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Slides from launch                of    Women at the           Centre          Dr Simon Duffy          Angela Everson     ...
1. Complex Needs2. Complex Responses3. WomenCentre Model4. Impact5. Investment Case6. Welfare Reform
Complex needs seem...really complicated
Complex needs arereally complicated12 possible needsRange of responses:1 to 10Mean response: 6Varied patternsReal complexity
Of 44 women working withWomenCentre:Managing a serious health condition                64%Finding a safer place to live   ...
Domestic Violence85% of the women in the whole group were recentvictims of domestic violence with 55% of womenexperiencing...
Victim of Crime41% of all women reported being a victim of crime inthe last year and there were 43 incidents of crime:•  1...
Perpetrating Crime39% of women had committed a crime at some time intheir lives. e number of women committingparticular c...
Using Drugs andIn the sample 52% of all women said that drugsor alcohol was an important part of their lifenow or in the p...
Chronic Health64% of all women were managing complex andsignificant medical conditions includingwomen with (in descending o...
Mental HealthSeverity Score                       0    1    2    3Feel slowed down                     9    21   12   2Fee...
HousingType of home                   Before   AfterHome owner                       8       7Renting from private        ...
Victim of Child Abuse• 36% had an unhappy childhood• 44% experienced emotional abuse• 26% experienced neglect• 51% experie...
Child Abuse NowFor those mothers with children now 54% ofthose who replied said that their children hadbeen abused and a f...
EducationWithin our sample we found that the women workingwith WomenCentre have varied educationalbackgrounds:• 23 had O-l...
Income79% of women were living alone or just with childrenunder 18 (40% of total).All relied upon some form of community-b...
Income Source       N   Child Tax Credit    18Money from              Council Tax                    1                    ...
Debt65% of women were worried by debt or had othermoney worries. e predominant forms of debt were:• Bank or credit union ...
Public service responsesto complex needs are
Public service responsesto complex needs areeven more complicated
Public service                 Used last    %    Helpful   UnhelpfulJob Centre                       year                 ...
An alternative hypothesis - ‘complex needs’are not really so complicated...‘complex needs’ is code for real poverty - them...
WomenCentre’s response to1. Start with the whole woman - gendered and   holistic2. Offer a positive and comprehensive model...
in other words...            personalised           support through           collective action
A positive model of service...         ...5 and half levels of
Us   PerService                      Cost                                       e    Cap.Level 1 - Information        £50,...
Knitting together the bond of
“Working with” - real wealth
UrgentService label    N                     N     Real need        N                        problemVictim of             ...
Focusing where the risk is...                                                                                             ...
108 women on any one day...   ...5,000 different women in one year
The WomenCentre
Total impact• Typical time in intensive case work - over 1 year• Our sample focused on women who were in the  middle of th...
Life area score    N    of sample   impactLife as a whole        42     95%        50%Relationships          28     64%   ...
Transformational86% of women felt more positive about their own future. 93%said WomenCentre had helped them with their att...
changed behaviour [for women offenders]                     100%better able to manage their relationships [for victims of ...
Quotes - key themes• Supportive & responsive - “Very  supportive, if you can’t get hold of  anyone someone always calls yo...
• WomenCentre builds a real  community through female identity• is holistic, because its identity does  not come through ‘...
Success                            Factors•   Stickability - no passing the buck, triage or segmentation•   Neo-profession...
WomenCentre helpswomen make it through     the maze
Complex funding...• In 2009-10 turnover was just over £1,000,000• 41 different funding streams• average size is £25,000• 22...
Growth brings nocoherence...    ...funding streams remain                         tiny
Constant re-definition in terms ofcentrally defined“project’s” - what’s
Funding is notLocal NHS contribution to WomenCentre in 2009-10 was £38,000- which represents 4% of WomenCentre’s budget an...
Funding sources               NLocal Government             13Local NHS                     5Regional or Sub-Regional     ...
Funding is not              but this reflects                    our highly           centralised nature           of UK we...
incoherence of localismwhere is the missing £0.9
and recent cutstarget localgovernment andeducation reformsfurther centralisecontrol
Complex funding, complex         like Penelope’s         nightly         unweaving...         ...and daily         reweaving
A better system would     1.through relationships     2.the real WomenCentre     3.to prevent domestic       violence     ...
