Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Creating your Brand
Three Part Guide
1
Before you start.
When starting a new company, many people often want to jump straight into the naming
of a company and th...
Before you start.
Caveats: 



Step by step: 

The order of things within this presentation doesn’t necessarily need to be...
What is a Brand?
To begin and to clarify things it is worth
starting with the basics.
What is a brand?
Formally: Proprieta...
What is a Brand?
!
!
A brand in it’s entirety is the sum total of the
customers overall perception and experience
of all o...
Guide Summary.
6
PART 1: RESEARCH



1. Know your market:

Includes: Market research, opportunities & threats,
competitor ...
Part One: Research
7
1. Know your market
Before you start developing a brand, it is essential that you truly understand your marketplace and au...
Porters Five Forces
In addition to the action points mentioned on the previous page, you
may also want to complete this po...
Porters Five Forces
Action Required: 

1. Create a document using the five forces listed below and brainstorm your observa...
2. Audience - STP
Now that you have an understanding of the marketplace and competitors, you now need to
understand and de...
Marketing Segmentation
The are many ways to segment your potential audience and discover niche’s with specific needs, grow...
Marketing Targeting
Now that you have a list of potential segments, it’s time to evaluate the potential commercial
attract...
Positioning Statement
A positioning statement is a corporate declaration which clearly defines your brands place in
the ma...
Part 1 - Checklist
To quickly recap this section before you move onto Part 2, you should now have a detailed
understanding...
Part Two: Brand DNA
16
Brand DNA - Methods
CORPORATE MISSION
BRAND ATTRIBUTES

CONSUMER BENEFITS

BRAND VALUES
BRAND 

PERSONALITY

BRAND

CORE

...
Brand DNA overview
HEADS & HEARTS -
INTERNAL DRIVERS

What the brand wants to
achieve and stands for, how the
brand will a...
Brand DNA overview
The brand DNA wheel on the left and in more detail on the
previous slide gives you an overview of all o...
Internal drivers
‘Heads & Hearts’
20
Corporate Mission
The first element you will focus on is your brands Corporate
Mission, and that consists of the following...
To consider
In this section of creating a Vision, Mission and Purpose statement it is worth noting the following:
As per S...
Reference Matrix
It is the ‘why’ your brand exists. It should be
the sole defining driver and motivator for
every action yo...
Brand Purpose (The Why)
Action Required: Define your Brand Purpose, that is the single minded reason WHY your brand exists...
Visioning (The What)
There is a lot of contradictory corporate dribble about what a Vision statement ‘should’ and ‘shouldn...
Visioning (The What)
How to create your Visioning story"
The eight steps below are taken from an article written by Ari We...
Vision (The What)
Action Required: Create your Vision Statement. For examples look at the ‘Reference Matrix’
What is a Vis...
Mission Statement (The How)
Action Required: Create a short and succinct Mission Statement following the four points liste...
Brand Values
Action Required: Define your core brand values, and also brand drivers - that is the application of the core
...
Goals
This is not necessarily an essential step for your branding development, however I have
added it as it’s quite a nat...
Rational & Emotional
Attributes, personality & essence
31
Rational & Emotional
The diagram on the left is a brand
essence wheel and it is a useful
reference tool to help map out th...
External drivers
‘Proof & Pudding’
33
Rational
This is the rational half of the wheel
Action Required: Brainstorm and answer the following points.
What the prod...
Brand Personality
‘Walking & Talking’
35
Emotional
This is the emotional half of the
wheel
Action Required: Brainstorm and
answer the following points.
How the bra...
Brand Personality
Action Required: List your key brand personalities. Use your competitor analysis to identify how your br...
Core of the brand
‘Brand Essence’
38
Brand Essence
Action Required: Define your brand essence - this is a single minded word(s) (one or two words max).
What is...
Part 2 - Recap & Checklist
To quickly recap this section before you move onto Part 3, you should now have a detailed
under...
Part Three:
Coming up with a name
41
Brainstorming 101
Different brands - different methods/rationale of creation:

There is the family name (Heinz), the descr...
Developing a name - Step 1 of 2
Step 1: Association Matrix
There are many methods to actually creating a brand name. One
m...
Developing a name - Step 2 of 2
Step 2: Mind Mapping
Following on from step 1, get a big sheet of paper and a pen and pick...
About the Author
Overview:

Over ten years experience as a digital marketing professional
working both client and digital ...
Appendix
www.ampagency.com/whats-your-brand-essence/
https://www.udemy.com/blog/positioning-statement-example/
www.optus.c...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Beginners guide to developing a brand

445 views

Published on

A short three part guide to developing a brand.

