. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Chennai Centre Date of Establishment : 16.12.1974, Area : 5.47 acres. Quarantine Officer (WR), Animal Quarantine and Certification Service Station, Government of India, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Animal Husbandry & Dairying, Valachery Main Road , Pallikaranai, Chennai – 601 302. Gram : ANIQUAR, CHENNAI Tel. : 044/22460659 Fax.: 044/22460659 Accommodation Capacity of Different Types of Animals/Birds in Quarantine: _________________________________________________________ Sl.No. Species Accommodation capacity (in nos.) _________________________________________________________ 1. Cattle 48 2. Sheep & Goat 270 3. Dogs/Cats 10 4. Horses 20 5. Pigs 60 6. Poultry/Birds (Adult) a) 100 Animal Quarantine http://dahd.nic.in/rtia2005/animal_quarantine.htm 4 of 13 3/26/2013 2:01 PM b) 1000 (Chicks) 7. Laboratory Animals 400
  10. 10. Powers and duties of Quarantine officer • 1. Regional Quarantine officer: • • a) To work as supervisor of the Quarantine Station and border Quarantine stations attached to it; b) To be in close association with the State Directors of Animal Husbandry to be in touch with up to date information on disease position and surveillance in his region; c) To associate with the heads of various recognized laboratories in India for getting expert opinion and for testing of materials whenever such facilities are required; d) To maintains up to date disease position in other parts of the world; e) To supervise the temporary quarantine camps set up for export of livestock in his region; f). To supervise the export of livestock and livestock products, biological and micro organisms from the carrier to the Quarantine Station and arrange for necessary tests, vaccinations at the Quarantine Station and to attend their release, dispatch or destruction and incineration as the case may be; g). To supervise the production, collection and examination of representative samples and packing of various livestock products so as to confirm to the international standards and to the requirement of the importing countries; h. To act as ultimate regional authority for deciding disputes in the issue of certificates; i) To act as Head of Office and Drawing-Disposing Officer and be responsible for all the administration and technical works of the station as well as to the Regional Units under his control. 2. QUARANTINE OFFICER a) To work as supervisor of the Quarantine Station and border Quarantine stations attached to it and to implement the import /export rules as framed by the Government of India. b) To be in close association with the State Directors of Animal Husbandry to be in touch with up to date information on disease position and surveillance in his region; c) To associate with the heads of various recognized laboratories in India for getting expert opinion and for testing of materials whenever such facilities are required; d) To maintains up to date disease position in other parts of the world; e) To supervise the temporary quarantine camps set up for export of livestock in his region; f). To supervise the import/export of livestock and livestock products, biological and micro organisms from the carrier to the Quarantine Station and arrange for necessary tests, vaccinations at the Quarantine Station and to attend their release, dispatch or destruction and incineration as the case may be; g). To supervise the production, collection and examination of representative samples and packing of various livestock products so as to confirm to the international standards and to the requirement of the importing countries; h. To act as ultimate regional quarantine authority for deciding disputes in the issue of certificates and to issue the import/export clearance certificates as per the health rules. i) To act as Head of Office and Drawing-Disposing Officer and be responsible for all the administration and technical works of the station as well as to the Regional Units under his control. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
  11. 11. Discharging duties at Quarantine station •Quarantine Stations are governed by the Livestock Importation Act, 2001. The procedure followed in the Quarantine Stations for the imported items are as under:•Before Arrival: •· On receipt of application for import of live animals, all the sheds and feed stores are thoroughly cleaned, disinfected with suitable disinfectants and also fumigated. •· All animals are transported by a suitable animal carrier as per the standards and requirements for different species of animals. •· The animal carrier is properly disinfected one day prior to the scheduled date of arrival of animals. •· All the arrangements are made for collection of necessary samples •On Arrival at the Point of Entry: •· Collect the necessary samples and arrange for testing in the specified laboratory. •· Carry out hematological/urine/faecal examination as and when required and take appropriate follow up action. •· Examine the animals for infestation of ecto-parasite and take appropriate follow up action including disinfection of the premises. •· The vaccination status is checked and if required, the necessary immunization is carried out at the quarantine station. •· For maintaining proper hygienic conditions during the period of quarantine, the animal sheds are cleaned, disinfected daily and the garbage is disposed as per the laid down procedures. •· In the event of mortality during the quarantine period, the post-mortem is conducted in the quarantine station by an authorized Veterinary Officer with all precaution and laid down procedure. If required, expert services of the specified laboratory/institutions are requisitioned and samples collected for confirmation. •After the post-mortem, the carcass is disposed of by incineration or as per the laid down procedure within the quarantine station premises. •· Release of animals after satisfying quarantine requirements and issue Quarantine Clearance Certificate (Import). •· The Regional/Quarantine Officer is authorized to take appropriate action including requisition of specialist services of State/University / Institutions.