1. Relationships - notprocuremente real questions toask:• Can we trust them?• What is their track  record?• Will they tak...
2. Use the whole model -stop the ‘projects’  ...its the dynamics of the whole system that makes                           ...
3. Domestic violence-prevent itResearch showed 87% ofwomen and 100% ofchildren were safer aer                            ...
4. Reoffending -Research shows reoffendingrate of less than 5%(compared to nationalaverage of 50%) for womenworking with Wo...
5. Health - improve it!Our research showed 73%reduction in drug use,95% improvement inphysical health and 98%improvement i...
6. Social Work - changeWomenCentre provides an effectivesocial work service to women andchildren at 55% of the cost - calcu...
7. Combined benefits -change itWhen we describe the benefits ofWomenCentre in relationship to onetarget, one service, one im...
potentialofTotal
systemic resistance to     innovation
The big question -   Will local leaders and           services     be able to embracethe real innovations created      by ...
The Centre for Welfare ReformThe Quadrant, 99 Parkway Avenue,Parkway Business ParkSheffield, S9 4WGT +44 114 251 1790 | M ...
(177) Full Women Centre Presentation (June 2010)
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(177) Full Women Centre Presentation (June 2010)

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Research and analysis within the book Women at the Centre - a model offering holistic and powerful support to the whole community

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(177) Full Women Centre Presentation (June 2010)

  1. 1. Slides from launch of Women at the Centre Dr Simon Duffy Angela Everson Clare Hyde © Simon Duffy. Rights Reserved. The author must be cited if images or slides are used
  2. 2. 1. Complex Needs2. Complex Responses3. WomenCentre Model4. Impact5. Investment Case6. Welfare Reform
  3. 3. Complex needs seem...really complicated
  4. 4. Complex needs arereally complicated12 possible needsRange of responses:1 to 10Mean response: 6Varied patternsReal complexity
  5. 5. Of 44 women working withWomenCentre:Managing a serious health condition 64%Finding a safer place to live 27%Living with childhood abuse 51%Didn’t finish their education 76%Recent experience of domestic violence 85%Fractured family (for those with young families) 66%Children have experienced abuse (for those with 55%children) a severe level of mental illnessLiving with 55%Living with some mental illness 91%History of drug or alcohol misuse 52%Victim of crime 41%Perpetrator of crimes 39%Worried by debt or lack of money 65%
  6. 6. Domestic Violence85% of the women in the whole group were recentvictims of domestic violence with 55% of womenexperiencing frequent domestic violence from theirpartner:• 46% had their partner steal from them• 65% were physically attacked• 18% were raped• 16% saw their children hurt• 31% felt like killing their partner• 68% were scared of their partner
  7. 7. Victim of Crime41% of all women reported being a victim of crime inthe last year and there were 43 incidents of crime:• 17 cases of criminal damage• 12 cases of domestic violence• 5 cases of the (non-vehicle)• 2 cases of burglary• 3 cases of serious wounding• 2 cases of wounding• 1 sexual offence• 1 muggingNote that domestic violence is oen not called a crimeby its victims - so these figures are an under-estimate.