Part 1: Marketing Research & Defining your audience
Part 2: Developing your brand DNA and vision
Part 3: Brand name development

Published in: Marketing
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Beginners guide to developing a brand

  1. 1. Creating your Brand Three Part Guide 1
  2. 2. Before you start. When starting a new company, many people often want to jump straight into the naming of a company and then delve into the design elements, i.e the logo / look and feel. ! There is much more involved in developing a brand from scratch than the name and look and feel. Think of these elements as individual parts of a jigsaw puzzle, that if put together create a bigger picture. It’s difficult to put the jigsaw puzzle together, if you don’t know what the bigger picture is. ! So using this analogy, this presentation is a guide to helping you define the bigger picture first, and then work putting the jigsaw together with this picture in mind. I have created it to a be a help guide to the many friends that ask me to help them create a brand name, as such it has been written as simply as possible. ! The guide is split into three parts: ! Part One is about understanding your marketplace, the opportunity, the risks and your audience(s). 
 Part Two is focused on defining your Brands DNA - that is what your brand represents
 Part Three is about the development of the brand name itself
 The action points throughout are in red. 2
  3. 3. Before you start. Caveats: 
 
 Step by step: 
 The order of things within this presentation doesn’t necessarily need to be fixed or rigid, there are times where one element can be done before another, however for the purpose of ‘A Guide’, it helps to have a step by step process in place. Who this guide is for: 
 This guide is not meant to be a definitive and ultimate guide to creating a brand. There are many different and more complex methods depending on your time and budget. It is a simplistic lean guide created for people that are new to marketing and branding and want to understand how they create their brand for their startup. I believe this guide has all of the key ingredients to help these people develop their understanding of all the elements that make up a brand, which will enable them to create a solid and appealing brand that reflects their product/service to their defined audience in the best possible way. 3
  4. 4. What is a Brand? To begin and to clarify things it is worth starting with the basics. What is a brand? Formally: Proprietary trademark for a specific product or service. Conceptually: A contract from a company to its customers, a promise of specific benefits, quality, and value. A relationship. In reality: It is the above, but it also can be simplified to this - It is whatever the customer thinks it is, and what customers tell each other it is. 4
  5. 5. What is a Brand? ! ! A brand in it’s entirety is the sum total of the customers overall perception and experience of all of the elements as shown on the left. It is not just the logo, the name, the strap line - It is the customer perception of the personality, the essence, the values, the touch, the feel, the products, the experience. 5
  6. 6. Guide Summary. 6 PART 1: RESEARCH
 
 1. Know your market:
 Includes: Market research, opportunities & threats, competitor analysis, POP & POD, & Porters Five Forces 2. Audience:
 Includes: Segmentation, targeting, & positioning statement ! PART 2: BRAND DNA & GOAL
 
 Includes: Brand Essence, Brand Values, Brand Personality, Mission Statement, Vision, Brand Promise, Brand Mantra, Goals, Brand Promise ! PART 3: BRAND DEVELOPMENT & VERBAL LANGUAGE
 
