The Economic Evidence of the Accessible Tourism Market

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Presentation to the NICAN\'s National Dialogue: Stakeholders in Accessible Tourism on the economic evidence of the accessible tourism market.

The presentation was based on the following chapter
Dwyer, L., & Darcy, S. (2011). Chapter 14 - Economic Contribution of Tourists with Disabilities: An Australian Approach and Methodology. In D. Buhalis & S. Darcy (Eds.), Accessible Tourism: Concepts and Issues (pp. 213-239). Bristol, UK: Channel View Publications.
http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?k=9781845411602

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The Economic Evidence of the Accessible Tourism Market

  1. 1. National Dialogue –Stakeholders in Accessible Tourism Monday 20 June 2011 Economic Contribution of the Accessible Tourism Market Associate Professor Simon Darcy UTS Business School University of Technology, Sydney simon.darcy@uts.edu.au
  2. 2. Overview1. Access market potential2. Business case3. Research Design4. Economic Contribution and Market Dynamics5. Concluding commentsBased on Dwyer, L., & Darcy, S. (2011). Chapter 14 - Economic Contribution of Tourists with Disabilities: An Australian Approach and Methodology. In D. Buhalis & S. Darcy (Eds.), Accessible Tourism: Concepts and Issues (pp. 213-239). Bristol, UK: Channel View Publications. 2 http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?k=9781845411602z
  3. 3. 1. Access Market Potential Domestic Demand Overseas Tourism • Australia = 4.0m • Europe = 127m • New Zealand = 0.7m • China = 62m • USA = 60m • India = 47m • Great Britian = 9m • Canada = 4m•Group Dynamics = 2.8/day trip = 3.4/domestic 3
  4. 4. Dimensions of Access• Mobility – Ramps, lifts, circulation space, accessible unisex toilets, automatic doors, table heights, operational dexterity• Vision – Tactile tiles, visual contrast, audible signals (lifts/street crossings), braille, large print, assistance animal respite areas• Hearing – Visual signals, Auslan Sign interpreters, captioning or Tele text, telephone typewriters, preprepared written material• Cognition/learning – Plain English material, iconic signage, time, speed of communication, environmental stimulus, alternative modes• Others 4
  5. 5. Source: HREOC 20035
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 2. Business Case for Access Markets• Global Trends • Part of all markets• Ageing of the population • A specific/niche market• Baby boomers • New products - innovation• Increased travel opportunity • Non peak periods • Segregated  Universal• Human rights declarations • Flexible/integrated space• Community expectations • Group size• Lifelong learning • Networks and collaborations• CSR – Social sustainability • Destination competitivness 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. Accessible Tourism as a Market? Disability As Part of Every Market?• UN 2006/2008 Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities• WHO 2007 aged friendly cities• 10% earn equal to or above the average weekly wage of their country• US accessible tourism market = US $13.5bn (HarrisMarket Research 2002 & 2005)• European accessible tourism market = €80bn (Buhalis et al. 2005)• Opportunity for niche business development and general inclusion as part of all business activity 9
  10. 10. 3. Research Design Data Steps and Requirements Requirement Source1. Australians with disabilities; Disability and Ageing and Carers survey (ABS, 2004)2. Australian population estimates; Australian Demographic Statistics (ABS, 2007)3. Overall contribution of tourism; Contribution to GDP (Tourism Research Australia, 2006), based on TSA4. Expenditure patterns associated with tourists with National Visitor Survey and without disabilities (aggregate and detailed (Bureau of Tourism types of goods and services) Research, 2003)5. The expenditure data must be converted into Carried out through TSA estimated contribution of key economic variables e.g. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and jobs. 10
  11. 11. Disability Pyramid Higher Support Needs Profound Severe Moderate Lower Support Needs Mild No Restriction All with a Disability 20% of Aust population (ABS 2004) Attitudes of Public & Industry Communication Ageing/Seniors Sensitivities Cognitive InvisibleMobility Hearing Vision 11
  12. 12. Step 1 & 2: PopulationEstimatesABS 2004 & 2007• 20.6m Australians• 4.1m people with disabilities 12
  13. 13. Step 3: Tourism Satellite Accounts Contribution of Tourism to the Economy• Overnight $AUS40.9bn;• Day trips $AUS12.0bn;• Inbound $AUS20.5bn; and• Outbound $AUS3.6bn 13
  14. 14. Step 4: Proportion of Trips & Travel Market (NVS 2003)Proportion Taking Trips Proportion of Market Overnight (last month) Overnight PWD 22.1% PWD 10.8% Non Disabled 27.8% Non Disabled 88.6% Outbound (last 3 months) Outbound PWD 2.7% PWD 6.8% Non Disabled 5.6% Non Disabled 92.7% Daytrip (last seven days) Daytrip PWD 14.6% PWD 13.3% Non Disabled 14.6% Non Disabled 86.3% 14
  15. 15. Step 5: Apply Step 4 to Step 3Scenario 1 (What is) Scenario 2 (Max)• Overnight $4.8bn • Overnight $8.5bn• Daytripper $1.6bn • Daytripper $1.6bn• Outbound $0.2bn • Outbound $0.2bn• Inbound $1.4bn • Inbound $1.4bn• TOTAL $8.0bn • TOTAL $11.6bn $3.6bn 15