  12. 12. Protocol for On day of arrival • On the day of arrival and time fixed with the importer, the Regional/Quarantine Officer and other staff reach the Airport/Seaport. • The animals or the products are thoroughly examined physically. • The Veterinary Certificate accompanying the animals or products is checked thoroughly to ascertain the specified health requirements. • After ensuring that the animals are clinically healthy and the health certificates accompanying the consignment are in order, a Provisional Quarantine Clearance Certificate (Import) or Veterinary Health Certificate (Import) is issued depending on the case to the importing agency for customs clearance. • The imported live animals are brought to the quarantine station under the supervision of the Regional/Quarantine Officer. • The animals are kept under the quarantine for 30 days or as specified in the health protocol by the Government of India for monitoring the health status of the animals. • In case of livestock products representative samples shall be drawn and tested in the relevant laboratories as per conditions laid down in the sanitary import permit.
  13. 13. • • • • • • • • • • Routine During Quarantine Maintain health record of the animal(s). Collect the necessary samples and arrange for testing in the specified laboratory. Carry out hematological/urine/faecal examination as and when required and take appropriate follow up action. Examine the animals for infestation of ecto-parasite and take appropriate follow up action including disinfection of the premises. The vaccination status is checked and if required, the necessary immunization is carried out at the quarantine station. For maintaining proper hygienic conditions during the period of quarantine, the animal sheds are cleaned, disinfected daily and the garbage is disposed as per the laid down procedures. In the event of mortality during the quarantine period, the post-mortem is conducted in the quarantine station by an authorized Veterinary Officer with all precaution and laid down procedure. If required, expert services of the specified laboratory/institutions are requisitioned and samples collected for confirmation. After the post-mortem, the carcass is disposed of by incineration or as per the laid down procedure within the quarantine station premises. Release of animals after satisfying quarantine requirements and issue Quarantine Clearance Certificate (Import). The Regional/Quarantine Officer is authorized to take appropriate action including requisition of specialist services of State/University / Institutions.
  14. 14. Other Requirements (Charges to be borne by the Importer): • Accommodation charges for the entire period of quarantine at the rates specified by the Government of India from time to time • Transport charges at the rates specified by the Government of India from time to time. • Laboratory charges directly paid to the concerned laboratory. • Actual cost of incineration/disposal of the carcass.
  15. 15. • • • • • • Animal Import and Export control in India As per the provisions under the Livestock Importation Act 1898 (Act 9 of 1898) as amended by Livestock Importation Amendment Act, 2001 (Act 28 of 2001) to import an animal you need: 1. NOC for pet animals (Dogs and Cats) from AQCS (Animal quarantine and certification Services). For all other animals and animal products: Import License and Sanitary import permit from DGFT (Directorate General of Foreign Trade) and also NOC from AQCS. For Finished leather products only NOC from AQCS. Health certificate/ Export fitness certificate for all livestock. All pet imports/ exports are to be notified 15 days in advance to AQCS Office with all physical documents by a representative of the importer. The copies of the following are needed: – Health certificate from a designate Veterinary officer. – Passport of the Pet with details of the vaccinations – Passport and tickets of the importer • • • The AQCS after verification of the documents will issue NOC. On arrival importer with all originals will report to Quarantine Officer to obtain provisional quarantine clearance certificate. On successful completion of 30 days quarantine, importer has to contact QO for Final Quarantine Clearance Certificate.