  8. 8. Perpetrating Crime39% of women had committed a crime at some time intheir lives. e number of women committingparticular crimes was:• 11 common assaults• 3 thes (not vehicle)• 3 thes from a shop• 2 drug offences• 1 the from a commercial vehicle• 3 burglaries in a dwelling• 3 acts of fraud or forgery• 2 other woundings• 2 thes from a commercial property• 1 serious wounding
  9. 9. Using Drugs andIn the sample 52% of all women said that drugsor alcohol was an important part of their lifenow or in the past:• 32% had used cannabis• 10% had used prescription drugs• 15% had used cocaine• 22% had used amphetamines• 7% had used heroin• 13% had used crack
  10. 10. Chronic Health64% of all women were managing complex andsignificant medical conditions includingwomen with (in descending order offrequency):• depression• asthma• anxiety or stress related illnesses• heart or blood pressure problems• illnesses of the bowels or stomach• diabetes
  11. 11. Mental HealthSeverity Score 0 1 2 3Feel slowed down 9 21 12 2Feel tense or wound up 2 25 7 6Don’t enjoy things I used to 13 14 7 6Get frightened and anxious 4 22 9 5Expect something awful to happen 6 8 13 12Lose interest in my appearance 18 10 10 5Can’t laugh or see the funny side 23 9 5 2Feel like I need to be on the move 7 15 14 7Worrying thoughts on my mind 7 11 17 7Don’t look forward to things 19 11 5 6Don’t feel cheerful 21 17 3 2Get sudden feelings of panic 7 15 18 2Can’t relax 8 22 9 4Can’t enjoy books or TV 23 17 2 2
  12. 12. HousingType of home Before AfterHome owner 8 7Renting from private 10 16landlordFriends or relatives floor or 6 1sofaRenting from council 8 9Renting from a HA 4 6Living with Parents or 3 2GuardianA guest in someone elses 3 1houseRefuge 1 0Total 43 42
  13. 13. Victim of Child Abuse• 36% had an unhappy childhood• 44% experienced emotional abuse• 26% experienced neglect• 51% experienced some kind of abuse• 33% experienced physical abuse• 16% experienced sexual abuse• 42% said that how they were treated as a child has made it more difficult for them in their lives today• 78% of those who said they had an unhappy childhood and 52% of those who were abused felt badly affected by those childhood experiences today
  14. 14. Child Abuse NowFor those mothers with children now 54% ofthose who replied said that their children hadbeen abused and a further three women said theywere not sure. Abuse was across the full range:• 39% experiencing emotional abuse• 12% experiencing sexual abuse• 12% experiencing physical abuse• 12% experiencing neglect
  15. 15. EducationWithin our sample we found that the women workingwith WomenCentre have varied educationalbackgrounds:• 23 had O-levels, GCSE’s or NVQs.• Some also had A-Levels, degrees or other forms of higher education.• 76% of women didn’t feel they had finished their education• 58% said school didn’t work for them• 33% said they had not gone to school regularly
  16. 16. Income79% of women were living alone or just with childrenunder 18 (40% of total).All relied upon some form of community-based incomesecurity.e poorest woman in the sample, living on incomesupport alone, her annual income is £2696 or £51.85 perweek.is is just 10% of the average annual salary in the UKand less than 2% of the salary of the Prime Minister.
  17. 17. Income Source N Child Tax Credit 18Money from Council Tax 1 14Partner or Family AllowanceWage 3 Incapacity Benefit 6 Disability LivingIncome Support 23 10 AllowanceBegging 0 Pension or Pension 5 Credit Invalid CarersMaintenance 2 1 AllowanceJob Seekers 7 Individual Budget 1AllowanceHousing Benefit 18 Other Earnings 1
  18. 18. Debt65% of women were worried by debt or had othermoney worries. e predominant forms of debt were:• Bank or credit union -6• Loan sharks - 3• Bills - 3• Catalogue - 1• Family - 4• Stores and credit cards - 3• Companies - 2• Student loan - 1• Tax and benefits - 3• Housing - 3• Private loan - 1
  19. 19. Public service responsesto complex needs are
  20. 20. Public service responsesto complex needs areeven more complicated
  21. 21. Public service Used last % Helpful UnhelpfulJob Centre year 26 59% 1 4Benefits Agency 27 61% 2 2Housing Services 20 45% 2 1Police & Victim Support 18 41% 1 0(victim)Police (criminal) 13 30% 1 0Prison 0 0% 0 0Probation 9 20% 1 2Children’s School 15 34% 1 1Acute Mental Health Services 4 9% 0 0Community Mental Health 6 14% 0 1ServicesGP Surgery 36 82% 3 1Community Health 11 25% 1 0Adult Social Work 2 5% 0 0Children Social Work 14 32% 1 4Adult Education 10 23% 0 0Citizen Advice Bureau 8 18% 4 2Children Centre 2 5% 1 0Sure Start 2 5% 2 0Carers Project 2 5% 2 0Age Concern 2 5% 2 0Counselling 3 7% 3 0Park Initiative (Community) 2 5% 2 0
  22. 22. An alternative hypothesis - ‘complex needs’are not really so complicated...‘complex needs’ is code for real poverty - themultiple and reinforcing erosion of personal
  23. 23. WomenCentre’s response to1. Start with the whole woman - gendered and holistic2. Offer a positive and comprehensive model of support - every woman is a one-stop-shop3. Build a bond of trust - create the means for woman to do real work together4. Be a new kind of community - women, working together, to improve lives and communities.
