iTEE presentation 2013

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  • It strikes me that in HE a pendulum swings between an education as a good for its own sake and education to service the needs of the economy. The swing at least in the UK and has been towards the latter. Governments who have been investing tax dollars in HE want to see a return. The ‘Graduate Attributes’ approach has been a model that some universities have adopted for transforming curriculum and instruction design, estates, technical infrastructure, etc to provide more effective learning experiences for students, and esp for preparing them for the world of work in a global environment. It has also provided institutions with the means to to brand themselves in some small ways, where they can identify particular strengths and aspirations and align strategies to help them get there. Universities' claims of certain generic qualities on behalf of their graduates are not new. Indeed Yale has an interesting 1828 statement, University of Sydney's first statement of generic attributes of graduates dates back to 1862 and many universities statements of generic attributes undoubtedly have their roots in their values and mission.Writing in 2000, Bowden, et al considers 'Generic Graduate Attributes’ to be; The qualities, skills and understandings a university community agrees its students should develop during their time with the institution. These attributes include but go beyond the disciplinary expertise or technical knowledge that has traditionally formed the core of most university courses. They are qualities that also prepare graduates as agents of social good in an unknown future. (Bowden et al., 2000) So we are trying to make ourselves as relevant as we can through a number of ways.
  • It strikes me that in HE a pendulum swings between an education as a good for its own sake and education to service the needs of the economy. The swing at least in the UK and has been towards the latter. Governments who have been investing tax dollars in HE want to see a return. The ‘Graduate Attributes’ approach has been a model that some universities have adopted for transforming curriculum and instruction design, estates, technical infrastructure, etc to provide more effective learning experiences for students, and esp for preparing them for the world of work in a global environment. It has also provided institutions with the means to to brand themselves in some small ways, where they can identify particular strengths and aspirations and align strategies to help them get there. Universities' claims of certain generic qualities on behalf of their graduates are not new. Indeed Yale has an interesting 1828 statement, University of Sydney's first statement of generic attributes of graduates dates back to 1862 and many universities statements of generic attributes undoubtedly have their roots in their values and mission.Writing in 2000, Bowden, et al considers 'Generic Graduate Attributes’ to be; The qualities, skills and understandings a university community agrees its students should develop during their time with the institution. These attributes include but go beyond the disciplinary expertise or technical knowledge that has traditionally formed the core of most university courses. They are qualities that also prepare graduates as agents of social good in an unknown future. (Bowden et al., 2000) So we are trying to make ourselves as relevant as we can through a number of ways.
  • iTEE presentation 2013

    1. 1. International Workshop on Technology Empowered Learning (TEL 2013)Using Google Apps to enhance the curriculum -benefits and threats Simon Walker Head of Educational Development University of Greenwich, London , UK
    2. 2. You may know the University betterthan you think - World Heritagesite, birthplace of King Henry8th, university and popular filmsetPatriot Games (1992)The Madness Of King George (1994)Four Weddings And A Funeral (1994)The Mummy Returns (2001)Shanghai Knights (2003)What a Girl Wants (2003Stage Beauty (2004) Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties (2006) The Golden Compass (2007) National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets (2007) Sherlock Holmes (2009) The Wolfman (2010) The Kings Speech (2010) Pirates of the Caribbean: on stranger tides (2011) Les Miserables ( 2013)
    3. 3. Football v Education?
    4. 4. Questions to frame this session1. How relevant is Google to a university?2. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience?1. What are the issues for universities and their staff and students in adopting Google?
    5. 5. How relevant is Google to a university?Some commentators consider higher education will be quite differentfrom the way it is today whilst others suggest that inertia is powerful andinstitutions may not look so different in the future….Learners bring withthem devices, skills, practice and knowledge that can support theirdevelopment through the university experience. They leave theuniversity with those skills enhanced, developed, challenged,repurposed and ready for sharing. It is interesting therefore that whilstthere is discussion about the crisis created by the way technology isimpacting upon education, the question, ‘what does a modern universitylook like in a digital age?’ is one that has only been embraced anddebated by institutions themselves in a limited way.Bryant, P, Walker, S (2013) The Modern University in the Digital Agehttp://arv13crisisforum.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/the-modern-university-in-the-digital-age/
    6. 6. A shifting curriculum?Graduate attributes defined in 2000 by Bowden as: “the qualities, skills and understandings a university community agrees its students should develop during their time with the institution. These attributes include but go beyond the disciplinary expertise or technical knowledge that has traditionally formed the core of most university courses. They are qualities that also prepare graduates as agents of social good in an unknown future”Bowden, J., Hart, G., King, B., Trigwell, K. & Watts, O. (2000). Generic Capabilities of ATN UniversityGraduates. Canberra: Australian Government Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs.Available at http:/www.clt.uts.edu.au/ATN.grad.cap.project.index.html
    7. 7. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience? http://www.olds.ac.uk/home Google Sites / Google groups Open education A VLE alternative?
    8. 8. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience? Google Drive Research and Project Collaboration
    9. 9. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience? Student presentation/ collaboration & research (from source)
    10. 10. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience? Google + Social networking
    11. 11. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience? Google hangouts Enhancing collaboration and communication
    12. 12. In what ways can Google benefit a higher education experience? Course 1 Course 2 Course 30 2 4 6 8 10 12 Week Based on the ESCAPE project (JISC 2008-2010 – University of Hertfordshire)
    13. 13. What we were looking for…• A dynamic way of engaging with fellow academics to shift existing quality assurance textual processes for representing the design of assessment and feedback;• A process that was light touch, and simple to use, scalable and customisable• Required no specialist knowledge• Non-discipline specific• Owned by the whole programme team• Sustainable and linked into technical ecosystem Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    14. 14. The Mapping process• A process for visualising the design of assessment and feedback via a Google tool;• Uses Google Docs, Motion Charts and Google sites;• This process culminated in an automatic report that graphically displays assessment diet, landscape and importantly an experiential timeline;• Staff are then able to interact with the assessment parts of their programmes and see graphically, in real-time, the consequences of their design decisions. Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    15. 15. Simple input form1 2 Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    16. 16. The Mapping process Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    17. 17. Using a map Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    18. 18. How to find the resources Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    19. 19. How to find the resources Adapted from ALT-C presentation 2012. Mark Kerrigan & Simon Walker
    20. 20. Interest & use http://www.mapmyprogramme.com Activity in the UKA very active team in Australia http://www.mapmyprogramme.com
    21. 21. What are the issues for universities and their staff and students in adopting Google? If Youre Not Paying for It; Youre the Product – the rise of big data and analytics As western/European pedagogy, or rather the corporatised, globalised versions of it, now deploys powerful and universal digital technologies in the interests of profit-driven business models, should we look at empowering more local and culturally appropriate forms of understanding, knowing, learning and enquiring? http://arv13crisisforum.wordpress.com/http://www.greenbookblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/big-data.jpg
    22. 22. s.walker@gre.ac.uk Sialker Simon Walker Simonwalker hugh snookNaa goodee, ee-may-nah, eh-sheh-wuh, Hvala,谢谢,Asanti, Dík, Tack, Danke, Merci, Tak, Kiitoksia, köszönet,Grazie, Dank, Takk, Dzięki, Obrigado, ……Thank you for listening and participating.

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