  16. 16. Guidelines for import of equids in India • Eligibility of the animal to be imported – The equine should come from a country: Which is free from African Horse Sickness. – Where Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) has not been reported during the last three years. However, from the CEM infected countries male up to seven years and female up to five years of age which have never been mated are allowed. – In case of Thoroughbred horse, import will be allowed for breeding purpose only. – Prior to export the equines are required to under to pre-export quarantine for necessary testing. – The equine shall only be imported through the International airports of Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and Chennai or any other airport notified by the Government from time to time and the quarantine officers may be informed by the importer in writing at least fifteen days prior to the arrival of the consignment. – The animal with more than three hundred days of pregnancy prior to departure is not be imported at all.
  17. 17. • • • • • • • • • IDENTIFICATION: The equine must accompany with a valid passport OR In case of the horse originate from countries not issuing a passport; the import must be accompanied by complete history sheet with an identification certificate duly authenticated by an official veterinarian of the exporting country. VETERINARY CERTIFICATE: The equine must accompany a valid health certificate issued by an official veterinarian of the exporting country as per the following format: VETERINARY CERTIFICATE FOR IMPORT OF EQUINES INTO INDIA Exporting Country………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Ministry/Department of ……………………………………………………………………………………………… Province or District. etc ……………………………………………………………………………………………… I. Identification of the animal Number; Breed; Sex; Age • • • • • • • II. Origin of the animal Name and address of exporter: Place of origin of the Animal… III. Destination of the animal Country of destination ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name and address of Consignee -------------------------------------------------------------Nature and identification of means of transport --------------------------------------------- • •
  18. 18. • • • • IV. Sanitary information certificate for boarding I, the undersigned official veterinarian certify that the animal described above examined on this day: (a) Shows no clinical sign or symptom of infectious or contagious diseases on the day of shipment. (b) Satisfies the following requirements: – – – – – – – The country is free from African Horse Sickness. During one hundred and eighty days immediately prior to export, the equine under export has not visited any country where African Horse Sickness occurred in the past two years immediately preceding the export. Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) has not been reported during last three years in the country and the animal has not original from/reared in/ visited any of the CEM infected countries during the last two years. OR The country has reported CEM but the animal under export is less than seven years (in case of male)/ less than five years (in case of female) of age which have never been mated and the equine has not been contact with breeding stock during the twelve months immediately prior to export and that swabs collected from the prepuce/urethra/vagina/cervix as the case may be of the equine has been found negative for pathogenic micro-organisms specifically Taylorella equigenitalis, by standard culture methods on three consecutive occasions at seven days interval during the thirty days pre-export quarantine. The equine was kept in establishment for three months prior to shipment where no infectious or contagious diseases including Epizootic Lymphangitis, Ulcerative Lymphangitis, Trypansomiasis, Dourine, Equine Piroplasmosis, Equine Rhinopncumonitis. Equine Encephalomyelitis, Equine Influenza, Equine Infectious Anemia, Potomac Horse Fever, West Nile Virus infection and Vesicular Stomatitis was reported and no such diseases reported around such establishment. The animal prior to export has been vaccinated with Equine Influenza (killed) bivalent vaccine, and the last vaccination be within thirty days prior to embarkation but not less than fourteen days. The equine being exported has been kept in isolation in an approved