  24. 24. in other words... personalised support through collective action
  25. 25. A positive model of service... ...5 and half levels of
  26. 26. Us PerService Cost e Cap.Level 1 - Information £50,000 13,520£3.70Level 2 - Advice & £200,000 1,000 £200counsellingLevel 3 - Case work £500,000 500 £1,000Level 3.5 - Intensive case £575,000 115 £5,000workLevel 4 - Training £200,000 268 £746.27Total £1,525,000
  27. 27. Knitting together the bond of
  28. 28. “Working with” - real wealth
  29. 29. UrgentService label N N Real need N problemVictim of Better self-domestic 55 Debt 50 64 esteemviolence To overcomeMentally Ill 39 Housing 48 54 past trauma To manageCriminal 35 Benefits 46 51 current trauma To stop beingPoor Mother 33 Health 37 50 bulliedMisuses 24 Rent 32 Guidance 50Alcohol Criminal Justice RelationshipUses Drugs 22 24 45 Advocate skillsViolent 19 Dentistry 8 Mothering skills 26Chronic Health 16 Others 3 Others 1Condition
  30. 30. Focusing where the risk is... © Simon Du y. All Rights Reserved. INFORMATION SHARING IDENTIFYING FAMILIES @ RISK Info Police Risk Factor 1 Risk Sharing Management Protocol Strategy NHS Risk Factor 2 Top 50 Families Social Service in Risk Factor 3 Crisis & Chaos WomenCentre Risk Factor 4 Focused Feedback & learn Assumed Support Consent to Referral + £
  31. 31. 108 women on any one day... ...5,000 different women in one year
  32. 32. The WomenCentre
  33. 33. Total impact• Typical time in intensive case work - over 1 year• Our sample focused on women who were in the middle of their intensive of work• 100% of women said life has improved since working with WomenCentre; 100% said WomenCentre helped
  34. 34. Life area score N of sample impactLife as a whole 42 95% 50%Relationships 28 64% 45%Work 15 34% 51%Leisure 33 75% 41%Housing 24 55% 48%Neighbourhood 15 34% 44%Money 30 68% 37%Physical health 21 48% 40%Mental health 36 82% 42%Children’s wellbeing 19 43% 36%
  35. 35. Transformational86% of women felt more positive about their own future. 93%said WomenCentre had helped them with their attitude to theirfuture. 74% of women said they felt their life was worthwhile,while 72% said they had positive dreams for the future, theseincluded:• 68% wanted to be a good mother• 68% wanted to be a good friend• 46% wanted to be a helpful neighbour• 55% wanted to help in the community as a volunteer• 6% wanted to play a bigger role in their faith community• 42% wanted to be a good employee• 24% wanted to run their own business
  36. 36. changed behaviour [for women offenders] 100%better able to manage their relationships [for victims of 78%domestic violence]need to use drugs & alcohol reduced 73%health improved 95%management of health improved 89%felt better 93%had improved education 40%managing money better 51%found a new place to live 29%housing had improved 50%helped to feel safer at home 64%children were safer [where abuse suspected] 43%feel safer in their neighbourhood 53%
  37. 37. Quotes - key themes• Supportive & responsive - “Very supportive, if you can’t get hold of anyone someone always calls you back quickly.”• Transformational - “It made my life worth living.”• Secure - “If I needed help or anyone to talk to there was always someone there to help and it’s also confidential.”• Social - “It’s a safe place where women can come together to socialise and learn to promote their own well being.”
  38. 38. • WomenCentre builds a real community through female identity• is holistic, because its identity does not come through ‘a specialism’• avoids the “privileged irresponsibility” of high status professional roles• instead, it develops a new kind of professionalism, with• transformational leadership - forgiving, supportive, mobile - modelling its support to women
  39. 39. Success Factors• Stickability - no passing the buck, triage or segmentation• Neo-professionalism - trained, committed, staff team• Relationship building - through facing urgent problems• Personalisation - using all of person’s real wealth• Positive - finding the key that’s right for that person• Pragmatic - adapting around what works• Coherent - faith in the possibility of renewal
  40. 40. WomenCentre helpswomen make it through the maze
  41. 41. Complex funding...• In 2009-10 turnover was just over £1,000,000• 41 different funding streams• average size is £25,000• 22 distinct projects• 33 reporting systems• with an average length of funding of 18 months• at best only 1 in 3 funding bids are successful• 2011 saw a 41% cut in funding!