 Includes: Brainstorming 101, developing a name (pt 1 & 2)
  7. 7. Part One: Research 7
  8. 8. 1. Know your market Before you start developing a brand, it is essential that you truly understand your marketplace and audience. The fact that you are now focusing on the brand itself would suggest you have already done the necessary research detailed within this section, however if you haven’t - you need to as understanding these elements is fundamental to the creation and success of your business plan. Action Required: Create a document that answers all of the points below Market Research - Size and potential scalability of industry, trends in technology / customer service / media - this research can and should be extended to look at the global marketplace as valuable insights may be found. Opportunities & Threats - What are they? Competitor Analysis - The point of this exercise is to paint a very detailed picture of your competitors. 
 Competitor analysis includes but is not limited to: who they are, where are they based/operate, what is their market-share, what are their strengths / weaknesses, what do you think they are doing well/badly, what are their customers saying about them (look on social media), what is your perception/experience of them, what marketing are they doing and where, how are the brands positioned, what is their story, their vision, their mission. What are their price-points? Points of Parity & Points of difference
 List what they are.
 Perceptual mapping is also a very useful way of graphically demonstrating competitor positioning for specific parameters. An example is on the right. 8
  9. 9. Porters Five Forces In addition to the action points mentioned on the previous page, you may also want to complete this popular business strategy exercise of competitive analysis called ‘Porters five forces analysis’. Action points and explanation are on the following slide. What is Porters five forces analysis? Porters five forces analysis has become an essential tool and framework for industry analysis and business strategy development. This tool helps you: Understand where power lies in a business situation Identify and qualitatively access the profitability, opportunity and risk based upon five factors within an industry - Supplier Power, Buyer power, Threat of New Entry, Threat of Substitution and Competitive Rivalry Understand the strength of a position you are considering moving into - useful if you are starting/launching a new business Understand the strength of your current competitive position - useful if you are an existing business ! 9
  10. 10. Porters Five Forces Action Required: 
 1. Create a document using the five forces listed below and brainstorm your observations on each factor - a template of questions to follow is on the diagram on the left, and there is a real life business example on the right.
 2. Mark each of the five key forces with either a ‘-‘, ‘+’, or ‘0’ to demonstrate the size and scale of the force; ‘negative’, ‘positive’, or neutral. This can be seen on the real life example on the right. 
 3. Think about how this analysis affects your business plan and things you can/need to do to strengthen it. ! Template questions by category ! Example of a real business ! 10
  11. 11. 2. Audience - STP Now that you have an understanding of the marketplace and competitors, you now need to understand and decide on your target audience. A popular way of doing this is using the Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning (STP) strategic approach. This model is a useful audience focused approach (as opposed to a product focused one) to creating a marketing communications plans because: It helps Marketers prioritise propositions It enables the development and delivery of relevant messaging to engage and resonate with specific and different audiences This exercise will lead you to develop a positioning statement for your brand that appeals to your specific audience and starts the ball rolling on the development of your brand. Marketing Segmentation ! - Identify bases for segmentation - Determine important characteristics of each market segment Marketing Targeting ! - Evaluate potential & commercial attractiveness of each segment - Select one or more segments Positioning Statement ! - Develop a detailed positioning statement for selected segments - Develop a marketing mix for each segment 11
  12. 12. Marketing Segmentation The are many ways to segment your potential audience and discover niche’s with specific needs, grow new audiences, and ensure marketing messaging is differentiated based upon the segment - it’s rarely a one hat fits all. Below are a few methods to do so. Demographics: Age, gender, income, education, ethnicity, marital status, education, household etc Psychographics: Refers to personality and emotions based on behaviours linked to purchase choices including attitudes, lifestyle, hobbies,risk aversion, personality and leadership traits Lifestyle: Relates to hobbies, recreational pursuits, entertainment, vacations, and other non-work time activities Beliefs and values: Refers to religious, political, nationalistic, and cultural beliefs and values Life stages: The chronological benchmarking of people’s lives at different stages - think Saga aimed at people 50+ Geography: Breakdown by country, region, area, metropolitan or rural location, population density, or even climate. Behaviour: Refers to there nature of the purchase, brand loyalty, usage level, benefits sought, distribution channels used, reaction to marketing factors. Benefit: Is the use and satisfaction gained by the consumer. ! Action Required:
 
 Using one, some or many of the approaches above, create a list of your intended audience segments. The next step ‘Targeting’ is the evaluation step. Marketing Segmentation ! - Identify bases for segmentation - Determine important characteristics of each market segment 12
  13. 13. Marketing Targeting Now that you have a list of potential segments, it’s time to evaluate the potential commercial attractiveness of each segment. Below are some criteria to help you evaluate your segments. Criteria Size: Is the market large enough to justify segmenting? If the market is small it may make it smaller Difference: The segments must have measurable differences between each other Money: Anticipated profits must exceed the costs of additional marketing plans and other changes Accessible: Each segment must be accessible to your team and the segment must be able to receive your marketing messages Marketing Targeting ! - Evaluate potential & commercial attractiveness of each segment - Select one or more segments Action Required:
 
