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e-Books and Inclusion: dream come true or nightmare unending?  Download this presentation http://slideshare.net/simonjball...
JISC TechDis www.techdis.ac.uk   <ul><li>Funded to increase accessibility and inclusion through technology in UK post-comp...
Work with  UK Publishers Association <ul><li>JISC TechDis have been working with UKPA and RNIB for several years on severa...
Progress so far <ul><li>UK Publishers are moving steadily towards more accessible practices: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agreein...
The Problem <ul><li>Most e-books are produced in EPUB format. </li></ul><ul><li>EPUB is fairly accessible due to being bas...
The Concept <ul><li>In order to conceptualise the difficulty users faced (and to present this to the Publishers) we devise...
The Model <ul><li>The E-Book Accessibility Bridge Model </li></ul>
The Research <ul><li>We decided to user-test for accessibility several of the more common e-book delivery platforms. </li>...
The Testing <ul><li>Each tested by a range of users for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personalisation (e.g. font size, colour, st...
Results <ul><li>3 types of barriers were identified: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Perceptual (users unable to find a feature that...
The good news… <ul><li>Most of the platforms were accessible to most of the users, to some degree. </li></ul><ul><li>Acces...
The bad news... an example <ul><li>Number of ‘actions’ needed to browse to a book and read three pages.  </li></ul>Platfor...
Inconsistency <ul><li>No platform was wholly accessible. </li></ul><ul><li>No platform was wholly inaccessible. </li></ul>...
The implications… <ul><li>The results have been positively received by the publishers. </li></ul><ul><li>They need to get ...
The Guidance <ul><li>The results have been used to produce a Good Practice Guide for publishers on the accessibility of e-...
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E-Books and Inclusion: dream come true or nightmare unending?

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Description of research conducted on the accessibility and usability of e-book delivery platforms and presentation of the Accessibility Bridge model as a metaphor for the access process in this multi-stage process.

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E-Books and Inclusion: dream come true or nightmare unending?

  1. 1. e-Books and Inclusion: dream come true or nightmare unending? Download this presentation http://slideshare.net/simonjball Dr Simon Ball JISC TechDis [email_address]
  2. 2. JISC TechDis www.techdis.ac.uk <ul><li>Funded to increase accessibility and inclusion through technology in UK post-compulsory education. </li></ul><ul><li>Work in many areas from guidance for teachers on using MS Word more accessibly, or using podcasts or video; to guidance for university managers on policy and strategy for inclusion. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Work with UK Publishers Association <ul><li>JISC TechDis have been working with UKPA and RNIB for several years on several projects, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adding Value to Libraries publication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Right To Read campaign http://bit.ly/RightToRead </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Publisher LookUp Database and Awards (nominations for 2010 awards still open) www.publisherlookup.org.uk </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Progress so far <ul><li>UK Publishers are moving steadily towards more accessible practices: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agreeing to support a standard procedure for universities obtaining accessible versions of texts: www.techdis.ac.uk/getaltformat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Entering contact details for obtaining alternative formats in Publisherlookup database </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consulting JISC TechDis on accessibility of new developments. This led to a potential problem being identified….. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. The Problem <ul><li>Most e-books are produced in EPUB format. </li></ul><ul><li>EPUB is fairly accessible due to being based on XHTML. </li></ul><ul><li>Most publishers/libraries wish to control or regulate the provision of e-books to those entitled (through registration, fee, library membership etc) </li></ul><ul><li>The platforms that are used to deliver e-books often over-ride the accessibility of EPUB e-books (some were reported to be very inaccessible). </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Concept <ul><li>In order to conceptualise the difficulty users faced (and to present this to the Publishers) we devised a model: The E-Book Accessibility Bridge. </li></ul><ul><li>Users have to travel over the bridge to get over the ‘inclusion gap’ and achieve full access to their e-books. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Model <ul><li>The E-Book Accessibility Bridge Model </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Research <ul><li>We decided to user-test for accessibility several of the more common e-book delivery platforms. </li></ul><ul><li>9 platforms were studied for </li></ul><ul><li>us by The Shaw Trust. </li></ul><ul><li>We wanted to test for their </li></ul><ul><li>actual accessibility or </li></ul><ul><li>usability – not their </li></ul><ul><li>adherence to standards or </li></ul><ul><li>guidelines. </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Testing <ul><li>Each tested by a range of users for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personalisation (e.g. font size, colour, style). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessibility information (Plain English advice). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assistive technology compatibility for key tasks. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each was tested with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Voice recognition. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keyboard only access. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Screenreader access. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low vision. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Results <ul><li>3 types of barriers were identified: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Perceptual (users unable to find a feature that was present and accessible to their technology). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Usability (access being theoretically possible, but impractical e.g. 100 keystrokes to browse to a book!) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technological (conflicts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>between the platform and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the user’s assistive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>technology). </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. The good news… <ul><li>Most of the platforms were accessible to most of the users, to some degree. </li></ul><ul><li>Access is often prevented by something very small and therefore readily fixed, for example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some required users to click on a button invisible to screen reading technology. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sometimes access could be greatly improved by the addition of ‘skip links’ features. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sometimes simply renaming links would help (so they don’t all read ‘go to e-book’!). </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. The bad news... an example <ul><li>Number of ‘actions’ needed to browse to a book and read three pages. </li></ul>Platform W X Y Z Keyboard-only 125 170 3 11 Mouse-only 7 5 9 3 Screen reader 9 18 XX 9 Voice input 6 7 XX 6
  13. 13. Inconsistency <ul><li>No platform was wholly accessible. </li></ul><ul><li>No platform was wholly inaccessible. </li></ul><ul><li>Most platforms were inconsistent in their accessibility – for example Platform Y was completely keyboard-accessible for some tasks, and completely keyboard-inaccessible for others. </li></ul>
  14. 14. The implications… <ul><li>The results have been positively received by the publishers. </li></ul><ul><li>They need to get this right in order to deliver in media even more likely to present barriers e.g. mobile media </li></ul>
  15. 15. The Guidance <ul><li>The results have been used to produce a Good Practice Guide for publishers on the accessibility of e-book platforms. http://bit.ly/EBooksAccessibility </li></ul><ul><li>A second Good Practice Guide aimed at libraries supporting users to obtain and use e-books is due in August 2010. </li></ul>

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