  42. 42. Growth brings nocoherence... ...funding streams remain tiny
  43. 43. Constant re-definition in terms ofcentrally defined“project’s” - what’s
  44. 44. Funding is notLocal NHS contribution to WomenCentre in 2009-10 was £38,000- which represents 4% of WomenCentre’s budget and 0.012% ofthe local NHS budget.Calderdale Council’s direct financial commitment toWomenCentre was approximately £165,000 - nearly 23% ofWomenCentre’s Calderdale specific funding and 0.03% of thewhole council budget.
  45. 45. Funding sources NLocal Government 13Local NHS 5Regional or Sub-Regional 7Charities 13Central Government 3Total 41 ...larger funding streams national
  46. 46. Funding is not but this reflects our highly centralised nature of UK welfare state - the most centralised
  47. 47. incoherence of localismwhere is the missing £0.9
  48. 48. and recent cutstarget localgovernment andeducation reformsfurther centralisecontrol
  49. 49. Complex funding, complex like Penelope’s nightly unweaving... ...and daily reweaving
  50. 50. A better system would 1.through relationships 2.the real WomenCentre 3.to prevent domestic violence 4.to reduce re-offending 5.to improve health 6.to reform social work
  51. 51. 1. Relationships - notprocuremente real questions toask:• Can we trust them?• What is their track record?• Will they take care?• How can we learn about what they do?• How can we develop our shared understanding?
  52. 52. 2. Use the whole model -stop the ‘projects’ ...its the dynamics of the whole system that makes it work
  53. 53. 3. Domestic violence-prevent itResearch showed 87% ofwomen and 100% ofchildren were safer aer © Simon Du y. All Rights Reserved.work with WomenCentre. INFORMATION SHARING IDENTIFYING FAMILIES @ RISKe event cost of domestic Info Sharing Protocol Police Risk Factor 1 Risk Management Strategyviolence is over £29,000 per NHS Social Service Top 50 Families in Risk Factor 2 Risk Factor 3 Crisis & Chaosincident. WomenCentre Risk Factor 4So an investment of £10,000 Assumed Consent Focused Support Feedback & learn to(intensive case work for two Referral + £years) would create a netsaving of £16,100 - a return
  54. 54. 4. Reoffending -Research shows reoffendingrate of less than 5%(compared to nationalaverage of 50%) for womenworking with WomenCentre.Event costs for mothers canbe estimated at £75,000 andso an investment of £10,000would produce a net savingof £61,250 - that is a return ofover 600%
  55. 55. 5. Health - improve it!Our research showed 73%reduction in drug use,95% improvement inphysical health and 98%improvement in mentalhealth.Yet health investment inWomenCentre isinsignificant.
  56. 56. 6. Social Work - changeWomenCentre provides an effectivesocial work service to women andchildren at 55% of the cost - calculatedon an hourly basis. It worksindependently and it is embedded in areal and mutually supportivecommunity that also draws inadditional resources. Staff are trained inmany disciplines and can provide a fullrange of skills.Current investment could shi fromstatutory to local, non-profit-makingservices like WomenCentre.
  57. 57. 7. Combined benefits -change itWhen we describe the benefits ofWomenCentre in relationship to onetarget, one service, one improvementwe miss its most exciting benefit -the same £10,000 improves life onevery dimension - deals with allareas. e average woman withcomplex needs has 6 distinct andsignificant needs - WomenCentreworks on all needs at once - for thesame money...
  58. 58. potentialofTotal
  59. 59. systemic resistance to innovation
  60. 60. The big question - Will local leaders and services be able to embracethe real innovations created by local people?
  61. 61. The Centre for Welfare ReformThe Quadrant, 99 Parkway Avenue,Parkway Business ParkSheffield, S9 4WGT +44 114 251 1790 | M +447729 7729 41admin@centreforwelfarereform.orgGet a free subscription at:© Simon Duffy. Rights Reserved. Full copyright details at www.centreforwelfarereform.org

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