 Evaluate your segments using the points above. 13
  14. 14. Positioning Statement A positioning statement is a corporate declaration which clearly defines your brands place in the market. It helps brings clarity and focus to your marketing strategy and gives a you a point of reference from which to make a decisions regarding everything about your image. Below are two templates which will help you create your positioning statement. Template #1:
 For (target audience ), (brand) is the (frame of reference) that delivers (benefit / point of difference) because only (brand name) is (reason to believe). Template #2:
 For (your target) who wants / needs (reason to buy your product / service), the (your product or service) is a (category) that provides (your key benefit). Unlike (your main competitor), the (your product/service) (your key differentiator) The source of these templates and further reading on this can be found here Action Required:
 
 Using one of the templates above, create your brand positioning statement. Positioning Statement ! - Develop detailed positioning statement for selected segments - Develop a marketing mix for each segment segments 14
  15. 15. Part 1 - Checklist To quickly recap this section before you move onto Part 2, you should now have a detailed understanding and written documentation of each of the following. If you haven’t, you need to. Market Research Opportunities & Threats Competitor Analysis Points of parity / points of difference Porters five forces analysis Audience (Segmentation, Targeting, Positioning) ! ! 15
  16. 16. Part Two: Brand DNA 16
  17. 17. Brand DNA - Methods CORPORATE MISSION BRAND ATTRIBUTES
 CONSUMER BENEFITS
 BRAND VALUES BRAND 
 PERSONALITY
 BRAND
 CORE
 First and foremost, there are tons of different methods, models, and terminologies around the subject of ‘Brand DNA’, which often have different or even contradicting meanings. The Marketing industry likes displaying information within shapes; pyramids, onions, circles, combined circles squares, rectangles, etc. There are different and compelling rationales for the shape of choice that is used, normally with equally valid arguments to flip the shape inside out or upside down - all of which can often leave the viewer thoroughly confused at the unnecessary over complication. Two popular models of showing and developing your brand DNA is 1. The Pyramid and 2. The brand Wheel. I have created both above with the elements that I believe are important. Whilst the Pyramid and the Brand Wheel examples above essentially contain the same information, they convey this information in slightly different ways. For the purpose of simplicity, meaning and mutual understanding, I favour the wheel methodology so use this within this section. 17
  18. 18. Brand DNA overview HEADS & HEARTS - INTERNAL DRIVERS
 What the brand wants to achieve and stands for, how the brand will achieve it, and the single minded reason why 
 
 Vision
 Mission
 Core Purpose
 Values
 Goals PROOF & PUDDING - EXTERNAL DRIVERS
 Key brand attributes that distinguish the brand most strongly, tangible or intangible Key benefits the customer receives from experiencing your brand, typically emotional to allow the strongest connection to the target Positioning
 Brand Attributes 
 Consumer benefits
 External Proposition WALKING & TALKING - BRAND PERSONALITY
 Key traits an audience will experience from your brand Brand personality
 Brand Mantra CORE OF THE BRAND - BRAND ESSENCE Single most important quality or principle that makes the brand most valuable, your point of difference 18
  19. 19. Brand DNA overview The brand DNA wheel on the left and in more detail on the previous slide gives you an overview of all of the components that make up the brand DNA. Keep coming back to this wheel, as by the end of this section you will have a clear and considered brand DNA with a definitive core ‘essence’. Action required: Read through the entire brand DNA section once before making a start so that you have overall understanding of the process and then come back to each of the action points detailed in red on the following slides. 19
  20. 20. Internal drivers ‘Heads & Hearts’ 20
  21. 21. Corporate Mission The first element you will focus on is your brands Corporate Mission, and that consists of the following elements as summarised in the pyramid on the right that was created by Marty Neumeier. Goals Mission Vision Purpose Action Required: Read through the following Mission, Vision, Goals, and Purpose slides to fully understand their role, meanings and differences before you create them for your brand. What the pyramid is trying to demonstrate is that the vision (the what) and the mission (the how) support the purpose (the why). You can have a ‘why’ without the ‘what’ and the ‘how’, but there is little common sense in having a ‘what’ and ‘how’ without a ‘why’. The why, the ‘Purpose’, determines everything in the pyramid (your brand) and should be the sole work related reason you get out of bed in the morning. As in life, purpose is everything. 21
  22. 22. To consider In this section of creating a Vision, Mission and Purpose statement it is worth noting the following: As per Simon Sinek’s very popular ‘Golden Circle’ philosophy. always start with the why, i.e the Brand Purpose. Brand Purpose can be a stand alone brand element or it can be a statement that is found within the Mission or Vision statement. What matters is that you have identified what your brands single minded purpose is and convey it within your brand DNA. Some popular brands just have a Mission, or a Vision - not both, or they have their Mission and Vision Statements around the wrong way. This obviously hasn’t impeded their success but is just worth noting if you are looking at examples. Some brands keep their Mission Statements internal and not public facing. When researching Mission, Vision and Purpose statements, it’s not unusual to find commentators labelling examples the wrong way around or incorrectly. I.e A ‘Purpose’ could actually be part of a brand Mission or Vision Statement. 
 What is important for the purpose of this guide:
 