  19. 19. Government quarantine station and subjected to the following tests with negative results:Disease Glanders Diagnostic Test Mallein/Complement Fixation Test (CFT) Dourine Complement Fixation Test (CFT) Equine infectious Anacmia (EIA) Coggins (Immunodiffusion Test) Infectious Equine (Salmonella abortus equi) Equine Viral Arterities (EVA) Abortion Serum Agglutination Test than one/three thousand) Condition During fifteen shipment. During fifteen shipment. During thirty shipment. (titre not greater During fifteen shipment. days before days before days before days before Virus Neutralization Test Two occasions at least fourteen days apart with negative result during twenty eight days prior to shipment. Vesicular Stomatitis Complement Fixation Test (CFT) / Ertzyme- At least 21 days after the Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) commencement of pre- export quarantine Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) Culture of Micro-organisms Three consecutive tests at weekly interval during pre- export quarantine period with negative results. Equine Piroplasmosis (Babesia equi Complement Fixation Test (CFT)/Indirect During thirty days before and Babesia caballi) Fluorescent Antibody Test (IFAT) shipment. Venezuelan Equine Encephalomye litis Hacmagglutination Inhibition, (HI)/ Not less than fourteen days after Complement Fixation (CFT)/ Plaque Reduction the commencement of pre-export Neutralization Test (PRNT) quarantine. N.B.: No Testing is necessary in respect of such diseases for which freedom status has been certified. Official Stamp: Issued at …………………………………on -----------------------Name and address of Veterinarian …………………………… Signature:
  20. 20. Post-Import Quarantine • After import into India, the animal shall be kept in quarantine for minimum period of thirty days at the Government Quarantine Station. • During the quarantine period, the animal shall be subjected to standard culture and serological examination for any disease as deemed necessary by the Government. • In the event of any animal found positive for any exotic disease, the same shall be deported back to the country of origin/ destroyed at the quarantine station at the cost of the importer.
  21. 21. Important definitions in The Live-Stock Importation (Amendment) Act, 2001, dt. 29-08-2001 , to regulate the import of livestock and their products. • THE LIVESTOCK IMPORTATION ACT, 1898, ACT NO. 9 OF 1898, amended in 2001. – the expression “ infectious or contagious disorders” includes tick-pest, glanders, farcy,, scabies and any other disease or disorder which may be specified Central Government by notification in the Official Gazette; and – “live-stock” includes horses, kines (bovine, canine, feline etc), camels, sheep and any other animal may be specified by the Central Government by notification in the Gazette; • • (c) “import” means the bringing or taking, by sea, land or air [India]. (d) “live-stock products’ include meat and meat products of all kinds including fresh, chilled and frozen meat, tissue, organs of poultry, pig, sheep, goat, egg and egg powder, milk and milk products, bovine, ovine and caprine, embryos, ova, semen; pet food products of animal origin and any other animal product which may be specified by the Central Government by notification in the Official Gazette.’
  22. 22. THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF INFECTIOUS AND CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN ANIMALS ACT, 2009 NO. 27 OF 2009 [20th March, 2009] • • An Act to provide for the prevention, control and eradication of infectious and contagious diseases affecting animals, for prevention of outbreak or spreading of such diseases from one State to another, and to meet the international obligations of India for facilitating import and export of animals and animal products and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. Provisions (VII chapters, 45 sections, 12 Schedules); Important sections are as under: – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Appointment of Veterinary Officers Reporting scheduled diseases obligatory Duty to segregate infected animals Notification of controlled areas and free areas Prohibition of movement of animals from controlled area Vaccination, marking and issue of vaccination certificate Prohibition of markets, fairs, exhibition, etc., in the controlled areas Prohibition of bringing of infected animals into market and other places Inspection and detention of animals at Check Posts and Quarantine Camps Cleaning and disinfection of carriers Declaration of infected areas Denotification of infected area Segregation, examination and treatment of infected animals Seizure and removal of certain animals Enforcement of orders and recovery of expenses Prevention of escape of causative organism
  23. 23. Schedules of PCICDA Act-2009 • • • • • • • • • • • • Schedule A: Diseases affecting multiple species (21, mostly zoonotic diseases, no TB but JD) Schedule B: 15 diseases affecting bovines (Bovine TB, BVD, Theleriasis, Typanosomiasis etc.) Schedule C; 11 diseases of sheep and goat, sheep pox, goat pox etc. Schedule D; 13 diseases of equids viz. Equine infectious anaemia, Equine Influenza., Equine piroplasmosis, Equine rhinopneumonitis., Equine viral arteritis, Glanders etc. ) Schedule E: 7 diseases of swine; African swine fever, Classical swine fever, Nipah virus encephalitis, Porcine cysticercosis, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome,Swine vesicular disease, Transmissible gastroenteritis. Schedule F: 14 diseases of birds, Fowl cholera, Fowl typhoid, HPAI, IBD, ND, Pullorum disease, Marek's disease etc. Schedule G: 2 diseases of lagomorphs, Myxomatosis, Rabbit haemorrhagic disease. Schedule H: 6 Bee diseases. Schedule I: 10 Fish diseases Schedule J; 7 Mollusks diseases. Schedule K: 7 Crustacean diseases Schedule L: Other Diseases, Camelpox, Leishmaniosis.