  16. 16. 4.Overnight Expenditure Pattern Pattern of Domestic Tourist Consumption Percentage Accommodation (can include food e.g. breakfast if included) 21.62 Takeaways and restaurant meals 14.83 Fuel (Petrol, diesel) 12.60 Shopping, gifts, souvenirs 11.59 Airline fares 9.95 Groceries etc for self-catering 6.77 Other (phone, postage, medical expenses, repairs, dry cleaning, etc) 5.45 Alcohol, drinks (not already reported with food above) 4.08 Entertainment, museums, movies, zoos, etc 2.44 Car hire costs (rental, leasing) 2.01 Purchase of motor vehicles or any other major equipment 1.78 Conference fees 1.64 Horse racing, gambling, casinos 1.33 Organised tours/side trips 1.33 Vehicle maintenance or repairs 0.99 Taxis (including to/from airport 0.81 Other long distance transport costs (train, coach, ship, etc) 0.77 Other local transport costs (bus, train, tram, ferry, etc) 0.60 Education, course fees 0.41 TOTAL 100.00 16Source: Purchasing pattern percentages from NVS (2003).
  17. 17. Proportion Attributable to Sectors Overnight Daytripper Outbound Inbound TotalAccommodation 28% Retail trade 32% Accommodation 28% Education 19% Accommodation 21%Retail trade 14% Other manufact 12% Retail trade 13% Accommodation 15% Retail trade 16%Cafes, restaurants 10% Cafes, restaurants 11% Cafes, restaurants 10% Retail trade 8% Air and water trans 10%Air, water transport 9% Clubs, pubs, taverns 3% Air, water transport 9% Cafes, restaurants 6% Cafes & restaurants 9%Non tourism 9% Non tourism 29% Non tourism 12% Non tourism 7% Non tourism 14% 17
  18. 18. Beyond the $bn 2003-2004• Spent $8.0bn - $11.6bn• Contributed $3.0bn - $4.5bn Tourism Gross Value Added (12% -15%)• Contributed between $ 3.8bn-$5.8bn Tourism Gross Domestic Product (11-16%)• Sustained between 51,820 and 77,495 direct jobs in the tourism industry (11-17%) 18
  19. 19. Comparative Travel Rates 30.0% 21% 27.8% 25.0% 22.1% 20.0% Percent 14.6% 14.6% 15.0% 10.0% 52% 5.6% 5.0% 2.7% 0.0% Daytrip Overnight Outbound PWD Non Disabled 19Source: NVS 2003 (n=20080)
  20. 20. Market Segment Comparison 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% PWD NonDisabled 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Budget traveller Something else Luxury traveller Adventurer Traveller Nature-based / Backpacker traveller (SPECIFY) ecotourism traveller 20Source: NVS 2003 (n=20080)
  21. 21. Travel patterns and impairment 45% 40% 38% 36% 37% 36% 35% 35% 35% 35% 31% 30% 30% 29% 25% 25% 24% Percent 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Mental w Vision Speech Phys - Hearing Phys - ABI/Stroke Other LT Medicated Mood Other Sup arms/feet General additional ConditionSource: NVS 2003 (n=20080)
  22. 22. PercentSource: NVS 2003 (n=20080) 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 40.0% Eq ui p or m ed C om fo rta bl e se at in g At te W nd he an el t c/ m ob ilit y ai d Ac ce ss Fr eq ue nt s to ps /to ile Trav% ts D ie ta ry ar ra Ntrav% ng em en ts O th er sp Travel Needs ec ifi ed N ot hi ng in pa rti cu U la na r bl e/ un w illi ng to tra ve l
  23. 23. Gap in Travel Patterns• Economic – All people…• Day trip – Control/own terms• Overnight – Planning – Accommodation – Transport – Familiarity• Overseas – Inc complexity – Language – Air travel – Loss of control 23
  24. 24. Accessible Market Use Circle 6. Monitor 1. Access Assessing the Enabling Business Case Environment Access Market Use Circle 2. 6. Review Organisation (Positive/ Commitment Negative) Customer Feedback Loop Access Audit, Customer Information & Feedback Training 3. Marketing , Promotion & 4. Market Use Distribution The Experience Traditional & Electronic based on W3CAdapted from Darcy, S. (2004). Disabling Journeys: the Social Relations of Tourism for People with Impairments in Australia24 - ananalysis of government tourism authorities and accommodation sector practices and discourses, Unpublished PhD Thesis, Faculty ofBusiness , University of Technology Sydney. Retrieved from http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/dspace/handle/2100/260
  25. 25. Universal Approach to Market Use Circle Support Needs Disability: Constraints & Dimension of Socioeconomic Access Circumstances Tourism Environment Person’s Organisational Considerations Responses Previous Experiences Traveller Reflection & Travel Feedback Planning & Universal Decision Making Approaches Inform Every Stage Transit Transit Destination 25Buhalis, D., & Darcy, S. (Eds.). (2011). Accessible Tourism: Concepts and Issues. Bristol, UK: Channel View Publications.http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?k=9781845411602
  26. 26. Managing Expectation• All organisations have has access warts!• Strategic approach• Expectation = experience  • Expectation ≠ experience     • Information provision• Customer service culture• Organisational communication and commitment 26
  27. 27. 5. Conclusion• Powerful National Secondary Data – Disability, ageing and carers survey – Census• Nation Visitor Survey• Tourism Satellite Account• Valid and reliable methodology• NVS 2009 & 2010 27
  28. 28. ContactDr Simon DarcyUTS Business SchoolUniversity of Technology, Sydney02 9514-5100simon.darcy@uts.edu.au 28

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