 Accept there are different opinions and methods in creating these statements. What is important is the outcome of completing the methodology stated in this guide - that is the thinking, consideration, and single minded focus and direction which leaves you with clear answers as to your brands ‘What’, ‘How’, and ‘Why’. For the purpose of this guide Purpose is the sole motivator for the existence of the brand (The why) Vision is the snapshot of the destination (The what) The Mission is the path to get to that destination (The how) 22
  23. 23. Reference Matrix It is the ‘why’ your brand exists. It should be the sole defining driver and motivator for every action your brand makes. ! Purpose transcends business and product (the what) and delivers on human principles (the why).! Some brands do not have a standalone brand purpose and rather include it within their Mission or Vision. What is important is that your brand has a defined single minded purpose regardless of where it is found. " Some of these examples come from the brands Mission or Vision statements! Johnson & Johnson - Caring for the World (one person at a time)! Nintendo - Put smiles on the faces of everyone we touch! Coke Cola - To refresh the World, to inspire moments of optimism and happiness, to create value and make a difference" What is Brand Purpose?" Visioning is a picture of what success will be at a particular time in the future.! A vision statement makes business planning effective and provides the destination for the journey you are on. ! A vision statement is a brief and succinct sentence that clearly focuses on the potential inherent in the companies future and states what they intend to be. ! Whilst some Vision Statements may reference how they intend to make ‘the what’ happen, ‘the how’ is really part of the Mission Statement.! Generic example: ”To become the number one produce store in Bondi by selling the highest quality, freshest farm produce, from farm to customer in under 24 hours on 75% of our range and with 98% customer satisfaction.”! Red Bull: ““Our mission is to be the premier marketer and supplier of Red Bull in Asia,Europe, and other parts of the globe. We will achieve this mission by building long-term relationships with the people who can make it become a reality.”! Amazon example: ”Our [Amazon's] vision is to be earth's most customer centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”! Nike: To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete (they actually call this their Mission but by definition it is their vision)! Generic example: To help people be healthy" What is a Mission Statement?" What is Visioning & Vision Statement?" Mission Statement Examples" Vision Statement Examples"Brand Purpose Examples" A company’s Mission Statement acts as the company’s compass. The mission is the path. (The vision is the end point) A short, sharp and concise sentence or paragraph that helps clarify what business you are in, your goals and your objectives. It defines the key measures of the organisations success and can be used both internally and publicly. ! ! 23
  24. 24. Brand Purpose (The Why) Action Required: Define your Brand Purpose, that is the single minded reason WHY your brand exists. What is Brand Purpose? It is the ‘why’ your brand exists. It should be the sole defining driver and motivator for every action your brand makes. Purpose transcends business and product (the what) and delivers on human principles (the why). Examples: As you can see below, some brands’ Purposes’ are found and defined in their Mission or Vision Statements. ! ! ! ! 24
  25. 25. Visioning (The What) There is a lot of contradictory corporate dribble about what a Vision statement ‘should’ and ‘shouldn’t’ be rather than the important stuff like what it actually represents and its practical application. In my opinion there are two important elements around developing a company vision, that is Visioning and your Vision Statement.. What is Visioning? 
 Visioning can be used for almost anything, from a single project, business unit, specific meeting to a holistic view of an entire brand in the future. What Visioning is and should answer is described in the diagram below. Visioning Is a picture of what success looks like at a particular time in the future What does your company look like? A goal everyone is working towards How big is your company? What is your company known / famous for? Why does anyone care about what your company does? What’s your role in the future of the company? Inspiring Exciting Motivating (for you and your team) Strategically sound but not a strategic plan Something that won't change every time the market or your Ambitious but achievable 25