  24. 24. Laws related to animal welfare and Health in India 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 (As amended by Central Act 26 of 1982) Glanders and Farcy Act, 1899 Dourine Act, 1910 (Act No. V of 1910) Livestock importation (Amendment) Act, 2001 Poisons Act, 1919 (Act No. XII of 1919) Dangerous Drug Act, 1930. Drug & Cosmetic Act, 1940 (Amendments) Act, 1995. Indian Panel Code. Prevention of Food Adulteration Act, 1954. Indian Veterinary Council Act, 1984. Bio-diversity Act, 2002 Bio-Terrorism Act, 2008 Milk and Milk Product Order, 1992 Meat And Meat Products Order (MFPO), 1973 Raw Meat (Quality control & Inspection) rules, 1992 Food safety and Standards Act, 2006 Wild Life (Protection) Act 1972 Prevention and Control of Infectious and Contagious Diseases in animals Act, 2009
  25. 25. Acts related to animal health and welfare from various Indian States 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Goa, Daman & Diu Diseases of Animals Act 1974 (Goa, Daman and Diu) Gujarat Diseases of Animals (Control) Act 1963 (Gujarat) Himachal Pradesh Livestock and Birds Diseases Act 1968 and Himachal Pradesh Livestock and Birds Diseases, Rules 1971 (Himachal Pradesh) Jammu and Kashmir Animal Disease (Control) Act Svt. 2006 (1949 AD) (Jammu and Kashmir) Madhya Pradesh Cattle Disease Act 1934 and Madhya Bharat Animal Contagious Diseases Act, 1955 (Madhya Pradesh) Bombay Diseases of Animal Act, 1948 (Maharashtra) Orissa Animal Contagious Diseases Act, 1949 (Orissa) Punjab Livestock and Birds Diseases Act, 1948 and Punjab Contagious Diseases of Animals Rules 1953 (Punjab) Rajasthan Animal Disease Act, 1959 and Rajasthan Animal Disease Rules 1960 (Rajasthan) Bengal Diseases of Animals Act, 1944 (West Bengal) Pradesh Cattle Disease Act 1866; Andhra Pradesh Cattle Disease (Extension and Amendment) Act, 1961; By Laws made under Andhra Pradesh Cattle Disease Act 1866 (Andhra Pradesh) Karnataka Animal Diseases Control Act 1961: Karnataka Diseases (Control) Rules 1967 (Karnataka) The Madras Rinder-pest Act, 1940 (Tamilnadu) The Madras Cattle Diseases Act, 1866 (Tamilnadu) Kerala Prevention and Control of Animal Disease Act, 1967 (Kerala) The livestock importation (amendment) act, 2001. Kerala prevention and control of animal diseases (amendment) rules, 2004 Karnataka poultry and livestock feed (regulation of manufacture and sale) order, 1987 The cattle feed and fodder (standard of quality) order, 2001 Assam cattle diseases Act 1948 (applicable to all seven north eastern states)

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