  26. 26. Visioning (The What) How to create your Visioning story" The eight steps below are taken from an article written by Ari Weinzweig, which is itself an adaption of his book, ‘Zingerman's Guide to Good Leading, Part 1: A Lapsed Anarchist's Approach to Building a Great Business.’ ! Ari is the successful co-founder and CEO of Zingerman's Community of Businesses in Michigan, which currently has over 500 employees and revenue of $37 million a year.! Ari’s article brilliantly articulates what visioning is. For a more detailed explanation of the eight steps below I recommend you read his article here ! Eight steps to creating a Visioning Story" 1. Pick your topic - in this case the topic is your entire brand! 2. Pick your time frame - Far out enough to get beyond present-day problems but not so far out that you have no sense at all of actually getting there. 5-10 years is the standard. ! 3. Put together a list of “prouds” - Spend about ten minutes creating a list of positive and relevant achievements including past successes, skills, techniques, and resources that could be assets in achieving your vision. ! 4. Write the first draft - Go for something great - Write from the heart - Step into the future - Go quickly - Get personal" 5. Review and redraft" 6. More redrafts" 7. Solicit Input - Get input from people you trust and respect" 8. Share the vision - Share it with everyone who will be involved with implementing or who will be affected by it" 26
  27. 27. Vision (The What) Action Required: Create your Vision Statement. For examples look at the ‘Reference Matrix’ What is a Vision Statement? A Vision Statement makes business planning effective and provides the destination for the journey you are on. A Vision Statement is a brief and succinct sentence that clearly focuses on the potential inherent in the companies future and states what they intend to be. Whilst some Vision Statements may reference how they intend to make ‘the what’ happen, ‘the how’ is really part of the Mission Statement. ! ! 
 27
  28. 28. Mission Statement (The How) Action Required: Create a short and succinct Mission Statement following the four points listed below. For examples look at the ‘Reference Matrix’ What is a Mission Statement? A company’s Mission Statement acts as the company’s compass. The mission is the path. (The vision is the end point) A short, sharp and concise sentence or paragraph that helps clarify what business you are in, your goals and your objectives. It defines the key measures of the organisations success and can be used both internally and publicly. How to create your mission statement 1. First identify your organisation's "winning idea”, that is your USP that was discovered within the competitor research phase. 2. Next identify the key measures of your success. Make sure you choose the most important measures (and not too many of them!) 3. Combine your winning idea and success measures into a tangible and measurable goal. 4. Refine the words until you have a concise and precise statement of your mission, which expresses your ideas, measures and desired result. “(Time-scale in years) from now, my company will…………….by…………………..: Interesting further reading here ! 28
  29. 29. Brand Values Action Required: Define your core brand values, and also brand drivers - that is the application of the core values. What are ‘Brand Values’? Your brand values define who you are. They are key behaviours, attitudes or virtues that need to be expressed all of the time. These values work together cohesively - each complimenting the other. They are a call to action and doctrine for everyone responsible for the brand. Brand drivers are the application of the brand values Examples and application: Optus core values are: Customer Focus, Challenger Spirit, Teamwork, Integrity, Personal Excellence Other Examples: Quality before quantity We put the customer first We work as one team 29
  30. 30. Goals This is not necessarily an essential step for your branding development, however I have added it as it’s quite a natural and important step for your overall business development following the creation of your Vision and Mission statements. Action Required: List short-term (1-5 years) objectives that support your Mission and Vision Goals should be SMART that is: Specific Measurable Attainable Relevant Time-based Further reading on Goal Setting using this SMART model - 30
  31. 31. Rational & Emotional Attributes, personality & essence 31
  32. 32. Rational & Emotional The diagram on the left is a brand essence wheel and it is a useful reference tool to help map out the rational and emotional attributes and characteristics of your brand. It covers the ‘External Drivers’ aka ‘Proof & Pudding’, ‘Brand Personality’ aka ‘Walking and Talking’, and the core essence of your brand as shown in the original Brand Wheel diagram at the beginning of the brand DNA section. ! Action Required: The following slides will go through each element as per this wheel. 32
  33. 33. External drivers ‘Proof & Pudding’ 33
  34. 34. Rational This is the rational half of the wheel Action Required: Brainstorm and answer the following points. What the product does for me How I would describe the product Facts about the product / service ! ! ! ! ! This is the rational half of the wheel Action Required: Brainstorm and answer the following points. What the product does for me How I would describe the product Facts about the product / service 34
  35. 35. Brand Personality ‘Walking & Talking’ 35
  36. 36. Emotional This is the emotional half of the wheel Action Required: Brainstorm and answer the following points. How the brand makes me look How the brand makes me feel Read the next slide for how to define your brand personality ! 36
  37. 37. Brand Personality Action Required: List your key brand personalities. Use your competitor analysis to identify how your brand personality is different to your competitors. What is Brand Personality? It can be defined as the brand's values, beliefs, gender, age, and numerous other qualities that associate the brand with a “person” using human personality personality traits, e.g friendly, intelligent, innovative etc Personality is how the brand behaves and is represented all of the time. Customers are more likely to purchase from your brand/use your service if its personality is similar to theirs. It is an expression of the relationship between the consumer and the brand, and is another way to differentiate yourself from competition. We associate brands with personalities by how positive or negative our experiences with the brand are. If it has solid customer service, is family friendly and has good value for the product then it is more likely to receive a positive brand personality. Examples:
 Most brand personality traits fall within one of five main categories (in bold below). Examples of the actual brand personalities after. Excitement: carefree, spirited, youthful Sincerity: genuine, kind, family-oriented, thoughtful Ruggedness: rough, tough, outdoors, athletic Competence: successful, accomplished, influential, a leader Sophistication: elegant, prestigious, pretentious ! Malboro is “masculine’, while Virginia is ‘slim’
 IBM is ‘older’, while Apple is ‘younger’
 Coke is classic and mature, while Pepsi is younger, hipper (than coke) 37
  38. 38. Core of the brand ‘Brand Essence’ 38
  39. 39. Brand Essence Action Required: Define your brand essence - this is a single minded word(s) (one or two words max). What is ‘Brand Essence’? Brand essence sums up how your brand connects emotionally with your customers and is the emotional heart of a brand. A brand essence is intangible and encapsulates the soul of the brand. It should be enduring, and provide differentiation from competitors. Examples: Nike is inspirational - Walt Disney is magical. Brand essence needs to be: Unique: The essence of a brand is how it is different from competitors in the same category. e.g., if Apple (and its products) is friendly and approachable, then it is claiming that its competitors are not. Experiential: The essence captures what the consumer feels during an encounter with the brand. e.g., “Driving a Volvo makes me feel that my family is safe.” Consistently delivered: If the proposed essence is not consistently experienced (e.g, if a trip to Walt Disney World isn’t magical), then it isn’t the essence. Can your organisation deliver? Authentic: The essence must be credible or the brand will be rejected. To find out what consumers believe about your brand, ask them. It’s okay for the brand essence to be aspirational, but only if your customers believe you can 39
  40. 40. Part 2 - Recap & Checklist To quickly recap this section before you move onto Part 3, you should now have a detailed understanding and written documentation of each of the following. If you haven’t, you need to. Corporate Mission: Internal Drivers ‘Heads & Hearts’ - Visioning & Vision Statement, Mission Statement, Brand Purpose, Brand Values, and a list of short-term goals, Rational: External drivers ‘Proof & Pudding’ - What the product does for me, how I would describe the product, facts about the product/service Emotional: Brand Personality ‘Walking & Talking’ - How the brand makes me look, how the brand makes me feel = Brand Personality Core of the Brand: Brand Core Essence ! ! ! ! 40
  41. 41. Part Three: Coming up with a name 41
  42. 42. Brainstorming 101 Different brands - different methods/rationale of creation:
 There is the family name (Heinz), the descriptive name (FastCompany), the acronym (QANTAS), the contraction (FedEx), the fantasy name (Google), names from mythology (Nike), and there is the symbolic name (Red Cross). They are all excellent descriptions of various types of names and I think they make excellent starting points to generate great names. Here is a short article and infographic showing the hidden meaning of 40 famous logo’s. Rules of brainstorming: Rule #1: Quality comes from Quantity – You will be writing down a LOT of names. Most of them will probably suck. Some of them will be mediocre and only a few of them will be good or even brilliant. Do not hesitate to write down any idea that pops to mind. Aim to build a list of at least 30 names - the last few will be the hardest to think of. Rule #2: Postpone Judgment or Selection Mechanisms - During a brainstorm a lot of ideas that simply suck or make no sense at all will be brought to the table. Hear something idiotic, wrong or impossible? Don’t comment or critique but retaliate creatively – by coming up with a different idea. Rule #3: Associate, Associate, Associate – Use any previous ideas (even the ones that suck) or other stimuli at your disposal (you did bring a few dictionaries and a stack of magazine did you?) to freely associate and come up with new ones. 42
  43. 43. Developing a name - Step 1 of 2 Step 1: Association Matrix There are many methods to actually creating a brand name. One method that I like to get the ball rolling is called ‘Association Matrix’ and is inspired by a post by Hurricane and is explained below. This element is step 1 of a 2 step process and is a task to get the creative juices working - the outcome of this step is not to have a finalised brand name. On the right is a table that lists 12 categories along its 12 rows. At the top are labels for five to eight columns. You have to label these with the five to eight most important attributes of the brand: these could be its core values, its unique selling points, a single word that describes your brand promise or any other characteristics that you want to emphasize. There is no wrong input. Keep it short (preferably one word) and preferably use use nouns, name, verbs, adjectives. If you have to chose between two words (i.e. library and scriptorium) chose the most inspiring sounding one. If you get stuck, skip a rectangle and get back to it later. You’re not done until you fill in ALL the blanks. ! Blank PDF download can be found here - ! http://vandewerk.nl/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Association- Matrix-Empty.pdf 43
  44. 44. Developing a name - Step 2 of 2 Step 2: Mind Mapping Following on from step 1, get a big sheet of paper and a pen and pick a word from step 1 that you find most inspiring and start writing out associations around it; these could be variations of the word, homonyms, synonyms etc. Connect relating words using lines and arrows. You will end up with a mind map - see image on the right. Again the goal here is quantity not quality and quality is derived from quantity so keep writing. Combinations will start to be found that you like - when this happens circle them and repeat the process. To allow creativity to continue you can also play and modify the word suggestions that you created in step 1. Common ways of doing this are to:
 Add - take a word and add something to it
 Subtract - Take a word and subtract something from it (I.E pegasus becomes Pega, Pegsus) 
 Combine - Can you combine two words together?
 Translate - Look at foreign translations for your word (Reebok is an African antelope in Afrikaans). Greek & latin are popular. 
 Modify - Slightly change the spelling of a word (Think Googol - Google)
 Exaggerate - Exaggerating adjectives - Green Giant, Pepsi Max, Megablocks
 Reverse - Reverse the meaning of a word
 Rhyme and rhythm 44
  45. 45. About the Author Overview:
 Over ten years experience as a digital marketing professional working both client and digital agency side. From new business development, working up the ranks in account services to account director, Digital Marketing Manager to Head of Marketing at a major international sports broadcaster, to a freelance senior digital strategist across major brands, and presently heading up Digital at a leading not for profit. ! ! Performance focused digital strategy across the full customer lifecycle, leadership, a thirst for continued personal development, and a genuine passion for all things digital are my driving forces.! ! Blog:" For interesting things in digital, marketing, TED Talks, life-coaching and personal developmentI check out my blog! ! Connect:" It’s always great to network with like-minded people so please connect with me on the following:! ! ! ! ! 45
  46. 46. Appendix www.ampagency.com/whats-your-brand-essence/ https://www.udemy.com/blog/positioning-statement-example/ www.optus.com.au/aboutoptus/About+Optus/Careers/Working+at+Optus/Optus+Values/Optus+Values http://www.slideshare.net/jlincoln/developing-a-brand-essence http://www.substance151.com/news-insights/articles-presentations/article/five-steps-creating-winning-brand http://redburnmonsters.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/red-bull-brand-image-the-cbbe-pyramid/ http://granitefallsoutfitters.com/GFC/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/BrandPyramid.png http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/brand-pyramid.htm http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMC_08.htm http://www.mplans.com/articles/using-porters-five-forces-when-creating-your-marketing-plan/ Mission Statement - http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/65230 http://topnotchquotes.com/?page_id=706 http://communicatingasiapacific.com/2012/06/15/mission-statements-worlds-top-10-brands/ http://www.salterbaxter.com/what-do-you-stand-for/ http://www.smartinsights.com/digital-marketing-strategy/customer-segmentation-targeting/segmentation-targeting-positioning-model/ ! 46

×